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Keyword: dinosaur

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  • Rhinorex Condrupus: 75-Million-Year-Old Huge-Nosed 'Jimmy Durante' Dinosaur Discovered in Utah

    09/23/2014 11:59:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    International Business Times (UK) ^ | September 22, 2014 11:01 BST | By Lydia Smith
    Palaeontologists have discovered what they are calling the "Jimmy Durante" of dinosaurs, a type of hadrosaur with a distinctive nasal profile. Named Rhinorex condrupus, the fossil was found by researchers from North Carolina State University and Brigham Young University, and lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. According to National Geographic, the date places the creature in the middle of a major dinosaur radiation, the process by which species adapt to new ecological niches. Rhinorex, which translates roughly into "King Nose", was a plant-eater and a close relative of other Cretaceous...
  • Ancient Birds Flew On All Fours

    09/22/2006 6:27:23 AM PDT · by Tokra · 181 replies · 2,650+ views
    eurekalert ^ | Spet. 22, 2006 | Nick Longrich
    The earliest known ancestor of modern-day birds took to the skies by gliding from trees using primitive feathered wings on their arms and legs, according to new research by a University of Calgary paleontologist. In a paper published in the journal Paleobiology, Department of Biological Sciences PhD student Nick Longrich challenges the idea that birds began flying by taking off from the ground while running and shows that the dinosaur-like bird Archaeopteryx soared using wing-like feathers on all of its limbs. "The discussions about the origins of avian flight have been dominated by the so-called 'ground up' and 'trees down'...
  • Dover, PA Evolution Trial [daily thread for 07 Oct]

    10/07/2005 7:23:15 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 456 replies · 4,761+ views
    York Daily Record ^ | 07 October 2005 | Staff
    To keep this all in one daily thread, here are links to two articles in the York Daily Record (with excerpts from each), which has been doing a great job of reporting on the trial: Forrest cross-examination a rambling wonder. About the time that Richard Thompson, head law guy at the Thomas More center and chief defender of the Dover Area School Board, started his third year of cross-examination of philosopher Barbara Forrest, it was easy to imagine that at that moment, everyone in the courtroom, including Forrest, who doesn’t believe in God, was violating the separation of church and...
  • Hunters Claim to Find 4-Winged Dinosaur

    01/22/2003 11:38:37 AM PST · by Dallas · 56 replies · 748+ views
    Fossil hunters in China have discovered what may be one of the weirdest prehistoric species ever seen -- a four-winged dinosaur that apparently glided from tree to tree. The 128-million-year-old animal -- called Microraptor gui, in honor of Chinese paleontologist Gu Zhiwei -- was about 2 1/2 feet long and had two sets of feathered wings, with one set on its forelimbs and the other on its hind legs. Exactly where the creature fits into the evolution of birds and dinosaurs is not clear. But researchers speculated that it developed around the same time as or even later than...
  • Spinosaurus fossil: 'Giant swimming dinosaur' unearthed

    09/12/2014 6:01:43 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    BBC ^ | September 11, 2014 | Rebecca Morelle
    The 95-million-year-old remains confirm a long-held theory: that this is the first-known swimming dinosaur. Scientists say the beast had flat, paddle-like feet and nostrils on top of its crocodilian head that would allow it to submerge with ease. The research is published in the journal Science. Lead author Nizar Ibrahim, a palaeontologist from the University of Chicago, said: "It is a really bizarre dinosaur - there's no real blueprint for it.
  • Ancient swamp creature had lips like Mick Jagger

    09/10/2014 10:14:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Provided by Duke University
    Sir Mick Jagger has a new animal named after him. Scientists have named an extinct swamp-dwelling creature that lived 19 million years ago in Africa after the Rolling Stones frontman, in honor of a trait they both share—their supersized lips. "We gave it the scientific name Jaggermeryx naida, which translates to 'Jagger's water nymph,'" said study co-author Ellen Miller of Wake Forest University. The animal's fossilized jaw bones suggest it was roughly the size of a small deer and akin to a cross between a slender hippo and a long-legged pig. Researchers uncovered the fossils—consisting of multiple jawbone fragments—amid the...
  • Newly discovered dinosaur, Dreadnoughtus, takes title of largest terrestrial animal

