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Keyword: dinosaur

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  • 'Loch Ness monster' dinosaur fossil found in Alaska

    08/08/2015 11:44:33 AM PDT · by NYer · 17 replies
    Telegraph ^ | August 7, 2015
    Elasmosaurs had extremely long necks, small heads and paddle-shaped limbs for swimming Photo: Nobu Tamura Researchers in Alaska have uncovered the bones of a prehistoric marine reptile dating back 70 million years. This is the first time an elasmosaur has ever been unearthed in this state. Its vertebrae were discovered embedded in an eroding cliff. Curvin Metzler (left) and Dr Patrick Druckenmiller on the cliff face where the elasmosaur was discovered  Photo: University of Alaska Museum of the North Elasmosaurs had extremely long necks, small heads and paddle-shaped limbs for swimming. • Scientists study remains of massive Dreadnoughtus dinosaur, in pics...
  • Support for a Young Earth? Scientists Baffled by Preserved Dinosaur Blood Cells [Psalms 85:11]

    07/09/2015 9:48:38 AM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 110 replies
    CNS News ^ | 6/15/2015 | Garrett Haley
    LONDON The discovery of well-preserved blood and proteins in a supposedly 75-million-year-old dinosaur fossil has stumped secular scientists and led one Christian apologist to herald the findings as evidence of a young Earth. A team of scientists at the U.K.s Imperial College London carefully examined eight Cretaceous dinosaur bones discovered in North America, scrutinizing the bones interiors with an electron microscope. The researchers were stunned when they discovered what appeared to be red blood cells in one of the specimens. Upon closer examination, the British scientists identified an internal structure within the dinosaur cells, complete with nuclei and amino...
  • Carbon-14 Found in Dinosaur Fossils

    07/08/2015 8:48:19 AM PDT · by fishtank · 61 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 7-6-2015 | Brian Thomas
    Carbon-14 Found in Dinosaur Fossils by Brian Thomas, M.S. * New science directly challenges the millions-of-years dogma scattered throughout the blockbuster movie Jurassic World. The spring 2015 edition of the Creation Research Society Quarterly (CRSQ) is a special issue that focuses on the investigation of dinosaur proteins inside fossil bones. The last article in the issue presents never-before-seen carbon dates for 14 different fossils, including dinosaurs. Because radiocarbon decays relatively quickly, fossils that are even 100,000 years old should have virtually no radiocarbon left in them.1 But they do. Jurassic World characters repeatedly mention "million years ago" in the context...
  • Tracking Down Leviathan

    07/06/2015 8:17:47 AM PDT · by fishtank · 6 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | July 2015 | Tim Clarey, Ph.D.
    Tracking Down Leviathan by Tim Clarey, Ph.D. * What exactly was the leviathan described so vividly in Job 41? Was it a swimming reptile like a plesiosaur or a mosasaur, or something we have yet to unearth? We may never know the answer for certain, but the latest discovery of a large, semiaquatic dinosaur offers another possibility.1 Most specimens of the large theropod dinosaur Spinosaurus, made famous by the Jurassic Park movies as the dinosaur that defeated T. rex, are found in North Africa. Whether an encounter between the two would have had the same result in reality is highly...
  • Dinosaur proteins and radiocarbon wreak Jurassic World havoc. Latest creationist research...

    06/29/2015 8:09:20 AM PDT · by fishtank · 39 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 6-25-2015 | Brian Thomas
    Dinosaur proteins and radiocarbon wreak Jurassic World havoc Latest creationist research demolishes dinosaur dogma by Brian Thomas Published: 25 June 2015 (GMT+10) The record-earning movie Jurassic World continuously reminds its viewing audience that dinosaurs went extinct tens of millions of years ago. Most agree with this, of course, because it is the standard view of the evolutionary establishment. But just days after the movie hit big screens around the world, six technical papers in a special, groundbreaking, dinosaur issue of the journal Creation Research Society1 Quarterly (CRSQ) presented evidence that directly confronts the millions-of-years concept.2 I wrote one paper that...
  • Jurassic World Called "Racist" Over Dinosaur Name

