Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • Jack FM turkey 'cook or save' vote slammed by Brian May [Queen guitarist]

    12/14/2014 8:59:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    BBC ^ | December 11, 2014 | unattributed
    A radio station that asked listeners to vote on whether two turkeys should be killed has been criticised by animal lovers - including Queen guitarist Dr Brian May. And the RSPCA has urged Jack FM to rethink the online vote on whether the turkeys should be cooked or kept alive. The RSPCA said it opposed any practice with the "potential to cause animals pain... in the name of entertainment". Currently, 62% of people have voted to save the turkeys, named Sage and Onion. The Oxfordshire station said if listeners voted to kill the pair in the "cook it or keep...
  • Water's role in the rise and fall of the Roman Empire

    12/13/2014 6:19:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Science Daily ^ | December 11, 2014 | European Geosciences Union
    Smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network enabled the Romans to thrive in the water-limited environment of the Mediterranean, a new study shows. But the stable food supply brought about by these measures promoted population growth and urbanisation, pushing the Empire closer to the limits of its food resources... Brian Dermody, an environmental scientist from Utrecht University, teamed up with hydrologists from the Netherlands and classicists at Stanford University in the US. The researchers wanted to know how the way Romans managed water for agriculture and traded crops contributed to the longevity of their civilisation. They were also curious...
  • Peter Stuyvesant's rules for drinking responsibly (NYC opens historical records)

    12/11/2014 5:04:01 AM PST · by NYer · 34 replies
    Bowery Boys ^ | December 3, 2014
    From A New and Accurate Map of the Entire New Netherland, engraving believed to be by Carolus Allard, courtesy the Department of Records   Over the Thanksgiving holiday, the New York City Department of Records just blew the minds of history geeks everywhere.  They released the first batch of digitized documents from the first years of the city's existence, back when it was the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam. You can find the first batch of released documents at the city's attractive new portal here. This is the equivalent of pulling out old photo albums of you playing with...
  • Virginia brewery taps 300-year-old beer recipe

    12/05/2014 7:35:05 AM PST · by C19fan · 10 replies
    AP ^ | December 4, 2014 | Michael Felderbaum
    What do you get when you combine water, American persimmons and hops and ferment it with yeast? A beer based on a 300-year-old recipe scribbled in a cookbook kept by Virginia's prominent Randolph family. Ardent Craft Ales in Richmond recently brewed "Jane's Percimon Beer" unearthed from the book in the Virginia Historical Society's collections from the 1700s that contains food, medicinal remedies and beer recipes. The formula for the Colonial-era concoction is one of thousands of alcoholic recipes in the society's collection that provide a glimpse into what Virginians and others were drinking in the 18th century and other points...
  • Connecting dots of migration in ancient Southwest [ Anasazi star orientation? ]

    07/03/2009 5:09:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 437+ views
    George Johnson ^ | Wednesday, July 1, 2009 | STL Today / St. Louis Post-Dispatch / Associated Press
    From the sky, the Mound of the Cross at Paquime, a 14th-century ruin in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, looks like a compass rose -- the roundish emblem indicating the cardinal directions on a map. About 30 feet in diameter and molded from compacted earth and rock taken near the banks of the Casas Grandes River, the crisscross arms point to four circular platforms. They might as well be labeled N, S, E and W...
  • Ancient Chihuahuas in Southeastern U.S.?

    11/30/2014 5:29:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Lost Worlds ^ | February 14, 2012 | Gary C. Daniels
    Do three dog effigy pots excavated in Georgia in the 1930s at the Bull Creek Site and one from the Neisler Mound site represent the Chihuahua breed, a native dog of Mexico? Is the tribe most likely associated with these pots the Kasihta/Cussetta Creek Indians whose migration legends strongly suggest an origin in west Mexico, likely the state of Colima which is also known for similar dog effigy pots? Did the Kasihta raise Chihuahuas for food which they fattened up for this purpose as depicted by the pots and as recorded by early Spanish eye-witness accounts? Finally, does this evidence...
  • Archaeologists Virtually Recreate Ancient Egyptian Brewery

