Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history — the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Clemson's first harvest of ancient Southern wheat exceeds expectations

    06/20/2016 10:37:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    phys.org ^ | 06-20-2016 | by Jim Melvin & Provided by: Clemson University
    Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Credit: Scott Miller / Clemson University ================================================================================================= The first step of an ongoing-process designed to bring a valuable heirloom wheat back from the brink of extinction has been completed with flying colors. Last month, Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Purple Straw is the only heirloom wheat to have been cultivated continually in the South from...
  • Oldest noodles unearthed in China

    10/12/2005 1:36:46 PM PDT · by bigmac0707 · 78 replies · 1,386+ views
    BBC News ^ | 9/12/05 | BBC News
    Oldest noodles unearthed in China Late Neolithic noodles: They may settle the origin debate The 50cm-long, yellow strands were found in a pot that had probably been buried during a catastrophic flood. Radiocarbon dating of the material taken from the Lajia archaeological site on the Yellow River indicates the food was about 4,000 years old. Scientists tell the journal Nature that the noodles were made using grains from millet grass - unlike modern noodles, which are made with wheat flour. The discovery goes a long way to settling the old argument over who first created the string-like food. Professor Houyuan...
  • Ancient, still-edible chunk of butter unearthed in Irish bog

    06/14/2016 10:22:57 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    Fox News ^ | Published June 14, 2016 | By James Rogers
    The 2,000 year-old bog butter found in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1 (Cavan County Museum/Copper Tree Photography). ============================================================================================ Would you eat ancient butter? A 2,000-year-old 20-pound chunk of butter has been unearthed from a peat bog in Ireland, which is said to still be edible. The large lump of butter was discovered by farmer Jack Conway while cutting turf for fuel in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1. The strange rugby-ball shaped object was buried about 16 feet down in the bog. Conway quickly realized that he had found what is known as ‘bog butter’ and contacted...
  • 64-year-old tub of lard found in Germany -- still edible

    02/01/2012 4:54:40 PM PST · by Kartographer · 78 replies
    A German pensioner who had kept a tub of lard in his cupboard for 64 years, took it to authorities who pronounced it very much fit for consumption -- if a little tasteless. Retired chemist Hans Feldmeier, 87, told AFP he had received the pig fat as a student in 1948 near the northern city of Rostock as part of the post-war US aid programme.
  • Turf Cutters Unearth Prehistoric Lump Of Bog Butter [Ireland]

    06/12/2016 5:52:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | June 9, 2016 | unattributed
    A prehistoric 10 kilo lump of bog butter thought to have been a gift to the gods has been found by turf cutters. The creamy white dairy product, which smells like a strong cheese and is believed to be about 2,000 years old, was unearthed by Jack Conway, from Maghera, Co Cavan, while he worked on Emlagh bog in Co Meath last week. The find, while not unusual, has been given to the National Museum where it will be preserved. Andy Halpin, assistant keeper in the museum's Irish Antiquities Division, said the discovery was significant because it was found in...
  • 'Bog butter' from 3,000 BC found in ancient underground store

    05/11/2011 1:54:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    IrishCentral.com ^ | Friday, April 29, 2011 | Cathy Hayes
    Peat cutter said the ancient food still smells of dairy Over 100 pounds of "bog butter" have been discovered in Tullamore, County Offaly. This ancient food substance, thought to been buried as a form of refrigeration, is thought to be 5,000 years old, dating from the Iron Age. Brian Clancy and his uncle Joe were cutting turf in Ballard Bog when they made the discovery. Joe explained "We were cutting turf and I found what looked like a huge piece of timber...We took it out with a spade and it turned out to be bog butter." Speaking to the Irish...
  • 3,000 yr old butter discovered in Ireland [smashing all the lies of the Evolutionists!!!] ;')

    08/20/2009 6:10:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 101 replies · 2,451+ views
    Thai-Indian ^ | Thursday, August 20, 2009 | ANI
    Two workers have discovered an oak barrel, full of butter, estimated to be roughly 3,000 years old, in Gilltown bog, between Timahoe and Staplestown, in Ireland. According to a report in Leinster Leader, the amazing discovery of the barrel, which is being described by archaeology experts in the National Museum as a "really fine example" was found by two Bord na Mona workers... What they found was an oak barrel, cut out of a trunk, full of butter. It was largely intact, except for a gash towards the bottom of it caused by the harrow. It was head down, and...
  • Mysteries Of Bog Butter Uncovered (NOTICE: Some photos may be disturbing)