    06/21/2015 12:03:14 PM PDT · by rightistight · 76 replies
    The Social Memo ^ | 6/21/15 | Aurelius
    Some viewers of Jurassic World are taking offense to the film, calling one of the lines in the movie "racist." Specifically, the abbreviation of the dinosaur Pachycephalosaurus. During the course of the film, the Pachycephalosaurus escape from their enclosures, leading one character to shout, "The Pachys are out of containment!" This has led news outlets and Twitter users to call the film "racist." A British comedian originally brought attention to the line, offering a tongue-in-cheek rant against the dinosaur's name. However, people did not get the joke, and are actually calling the film racist. The Independent called the line "very...
  • Mystery solved: Why large dinosaurs avoided the tropics for millions of years

    06/20/2015 1:31:56 PM PDT · by ETL · 66 replies
    FoxNews.com/science ^ | June 17, 2015 | Walt Bonner
    New research has revealed why it took more than 30 million years for large Triassic dinosaurs to populate the tropics after they first appeared on Earth, ending a mystery that has kept researchers baffled for decades. Using new geological evidence culled from Ghost Ranch, N.M., researchers from the University of Southampton in the U.K. have found that an extremely unpredictable hot and arid climate due to elevated carbon dioxide levels (four to six times of what they are today) kept large herbivorous dinos at bay until after 200 million years ago.
  • Signs of ancient cells and proteins found in dinosaur fossils

    06/15/2015 11:56:01 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 16 replies
    Science ^ | 06/15/2015 | By Robert F. Service
    The cupboards of the Natural History Museum in London hold spectacular dinosaur fossils, from 10-centimeter, serrated Tyrannosaurus rex teeth to a 4-meter-long hadrosaur tail. Now, researchers are reporting another spectacular find, buried in eight nondescript fossils from the same collection: what appear to be ancient red blood cells and fibers of ancient protein. Using new methods to peer deep inside fossils, the study in this weeks issue of Nature Communications backs up previous, controversial reports of such structures in dinosaur bones. It also suggests that soft tissue preservation may be more common than anyone had guessed. Its encouraging, especially because...
  • Fibres and cellular structures preserved in 75-millionyear-old dinosaur specimens

    06/10/2015 2:56:39 PM PDT · by Sopater · 42 replies
    Nature Communications ^ | 09 June 2015 | Sergio Bertazzo, Susannah C. R. Maidment, Charalambos Kallepitis, Sarah Fearn, Molly M. Stevens
    Abstract Exceptionally preserved organic remains are known throughout the vertebrate fossil record, and recently, evidence has emerged that such soft tissue might contain original components. We examined samples from eight Cretaceous dinosaur bones using nano-analytical techniques; the bones are not exceptionally preserved and show no external indication of soft tissue. In one sample, we observe structures consistent with endogenous collagen fibre remains displaying ~67 nm banding, indicating the possible preservation of the original quaternary structure. Using ToF-SIMS, we identify amino-acid fragments typical of collagen fibrils. Furthermore, we observe structures consistent with putative erythrocyte remains that exhibit mass spectra similar to emu...
  • New species of horned dinosaur with 'bizarre' features revealed

    06/05/2015 10:38:36 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Jun 04, 2015
    About 10 years ago, Peter Hews stumbled across some bones sticking out of a cliff along the Oldman River in southeastern Alberta, Canada. Now, scientists describe in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on June 4 that those bones belonged to a nearly intact skull of a very unusual horned dinosaura close relative of the familiar Triceratops that had been unknown to science until now. "The specimen comes from a geographic region of Alberta where we have not found horned dinosaurs before, so from the onset we knew it was important," says Dr. Caleb Brown of the Royal Tyrrell Museum...
  • Enjoy water? Youre drinking dinosaur pee

    05/29/2015 4:47:31 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 68 replies
    Toronto Sun ^ | May 29, 2015 | Postmedia Network
    That glass of water in your hand is dinosaur pee, apparently. Not like it's unfiltered, but a science YouTube video posted this week raises the interesting tidbit that, since dinosaurs were around for 186 million years and water molecules are everlasting, it's a foregone conclusion that every drop of water on the planet passed through the prehistoric species once upon a time. "While most of the water molecules in your 8 ounce glass have never been drunk by another human, almost every single molecule has been drunk by a dinosaur," the video by CuriousMinds says. "So drink up and enjoy...
  • Dinosaur-like snouts grown on chicken embryos