    09/05/2014 8:11:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 4, 2014 | Meeri Kim
    Scientists have discovered the fossilized remains of a new long-necked, long-tailed dinosaur that has taken the crown for largest terrestrial animal with a body mass that can be accurately determined. Measurements of bones from its hind leg and foreleg revealed that the animal was 65 tons, and still growing when it died in the Patagonian hills of Argentina about 77 million years ago. “To put this in perspective, an African elephant is about five tons, T. rex is eight tons, Diplodocus is 18 tons, and a Boeing 737 is around 50 tons,” said study author and paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara at...
  • "Astoundingly huge" dinosaur skeleton unearthed in Argentina

    09/04/2014 11:29:26 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 69 replies
    CBS News ^ | September 4, 2014 | Agata Blaszczak-Boxe
    Scientists have unearthed the skeleton of a previously unknown, massive dinosaur species that may be the largest land animal ever found.The specimen named Dreadnoughtus schrani is exceptionally complete, with about 70 percent of its bones recovered. Scientists believe the creature, which lived about 77 million years ago, measured 85 feet (26 meters) long and weighed about 65 tons, heavier than a Boeing 737.
  • Did Angkor really see a dinosaur?

    06/23/2014 9:24:28 AM PDT · by fishtank · 50 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 6-23-14 | Jonathan O’Brien and Shaun Doyle
    Did Angkor really see a dinosaur? Jonathan O’Brien and Shaun Doyle The September 2007 Creation magazine back page feature article ‘Angkor saw a Stegosaur?’ showed a stone carving on a temple of Angkor, Cambodia, (a. 1200 AD), depicting what looks like an artistic impression of a stegosaurian-type dinosaur.1 As such evidence clearly supports the biblical view of dinosaurs, it naturally provoked the ire of vocal atheists. Here are their objections: “If it is a dinosaur, they carved it from fossils” The plates along the back of the animal are unlike all the other decorative designs in the temple walls. One...
  • 'Biggest dinosaur ever' discovered

    05/17/2014 10:54:58 AM PDT · by Izzy Dunne · 100 replies
    BBC ^ | 16 May 2014 | James Morgan
    Based on its huge thigh bones, it was 40m (130ft) long and 20m (65ft) tall. Weighing in at 77 tonnes, it was as heavy as 14 African elephants, and seven tonnes heavier than the previous record holder, Argentinosaurus. Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period. A local farm worker first stumbled on the remains in the desert near La Flecha, about 250km (135 miles) west of Trelew, Patagonia.
  • Baseball Solves The Problem of Batter Rushing the Mound Towards Pitcher Regarding Errant pitch

    05/12/2014 4:42:35 PM PDT · by lbryce · 7 replies
    GooglePlus ^ | May 12, 2014 | Google Plus
  • Asteroid Breakup May Have Doomed Dinosaurs

    09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies · 1,261+ views
    It’s a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...
  • Jurassic Park HERE NOW: UK Scientists Successfully Clone Dinosaur from Well-Preserved DNA Fragments

    03/31/2014 10:03:54 PM PDT · by Reaganite Republican · 35 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | 01 April 2014 | Reaganite Republican
    British scientists have announced that they have successfully clone a dinosaur, according to a spokesman from Liverpool’s Jon Moore University... They’ve cloned an Aparosaurus by extracting DNA from a well-preserved fossil, then injected it into a fertile ostrich womb. The dinosaur, nicknamed “Spot” is currently being incubated at the university’s College of Veterinary Medicine. “Ostriches share a lot of genetic traits with dinosaurs,” said Dr. Gerrard Jones, a biology professor at LJMU and the project’s leading scientist. “Their eggshell microstructures are almost identical to those of the Apatosaurus. That’s why the cloning worked so perfectly.” Religious groups and animal rights...
  • New dinosaur called the Chicken From Hell