    03/20/2004 5:26:34 PM PST · by blam · 50 replies · 767+ views
    Nature ^ | 3-17-2004 | Philip Ball
    Mysteries of bog butter uncoveredWax found in Celtic bogs is the remains of ancient meat and milk. 17 March 2004 PHILIP BALL Peat cutters often stumble on chunks of butter in the bogs. © Stockbyte Chemical detectives have traced deposits of fat in Scottish peat bogs to foodstuffs buried by people hundreds of years ago. The 'bog butter' is the remains of both dairy products and meat encased in the peat, say Richard Evershed of the University of Bristol and colleagues. Those who live in the countryside of Ireland and Scotland and dig up chunks of peat for fuel have...
  • 'Farming in India began much earlier'

    12/05/2006 10:59:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 403+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 3, 2006 | HT Correspondent
    Professor VD Mishra said that new researches have revealed that agricultural practices in India started in Mesolithic period (6-7,000 BC), much before the Neolithic period (4000 BC) as is generally believed. This discovery has proved that agriculture in India started simultaneously with other parts of the world. He said that Sativa rice, discovered from excavations at Chopni in Belan valley, has proved that India did not lag behind in agriculture... Joshi said that encroachments around historical monuments should be stopped because it harms our heritage. Citing an example, he said that Gwalior Fort could not be declared World Heritage due...
  • SEE IT: Japanese high school students hatch a baby chick without a shell

    06/08/2016 1:21:51 PM PDT · by EinNYC · 22 replies
    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS ^ | June 8, 2016 | MOLLY CRANE-NEWMAN
    What an eggsperiment! A group of high school students in Japan have made an incredible discovery - they've figured out how to hatch a perfectly healthy chick from an egg without the shell. The discovery is so significant, the students' findings have been published in a scientific journal. The experiment - which was filmed and then shared on YouTube - consists of a few very simple steps and takes less than one month. By day three - the little chick's heart had formed, and by day five, the outline of its body could be seen. In just three weeks, a...
  • 5,000-Year-Old Beer Recipe Had Secret Ingredient

    05/24/2016 7:14:00 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    discovery.com ^ | May 24, 2016 09:42 AM ET | Tom Metcalfe, Live Science
    Scientists conducted tests on ancient pottery jars and funnels found at the Mijiaya archaeological site in China’s Shaanxi province. The analyses revealed traces of oxalate — a beer-making byproduct that forms a scale called “beerstone” in brewing equipment — as well as residues from a variety of ancient grains and plants. These grains included broomcorn millets, an Asian wild grain known as “Job’s tears,” tubers from plant roots, and barley. Barley is used to make beer because it has high levels of amylase enzymes that promote the conversion of starches into sugars during the fermenting process. It was first cultivated...
  • Researchers Have Finally Solved The Mystery Of The Irish Potato Famine

    05/24/2013 9:45:13 AM PDT · by blam · 31 replies
    http://www.livescience.com ^ | 5-24-2013 | Denise Chow
    Researchers Have Finally Solved The Mystery Of The Irish Potato Famine Denise Chow, LiveScience May 24, 2013, 12:03 PM The Irish potato famine that caused mass starvation and approximately 1 million deaths in the mid-19th century was triggered by a newly identified strain of potato blight that has been christened "HERB-1," according to a new study. An international team of molecular biologists studied the historical spread of Phytophthora infestans, a funguslike organism that devastated potato crops and led to the famine in Ireland. The precise strain of the pathogen that caused the devastating outbreak, which lasted from 1845 to 1852,...
  • The Sinister, Secret History Of A Food That Everybody Loves [the Curse of the Potato]