    05/12/2015 2:35:40 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 28 replies
    Birds are thought to have evolved from dinosaurs, but have very different jaws. Bird-like dinosaurs such as the velociraptor have two bones at the tip of their upper jaws. In birds, those bones are fused to form a beak. By blocking two proteins that are activated when chicken embryos grow their beaks, U.S. researchers caused their jaws to "revert" to a velociraptor-like snout. The changes were observed in chick embryos that developed until they were close to hatching. To their surprise, the birds' palates, on the roof of their mouths, also became dinosaur-like. "This was unexpected and demonstrates the way...
  • Bat-Like, Pigeon-Sized Dino Soared Over China

    04/29/2015 12:01:11 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Jennifer Viegas
    A dinosaur with bat-like wings once soared through the skies of what is now China, The Jurassic dinosaur, named Yi qi, has the shortest name ever given to a dino: Yi qi, pronounced "ee chee," means "strange wing." It also appears to be the earliest known flying non-avian dinosaur. At 160 million years old, it is older than the first known birds, such as Archaeopteryx. ... He and his colleagues unearthed the remains for Yi qi at Hebei Province in China. At first, the scientists puzzled over rod-like bones that extended from each wrist of the tiny dinosaur that weighed...
  • The Brontosaurus Is Back [it really is a separate species]

    04/08/2015 6:41:36 PM PDT · by grundle · 30 replies
    Scientific American ^ | April 7, 2015 | Charles Choi
    Some of the largest animals to ever walk on Earth were the long-necked, long-tailed dinosaurs known as the sauropodsand the most famous of these giants is probably Brontosaurus, the "thunder lizard." Deeply rooted as this titan is in the popular imagination, however, for more than a century scientists thought it never existed. The first of the Brontosaurus genus was named in 1879 by famed paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh. The specimen still stands on display in the Great Hall of Yale's Peabody Museum of Natural History. In 1903, however, paleontologist Elmer Riggs found that Brontosaurus was apparently the same as the...
  • In cable, its survival of the fittest as channels drop from the bundle

    04/08/2015 11:57:07 AM PDT · by C19fan · 27 replies
    Washington Post ^ | April 7, 2015 | Cecilia Kang
    At the Weather Channel, the heavy snow and bitter cold that swept the Northeast this winter was cause for celebration as its wall-to-wall coverage helped lift ratings to their highest level in years. But none of that mattered in the spring, when Verizon Fios dropped the channel from its offerings to more than 5 million subscribers. In a letter to customers, Verizon said that people want to get their reports from the Internet and apps on their phones these days, not TV.
  • Brontosaurus Finally Validated as a Distinct Dinosaur

    04/08/2015 4:11:18 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 18 replies
    ABC News ^ | Apr 7, 2015, 10:43 AM ET | ALYSSA NEWCOMB
    On the edge of the solar system, the dwarf planet Pluto, which knows what it feels like to be banished from an exclusive club, may be cheering for the brontosaurus. While the long-necked dinosaur's name may be known by legions of fans and even made it on to a postage stamp in the 1980s, most paleontologists would be quick to correct people that the brontosaurus is not a dinosaur. But the iconic dinosaur name may finally be reinstated more than a century after researchers found the long-necked brontosaurus and apatosaurus likely belonged to the same genus, according to an analysis...
  • Fact or Fiction?: Dark Matter Killed the Dinosaurs

    04/02/2015 10:15:04 PM PDT · by grundle · 58 replies
    Scientific American ^ | March 25, 2015 | Lee Billings
    A new out-of-this-world theory links mass extinctions with exotic astrophysics and galactic architecture Every once in a great while, something almost unspeakable happens to Earth. Some terrible force reaches out and tears the tree of life limb from limb. In a geological instant, countless creatures perish and entire lineages simply cease to exist. The most famous of these mass extinctions happened about 66 million years ago, when the dinosaurs died out in the planet-wide environmental disruption that followed a mountain-sized space rock walloping Earth. We can still see the scar from the impact today as a nearly 200-kilometer-wide crater in...
  • Class action lawsuit claims (Soros') Dinosaur Bar-B-Que doesn't pay fair wages to tipped workers