    03/20/2014 6:15:25 AM PDT · by C19fan · 49 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 19, 2014 | Joel Achenbach
    Scientists have discovered a freakish, birdlike species of dinosaur — 11 feet long, 500 pounds, with a beak, no teeth, a bony crest atop its head, murderous claws, prize-fighter arms, spindly legs, a thin tail and feathers sprouting all over the place. Officially, it’s a member of a group of dinosaurs called oviraptorosaurs. Unofficially, it’s the Chicken From Hell.
  • Scientists find dinosaur that was scourge of Jurassic Europe

    03/06/2014 6:37:05 AM PST · by C19fan · 23 replies
    Reuters ^ | March 5, 2014 | Will Dunham
    In Europe 150 million years ago, this dude was the biggest, baddest bully in town. Two scientists in Portugal announced on Wednesday that they have identified the largest carnivorous dinosaur ever found in Europe, a 33-foot-long (10-meter-long) brute called Torvosaurus gurneyi that was the scourge of its domain in the Jurassic Period.
  • Pompeii-like volcanic ash kept dinosaur remains fresh

    02/04/2014 7:44:58 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 02/04/2014 | Jeff Hecht
    It's hot storage. Millions of years before volcanic ash entombed the Roman town of Pompeii, a group of dinosaurs succumbed to a similar fate. China's famous feathered dinosaur fossils owe their exquisite preservation to volcanic eruptions between about 130 and 120 million years ago. The Jehol fossils have transformed our understanding of dinosaurs by showing that the relatives of Velociraptor and T. rex had a feather-like body covering, like birds. The Jehol deposits also preserved soft tissue from early mammals and flowering plants. Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University, China, and his colleagues think they know why the remains are so...
  • Double meteorite strike 'caused dinosaur extinction'

    08/27/2010 12:05:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 25 replies
    BBC ^ | Howard Falcon-Lang
    The dinosaurs were wiped out 65 million years ago by at least two meteorite impacts, rather than a single strike, a new study suggests.Previously, scientists had identified a huge impact crater in the Gulf of Mexico as the event that spelled doom for the dinosaurs. Now evidence for a second impact in the Ukraine has been uncovered. This raises the possibility that the Earth may have been bombarded by a whole shower of meteorites. The new findings are published in the journal Geology by a team lead by Professor David Jolley of Aberdeen University. When first proposed in 1980, the...
  • Oldest dinosaur nursery found in South Africa

    01/24/2012 12:37:19 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 20 replies
    zeenews ^ | January 24, 2012 | ANI
    An ancient dinosaur nursery - the oldest nesting site ever found - has been unearthed in an excavation at a site in South Africa. The 190-million-year-old nesting site of the prosauropod dinosaur Massospondylus reveals significant clues about the evolution of complex reproductive behaviour in early dinosaurs. It discover clutches of eggs, many with embryos, as well as tiny dinosaur footprints, providing the oldest known evidence that the hatchlings remained at the nesting site long enough to at least double in size. “This research project, which has been ongoing since 2005 continues to produce groundbreaking results and excavations continue. First it...
  • Antarctic Lost Worlds - 2 New Dinosaurs Species Found

    02/27/2004 9:36:42 AM PST · by Mark Felton · 47 replies · 5,241+ views
    Astrobiology Magazine ^ | 2/27/04 | astrobiology
    Finding dinosaurs in Antarctica is both easier and harder than finding them on another continent. Easier, because like looking for meteorites, dinosaur bones show up against the stark landscape. Harder, because the dinosaur's cold-bloodedness wouldn't have lasted long prior to continental drift and climate changes. Antarctic Lost Worlds Tale of Two Dinosaursbased on National Science Foundation report Against incredible odds, researchers working in separate sites, thousands of miles apart in Antarctica have found what they believe are the fossilized remains of two species of dinosaurs previously unknown to science. Life on the Edge. South Pole view from Space.Credit: NASA One...
  • Dinosaur Skull Provides Geological Clues

    05/31/2004 12:44:53 PM PDT · by Junior · 14 replies · 212+ views
    Science - AP ^ | 2004-05-29 | ERIC FIDLER
    CHICAGO - The fossil skull of a peculiar, wrinkle-faced dinosaur unearthed four years ago in the Sahara is providing new evidence that Africa split from the other southern continents more recently than previously thought, scientists say. "It was sort of a missing puzzle piece that serves to banish the notion that Africa was isolated earlier," said Paul Sereno, a University of Chicago paleontologist who led the dinosaur-hunting expedition to a remote, desert region of Niger in 2000."It really completes the story very convincingly," he said. The skull, found amid a wealth of dinosaur bones from the late cretaceous period, came...
  • Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests

    10/25/2006 3:33:16 PM PDT · by blam · 94 replies · 2,818+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-24-2006 | GSA
    Source: Geological Society of America Date: October 24, 2006 Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests There's growing evidence that the dinosaurs and most their contemporaries were not wiped out by the famed Chicxulub meteor impact, according to a paleontologist who says multiple meteor impacts, massive volcanism in India, and climate changes culminated in the end of the Cretaceous Period. Cottonmouth Creek waterfall over the event deposit with reworked Chicxulub impact spherules. The original Chicxulub ejecta layer was discovered in a yellow clay layer 45 cm below the base of the event deposit. The yellow clay represents a...
  • Dinosaurs' climate shifted too, reports show

    09/25/2006 4:15:43 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 27 replies · 830+ views
    Indiana University ^ | 23-Sep-2006 | David Bricker
    Caption: IU Bloomington geochemist Simon Brassell (right), Penn State sedimentologist Michael Arthur (middle), and Tohoku Univ. sedimentologist Harumasa Kano (left) inspect an ancient shale aboard the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Ancient rocks from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean suggest dramatic climate changes during the dinosaur-dominated Mesozoic Era, a time once thought to have been monotonously hot and humid. In this month's Geology, scientists from Indiana University Bloomington and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research present new evidence that ocean surface temperatures varied as much as 6 degrees Celsius (about 11 degrees Fahrenheit) during the...
  • Dinosaur Soft Tissue Preserved by Blood?

    12/11/2013 8:10:28 AM PST · by fishtank · 102 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 12-11-13 | Brian Thomas
    Dinosaur Soft Tissue Preserved by Blood? by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Researchers are now suggesting that iron embedded in blood proteins preserved the still-soft tissues, cells, and molecules discovered inside dinosaurs and other fossils after the creatures were buried in sediments. The ability to justify millions of years is at stake, and this study promises to do just that. What are its merits and demerits? Publishing in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Mary Schweitzer led a team that showed how iron atoms from blood adhere to and preserve blood vessels.1 The team placed ostrich bone blood vessels...
  • Baby Dinosaur Skeleton Unearthed in Canada

    11/25/2013 2:27:23 PM PST · by Dysart · 20 replies
    The tiny, intact skeleton of a baby rhinoceroslike dinosaur has been unearthed in Canada. The toddler was just 3 years old and 5 feet (1.5 meters) long when it wandered into a river near Alberta, Canada, and drowned about 70 million years ago. The beast was so well-preserved that some of its skin left impressions in the nearby rock.
  • Just How Old is Dinosaur Soft Tissue?

    10/04/2013 7:15:37 AM PDT · by kimtom · 82 replies
    http://www.apologeticspress.org ^ | 11/1/2012 | Eric Lyons
    Imagine watching an interview on television and hearing a bald, blind, deaf, wrinkled, hunched-back, bedridden man claim that he is 130 years old. Although you might doubt such a claim, if ever there was a man in modern times to live 130 years on Earth, he likely would have looked as worn out as this man appeared. Imagine, however, if a quick-witted, muscular, marathon runner with fair skin, thick, dark hair, low blood pressure, and a good memory, claimed to be 130 years old. What reasonable person would believe such a claim? Everyone would doubt the statement, especially the doctors,...
  • ‘Beautiful’ dinosaur fossil unearthed near Spirit River

    10/03/2013 12:29:16 PM PDT · by Squawk 8888 · 45 replies
    Edmonton Journal ^ | October 2, 2013 | Marty Klinkenberg
    EDMONTON - Experts are calling a dinosaur fossil unearthed in northern Alberta this week one of the “most complete finds in this part of the world in a long time.” Brian Brake, executive director of the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, said the fossilized remains of a hadrosaur were discovered at an energy company’s work site near Spirit River. Officials from the pipeline firm contacted the museum, which sent paleontologists to assess the find. “What we have is a totally composed tail,” Brake said. “It’s beautiful.” The Currie Museum contacted its counterparts at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, which...
  • Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian Amber