    05/23/2016 4:55:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 75 replies
    Washington Post 'blogs ^ | April 25, 2016 | Jeff Guo
    "The Spaniards were much impressed with the productivity of manioc in Arawak agriculture in the Greater Antilles," historian Jonathan Sauer recounts in his history of crop plants. "[A Spanish historian] calculated that 20 persons working 6 hours a day for a month could plant enough yuca to provide cassava bread for a village of 300 persons for 2 years." By all accounts, the Taíno were prosperous -- "a well-nourished population of over a million people," according to Sauer. And yet... lacked the monumental architecture of the Maya or the mathematical knowledge of the Aztec. And most importantly, they were not organized in...
  • Chinese archaeologists discover 8,000-year-old paddy

    05/10/2016 12:32:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    China Daily ^ | May 6, 2016 | Xinhua
    Chinese archaeologists said they have found a paddy dating back more than 8,000 years, which could be the earliest wet rice farming site in the world. The field, covering less than 100 square meters, was discovered at the neolithic ruins of Hanjing in Sihong county in East China's Jiangsu province in November 2015, according to a spokesman with the archeology institute of Nanjing Museum. At a seminar held in late April to discuss findings at the Hanjing ruins, more than 70 scholars from universities, archeology institutes and museums across the country concluded that the wet rice field was the oldest...
  • Fat? Maybe you can’t blame your genes after all

    05/02/2016 9:14:49 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 28 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 05/02/16 | Patrick Hahn
    An impressive array of brainpower —“Fat? Blame your genes, say doctors” —“Overweight? Maybe you really can blame your genes” —“Blame your genes for obesity” Headlines such as these have become a staple of science and health journalism. Are they right? Are obese people really helpless victims of their genes? Let us begin by distinguishing between “monogenic” obesity and what scientists call “common” obesity. Monogenic obesity, as the name implies, is caused by a mutation in a single gene, which is inherited in a Mendelian fashion, just as conditions such as sickle-cell anemia and cystic fibrosis are. In the case of...
  • Editorial: The heretical Minnesota heart study: When science stops asking questions

    04/30/2016 4:16:08 AM PDT · by rellimpank · 31 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | 30 apr 2016
    In the second half of the 20th century, conventional wisdom in the medical community held that overconsumption of saturated fats — the kind found in milk, cheese, meats and butter — was dangerous. And so, between 1968 and 1973, a well-planned, well-executed study involving more than 9,000 patients was performed to test this widely accepted relationship between diet and heart disease. The results of the Minnesota Coronary Experiment were notable for two reasons. First, the findings contradicted much of what was believed at the time: The study demonstrated that people who ate a diet rich in saturated fats did not...
  • High Alpine Dairying May Have Begun Over 3000 Years Ago

    04/26/2016 11:30:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | April 22, 2016 | Beth Jones, PLOS.org
    Dairy fats on Iron Age pottery sherds, evidence of pre-historic origin for dairying. The discovery of dairy fats on ancient pottery may indicate dairying high in the Alps occurred as early as the Iron Age over 3000 years ago, according to a study published April 21, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Francesco Carrer from the University of York, UK, and colleagues. Dairy farming has long been an important economic and cultural tradition in the European high Alps, but little is known about when and how the practice originated. Using organic residue analysis, the authors of the present...
  • ‘Be cheerful, live your life:’ Ancient mosaic ‘meme’ found in Turkey’s south

    04/23/2016 2:02:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | April 20, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    Demet Kara, an archaeologist from the Hatay Archaeology Museum, said the mosaic, which was called the “skeleton mosaic,” belonged to the dining room of a house from the 3rd century B.C., as new findings have been unearthed in the ancient city of Antiocheia. “There are three scenes on glass mosaics made of black tiles. Two things are very important among the elite class in the Roman period in terms of social activities: The first is the bath and the second is dinner. In the first scene, a black person throws fire. That symbolizes the bath. In the middle scene, there...
  • Archaeobeer (Brewers and Vintner's thread)

    04/08/2016 2:04:46 PM PDT · by taxcontrol · 19 replies
    Brew your own ^ | September 2007 | Dan Mouer
    Back in the day - we're talking WAY back in the day - beer was brewed with malt, and bread, and honey and wine . . . and just about anything that could be fermented. How the ancients brewed - and how you can too! Archaeology and beer seem to go together, and it’s not just because a cold brew helps wash the dust from your teeth after a long day on the digs. I’m an archaeologist by profession and a homebrewer by avocation. Lots of archaeologists brew their own, and those who don’t often have a passion for more...
  • Why I Don't Buy Organic, And Why You Might Not Want To Either