    03/29/2015 6:20:38 PM PDT · by Behind Liberal Lines · 15 replies
    2015 Syracuse Media Group All rights reserved ^ | March 29, 2015 at 9:51 AM | By Don Cazentre | dcazentre@syracuse.com
    A New York City law firm says it has filed a class action lawsuit accusing the Syracuse-based Dinosaur Bar-B-Que chain of failing to pay its tipped workers fair wages. The suit claims Dinosaur failed to properly use the "tipped credit" provision in federal law, which requires employers to make up the difference between tips and pay to meet minimum wage standard....The suit also claims Dinosaur failed to properly pay overtime wages, "misappropriated" tips belonging to the tipped workers, wrongly required tipped workers to share tips with managers for large events and failed to properly pay workers for shifts exceeding 10...
  • Ocean hot in days of dinosaurs, study finds

    02/18/2006 7:38:53 AM PST · by worldclass · 43 replies · 935+ views
    Sometimes we make that first dash into the ocean on summer vacation and happily announce, "It's warm as bathwater." But a new study based on ancient sediments collected off South America indicates that the tropical Atlantic Ocean really did hit temperatures as high as 107 degrees Fahrenheit back when dinosaurs ruled. The finding, reported Friday by researchers from the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution during the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, also estimates that carbon dioxide made up as much as six times more of the atmosphere at that time than it does today.
  • Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid?

    04/05/2003 9:39:18 PM PST · by SteveH · 19 replies · 493+ views
    Discovery News ^ | April 3, 2003 | Larry O'Hanlon
    Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid? By Larry O'Hanlon, Discovery News April 3, 2003 The evidence is still skimpy, but there is a chance that the dino killer asteroid was not alone when it walloped the Earth 65 million years ago. A possible second crater, at least as big or bigger than the famous Chicxulub crater off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, may have been created by a second hit moments after Chicxulub and off the coast of Maine. "It probably is a crater, but we really don't have age data," said marine geologist Dallas Abbott Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia...
  • A Pint-Size Polar Predator

    12/26/2014 7:25:45 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Discover ^ | Wednesday, December 10, 2014 | Gemma Tarlach
    Nanuqsaurus hoglundi was the big little dinosaur find that nearly got left behind. Classified in a March study, the hobbit T. rex, barely two-thirds the size of its more famous relative, roamed the Arctic some 70 million years ago. It's the only tyrannosaur ever found outside temperate latitudes, rewriting our understanding of the animals' diversity... In 2006, Fiorillo's team was above the Arctic Circle, on Alaska's North Slope. The polar season for fieldwork is brief, and they were busy excavating horned dinosaurs. But they also noticed a few interesting-looking, basketball-size rocks lying around the site. Fiorillo set them aside, thinking...
  • Oldest Horned Dinosaur in North American Discovered

    12/26/2014 7:25:41 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Paleontologists working in southern Montana unearthed a 3-inch beaked skull with pointed cheeks, which they believe is the oldest definitive evidence of a horned dinosaur in North America. Though small, the skull helps fill gaps in the evolutionary history of horned creatures on this continent... Fossil remains of horned dinosaurs, called neoceratopsian, have been found throughout North America, but the fossil record of these creatures is incredibly limited further back in time. That's been a hang-up for paleontologists because the late Early Cretaceous period (roughly 113 to 105 million years ago) was a time of important diversification for horned dinosaurs....
  • New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs' extinction

    12/19/2014 11:42:56 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.sciencedaily.com ^ | December 18, 2014 | Source: Princeton University
    A definitive geological timeline shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago spewed enormous amounts of climate-altering gases into the atmosphere immediately before and during the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, according to new research from Princeton University. A primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps, which were once three times larger than France, began its main phase of eruptions roughly 250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene, or K-Pg, extinction event, the researchers report in the journal Science. For the next 750,000 years, the volcanoes unleashed more than 1.1 million cubic...
  • Rhinorex Condrupus: 75-Million-Year-Old Huge-Nosed 'Jimmy Durante' Dinosaur Discovered in Utah