    08/11/2013 10:37:07 AM PDT · by Renfield · 13 replies
    ancient-origins.net ^ | 8-7-2013 | April Holloway
    A Polish archaeologist at the Jagiellonian University Institute of Archaeology has made a 3D reconstruction of a 5,500-year-old brewing installation which was found at Tell el-Farcha, an archaeological site in Egypt dating back to approximately 3700 BC when it functioned as a centre of local Lower Egyptian Culture. The virtual reconstruction has brought to life the ancient scene in which Egyptians practiced a traditional form of beer making. The reconstruction was created based on preserved structures of similar analogous buildings at both Tell el-Farcha and other brewing centres in Upper Egypt. The Tell el-Farcha brewery, the oldest ever brewery found...
  • Archaeologists Rewrite Timeline Of Bronze And Iron Ages, Alphabet

    12/24/2001 5:04:31 AM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 613+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 12-19-2001 | Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
    Archaeologists rewrite timeline of Bronze and Iron Ages, including early appearance of alphabet FOR RELEASE: Dec. 19, 2001 Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr. Office: 607-255-3290 E-Mail: bpf2@cornell.edu ITHACA, N.Y. -- Using information gleaned from the sun's solar cycles and tree rings, archaeologists are rewriting the timeline of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The research dates certain artifacts of the ancient eastern Mediterranean decades earlier than previously thought. And it places an early appearance of the alphabet outside Phoenicia at around 740 B.C. Writing in two articles in the forthcoming issue of the journal Science (Dec. 21), archaeologists from Cornell University ...
  • Nordic Grog Is Latest of Dogfish Head's Ancient Brews

    12/25/2013 2:50:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 23, 2013 | editors
    Residues of pottery sherds from ancient Scandinavian settlements dating as far back as 1200 B.C. are the inspiration for Delaware-based brewey Dogfish Head's latest ancient ale, Kvasir. Patrick McGovern, a bioarchaeolgist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and frequent collaborator with Dogfish Head on these brews calls the drink a Nordic grog. The recipe for Kvasir, which is available in limited quantities now, involves yarrow, lingonberries, cranberries, bog myrtle, and birch syrup. Prior to Kvasir, Dogfish Head brewed Midas Touch, influenced by residues taken from 2,700-year-old pottery found in Turkey, and Chateau Jiahu, an ale that traces its history back...
  • Chemistry Used to Unlock Secrets in Archeological Remains

    04/30/2002 6:10:04 PM PDT · by vannrox · 5 replies · 1,037+ views
    VOA News ^ | 27 Apr 2002 12:35 UTC | Written by Laszlo Dosa , Voiced by Faith Lapidus
    Patrick McGovern "The site is very rich archeologically, has been excavated for the last 50 years by the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It has a large palace area with rooms, some of which are thought to have been kitchens for making the food for the palace, with jars of barley and other goods. Also, it has a whole series of tombs in which the burial was done in a special wooden chamber beneath a very large mound. It's almost as if you cut it yesterday and put the structure together. It is the earliest intact human building made of...
  • King Midas' Modern Mourners

    11/28/2004 6:23:26 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 618+ views
    Science News ^ | Nov. 4, 2000; Vol. 158, No. 19 , p. 296 | Jessica Gorman
    The modern diners sitting before Sams were about to eat the first reconstruction of that feast—a celebration that had remained undiscovered for decades after archaeologist Rodney S. Young first excavated Midas' tomb in 1957. Ancient Roman, Greek, or even Maya banquets had been re-created previously, but generally from texts and ancient recipes. Not so with the Midas feast. "It's the first time that somebody tried to do it working just from the chemical evidence," says Patrick E. McGovern, the museum's molecular archaeologist who led the analyses. In other words, from the pan scrapings.
  • Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the Ice Age