    03/21/2016 6:33:08 PM PDT · by MtnClimber · 90 replies
    Forbes ^ | 10 Mar, 2016 | Steven Savage
    I don’t buy organic foods. In fact I specifically avoid doing so. It’s not my place to tell anyone else what to do, but I’d like to lay out three, seriously considered factors that have shaped my personal stance on organic: 1. Informed confidence that we are safe buying “conventional” foods 2. Recognizing that some of the best farming practices from an environmental perspective are not always allowed or practical under the organic rules 2.An ethical problem with the tactics that some organic advocates and marketers employ which seriously misrepresents their “conventional” competition...... As for the safety issue. When most...
  • Neanderthals diet: 80% meat, 20% vegetables

    03/20/2016 5:22:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 50 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 14, 2016 | Senckenberg Research Institute and Natural History Museum
    Scientists from the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment (HEP) in Tübingen have studied the Neanderthals' diet. Based on the isotope composition in the collagen from the prehistoric humans' bones, they were able to show that, while the Neanderthals' diet consisted primarily of large plant eaters such at mammoths and rhinoceroses, it also included vegetarian food. The associated studies were recently published in the scientific journals Journal of Human Evolution and Quaternary International. The paleo-diet is one of the new trends among nutrition-conscious people -- but what exactly did the meal plan of our extinct ancestors include? "We have...
  • How lager conquered the world: Food historian argues it globally dominated because it’s ‘clean’

    03/12/2016 6:05:35 PM PST · by rickmichaels · 39 replies
    National Post ^ | March 11, 2016 | Joseph Brean
    Like a Big Mac or a Coke, a Budweiser is one of the global economy’s more reliable pleasures, cheaply available almost everywhere. Historically, like the double-pattie burger and the iconic cola, the global dominance of light, fizzy, relatively bland, central European-style lager — from Budweiser to Molson and Corona — relied as much on cleanliness and consistency as it did on taste, as anyone who has tasted a Bud can tell you. In a talk to a gastronomy conference at the University of Toronto Mississauga this weekend, food historian Jeffrey Pilcher will argue that lager conquered the world, after first...
  • Ancient Grave of Teenage Girl May Reveal Secrets of Southwest’s Earliest Farmers

    02/27/2016 4:44:56 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 20 replies
    Archaeologists working in the borderlands of northern Mexico have uncovered a camp used by ancient hunters as much as 10,500 years ago, revealing insights into some of the earliest human history in the Greater Southwest. On a ranch near the Santa Maria River in northern Chihuahua, researchers have unearthed more than 18,000 artifacts, including thousands of stone flakes, cores, and hammers, along with 370 projectile points, and a dozen stone ovens. But the most surprising find has been the grave of a teenage girl, who was interred among the rocks, alone and unadorned, some 3,200 years ago.
  • Did Humans Kill Huge Animals in Snowmass 50,000 Years Ago?

    02/19/2016 1:40:44 AM PST · by SteveH · 31 replies
    Aspen Journalism ^ | July 3, 2013 | Allan Best
    Do earthquakes explain all those mastodon bones at Snowmass? Not likely, say scientists, although they haven’t completely shelved the idea. And did humans kill a mammoth 50,000 years ago and then cache the meat for later use? Circumstantial evidence of rocks intermixed with bones suggests that was the case. If so, it would rank as one of the major scientific discoveries of the decade, putting people on the North American continent some 36,000 years earlier than what is now generally agreed upon by archaeologists. That intriguing idea also remains on the shelf, just beyond touch for lack of corroborating evidence.
  • French wine 'has Italian origins' [Etruscans]