    09/23/2014 11:59:55 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    International Business Times (UK) ^ | September 22, 2014 11:01 BST | By Lydia Smith
    Palaeontologists have discovered what they are calling the "Jimmy Durante" of dinosaurs, a type of hadrosaur with a distinctive nasal profile. Named Rhinorex condrupus, the fossil was found by researchers from North Carolina State University and Brigham Young University, and lived in what is now Utah approximately 75 million years ago during the Late Cretaceous period. According to National Geographic, the date places the creature in the middle of a major dinosaur radiation, the process by which species adapt to new ecological niches. Rhinorex, which translates roughly into "King Nose", was a plant-eater and a close relative of other Cretaceous...
  • Ancient Birds Flew On All Fours

    09/22/2006 6:27:23 AM PDT · by Tokra · 181 replies · 2,650+ views
    eurekalert ^ | Spet. 22, 2006 | Nick Longrich
    The earliest known ancestor of modern-day birds took to the skies by gliding from trees using primitive feathered wings on their arms and legs, according to new research by a University of Calgary paleontologist. In a paper published in the journal Paleobiology, Department of Biological Sciences PhD student Nick Longrich challenges the idea that birds began flying by taking off from the ground while running and shows that the dinosaur-like bird Archaeopteryx soared using wing-like feathers on all of its limbs. "The discussions about the origins of avian flight have been dominated by the so-called 'ground up' and 'trees down'...
  • Dover, PA Evolution Trial [daily thread for 07 Oct]

    10/07/2005 7:23:15 AM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 456 replies · 4,761+ views
    York Daily Record ^ | 07 October 2005 | Staff
    To keep this all in one daily thread, here are links to two articles in the York Daily Record (with excerpts from each), which has been doing a great job of reporting on the trial: Forrest cross-examination a rambling wonder. About the time that Richard Thompson, head law guy at the Thomas More center and chief defender of the Dover Area School Board, started his third year of cross-examination of philosopher Barbara Forrest, it was easy to imagine that at that moment, everyone in the courtroom, including Forrest, who doesnt believe in God, was violating the separation of church and...
  • Hunters Claim to Find 4-Winged Dinosaur

    01/22/2003 11:38:37 AM PST · by Dallas · 56 replies · 748+ views
    Fossil hunters in China have discovered what may be one of the weirdest prehistoric species ever seen -- a four-winged dinosaur that apparently glided from tree to tree. The 128-million-year-old animal -- called Microraptor gui, in honor of Chinese paleontologist Gu Zhiwei -- was about 2 1/2 feet long and had two sets of feathered wings, with one set on its forelimbs and the other on its hind legs. Exactly where the creature fits into the evolution of birds and dinosaurs is not clear. But researchers speculated that it developed around the same time as or even later than...
  • Spinosaurus fossil: 'Giant swimming dinosaur' unearthed

    09/12/2014 6:01:43 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    BBC ^ | September 11, 2014 | Rebecca Morelle
    The 95-million-year-old remains confirm a long-held theory: that this is the first-known swimming dinosaur. Scientists say the beast had flat, paddle-like feet and nostrils on top of its crocodilian head that would allow it to submerge with ease. The research is published in the journal Science. Lead author Nizar Ibrahim, a palaeontologist from the University of Chicago, said: "It is a really bizarre dinosaur - there's no real blueprint for it.
  • Ancient swamp creature had lips like Mick Jagger

    09/10/2014 10:14:01 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Provided by Duke University
    Sir Mick Jagger has a new animal named after him. Scientists have named an extinct swamp-dwelling creature that lived 19 million years ago in Africa after the Rolling Stones frontman, in honor of a trait they both sharetheir supersized lips. "We gave it the scientific name Jaggermeryx naida, which translates to 'Jagger's water nymph,'" said study co-author Ellen Miller of Wake Forest University. The animal's fossilized jaw bones suggest it was roughly the size of a small deer and akin to a cross between a slender hippo and a long-legged pig. Researchers uncovered the fossilsconsisting of multiple jawbone fragmentsamid the...
  • Newly discovered dinosaur, Dreadnoughtus, takes title of largest terrestrial animal