    11/07/2014 1:36:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | Nov 06, 2014
    The study also uncovers a more accurate timescale for when humans and Neanderthals interbred, and finds evidence for an early contact between the European hunter-gatherers and those in the Middle East – who would later develop agriculture and disperse into Europe about 8,000 years ago, transforming the European gene pool. Scientists now believe Eurasians separated into at least three populations earlier than 36,000 years ago: Western Eurasians, East Asians and a mystery third lineage, all of whose descendants would develop the unique features of most non-African peoples - but not before some interbreeding with Neanderthals took place. Led by the...
  • Ancient Europeans remained intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    11/02/2014 8:20:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    University College Dublin ^ | 22 October 2014 | UCD University Relations
    By analysing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making among Central European Neolithic farmers. The findings published in the scientific journal Nature Communications (21 Oct) also suggest that major technological transitions in Central Europe between the Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age were also associated with major changes in the genetics of these populations. For the study, the international team of scientists examined...
  • Fossilized maize, rice found in Temanggung

    11/02/2014 7:31:10 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Jakarta Post ^ | Wednesday, October 29, 2014 | Agus Maryono
    Liyangan archaeological site on the slope of Mount Sindoro in Temanggung regency, Central Java, has again proven its position as home to one of main archeological findings in Indonesia after archeologists from the Yogyakarta Archeology Agency found the fossilized remnants of staple foods, comprising maize and rice, still inside a bamboo basket at the site. The archeologists said the finding indicated that Indonesia had long been part of an international agriculture network because maize was not endemic to Java and at the site they had also found many artifacts from other countries, especially China. Head of the Yogyakarta Archeology Agency,...
  • Roman gladiators' diet probably not what you'd expect, researchers find

    10/21/2014 12:59:30 PM PDT · by dware · 42 replies
    Newser via Fox News ^ | 10.21.2014 | Jenn Gidman
    You'd figure a typical Roman gladiator to be a real meat-and-potatoes guy, right? You'd be figuring wrong—at least if you were talking about gladiators from the city of Ephesus.
  • Clues to Prehistoric Human Exploration Found in Sweet Potato Genome

    01/21/2013 8:39:59 PM PST · by Theoria · 23 replies
    Science ^ | 21 Jan 2013 | Lizzie Wade
    Europeans raced across oceans and continents during the Age of Exploration in search of territory and riches. But when they reached the South Pacific, they found they had been beaten there by a more humble traveler: the sweet potato. Now, a new study suggests that the plant's genetics may be the key to unraveling another great age of exploration, one that predated European expansion by several hundred years and remains an anthropological enigma. Humans domesticated the sweet potato in the Peruvian highlands about 8000 years ago, and previous generations of scholars believed that Spanish and Portuguese explorers introduced the crop...
  • Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after five centuries

    09/27/2014 1:49:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 17, 2014 | Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
    A team of Spanish researchers have obtained the first partial genome sequence of an ancient pig. Extracted from a sixteenth century pig found at the site of the Montsoriu Castle in Girona, the data obtained indicates that this ancient pig is closely related to today's Iberian pig. Researchers also discard the hypothesis that Asian pigs were crossed with modern Iberian pigs. The study, published in Heredity, sheds new light on evolutionary aspects of pig species, and particularly on that of the Iberian breed, considered to be representative of original European Mediterranean populations... The sample dates approximately from the years 1520...
  • The evidence of polygamy is in our genes

    09/26/2014 8:14:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 25, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    In the genetic history of our species, the mamas outnumber the papas. A new study in Investigative Genetics reports that females have made a bigger contribution than men. By studying the DNA of 623 males from 51 populations, the researchers found more genetic diversity in the DNA inherited from mothers than they did in the DNA inherited from fathers. At first glance, these results could be taken to mean that there used to be more women than men. But if you know anything about history, it makes more sense to blame reproductive habits: In many cultures, more women reproduced than...
  • Archaeologists discover 'industrial scale' wine production at ancient site