    06/08/2013 7:40:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    BBC News ^ | Monday, June 3, 2013 | Jason Palmer
    The earliest known examples of wine-making as we know it are in the regions of modern-day Iran, Georgia, and Armenia -- and researchers believe that modern winemaking slowly spread westward from there to Europe... The Etruscans, a pre-Roman civilisation in Italy, are thought to have gained wine culture from the Phoenicians -- who spread throughout the Mediterranean from the early Iron Age onward -- because they used similarly shaped amphoras... Dr McGovern's team focused on the coastal site of Lattara, near the town of Lattes south of Montpellier, where the importation of amphoras continued up until the period 525-475 BC....
  • Dietler Discovers Statue In France That Reflects Etruscan Influence

    02/19/2004 3:22:01 PM PST · by blam · 4 replies · 359+ views
    University Of Chicago Chronicle ^ | 2-19-2004 | William Harms
    Dietler discovers statue in France that reflects an Etruscan influence By William Harms News Office This image depicts the reconstruction of the statue Michael Dietler found at Lattes in southern France. An image of the statue is positioned in the torso area of the figure of the warrior." A life-sized statue of a warrior discovered in southern France reflects a stronger cultural influence for the Etruscan civilization throughout the western Mediterranean region than previously appreciated. Michael Dietler, Associate Professor in Anthropology, and his French colleague Michel Py have published a paper in the British journal Antiquity on the Iron Age...
  • Remains of earliest known massacre victims uncovered in Kenya

    01/21/2016 2:13:42 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 23 replies
    Fox News ^ | January 21, 2016 | Fox News
    Scientists say they have uncovered the remains of the earliest known massacre victims, dating from approximately 10,000 years ago. Archaeologists believe the victims were members of an extended family group of hunter-gatherers who were slaughtered by a rival group.
  • Breeding wildness back into our fruit and veggies

    02/12/2016 9:24:30 PM PST · by JimSEA · 47 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 2/9/16 | Newcastle University
    Wild tomatoes are better able to protect themselves against the destructive whitefly than our modern, commercial varieties, new research has shown. The study, published today in the academic journal Agronomy for Sustainable Development, shows that in our quest for larger redder, longer-lasting tomatoes we have inadvertently bred out key characteristics that help the plant defend itself against predators. Dual mode of resistance in wild tomatoes Led by Newcastle University, UK, the research shows that wild tomatoes have a dual line of defence against these voracious pests; an initial mechanism which discourages the whitefly from settling on the plant in the...
  • 200,000 fish bones suggest ancient Scandinavian people were more complex than thought

    02/08/2016 10:58:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | February 8, 2016 | Elsevier
    200,000 fish bones discovered in and around a pit in Sweden suggest that the people living in the area more than 9000 years ago were more settled and cultured than we previously thought. Research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science suggests people were storing large amounts of fermented food much earlier than experts thought. The new paper reveals the earliest evidence of fermentation in Scandinavia, from the Early Mesolithic time period, about 9,200 years ago. The author of the study, from Lund University in Sweden, say the findings suggest that people who survived by foraging for food were actually...
  • Mead, drink of vikings, comes out of the Dark Ages

    12/29/2010 10:09:41 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 67 replies · 3+ views
    hosted ^ | Dec 29 | ALLEN G. BREED
    PITTSBORO, N.C. (AP) -- Mead, that drink of viking saga and medieval verse, is making a comeback. But this ain't your ancestors' honey wine. "It's not just for the Renaissance fair anymore," says Becky Starr, co-owner of Starrlight Mead, which recently opened in an old woven label mill in this little North Carolina town. In fact, this most ancient of alcoholic libations hasn't been this hot since Beowulf slew Grendel's dam and Geoffrey Chaucer fell in with the Canterbury pilgrims at the Tabard.
  • Eggnog: A Colonial Christmas Tradition (Gen. Washington's Recipe)

    12/17/2005 8:35:25 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 62 replies · 1,292+ views
    MyMerryChristmas.com ^ | December, 2005 | Jeff Westover
    The General's Eggnog One quart of cream One quart of milk A dozen eggs One pint of brandy A half pint of rye A quarter pint of rum A quarter pint of sherry Christmas of 1826 was snowy, cold and lonely for the cadets of West Point. Though called "men" they were really teenage boys -- some as young as 17 -- and they wanted to celebrate Christmas. Young Jefferson Davis, future president of the Confederate States of America, was amongst them. But West Point then, as it is now, was a house of order and discipline. The military...
  • A Mysterious Mammoth Carcass Could Change Human History