    09/05/2014 8:11:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 4, 2014 | Meeri Kim
    Scientists have discovered the fossilized remains of a new long-necked, long-tailed dinosaur that has taken the crown for largest terrestrial animal with a body mass that can be accurately determined. Measurements of bones from its hind leg and foreleg revealed that the animal was 65 tons, and still growing when it died in the Patagonian hills of Argentina about 77 million years ago. To put this in perspective, an African elephant is about five tons, T. rex is eight tons, Diplodocus is 18 tons, and a Boeing 737 is around 50 tons, said study author and paleontologist Kenneth Lacovara at...
  • "Astoundingly huge" dinosaur skeleton unearthed in Argentina

    09/04/2014 11:29:26 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 69 replies
    CBS News ^ | September 4, 2014 | Agata Blaszczak-Boxe
    Scientists have unearthed the skeleton of a previously unknown, massive dinosaur species that may be the largest land animal ever found.The specimen named Dreadnoughtus schrani is exceptionally complete, with about 70 percent of its bones recovered. Scientists believe the creature, which lived about 77 million years ago, measured 85 feet (26 meters) long and weighed about 65 tons, heavier than a Boeing 737.
  • Did Angkor really see a dinosaur?

    06/23/2014 9:24:28 AM PDT · by fishtank · 62 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 6-23-14 | Jonathan OBrien and Shaun Doyle
    Did Angkor really see a dinosaur? Jonathan OBrien and Shaun Doyle The September 2007 Creation magazine back page feature article Angkor saw a Stegosaur? showed a stone carving on a temple of Angkor, Cambodia, (a. 1200 AD), depicting what looks like an artistic impression of a stegosaurian-type dinosaur.1 As such evidence clearly supports the biblical view of dinosaurs, it naturally provoked the ire of vocal atheists. Here are their objections: If it is a dinosaur, they carved it from fossils The plates along the back of the animal are unlike all the other decorative designs in the temple walls. One...
  • 'Biggest dinosaur ever' discovered

    05/17/2014 10:54:58 AM PDT · by Izzy Dunne · 100 replies
    BBC ^ | 16 May 2014 | James Morgan
    Based on its huge thigh bones, it was 40m (130ft) long and 20m (65ft) tall. Weighing in at 77 tonnes, it was as heavy as 14 African elephants, and seven tonnes heavier than the previous record holder, Argentinosaurus. Scientists believe it is a new species of titanosaur - an enormous herbivore dating from the Late Cretaceous period. A local farm worker first stumbled on the remains in the desert near La Flecha, about 250km (135 miles) west of Trelew, Patagonia.
  • Baseball Solves The Problem of Batter Rushing the Mound Towards Pitcher Regarding Errant pitch

    05/12/2014 4:42:35 PM PDT · by lbryce · 7 replies
    GooglePlus ^ | May 12, 2014 | Google Plus
  • Asteroid Breakup May Have Doomed Dinosaurs

    09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies · 1,261+ views
    Its a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...
  • Jurassic Park HERE NOW: UK Scientists Successfully Clone Dinosaur from Well-Preserved DNA Fragments

    03/31/2014 10:03:54 PM PDT · by Reaganite Republican · 35 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | 01 April 2014 | Reaganite Republican
    British scientists have announced that they have successfully clone a dinosaur, according to a spokesman from Liverpools Jon Moore University... Theyve cloned an Aparosaurus by extracting DNA from a well-preserved fossil, then injected it into a fertile ostrich womb. The dinosaur, nicknamed Spot is currently being incubated at the universitys College of Veterinary Medicine. Ostriches share a lot of genetic traits with dinosaurs, said Dr. Gerrard Jones, a biology professor at LJMU and the projects leading scientist. Their eggshell microstructures are almost identical to those of the Apatosaurus. Thats why the cloning worked so perfectly. Religious groups and animal rights...
  • New dinosaur called the Chicken From Hell

    03/20/2014 6:15:25 AM PDT · by C19fan · 49 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 19, 2014 | Joel Achenbach
    Scientists have discovered a freakish, birdlike species of dinosaur 11 feet long, 500 pounds, with a beak, no teeth, a bony crest atop its head, murderous claws, prize-fighter arms, spindly legs, a thin tail and feathers sprouting all over the place. Officially, its a member of a group of dinosaurs called oviraptorosaurs. Unofficially, its the Chicken From Hell.
  • Scientists find dinosaur that was scourge of Jurassic Europe