    09/16/2013 10:35:49 PM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 44 replies
    io9 ^ | 9/15/2013 | Analee Newitz
    Pictures of Dinofuzz at Source.
  • Amish Newspapers Thrive in Digital Age

    08/31/2013 10:45:25 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 7 replies
    WSJ ^ | 8-31-13 | Clare Ansberry
    SUGARCREEK, Ohio—The corn stands 5 feet tall, the temperatures are in the 90s and Johnny Byler got hooked on his head while fishing with a friend, reported Mrs. Jerry Ray Byler in a recent front-page article of the Budget. Mrs. Byler is one of about 860 correspondents for the Budget, a 123-year-old weekly newspaper, which carries the news of Amish and Mennonite communities, from Diagonal, Iowa to the three Minnesota outposts of Bertha, Clarissa and Lenora. They write about who got married, who went to church, who received dentures—and how 11 chickens went missing when Toby Schrocks of Cisne, Ill.,...
  • Researchers say fossil with tooth proves T. rex was predator

    07/31/2013 1:34:41 AM PDT · by imardmd1 · 66 replies
    CNN US ^ | 2:08 PM EDT, Tue July 16, 2013 | Mayra Cuevas
    Was Tyrannosaurus rex a predator or scavenger? The question has been a point of controversy in the scientific community for more than a century. "You see 'Jurassic Park,' and you see T. rex as this massive hunter and killer, as incredibly vicious. But scientists have argued for 100 years that he was too big and too slow to hunt prey and that he was probably a scavenger, an animal that feeds only on dead things," University of Kansas paleontologist David Burnham said. Burnham and researcher Robert DePalma got what Burnham described as his "lucky break" when they found the fossil...
  • High Tooth Replacement Rates in Largest Dinosaurs Contributed to Their Evolutionary Success

    07/20/2013 5:06:11 PM PDT · by null and void · 15 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 7/13/13
    July 17, 2013 — Rapid tooth replacement by sauropods, the largest dinosaurs in the fossil record, likely contributed to their evolutionary success, according to a research paper by Stony Brook University paleontologist Michael D'Emic, PhD, and colleagues. This is an illustration of a skull of Diploducus alongside the research team’s CT scan-generated images of some teeth in the front of its jaws. Bone is transparent and teeth are yellow. The arrows show the direction of tooth replacement, which is back to front similar to a shark. (Credit: Image courtesy of Stony Brook University) Paleontologists have long wondered how sauropods digested...
  • Scientist Stumped by Actual Dinosaur Skin (article)

    05/20/2013 7:15:16 AM PDT · by fishtank · 43 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | May 20, 2013 | Brian Thomas
    Scientist Stumped by Actual Dinosaur Skin by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Being the first ever to examine a dinosaur fossil long buried in sedimentary rock is thrilling enough for a field researcher. But a team working in Canada found an exhilarating bonus on a hadrosaur fossil fragment—it had actual skin still attached. They found the duck-bill dinosaur fossil near Grand Prairie, Alberta. University of Regina physicist Mauricio Barbi operates state-of-the art synchrotron equipment that can detect and identify chemical signatures without destroying samples. He plans to use the technology to investigate the special fossil and its skin. He told Canadian...
  • Amazing Horned Dinosaurs Found on 'Lost Continent' (Fifteen Horns)

    09/23/2010 4:04:05 AM PDT · by tlb · 24 replies · 1+ views
    Fox ^ | September 22, 2010 | staff
    The Utah reptiles belong to the horned-dinosaur family, which is known for outlandish anatomy, and are wowing seasoned fossil hunters. The species named Kosmoceratops had 15 horns decorating its massive head, giving it the most elaborate dinosaur headdress known to science. At 15 feet long, it was larger than a Ford Fiesta. Its name means "ornate horned-face" in Latin. The newly discovered dinosaurs, close relatives of the famous Triceratops, were announced today. Utah scientists believe most of the horns were used to attract mates and intimidate rivals of the same species. The dinosaur fossils were found in the Grand Staircase-Escalante...
  • Outlandish species alert: A dinosaur with 15 horns?