    01/14/2016 8:42:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 108 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 01/14/2016 | Maddie Stone
    The carcass was remarkably well preserved, but something was clearly wrong. A rounded hole through the interior jugal. Deep incisions along the ribs. Dents in the left scapula. A broken mandible. This 45,000 year-old mammoth's life ended violently at the hands of hunters. That wouldn't be surprising-it's well known that Pleistocene humans were expert mammoth killers=but for the location. It was excavated from a permafrost embankment at Yenisei bay, a remote spot in central Siberia where a massive river empties into the Arctic Ocean. That makes this brutalized mammoth the oldest evidence for human expansion into the high Arctic by...
  • Were Panamanian islanders dolphin hunters?

    01/07/2016 11:49:33 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | January 6th, 2016 | Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    Precolombian seafarers left what is now mainland Panama to settle on Pedro Gonzalez Island in the Perlas archipelago about 6,000 years ago, crossing 50-70 kilometers (31-44 miles) of choppy seas -- probably in dugout canoes. Dolphins were an important part of the diet of island residents according to Smithsonian archeologist Richard Cooke and colleagues from the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA and Colombia's Universidad del Norte... According to the results of recent excavations, published in Journal of Archaeological Science Reports, 8 percent of the mammal specimens -- bones and teeth -- recovered from a prehistoric scrap heap, or midden,...
  • The Iceman's Stomach Bugs Offer Clues to Ancient Human Migration

    01/07/2016 7:00:24 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 25 replies
    smithsonianmag ^ | 01/07/2016 | Brian Handwerk
    Otzi the legendary “Iceman” wasn't alone when he was mummified on a glacier 5,300 years ago. With him were gut microbes known to cause some serious tummy trouble. These bacteria, Helicobacter pylori, are providing fresh evidence about Otzi's diet and poor health in the days leading up to his murder. Intriguingly, they could also help scientists better understand who his people were and how they came to live in the region. ... Discovered in the 1990s, Otzi lived in what are today the Eastern Italian Alps, where he was naturally mummified by ice after his violent death. The body is...
  • I Now Drink My Coffee Black

    01/04/2016 8:08:11 PM PST · by SamAdams76 · 117 replies
    "Harry, I'm going to let you in on a little secret: every day, once a day, give yourself a present. Don't plan it; don't wait for it; just let it happen. It could be a new shirt in a men's store, a catnap in your office chair, or two cups of good, hot, black, coffee." Never thought I'd say this but after decades of having a little coffee with my cream and sugar, I started drinking my coffee black as midnight on a new moon. This was no gradual transition. I did it cold turkey and on the spur...
  • Tree Grown From Ancient Seed Found in Jewish Fortress

    06/13/2008 10:01:24 AM PDT · by mware · 37 replies · 56+ views
    Fox News ^ | Friday, June 13, 2008 | By Clara Moskowitz
    Scientists have grown a tree from what may be the oldest seed ever germinated. The new sapling was sprouted from a 2,000-year-old date palm excavated in Masada, the site of a cliff-side fortress in Israel where ancient Jews are said to have killed themselves to avoid capture by Roman invaders. Dubbed the "Methuselah Tree" after the oldest person in the Bible, the new plant has been growing steadily, and after 26 months, the tree was nearly four feet (1.2 meters) tall.
  • Ancient Seeds Yield Once Extinct Squash

    01/01/2016 8:36:56 AM PST · by Popman · 131 replies
    Wimp ^ | NOV 24, 2015 | Jake Brannon:
    Students from Winnipeg, Canada recently discovered a stash of 800-year-old seeds while on an archaeological dig. The mysterious seeds, once planted, grew into a rare species of squash that has been extinct for hundreds of years. While we don't know if the seeds themselves were safe to eat, the squash that they harvested was absolutely delicious. Check out the images below to see the rare gourd for yourself and learn more about this discovery.
  • How a Ship Full of Fish Helped Recreate an Ancient Fish Sauce

