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  • Who are the Luwians?

    07/16/2019 8:10:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Luwian Studies ^ | up to and including 2019 | unattributed
    A gap between linguistics and prehistoryThanks to the over 33,000 documents from Hattusha, the capital of the Hittite Kingdom, linguists have been able to gain a comprehensive insight into Luwian culture. Some fundamental publications include the book Arzawa, by Susanne Heinhold-Krahmer (1977); The Luwians, edited by H. Craig Melchert (2003); and Luwian Identities, edited by Alice Mouton and others (2013). Field-oriented excavating archaeologists, on the other hand, never mention Luwians in their explanatory models. The current knowledge regarding the Aegean Bronze Age has been summarized in a number of recently published voluminous works, without attention to any Luwian culture....
  • Throne of Homer’s hero is unearthed

    06/18/2016 2:45:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    The Times of London ^ | June 18 2016 | Anthee Carassava
    A chunk of worked limestone unearthed at a dig came from to the lost throne of Agamemnon, the ancient Greek hero revered by Homer in The Iliad, his epic story of the Trojan War, according to an archaeologist. Christofilis Maggidis, who leads excavations in Mycenae, in the north-eastern Peloponnese, said that the 110lb (50kg) slab was found two years ago in a streambed metres from a palace that collapsed during an earthquake in about 1200 BC. “This is one of the most emblematic and significant finds from the Mycenaean era,” Mr Maggidis said after an elaborate, year-long study of the...
  • Phaistos Disk: Greek or Luwian?

    06/25/2009 3:16:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 592+ views
    Examiner ^ | Wednesday, June 24, 2009 | Diana Gainer
    Since this disk was found in Crete, and the people of Crete today speak Greek, that's a good language to assume was spoken by the maker of the disk. Still, that's a guess, or a hypothesis, not a fact. Besides that, we know that not everybody on Crete spoke Greek in the Bronze Age. The classical Greeks mentioned people they called Eteocretans who did not speak Greek. Further, we know that Linear A, written by the Minoans on Crete before the Mycenean Greeks came, did not represent Greek. Professor Hubert LaMarle considers it to be an early Indo-Iranian language, related...
  • Neanderthal or Cretin? A Debate Over Iodine

    08/24/2006 11:13:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 964+ views
    New York Times ^ | December 1, 1998 | John Noble Wilford
    In a study already drawing the fire of controversy, an American geographer has pointed out evidence suggesting, in his view, that little more than the amount of iodine in their diets may have been responsible for the physical differences between Neanderthals and modern humans and that this might solve the mystery of what happened to the Neanderthals. According to this interpretation, the skeletons of Neanderthals bear signs of physical deformities and possibly impaired mental health, which could be a result of iodine-deficient diets... It may even mean that Neanderthals could actually have been anatomically modern humans who were pathologically altered...
  • Unprecedented Ice Age Cave Art Discovered In UK

    08/21/2004 3:24:28 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 922+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 8-18-2004 | John Pickrell
    Unprecedented Ice Age Cave Art Discovered in U.K. John Pickrell in England for National Geographic News August 18, 2004 Vivid frescoes of stampeding bulls, horses, and other animals drawn by Stone Age artisans grace the walls of many European caves. The most spectacular examples are found in Altimera in Spain and Lascaux and Chauvet in France. For many years the total lack of cave art in Britain dating to the same period perplexed researchers. Britain was inhabited, after all. And throughout the Ice Age, it was linked to mainland Europe by a land bridge. Last year researchers discovered a handful...
  • Was There a Trojan War?

    07/29/2004 11:43:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies · 6,648+ views
    Archaeology ^ | May/June 2004 | Manfred Korfmann
    A spectacular result of the new excavations has been the verification of the existence of a lower settlement from the seventeenth to the early twelfth centuries B.C. (Troy levels VI/VIIa) outside and south and east of the citadel. As magnetometer surveys and seven excavations undertaken since 1993 have shown, this lower city was surrounded at least in the thirteenth century by an impressive U-shaped fortification ditch, approximately eleven and a half feet wide and six and a half feet deep, hewn into the limestone bedrock. Conclusions about the existence and quality of buildings within the confines of the ditch...
  • Helen of Troy: Goddess, Princess, Whore

    10/09/2005 8:29:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 4,316+ views
    PRNewswire ^ | Sep. 14, 2005 | Melanie Pope of Renault Communications
    While Hughes explores the Late Bronze Age reality behind the story of Helen, she takes in some of the most beautiful scenery of the ancient world, from the magnificent citadel at Mycenae to the spectacular site of the shrine to Helen, high in the hills above Sparta. She also tastes the food of the ancient world -- based on the latest archaeological research -- and discovers how the conflict in Helen's name would really have been fought. Working with weapons experts and accurate replicas of chariots pulled by local gypsy horses, Hughes experiences firsthand how chariots and archers battled beneath...
  • Fossil Insects Tweak Date of Deadly "Atlantis" Eruption