    09/23/2010 6:39:34 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 13 replies
    The Week ^ | September 23, 2010
    Fossil hunters have unearthed the remains of two new dinosaur species that roamed Utah's swamps 76 million years ago. Here's a brief guide to what exactly they found: What are the two new species? Kosmoceratops and Utahceratops, which have been classified (for obvious reasons) in the horned-dinosaur family which also includes the Triceratops. What did they look like? Kosmoceratops, whose hulking head sprouted 15 horns, was about 15 feet long, the size of a small car. Scott Sampson, the study leader at the Utah Museum of Natural History, calls it "one of the most amazing animals known." Utahceratops was 30...
  • Underwater T.Rex-Like Carnivores Built to Kill

    10/02/2010 1:47:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Friday, October 1, 2010 | Jennifer Viegas
    These extinct relatives of crocodiles sunk their sharp, serrated teeth into prey and then spun, ripping out chunks of flesh... The carnivores that evolved alongside dinosaurs hunted with quick, opportunistic strikes... marine mega meat-eaters ripped into prey with massive, serrated teeth some 171 to 136 million years ago to satisfy a diet of at least 70 percent flesh. What's more, metriorhynchids, the extinct relatives of today's crocodiles, had a killing skill that T. Rex lacked: The death roll. The creatures would sink their teeth into prey and then spin their bodies in the water to tear out large chunks of...
  • Triceratops 'Never Existed' -- Three-horned fossils are actually juvenile torosauruses

    11/09/2010 7:32:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 66 replies · 1+ views
    Newser ^ | August 3, 2010 | Rob Quinn
    One of the best-known dinosaur species may not have really been a dinosaur species at all, according to new research. Scientists compared triceratops skulls to those of a lesser-known species, the torosaurus, and concluded that the triceratops were actually young torosauruses, New Scientist reports. They believe the three-horned dinosaur's skull changed shape as it aged. Researchers say the bones of the horns and neck frill in the young dinosaurs remained spongy until they became full adults. "Even in the most mature specimens that we've examined, there is evidence that the skull was still undergoing dramatic changes at the time of...
  • Eggs with the oldest known embryos of a dinosaur found

    11/13/2010 8:11:07 AM PST · by Hotlanta Mike · 16 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12 November 2010 | Katia Moskvitch
    Palaeontologists have identified the oldest known dinosaur embryos, belonging to a species that lived some 190 million years ago. The eggs of Massospondylus, containing well-perserved embryos, were unearthed in South Africa back in 1976. The creature appears to be an ancestor of the family that includes the long-necked dino once known as Brontosaurus. The study in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology also sheds light on the dinosaurs' early development.
  • Peerless Pterosaur Could Fly Long-Distance For Days

    11/25/2010 4:47:02 PM PST · by decimon · 25 replies
    NPR ^ | November 22, 2010 | Reid R. Frazier
    > The pterosaur's wingspan and size have spawned comparisons to dragons. But recently some scientists wondered whether the creature was too big to fly. A pair of papers recently asserted that the biggest pterosaurs may have been too heavy to get off the ground. That seemed implausible to Habib. After all, the biggest birds often have the longest flight range. And Quetzalcoatlus, with its 35-foot wingspan, certainly fits the bill for gigantic. So Habib teamed up with Mark Witton, a British paleontologist, to plug in factors like wingspan, weight and aerodynamics into a computer model. The results, which they presented...
  • Dino Demise Led to Evolutionary Explosion of Huge Mammals

    11/25/2010 11:56:18 AM PST · by Racehorse · 39 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 25 November 2010 | Janelle Weaver
    Mammals around the world exploded in size after the major extinction at the end of the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago, filling environmental niches left vacant by the loss of dinosaurs, according to a new study published today (Nov. 25) in the journal Science. The maximum size of mammals leveled off about 25 million years later, or 40 million years ago, because of external limits set by temperature and land area, reported an international team led by paleoecologist Felisa Smith of the University of New Mexico. "For the first 140 million years of their evolutionary history, mammals were basically...
  • 100-million-year-old crocodile species discovered (Thailand)