    03/06/2012 10:18:22 AM PST · by Renfield · 20 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 3-1-2012 | Peter Smith
    If you’re like me, the last post on the convoluted origins of our favorite fermented condiment—ketchup—probably left you wondering: What is the difference between Roman garum than modern Thai fish sauce? What little I know comes from an experiment performed by Sally Grainger, author of Cooking Apicus, recounted in the book Cured, Fermented and Smoked Foods. Grainger is a British chef and an experimental archeologist. She looked at studies on fish sauce amphorae (ceramic vessels) from archeological sites in Spain and North Africa. One of her more fascinating sources comes from a 2,000-year-old shipwreck discovered off the coast of Grado,...
  • Roman Shipwreck Discovered Near Aeolian Islands

    07/02/2010 5:59:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | July 2010 | unattributed
    The wreck of a Roman ship from the first century AD which is still whole and has over 500 wide-mouthed amphorae onboard has been discovered to the south of the island of Panarea... [announced] by the Regional Councillor for Cultural Heritage, Gaetano Armao, and by the Superintendent, Sebastiano Tusa. ''From the first surveys,'' said Tusa, ''we can establish that it is a merchant shipping measuring around 25 metres, in perfect condition, which transported fruit and vegetables from Sicily to the markets in the north. The style of the amphorae is in fact typical of the 'workshops' of the island and...
  • Waiter, There's a Fish in My Wine!

    01/31/2005 1:44:55 PM PST · by Junior · 46 replies · 923+ views
    Oddly Enough, Reuters ^ | Mon Jan 31,10:36 AM ET
    BEIJING (Reuters) - The French used grapes, Russians fermented potatoes, Koreans put ginseng in their drink and Mexicans distilled cactus plants to make fiery tequila. Now China is introducing fish wine. Sun Keman, an entrepreneur in the northeastern port city of Dalian, has formed the Dalian Fisherman's Song Maritime Biological Brewery, with a plan to use his background in the fishing industry to make fish into wine. "Different from China's thousands of years of brewing, the brewery will clean, boil, and ferment fish for making wine," the official Xinhua news agency reported. The company already had orders from Japan, Russia...
  • Sunken haul of Roman fish sauce found off Italy

    12/12/2015 4:36:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | Decenber 11, 2015 | unattributed
    In spite of the mystery that usually surrounds ancient shipwrecks, it is almost certain that the ship was sailing a route between Italy, Spain and Portugal in order to transport a precious cargo of Roman garum. The clue lies in the shape of the clay jars, as the sauce itself has all since seeped into the sea. "After we filmed the wreck and analyzed an amphora [clay jar] and some fragments that a robotic craft brought back to the surface, we realized the ship was carrying a huge quantity of fish sauce when it sank," said Trigona. "The amphora are...
  • The first inter-cultural ‘party’ in Europe?

    12/07/2015 10:44:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 6, 2015 | Francesco Iacono
    The sharing of food and alcoholic beverages is extremely important today as in the past because provides a wealth of information on societies where this occurred. So far however, most of these practices known through archaeology have been primarily those undertaken by people from the same individual community or regional district. The Bronze Age site of Roca (2) in Southern Italy, has produced clear evidence for the existence at this place of one of the earliest inter-cultural feasting 'party' in Mediterranean Europe, dating to c.a. 1200 BC. This small (about 3 hectares nowadays, although it was larger in the past)...
  • The Cold Snap That Civilised The World

    02/23/2002 2:33:42 PM PST · by blam · 95 replies · 2,860+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 2-22-2002 | David Derbyshire
    The cold snap that civilised the world By David Derbyshire, Science Correspondent (Filed: 22/02/2002) A SUDDEN drop in temperatures 5,000 years ago ushered in the modern climate and may have encouraged the development of complex civilisations around the world. Researchers studying ancient fish bones off the coast of Peru say the temperature fall heralded El Nino, the periodical warming of the Pacific which brings unusual weather patterns every two to seven years. The rapidly changing weather, which followed several thousand years of post-Ice Age stability, triggered a new temple building culture in South America. Elsewhere, it may have forced Stone ...
  • New way to make yeast hybrids may inspire new brews, biofuels