    08/25/2013 2:52:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    National Geographic ^ | August 22, 2013 | Ker Than
    A new study of insect pests found in an ancient storage jar on the Greek island of Santorini suggests the major volcanic eruption that took place there around 1600 B.C. -- and which may have inspired the legend of Atlantis -- happened in early summer. The "Atlantis" eruption was one of the most significant volcanic eruptions in human history. The blast is credited for not only ending the Minoan civilization, but also for affecting ancient Egypt and other communities around the eastern Mediterranean, explained Eva Panagiotakopulu, a palaeoecologist and fossil-insect expert at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. Based on...
  • Greek Island of Santorini Volcano Erupted in 16th Century

    03/22/2014 4:46:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | March 8, 2014 | Abed Alloush
    According to a recent international study, the volcano of the island Santorini, Greece, erupted in the 16th century BC and not earlier. The survey characterized a number of research studies that took place in the past and have indicated that Santorini's volcano may have erupted a century earlier, as unreliable because the method based on tree-ring measurements that they used, could not provide them with accurate results. An international team of researchers led by Paolo Cherubini from the Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research (WSL) has demonstrated in the scientific journal Antiquity, that this method cannot provide...
  • New Ice-Core Evidence Challenges the 1620s age for the Santorini (Minoan) Eruption

    07/29/2004 12:25:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies · 4,057+ views
    Journal of Archaeological Science, Volume 25, Issue 3, March 1998, Pages 279-289 ^ | 13 July 1997 | Gregory A. Zielinski, Mark S. Germani
    Determining a reliable calendrical age of the Santorini (Minoan) eruption is necessary to place the impact of the eruption into its proper context within Bronze Age society in the Aegean region. The high-resolution record of the deposition of volcanically produced acids on polar ice sheets, as available in the SO42-time series from ice cores (a direct signal), and the high-resolution record of the climatic impact of past volcanism inferred in tree rings (a secondary signal) have been widely used to assign a 1628/1627 age to the eruption. The layer of ice in the GISP2 (Greenland) ice core corresponding to...
  • Layers of mystery: Archaeologists look to the earth for Minoan fate

    11/03/2007 11:04:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 110+ views
    Worcester Telegram & Gazette ^ | Sunday, October 28, 2007 | Judy Powell
    While archaeologists have theorized that a volcanic explosion on the island of Thera, 70 miles north of Crete, was responsible for the Minoan downfall, it wasn't until recently that evidence of a massive tsunami, brought on by the eruption, was linked to the mystery... During a recent dig, a team working under Montreal-born scientist Sandy MacGillivray found volcanic ash and strange gravel deposits that looked as if "they had been washed into the site by a violent flood," Mr. Hadingham said. While the ash's composition was identical to that found on the island of Thera, there was no river or...
  • News from Finds at the Minoan Palace of Zakros

    10/29/2011 5:41:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | October 24, 2011 | Apostolos Papapostolou
    Minoan civilisation, Zakros Palace in particular, are the focus of the 11th International Cretological Congress on October 21-27 in Rethymnon, one of the three big cities on the island. The Minoan Zakros Palace, located on the eastern part of the island, is one of the four Minoan palaces -- the others are Knossos, Festos and Malia – uncovered by archaeological excavations last century. The palace spans 4,500 square metres (one fifth of the area of the Palace of Knossos) and was the religious and administrative centre for a settlement that spanned 8,000 square metres. The palace has two main structures,...
  • Fortifications on Gournia Debunk Myth of Peaceful Minoan Society

    05/04/2010 5:03:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies · 451+ views
    Heritage Key ^ | Tuesday, May 4, 2010 | Owen Jarus
    A team of archaeologists, led by Professor Vance Watrous and Matt Buell of the University at Buffalo, have discovered a fortification system at the Minoan town of Gournia. The discovery rebukes the popular myth that the Minoans were a peaceful society with no need for defensive structures. That idea arose from work done in the early 20th century by Sir Arthur Evans... The town was originally excavated from 1901-1904 by Harriet Boyd Hawes, a pioneering women who was among the first to excavate a Minoan settlement. Located on the north coast, Gournia was in use during the "neo-palatial" period (ca....
  • Thera eruption in 1613 BC

    12/03/2008 4:12:12 AM PST · by Mike Fieschko · 44 replies · 1,503+ views
    ANA ^ | 12/03/2008 | SIMELA PANTZARTZI
    Two olive branches buried by a Minoan-era eruption of the volcano on the island of Thera (modern-day Santorini) have enabled precise radiocarbon dating of the catastrophe to 1613 BC, with an error margin of plus or minus 10 years, according to two researchers who presented conclusions of their previously published research during an event on Tuesday at the Danish Archaeological Institute of Athens. Speaking at an event entitled "The Enigma of Dating the Minoan Eruption - Data from Santorini and Egypt", the study's authors, Dr. Walter Friedrich of the Danish University of Aarhus and Dr. Walter Kutschera of the Austrian...
  • New analysis on problems between archaeology and pharaonic chronology, based on radiocarbon dating