    09/21/2014 5:03:38 AM PDT · by RouxStir · 9 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | September 19, 2014
    <p>"Archaeologists in Israel have discovered a massive compound dating back to the Byzantine era, which was used for “industrial-scale” production of wine and olive oil.</p> <p>The site at Ramat Bet Shemesh about 19 miles west of Jerusalem contains an oil press, wine press and colorful mosaics, according to the Israel Antiquities Authority.</p>
  • Nutrition and health in agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers

    09/19/2014 3:27:29 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 6 replies
    proteinpower ^ | 2. April 2009, | Michael R Eades
    Nutrition and health in agriculturalists and hunter-gatherers 22. April 2009, 2:21 UhrLow-carb diets, Paleolithic diet, Paleopathologymreades139 comments 87 When I wrote the Overcoming the Curse of the Mummies chapter in Protein Power, I wrote mainly about the evidence of disease found in the mummies of ancient Egyptians and correlated this disease with their high-carbohydrate diet.  Along with all the material on mummies, which is the part everyone seems to remember, I wrote about a study done in the United States in the 1970s that persuasively demonstrated the superiority of the hunter diet as compared to an agricultural diet, which no...
  • Europeans descended from three ancient tribes

    09/18/2014 10:20:25 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 35 replies
    BBC ^ | 9/17/14 | Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based on analysis of genomes from nine ancient Europeans. Agriculture originated in the Near East - in modern Syria, Iraq and Israel - before expanding into Europe around 7,500 years ago. It really does look like the indigenous West European hunter gatherers...
  • Europeans drawn from three 'tribes'

    09/17/2014 11:19:24 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    BBC News Science and Environment ^ | 09/17/2014 | By Paul Rincon
    The modern European gene pool was formed when three ancient populations mixed with one another within the last 7,000 years, Nature journal reports. Blue-eyed, swarthy hunters mingled with brown-eyed, pale skinned farmers as the latter swept into Europe from the Near East. But another, mysterious population with Siberian affinities also contributed to the genetic landscape of the continent. The findings are based analysis of the genomes of nine ancient Europeans. Agriculture originated in the Near East - in modern Syria, Iraq and Israel - before expanding into Europe around 7,500 years ago. Multiple lines of evidence suggested this new way...
  • New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

    08/30/2014 2:32:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | August 28, 2014 | Uppsala University
    The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication... The domestication of animals and plants, a prerequisite for the development of agriculture, is one of the most important technological revolutions during human history. Domestication of animals started as early as 9,000 to 15,000 years ago and initially involved dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. The rabbit was domesticated much later, about 1,400 years...
  • Fowl play: Neanderthals were first bird eaters (Update)

    08/18/2014 8:00:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | August 07, 2014 | Brian Reyes
    Neanderthals may have caught, butchered and cooked wild pigeons long before modern humans became regular consumers of bird meat, a study revealed on Thursday. Close examination of 1,724 bones from rock doves, found in a cave in Gibraltar and dated to between 67,000 and 28,000 years ago, revealed cuts, human tooth marks and burns, said a paper in the journal Scientific Reports. This suggested the doves may have been butchered and then roasted, wrote the researchers—the first evidence of hominids eating birds. And the evidence suggested Neanderthals ate much like a latter-day Homo sapiens would tuck into a roast chicken,...
  • Unearthed Neanderthal site rich in horse bones

    08/17/2014 12:02:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Horsetalk ^ | August 15, 2014 | unattributed
    A site in southwestern France found to be rich in the bones of horses and other large herbivores has provided important insights into the hunting and scavenging habits of Neanderthals. A team of archaeologists from the French archaeological agency Inrap have unearthed hundreds of bones at the Middle Paleolithic site in Quincieux dating back 35,000 to 55,000 years. The work was started due to roadworks in the area, with the outstanding discovery prompting local authorities to extend the time available for excavations. The excavation of the prehistoric site, on a hill overlooking the old bed of the Saone River, revealed...
  • Analysis confirms dairy farming in prehistoric Finland