    12/04/2015 1:18:16 PM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 4, 2015 | by Terry Devitt & Provided by: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Orange-colored galls, such as these pictured in 2010, from the beech tree forests of Patagonia have been found to harbor the yeast that makes lager beer possible. Five hundred years ago, in the age of sail and when the trans-Atlantic trade was just beginning, the yeast somehow made its way from Patagonia to the caves and monastery cellars of Bavaria where the first lager beers were fermented. University of Wisconsin-Madison Genetics Professor Chris Todd Hittinger and colleagues have discovered a quick and efficient way to fuse different strains of yeast to make hybrids similar to the lager beer hybrid, an...
  • Oldest Peach Pits Found in China [ > 2 million yrs old ]

    12/02/2015 11:43:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Tuesday December 1, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The oldest peach pits have been found near a bus station in China, according to a new study that sheds new light on the little-known evolutionary history of the fruit. The eight fossilized peach endocarps, or pits, date back more than two and a half million years. They were found by Tao Su, associate professor at Xishuangbanna Tropical Botanical Garden, when road construction near his house in Kunming, capital of Yunnan in southwest China, exposed a rock outcrop from the late Pliocene. Preserved within the Pliocene layers, the fossils looked "strikingly modern," according to Su. With colleague Peter Wilf, a...
  • Israel Aims to Recreate Wine That Jesus and King David Drank

    11/30/2015 6:28:11 PM PST · by SJackson · 41 replies
    NY Times ^ | NOV. 29, 2015 | JODI RUDOREN
    HEFER VALLEY, Israel — The new crisp, acidic and mineral white from a high-end Israeli winery was aged for eight months — or, depending on how you look at it, at least 1,800 years. The wine, called marawi and released last month by Recanati Winery, is the first commercially produced by Israel’s growing modern industry from indigenous grapes. It grew out of a groundbreaking project at Ariel University in the occupied West Bank that aims to use DNA testing to identify — and recreate — ancient wines drunk by the likes of King David and Jesus Christ. Eliyashiv Drori, the...
  • U.S. Cattle Futures Slide Limit-Down, Sending Hog Prices Sharply Lower

    11/21/2015 11:40:43 AM PST · by jjotto · 32 replies
    NASDAQ ^ | November 16, 2015 | Kelsey Gee
    [Excerpt and link] ...Live-cattle futures for December fell 3 cents, or 2.3%, to $1.27675 a pound, after declining 3.1% over the past week on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Cattle futures for February were also limit-down, dropping 2.3% to $1.2965 a pound. Feeder-cattle futures for November fell 2.775 cents to $1.7230 a pound. Other feeder-cattle futures were limit-down... ...December lean hogs fell 3 cents, or 5.5%, to 51.80 cents a pound, a fresh six-year low...
  • Ancient Canals Reveal Underpinnings of Early Andean Civilization

    05/12/2007 6:38:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 444+ views
    Newswise ^ | Tuesday, November 29, 2005 | Vanderbilt University
    The discovery by Vanderbilt University anthropologist Tom Dillehay and his colleagues, Herbert Eling, Instituto Naciona de Anthropolotica e Historia in Coahulila, Mexico, and Jack Rossen, Ithaca College, was reported in the Nov. 22 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The anthropologists discovered the canals in Peru's upper middle Zana Valley, approximately 60 kilometers east of the Pacific coast. Preliminary results indicate one of the canals is over 6,700 years old, while another has been confirmed to be over 5,400 years old. They are the oldest such canals yet discovered in South America... Dillehay and his team...
  • Evidence Found for Canals That Watered Ancient Peru

    01/03/2006 3:43:00 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 23 replies · 823+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 3, 2006 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Photograph courtesy of Tom D. DillehayRUNNING WATER The sites of ancient irrigation canals. People in Peru's Zańa Valley dug the canals as early as 6,700 years ago to divert river water to their crops. In the Andean foothills of Peru, not far from the Pacific coast, archaeologists have found what they say is evidence for the earliest known irrigated agriculture in the Americas. An analysis of four derelict canals, filled with silt and buried deep under sediments, showed that they were used to water cultivated fields 5,400 years ago, in one case possibly as early as 6,700 years ago,...