    11/25/2010 7:17:25 AM PST · by decimon · 10 replies
    Associated Press ^ | November 25, 2010 | Unknown
    BANGKOK – A new species of crocodile that lived 100 million years ago has been identified from a fossil found in Thailand, researchers said Thursday. Komsorn Lauprasert, a scientist at Mahasarakham University, said the species had longer legs than modern-day crocodiles and probably fed on fish, based on the characteristics of its teeth.
  • Crocs dispel 'living fossil' myth

    12/08/2010 7:57:19 PM PST · by decimon · 13 replies
    BBC ^ | December 8, 2010 | Ella Davies
    Crocodiles can no longer be referred to as "living fossils", according to scientists.Members of the crocodilian family have previously been thought to have changed little since prehistoric times. However, new fossil analyses suggests that modern crocodilians actually evolved from a very diverse group. Recently discovered ancient ancestors include small cat-like specimens, giant "supercrocs" and a pug-nosed vegetarian species. Body structureModern crocodilians are adapted to aquatic environments with long snouts, strong tails and powerful jaws. Yet contrary to popular belief, scientists now suggest that the basic body structure of crocodiles, alligators and ghariels evolved from a diverse group of prehistoric reptiles...
  • Fossilized Bird Brains May Yield Secret of First Flights

    01/01/2011 5:28:01 PM PST · by decimon · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 1, 2011 | Charles Q. Choi
    By reconstructing the brains of extinct birds, researchers could shed light on when birds evolved into creatures of flight. Overwhelming evidence suggests birds evolved from dinosaurs some 150 million years ago, but one of the missing pieces to the evolutionary puzzle is how such birds took to the air. Scientists in Scotland are focusing on changes in the size of a part of the rear of the brain. This part of the cerebellum, known as the flocculus, is responsible for integrating visual and balance signals during flight, allowing birds to judge the position of other objects in midflight. [3-D Image...
  • Dating sheds new light on dawn of the dinosaurs

    01/24/2011 2:55:25 PM PST · by decimon · 18 replies
    University of California, Davis ^ | January 24, 2011 | Unknown
    Careful dating of new dinosaur fossils and volcanic ash around them by researchers from UC Davis and UC Berkeley casts doubt on the idea that dinosaurs appeared and opportunistically replaced other animals. Instead -- at least in one South American valley -- they seem to have existed side by side and gone through similar periods of extinction. Geologists from Argentina and the United States announced earlier this month the discovery of a new dinosaur that roamed what is now South America 230 million years ago, at the beginning of the age of the dinosaurs. The newly discovered Eodramaeus, or "dawn...
  • CSI: Manchester -- University team gets forensic on dinosaurs (TV series)

    01/25/2011 12:53:45 PM PST · by decimon · 3 replies
    University of Manchester ^ | January 25, 2011 | Unknown
    A new TV series featuring dinosaur detectives from The University of Manchester looking at how dinosaurs once lived, looked and functioned begins in the UK this week. Presented by University of Manchester palaeontologist Dr Phil Manning, the series will be aired on the National Geographic Channel, starting in the UK on Thursday February 3rd, before being transmitted to many countries around the world. It is the first ever series on dinosaurs commissioned by National Geographic, as previously documentaries have only aired as one or two-hour specials. Jurassic CSI will for the first time provide a detailed forensic look at dinosaurs...
  • Test shows dinosaurs survived mass extinction by 700,000 years

    01/27/2011 11:05:42 AM PST · by decimon · 57 replies
    University of Alberta ^ | January 27, 2011 | Unknown
    University of Alberta researchers determined that a fossilized dinosaur bone found in New Mexico confounds the long established paradigm that the age of dinosaurs ended between 65.5 and 66 million years ago. The U of A team, led by Larry Heaman from the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, determined the femur bone of a hadrosaur as being only 64.8 million years old. That means this particular plant eater was alive about 700,000 years after the mass extinction event many paleontologists believe wiped all non-avian dinosaurs off the face of earth, forever. Heaman and colleagues used a new direct-dating method...
  • New 'thunder-thighs' dinosaur discovered