    08/02/2014 9:04:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Wednesday, July 30, 2014 | University of Bristol
    By comparing the residues found in the walls of cooking pots from two separate eras and cultures, dating to circa 3900 BC to 3300 BC and circa 2500 BC, the more recent pottery fragments showed evidence of milk fats. This coincided with the transition from a culture of hunting and fishing – relying mainly on marine foods – to the arrival of ‘Corded Ware’ settlements which we now know saw the introduction of animal domestication. Lead author Dr Lucy Cramp, from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bristol University, said: “This is remarkable evidence which proves that four and...
  • DNA reveals how the Italian Iceman went down fighting

    08/12/2003 1:49:37 PM PDT · by Pokey78 · 27 replies · 571+ views
    The Independent (U.K.) ^ | 08/13/03 | Peter Popham
    Italy's prehistoric Iceman was murdered by an arrow in the back, despite the efforts of a companion to save him. But although he apparently died fleeing from a skirmish, he did not give up without a fight. He bore traces of the blood of four other men on his weapons and clothes, three of whom he had killed or wounded. These are among the startling findings of Dr Tom Loy of Queensland University in Brisbane, Australia, published this week after analysis of blood traces found on the 5,300-year- old mummy, which was dug out of the Alpine ice 12 years...
  • Italy's 5,000-Year-Old Iceman Put Up a Fight [DNA of 4 foes, venison and ibex his final meal]

    08/14/2003 6:39:27 PM PDT · by SJackson · 33 replies · 966+ views
    Reuters/Yahoo ^ | 8-11-03 | Shasta Darlington
    ROME (Reuters) - A prehistoric Italian iceman nicknamed "Otzi" may have been shot in the back with an arrow, but he only died after prolonged combat with his foes, new DNA evidence has shown. Reuters Photo Missed Tech Tuesday? Check out the powerful new PDA crop, plus the best buys for any budget The 5,000-year-old corpse, dug out of a glacier in northern Italy more than a decade ago, had traces of blood from four different people on his clothes and weapons, molecular archeologist Tom Loy said Wednesday. He also had "defensive cut wounds" on his hands, wrists and rib...
  • Iceman's Stomach Sampled—Filled With Goat Meat

    06/28/2011 8:44:47 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 44 replies
    news.nationalgeographic ^ | June 23, 2011 | Ker Than
    Hours before he died, "Ötzi" the Iceman gorged on the fatty meat of a wild goat, according to a new analysis of the famous mummy's stomach contents. The frozen body of the Copper Age hunter was discovered in 1991 in the Alps of northern Italy, where he died some 5,000 years ago. The circumstances surrounding Ötzi's death are not fully known, but the most popular theory—based in part on the discovery of an arrowhead in his back—is that he was murdered by other hunters while fleeing through the mountains. Scientists previously analyzed the contents of Ötzi's lower intestine and determined...
  • Scientists finally determine iceman Otzi's last meal [Ice Man]

    06/22/2011 8:07:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | June 22, 2011 | by Deborah Braconnier
    In a presentation at the Seventh World Congress on Mummy Studies, researchers from the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman revealed that they had finally located the iceman known as Otzi’s stomach and determined his last meal. They were also able to successfully sequence his entire genome. Researchers from the Institute for Mummies and the Iceman in Italy divided the presentation into three different topics. The first part of the presentation was given by microbiologist Frank Maixner. He had recently examined old tomography scans taken of Otzi back in 2005 and was able to finally locate the stomach which was...
  • The Iceman's Last Meal

    06/20/2011 5:57:50 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 25 replies
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 20 June 2011 | Heather Pringle
    Less than 2 hours before he hiked his last steps in the Tyrolean Alps 5000 years ago, Ötzi the Iceman fueled up on a last meal of ibex meat. That was the conclusion of a talk here last week at the 7th World Congress on Mummy Studies, during which researchers—armed with Ötzi's newly sequenced genome and a detailed dental analysis—also concluded that the Iceman had brown eyes and probably wasn't much of a tooth brusher. The Iceman, discovered in the Italian Alps in 1991 some 5200 years after his death, has been a gold mine of information about Neolithic life,...
  • Iceman Oetzi's Last Supper