    03/06/2014 6:37:05 AM PST · by C19fan · 23 replies
    Reuters ^ | March 5, 2014 | Will Dunham
    In Europe 150 million years ago, this dude was the biggest, baddest bully in town. Two scientists in Portugal announced on Wednesday that they have identified the largest carnivorous dinosaur ever found in Europe, a 33-foot-long (10-meter-long) brute called Torvosaurus gurneyi that was the scourge of its domain in the Jurassic Period.
  • Pompeii-like volcanic ash kept dinosaur remains fresh

    02/04/2014 7:44:58 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 02/04/2014 | Jeff Hecht
    It's hot storage. Millions of years before volcanic ash entombed the Roman town of Pompeii, a group of dinosaurs succumbed to a similar fate. China's famous feathered dinosaur fossils owe their exquisite preservation to volcanic eruptions between about 130 and 120 million years ago. The Jehol fossils have transformed our understanding of dinosaurs by showing that the relatives of Velociraptor and T. rex had a feather-like body covering, like birds. The Jehol deposits also preserved soft tissue from early mammals and flowering plants. Baoyu Jiang of Nanjing University, China, and his colleagues think they know why the remains are so...
  • Double meteorite strike 'caused dinosaur extinction'

    08/27/2010 12:05:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 25 replies
    BBC ^ | Howard Falcon-Lang
    The dinosaurs were wiped out 65 million years ago by at least two meteorite impacts, rather than a single strike, a new study suggests.Previously, scientists had identified a huge impact crater in the Gulf of Mexico as the event that spelled doom for the dinosaurs. Now evidence for a second impact in the Ukraine has been uncovered. This raises the possibility that the Earth may have been bombarded by a whole shower of meteorites. The new findings are published in the journal Geology by a team lead by Professor David Jolley of Aberdeen University. When first proposed in 1980, the...
  • Oldest dinosaur nursery found in South Africa

    01/24/2012 12:37:19 AM PST · by Berlin_Freeper · 20 replies
    zeenews ^ | January 24, 2012 | ANI
    An ancient dinosaur nursery - the oldest nesting site ever found - has been unearthed in an excavation at a site in South Africa. The 190-million-year-old nesting site of the prosauropod dinosaur Massospondylus reveals significant clues about the evolution of complex reproductive behaviour in early dinosaurs. It discover clutches of eggs, many with embryos, as well as tiny dinosaur footprints, providing the oldest known evidence that the hatchlings remained at the nesting site long enough to at least double in size. This research project, which has been ongoing since 2005 continues to produce groundbreaking results and excavations continue. First it...
  • Antarctic Lost Worlds - 2 New Dinosaurs Species Found

    02/27/2004 9:36:42 AM PST · by Mark Felton · 47 replies · 5,241+ views
    Astrobiology Magazine ^ | 2/27/04 | astrobiology
    Finding dinosaurs in Antarctica is both easier and harder than finding them on another continent. Easier, because like looking for meteorites, dinosaur bones show up against the stark landscape. Harder, because the dinosaur's cold-bloodedness wouldn't have lasted long prior to continental drift and climate changes. Antarctic Lost Worlds Tale of Two Dinosaursbased on National Science Foundation report Against incredible odds, researchers working in separate sites, thousands of miles apart in Antarctica have found what they believe are the fossilized remains of two species of dinosaurs previously unknown to science. Life on the Edge. South Pole view from Space.Credit: NASA One...
  • Dinosaur Skull Provides Geological Clues

    05/31/2004 12:44:53 PM PDT · by Junior · 14 replies · 212+ views
    Science - AP ^ | 2004-05-29 | ERIC FIDLER
    CHICAGO - The fossil skull of a peculiar, wrinkle-faced dinosaur unearthed four years ago in the Sahara is providing new evidence that Africa split from the other southern continents more recently than previously thought, scientists say. "It was sort of a missing puzzle piece that serves to banish the notion that Africa was isolated earlier," said Paul Sereno, a University of Chicago paleontologist who led the dinosaur-hunting expedition to a remote, desert region of Niger in 2000."It really completes the story very convincingly," he said. The skull, found amid a wealth of dinosaur bones from the late cretaceous period, came...
  • Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests

    10/25/2006 3:33:16 PM PDT · by blam · 94 replies · 2,818+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-24-2006 | GSA
    Source: Geological Society of America Date: October 24, 2006 Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests There's growing evidence that the dinosaurs and most their contemporaries were not wiped out by the famed Chicxulub meteor impact, according to a paleontologist who says multiple meteor impacts, massive volcanism in India, and climate changes culminated in the end of the Cretaceous Period. Cottonmouth Creek waterfall over the event deposit with reworked Chicxulub impact spherules. The original Chicxulub ejecta layer was discovered in a yellow clay layer 45 cm below the base of the event deposit. The yellow clay represents a...
  • Dinosaurs' climate shifted too, reports show

    09/25/2006 4:15:43 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 27 replies · 830+ views
    Indiana University ^ | 23-Sep-2006 | David Bricker
    Caption: IU Bloomington geochemist Simon Brassell (right), Penn State sedimentologist Michael Arthur (middle), and Tohoku Univ. sedimentologist Harumasa Kano (left) inspect an ancient shale aboard the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Ancient rocks from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean suggest dramatic climate changes during the dinosaur-dominated Mesozoic Era, a time once thought to have been monotonously hot and humid. In this month's Geology, scientists from Indiana University Bloomington and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research present new evidence that ocean surface temperatures varied as much as 6 degrees Celsius (about 11 degrees Fahrenheit) during the...
  • Dinosaur Soft Tissue Preserved by Blood?

    12/11/2013 8:10:28 AM PST · by fishtank · 102 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 12-11-13 | Brian Thomas
    Dinosaur Soft Tissue Preserved by Blood? by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Researchers are now suggesting that iron embedded in blood proteins preserved the still-soft tissues, cells, and molecules discovered inside dinosaurs and other fossils after the creatures were buried in sediments. The ability to justify millions of years is at stake, and this study promises to do just that. What are its merits and demerits? Publishing in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B, Mary Schweitzer led a team that showed how iron atoms from blood adhere to and preserve blood vessels.1 The team placed ostrich bone blood vessels...
  • Baby Dinosaur Skeleton Unearthed in Canada

    11/25/2013 2:27:23 PM PST · by Dysart · 20 replies
    The tiny, intact skeleton of a baby rhinoceroslike dinosaur has been unearthed in Canada. The toddler was just 3 years old and 5 feet (1.5 meters) long when it wandered into a river near Alberta, Canada, and drowned about 70 million years ago. The beast was so well-preserved that some of its skin left impressions in the nearby rock.
  • Just How Old is Dinosaur Soft Tissue?

    10/04/2013 7:15:37 AM PDT · by kimtom · 82 replies
    http://www.apologeticspress.org ^ | 11/1/2012 | Eric Lyons
    Imagine watching an interview on television and hearing a bald, blind, deaf, wrinkled, hunched-back, bedridden man claim that he is 130 years old. Although you might doubt such a claim, if ever there was a man in modern times to live 130 years on Earth, he likely would have looked as worn out as this man appeared. Imagine, however, if a quick-witted, muscular, marathon runner with fair skin, thick, dark hair, low blood pressure, and a good memory, claimed to be 130 years old. What reasonable person would believe such a claim? Everyone would doubt the statement, especially the doctors,...
  • Beautiful dinosaur fossil unearthed near Spirit River

    10/03/2013 12:29:16 PM PDT · by Squawk 8888 · 45 replies
    Edmonton Journal ^ | October 2, 2013 | Marty Klinkenberg
    EDMONTON - Experts are calling a dinosaur fossil unearthed in northern Alberta this week one of the most complete finds in this part of the world in a long time. Brian Brake, executive director of the Philip J. Currie Dinosaur Museum, said the fossilized remains of a hadrosaur were discovered at an energy companys work site near Spirit River. Officials from the pipeline firm contacted the museum, which sent paleontologists to assess the find. What we have is a totally composed tail, Brake said. Its beautiful. The Currie Museum contacted its counterparts at the Royal Tyrrell Museum in Drumheller, which...
  • Dinosaur Feathers Discovered in Canadian Amber

    09/16/2013 10:35:49 PM PDT · by Mike Darancette · 44 replies
    io9 ^ | 9/15/2013 | Analee Newitz
    Pictures of Dinofuzz at Source.