    02/23/2011 6:54:46 AM PST · by decimon · 25 replies
    University College London ^ | February 23, 2011 | Unknown
    LONDON – A new dinosaur named Brontomerus mcintoshi, or "thunder-thighs" after its enormously powerful thigh muscles, has been discovered in Utah, USA. The new species is described in a paper recently published in the journal Acta Palaeontologica Polonica by an international team of scientists from the U.K. and the U.S. A member of the long-necked sauropod group of dinosaurs which includes Diplodocus and Brachiosaurus, Brontomerus may have used its powerful thighs as a weapon to kick predators, or to help travel over rough, hilly terrain. Brontomerus lived about 110 million years ago, during the Early Cretaceous Period, and probably had...
  • Rare 89-Million-Year-Old Flying Reptile Fossil from Texas May Be World's Oldest Pteranodon

    03/09/2011 10:26:34 PM PST · by Immerito · 11 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 1, 2011 | Unknown
    ScienceDaily (Mar. 1, 2011) — Fossilized bones discovered in Texas from a flying reptile that died 89 million years ago may be the earliest occurrence of the prehistoric creature known as Pteranodon. Previously, Pteranodon bones have been found in Kansas, South Dakota and Wyoming in the Niobrara and Pierre geological formations. This likely Pteranodon specimen is the first of its kind found in Texas, according to paleontologist Timothy S. Myers at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, who identified the reptile. The specimen was discovered north of Dallas by an amateur fossil hunter who found various bones belonging to the left...
  • Dorset pliosaur: ‘Most fearsome predator’ unveiled

    07/11/2011 12:55:09 PM PDT · by Renfield · 27 replies
    BBC News ^ | 7-8-2010 | Rebecca Morelle
    A skull belonging to one of the largest "sea monsters" ever unearthed is being unveiled to the public. The beast, which is called a pliosaur, has been described as the most fearsome predator the Earth has seen. The fossil was found in Dorset, but it has taken 18 months to remove the skull from its rocky casing, revealing the monster in remarkable detail. Scientists suspect the creature, which is on show at the Dorset County Museum, may be a new species or even genus. ~~~snip~~~ "It was probably the most fearsome predator that ever lived. Standing in front of the...
  • Last dinosaur before mass extinction discovered

    07/12/2011 5:54:31 PM PDT · by decimon · 35 replies
    Yale University ^ | July 12, 2011 | Unknown
    New Haven, Conn.—A team of scientists has discovered the youngest dinosaur preserved in the fossil record before the catastrophic meteor impact 65 million years ago. The finding indicates that dinosaurs did not go extinct prior to the impact and provides further evidence as to whether the impact was in fact the cause of their extinction. Researchers from Yale University discovered the fossilized horn of a ceratopsian – likely a Triceratops, which are common to the area – in the Hell Creek formation in Montana last year. They found the fossil buried just five inches below the K-T boundary, the geological...
  • Yale Scientists Discover the Last Living Dinosaur

    07/16/2011 4:39:22 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 130 replies
    CTV ^ | Sat Jul. 16 2011
    A fossil discovered in Montana has given new momentum to the hypothesis that dinosaurs were thriving right up until a devastating meteor hit Earth 65 million years ago, causing their extinction. Scientists from Yale University have found what is believed to be the youngest dinosaur fossil ever found, thought to be from just before the mass extinction took place. The discovery, described in a study published in the online edition of the journal Biology Letters, contradicts the theory that the dinosaurs slowly went extinct before the cosmic impact. The fossil -- a 45-centimetre horn believed to be from a triceratops...
  • Oldest pregnant lizard fossil discovered

    07/22/2011 5:55:54 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | July 22, 2011 | by Deborah Braconnie
    A new paper published in Naturwissenschaft reveals a fossil from 120 million years ago that proves that some lizards were not laying eggs but rather giving birth to live young. The fossil was discovered by Susan Evans, a professor from the University College London Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, in the Jehol region of Northeast China. This area has revealed hundreds of dinosaur, amphibian, reptile, fish, bird, mammal, invertebrate and plant fossils. The lizard in this case has been identified as Yabeinosaurus which scientists believe to be similar to the gecko. Evans did not pay much attention to the...