    12/01/2008 6:05:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 756+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Monday, December 1, 2008 | adapted from Dickson et al
    From the analysis of the intestinal contents of the 5,200-year-old Iceman from the Eastern Alps, Professor James Dickson from the University of Glasgow in the UK and his team have shed some light on the mummy's lifestyle and some of the events leading up to his death. By identifying six different mosses in his alimentary tract, they suggest that the Iceman may have travelled, injured himself and dressed his wounds. The Iceman is the first glacier mummy to have fragments of mosses in his intestine. This is surprising as mosses are neither palatable nor nutritious and there are few reports...
  • Blood residue from ancient tools reveals clues about past

    07/04/2014 5:45:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    Aiken Standard ^ | Saturday, June 28, 2014 | Dede Biles
    Blood residue on spear points and other ancient stone tools made by American Indians thousands of years ago is providing scientists based at the Savannah River Site with... interesting information that indicates what animals those early people hunted and when huge Pleistocene creatures such as mammoths and mastodons might have ceased to exist... The tools they looked at were made anywhere from 13,000 to 500 or 600 years ago. They were found at a Carolina bay at the Savannah River Site known as Flamingo Bay, at other locations in the CSRA and in the Fort Bragg area in eastern North...
  • Fossilized Human Poop Reveals The Real Paleo Diet (Neanderthals)

    06/26/2014 7:54:45 PM PDT · by blam · 72 replies
    BI - Reuters ^ | 6-26-2014 | Will Dunham
    Will Dunham, Reuters Jun. 26, 2014 Don't laugh, but the discovery of the oldest known human poop is offering valuable scientific insight into the life of Neanderthals who lived in Spain some 50,000 years ago. Scientists said on Wednesday they found five samples of human fecal matter at an archeological site called El Salt, in the floor of a rock shelter where Neanderthals once lived. Analysis of the samples provided a new understanding of the diet of this extinct human species, offering the first evidence that Neanderthals were omnivores who also ate vegetables as part of their meat-heavy diet, they...
  • Omnivore Ancestors? Fifty-thousand-year-old feces suggest Neanderthals ate both meat & vegetables

    06/27/2014 2:46:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    The Scientist ^ | June 26, 2014 | Jyoti Madhusoodanan
    Fossilized feces offer new evidence that Neanderthals ate both meat and plants. Chemical analysis confirmed the oldest-known ancient human fecal matter, according to a study published yesterday (June 25) in PLOS ONE. Previous isotope studies of bones suggested Neanderthals were primarily meat-eaters. Analyses of tartar from their teeth have indicated they may have also eaten plants, although some researchers noted that these plant remains could be traces from the stomach contents of herbivore prey. Stool, however, is "the perfect evidence because you’re sure it was consumed," study author Ainara Sistiaga from the University of La Laguna in Spain told BBC...
  • Neandertals ate their veggies, their feces reveal

    06/28/2014 8:43:41 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Science ^ | Wednesday, June 25, 2015 | Ann Gibbons
    Scientists excavating an archaeological site in southern Spain have finally gotten the real poop on Neandertals, finding that the Caveman Diet for these quintessential carnivores included substantial helpings of vegetables. Using the oldest published samples of human fecal matter, archaeologists have found the first direct evidence that Neandertals in Europe cooked and ate plants about 50,000 years ago... ...the team was able to detect the chemical byproducts created by bacteria in the gut in the digestion of cholesterol from meat, as well as sterols and stanols, which are lipids in plants that are similar to cholesterol. The tests revealed that...
  • Researchers Who Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity - Results Were False/Wrong

    05/18/2014 8:43:16 AM PDT · by blam · 59 replies
    BI ^ | 5-8-2014 | Jennifer Welsh
    Researchers Who Provided Key Evidence For Gluten Sensitivity Have Now Thoroughly Shown That It Doesn't Exist Jennifer WelshMay 15, 2014, 3:37 PMIn one of the best examples of science working, a researcher who provided key evidence of (non-celiac disease) gluten sensitivity recently published follow-up papers that show the opposite. The first follow-up paper came out last year in the journal Gastroenterology. Here's the backstory that makes us cheer: The study was a follow up on a 2011 experiment in the lab of Peter Gibson at Monash University. The scientifically sound — but small — study found that gluten-containing diets can...
  • Debate between Plant based and Paleo Diets