    06/17/2010 1:57:51 PM PDT · by decimon · 34 replies · 463+ views
    Article by Ben-Gurion University of the Negev professor published in Science magazineBEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL June 17, 2010 -- In a just published article in Science magazine (June 18, 2010), Prof. Hendrik J. Bruins of Ben-Gurion University of the Negev presents novel implications related to new developments in the radiocarbon dating of Pharaonic Egypt. The article reports that, for the first time, it is possible to relate the Minoan Santorini eruption with Egyptian Historical Chronology solely on the basis of radiocarbon dates. Thus, it appears that the eruption preceded the 18th Dynasty and occurred during the Hyksos Period. Moreover, conventional association of...
  • 1177 BCE, the year a perfect storm destroyed civilization

    05/03/2015 3:35:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 143 replies
    Haaretz ^ | April 13, 2015 | Julia Fridman
    Sometime after 1200 BCE, civilization collapsed, and a dark age prevailed. The Late Bronze Age collapse of societies throughout the Levant, the Near East and the Mediterranean some 3,200 years ago has been a mystery. Powerful, advanced civilizations disappeared, seemingly overnight. Now an archaeologist believes he has figured out what lay behind the cataclysm. The trigger seems to have been the invasion of ancient Egypt in 1177 BCE by marauding peoples known simply as the “Sea Peoples,” as recorded in the Medinet Habu wall relief at Ramses III' tomb. The relief depicts a sea battle (and also carts full of...
  • Real Tsunami May Have Inspired Legend of Atlantis

    10/10/2009 8:07:16 AM PDT · by BGHater · 33 replies · 1,136+ views
    LiveScience ^ | 09 Oct 2009 | Charles Q. Choi
    The volcanic explosion that obliterated much of the island that might have inspired the legend of Atlantis apparently triggered a tsunami that traveled hundreds of miles to reach as far as present-day Israel, scientists now suggest. The new findings about this past tsunami could shed light on the destructive potential of future disasters, researchers added. The islands that make up the small circular archipelago of Santorini, roughly 120 miles (200 km) southeast of Greece, are what remain of what once was a single island, before one of the largest volcanic eruptions in human antiquity shattered it in the Bronze Age...
  • Debate Erupts Anew: Did Thera's Explosion Doom Minoan Crete?

    10/23/2003 2:47:33 PM PDT · by blam · 83 replies · 1,645+ views
    International Herald Tribune ^ | 10-23-2003 | William J. Broad
    Debate erupts anew: Did Thera's explosion doom Minoan Crete? William J. Broad Thursday, October 23, 2003 For decades, scholars have debated whether the eruption of the Thera volcano in the Aegean more than 3,000 years ago brought about the mysterious collapse of Minoan civilization at the peak of its glory. The volcanic isle (whose remnants are known as Santorini) lay just 110 kilometers from Minoan Crete, so it seemed quite reasonable that its fury could have accounted for the fall of that celebrated people. . This idea suffered a blow in 1987 when Danish scientists studying cores from the Greenland...
  • Drilling under the Dead Sea through four Ice Ages [ 500K years ]

    11/24/2010 6:45:44 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | Wednesday, November 24, 2010 | Ehud Zion Waldoks
    An int'l research team at urging of TAU, Hebrew U. professors will drill half a kilometer to study year-by-year climate change from 500,000 years ago... The International Continental Scientific Drilling Program chose the Dead Sea as the site of its next drilling at the urging of Tel Aviv University's Prof. Zvi Ben-Avraham and the Israel Geological Survey's Dr. Mordechai Stein... sponsored by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities... "We will be taking out a vertical piece about half a kilometer long which will allow us to get a picture of climate change on a year-by-year basis going back 500,000...
  • “The Catastrophe” What the End of Bronze-Age Civilization Means for Modern Times

    09/28/2009 9:26:36 AM PDT · by Nikas777 · 80 replies · 2,059+ views
    brusselsjournal.com ^ | Tue, 2009-09-15 09:20 | Thomas F. Bertonneau
    “The Catastrophe” - Part 1: What the End of Bronze-Age Civilization Means for Modern TimesFrom the desk of Thomas F. Bertonneau on Tue, 2009-09-15 09:20 Introduction to Part I: Modern people assume the immunity of their situation to major disturbance or – even more unthinkable – to terminal wreckage. The continuance of a society or culture depends, in part, on that very assumption because without it no one would complete his daily round. A man cannot enthusiastically arise from bed as the sun comes up and set about the day’s errands believing that all undertakings will issue vainly because the...