    05/17/2014 10:49:04 AM PDT · by RichardMoore · 117 replies
    youtube.com ^ | Colin Campbell MD
    Debate between plant based diet and Paleo diet.
  • 'Rice theory' explains north-south China cultural differences, study shows

    05/09/2014 8:49:55 AM PDT · by fishtank · 26 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | May 9, 2014 | PhysOrg Dot Com
    'Rice theory' explains north-south China cultural differences, study shows A new cultural psychology study has found that psychological differences between the people of northern and southern China mirror the differences between community-oriented East Asia and the more individualistic ...
  • 'Dutch' Batavians more Roman than thought

    10/23/2009 8:23:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 490+ views
    AlphaGalileo ^ | October 22, 2009 | Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research
    The Batavians, who lived in the Netherlands at the start of the Christian era were far more Roman than was previously thought. After just a few decades of Roman occupation, the Batavians had become so integrated that they cooked, built and bathed in a Roman manner. Dutch researcher Stijn Heeren... studied excavated artefacts and traces of settlements and burial fields in the neighbourhood of Tiel. In Dutch history, the Batavians are often presented as a brave people who resisted a cruel oppressor. But Stijn Heeren has now demonstrated that these 'simple people' also adopted a lot of Roman customs. According...
  • Birthplace of the domesticated chili pepper identified in Mexico

    04/18/2014 9:49:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-18-2014 | by Pat Bailey AND Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    Central-east Mexico gave birth to the domesticated chili pepper—now the world's most widely grown spice crop—reports an international team of researchers, led by a plant scientist at the University of California, Davis. Results from the four-pronged investigation—based on linguistic and ecological evidence as well as the more traditional archaeological and genetic data—suggest a regional, rather than a geographically specific, birthplace for the domesticated chili pepper. That region, extending from southern Puebla and northern Oaxaca to southeastern Veracruz, is further south than was previously thought, the researchers found. The region also is different from areas of origin that have been suggested...
  • Mammoth meals helped early tribes thrive

    04/17/2006 7:13:44 PM PDT · by george76 · 49 replies · 1,199+ views
    The Times ^ | April 18, 2006 | Mark Henderson
    REGULAR meals of mammoth meat helped some early human tribes to expand more quickly than their largely vegetarian contemporaries, according to a genetic study. Human populations in east Asia about 30,000 years ago developed at dramatically different rates, following a pattern that appears to reflect the availability of mammoths and other large game. In the part of the region covering what is now northern China, Mongolia and southern Siberia, vast plains teemed with mammals such as mammoths, mastodons and woolly rhinoceroses and the number of early human beings grew between 34,000 and 20,000 years ago. Further south, where the terrain...
  • Ancient Siberians may have rarely hunted mammoths

    06/15/2013 9:54:20 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | Wednesday, June 12, 2013 | Bruce Bower
    Contrary to their hunting reputation, Stone Age Siberians killed mammoths only every few years when they needed tusks for toolmaking, a new study finds. People living between roughly 33,500 and 31,500 years ago hunted the animals mainly for ivory, say paleontologist Pavel Nikolskiy and archaeologist Vladimir Pitulko of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Hunting could not have driven mammoths to extinction, the researchers report June 5 in the Journal of Archaeological Science. On frigid tundra with few trees, mammoth tusks substituted for wood as a raw material for tools, they propose. Siberian people ate mammoth meat after hunts, but food...
  • DNA study suggests hunting did not kill off mammoth

    09/11/2013 3:59:46 AM PDT · by Renfield · 54 replies
    BBC News ^ | 9-10-2013 | Pallab Ghosh
    Researchers have found evidence to suggest that climate change, rather than humans, was the main factor that drove the woolly mammoth to extinction. A DNA analysis shows that the number of creatures began to decrease much earlier than previously thought as the world's climate changed. It also shows that there was a distinct population of mammoth in Europe that died out around 30,000 years ago. The results have published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The view many researchers had about woolly mammoths is that they were a hardy, abundant species that thrived during their time on the...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • Norwegian army placed on strict vegetarian diet

    11/21/2013 4:30:11 AM PST · by Renfield · 46 replies
    Oslo — The Norwegian military said Tuesday it plans to put its troops on a vegetarian diet once a week in a bid to fight a new kind of enemy -- climate change. The army said its new meatless Mondays are meant to cut its consumption of ecologically unfriendly foods whose production contributes heavily to global warming. "It's a step to protect our climate. The idea is to serve food that's respectful of the environment," spokesman Eystein Kvarving told AFP. The diet has already been introduced at one of Norway's main bases and will soon be rolled out to all...
  • Sweden Becomes First Western Nation to Reject Low-fat Diet Dogma

    11/24/2013 6:50:06 PM PST · by bkopto · 54 replies
    Health Impact News ^ | Nov 24, 2013 | Brian Shilhavy
    Sweden has become the first Western nation to develop national dietary guidelines that reject the popular low-fat diet dogma in favor of low-carb high-fat nutrition advice. The switch in dietary advice followed the publication of a two-year study by the independent Swedish Council on Health Technology Assessment. The committee reviewed 16,000 studies published through May 31, 2013. Butter, olive oil, heavy cream, and bacon are not harmful foods. Quite the opposite. Fat is the best thing for those who want to lose weight. And there are no connections between a high fat intake and cardiovascular disease. On Monday, SBU, the...
  • Neanderthal 'butcher shop' found in France

    09/28/2006 6:05:07 AM PDT · by DaveLoneRanger · 64 replies · 6,753+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | September 27, 2006 | Staff
    French and Belgian archaeologists say they have proof Neanderthals lived in near-tropical conditions near France's Channel coast about 125,000 years ago. In a dig at Caours, near Abbeville, France, archeologists found evidence of a Neanderthal "butcher's shop" to which animals as large as rhinoceros, elephant and aurochs, the forerunner of the cow, were dragged and butchered, The Independent reported Wednesday. Jean-Luc Locht, a Belgian expert in prehistory at the French government's archaeological service, told the newspaper: "This is a very important site, a unique site. It proves Neanderthals thrived in a warm northwest Europe and hunted animals like the rhinoceros...
  • Neanderthal Women Joined Men in the Hunt (Eat your heart out, feminists)

    12/07/2006 5:42:12 AM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 101 replies · 2,229+ views
    The New York Times ^ | December 5, 2006 | NICHOLAS WADE
    A new explanation for the demise of the Neanderthals, the stockily built human species that occupied Europe until the arrival of modern humans 45,000 years ago, has been proposed by two anthropologists at the University of Arizona. Unlike modern humans, who had developed a versatile division of labor between men and women, the entire Neanderthal population seems to have been engaged in a single main occupation, the hunting of large game, the scientists, Steven L. Kuhn and Mary C. Stiner, say in an article posted online yesterday in Current Anthropology. Because modern humans exploited the environment more efficiently, by having...
  • Doctoral Student Makes Discovery On Neanderthal Eating Habits

    02/07/2008 3:01:50 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 1,547+ views
    G W Hatchett.com ^ | 2-7-2008 | Michael Moffett
    Doctoral student makes discovery on Neanderthal eating habits by Michael Moffett Hatchet Reporter Issue date: 2/7/08 A doctoral student studying hominid paleobiology has pioneered a method for analyzing reindeer bones from around 65,000 to 12,000 years ago, an accomplishment that allows scientists to further understand the eating habits of early humans. Early humans flocked to reindeer meat when the temperature dropped, J. Tyler Faith discovered. "We see a steady increase in the abundance of reindeer, associated with declines in summer temperature," Faith said. Faith analyzed bones from the Grotte XVI archaeological site in southern France in order to better understand...