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Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • Fat Cells Are Sensitive to Sunlight

    02/01/2018 10:56:14 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 25 replies
    Sleep Review Magazine ^ | January 31, 2018
    fatcells A study by University of Alberta researchers has shown the fat cells that lie just beneath our skin shrink when exposed to the blue light emitted by the sun. “When the sun’s blue light wavelengths—the light we can see with our eye—penetrate our skin and reach the fat cells just beneath, lipid droplets reduce in size and are released out of the cell. In other words, our cells don’t store as much fat,” says Peter Light, PhD, senior author of the study, who is a professor of pharmacology and the director of UAlberta’s Alberta Diabetes Institute, in a release....
  • Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

    01/18/2018 2:45:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday, January 18, 2018 | Maev Kennedy
    More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago... Archaeologists from three different countries involved in an ongoing excavation have found evidence of a complex of drainage tunnels -- constructed 1,000 years before the famous indoor plumbing of the Minoan palace of Knossos on Crete -- and traces...
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 51 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rønning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • Chinese archaeologists find 2,000-year-old meat soup

    12/17/2016 10:20:36 AM PST · by LouieFisk · 50 replies
    newkerala.com ^ | December 15th 2016 | newkerala.com
    A vessel containing meat soup, prepared more than 2,000 years ago, was discovered during archaeological excavations in China's Henan province, authorities said on Thursday. The stew, containing beef bones and other ingredients, was discovered on Monday at an archaeological tomb site in Chengyang district near the city of Xinyang, Efe news reported.
  • Scientists have isolated the very first rust pathogen gene that wheat plants detect...

    12/21/2017 3:31:44 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    Mr Jiapeng Chen, a PhD candidate from the University of Sydney who initiated the work by sequencing and analysing the genome of a virulent rust isolate, said this was the first important step in addressing the diagnostic challenges posed by ever-changing fungi, which result in new rust pathogen strains. Professor Park explained: "It's like an ongoing arms race - we've got to keep one step ahead of this changing pathogen. "The last major epidemic of wheat stem rust in Australia alone, in 1973, caused $AU300 million in damage - imagine what that would be today." Co-corresponding author, Dr Peter Dodds...
  • Ancient barley took high road to China

    11/26/2017 3:45:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, November 22, 2017 | Washington University in St. Louis
    First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research... "Wheat was introduced to central China in the second or third millennium B.C., but barley did not arrive there until the first millennium B.C.," Liu said. "While previous research suggests wheat cultivation moved east along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, our study calls attention to the possibility of a southern route...
  • Was Johnny Appleseed for real?

    11/26/2017 8:46:53 AM PST · by Kaslin · 29 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 26, 2017
    AN APPLE A DAY may or may not keep the doctor away, but it's a sentiment shared by just about everyone our Mo Rocca has been visiting: At the Johnny Appleseed Festival in Fort Wayne, Ind., there's no such thing as a bad apple. There you can indulge in apple dumplings -- a skinless apple wrapped in dough, and deep-fried. Rocca asked, "How healthy is this? "Very healthy -- it's an apple!" he was told Or partake of apple petals ("Better than apple dumplings!" enthused cutthroat vendor Logan Forbing), and sample some apple sausages. Fort Wayne is where John Chapman...
  • World’s earliest evidence of wine-making found in Georgia

    11/14/2017 6:38:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 20 replies
    AFP ^ | November 14, 2017 | Staff
    he world's earliest evidence of grape wine-making has been detected in 8,000-year-old pottery jars unearthed in Georgia, making the tradition almost 1,000 years older than previously thought, researchers said Monday. Before, the oldest chemical evidence of wine in the Near East dated to 5,400-5,000 BC (about 7,000 years ago) and was from the Zagros Mountains of Iran, said the report in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), a peer-reviewed US journal.
  • Jurassic Farm: Can we bring prehistoric bovines back from extinction?

    09/10/2014 1:40:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    modernfarmer.com ^ | September 10, 2014 | By Kristan Lawson
    The 21st-century back-to-the-farm movement stems from our yearning to escape the artificiality of modern urban life. Yet the domesticated plants and animals now found in most gardens and farms are themselves artificial, the results of extensive human meddling, cross-breeding and genetic manipulation. Mankind began engineering what we now call “farm animals,” including cattle, all the way back in the Neolithic period, between 10,000 and 5,000 B.C. Try as you might, you won’t find an untamed Jersey cow that originated naturally in the wild, because no such thing exists — just like there’s no such thing as a wild labradoodle. Cattle...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...
  • Archaeology: The milk revolution

    08/02/2013 11:45:10 AM PDT · by Renfield · 40 replies
    Nature ^ | 7-31-2013 | Andrew Curry
    In the 1970s, archaeologist Peter Bogucki was excavating a Stone Age site in the fertile plains of central Poland when he came across an assortment of odd artefacts. The people who had lived there around 7,000 years ago were among central Europe's first farmers, and they had left behind fragments of pottery dotted with tiny holes. It looked as though the coarse red clay had been baked while pierced with pieces of straw. Looking back through the archaeological literature, Bogucki found other examples of ancient perforated pottery. “They were so unusual — people would almost always include them in publications,”...
  • Predecessor of Cows, The Aurochs, Were Still Living In The Netherlands Around AD 600

    12/21/2008 10:02:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies · 4,518+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Monday, December 15, 2008 | University of Groningen
    Archaeological researchers at the University of Groningen have discovered that the aurochs, the predecessor of our present-day cow, lived in the Netherlands for longer than originally assumed. Remains of bones recently retrieved from a horn core found in Holwerd (Friesland, Netherlands), show that the aurochs became extinct in around AD 600 and not in the fourth century. The last aurochs died in Poland in 1627... The aurochs was much larger than the common cows we know today, with aurochs bulls measuring between 160 and 180 cm at the withers, and aurochs cows between 140 and 150 cm. The cattle bred...
  • Ancient giant cattle genome first

    02/20/2010 5:30:54 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 28 replies · 878+ views
    bbc ^ | 17 February 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago. They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring....... One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands.... The species became extinct when a female animal died in a forest in Poland in 1627. Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar was said to have been impressed...
  • Scientists in aurochs genome sequence first (wild cattle)

    02/18/2010 3:33:47 AM PST · by decimon · 10 replies · 405+ views
    BBC ^ | Feb 17, 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago.They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring. One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands. The work was carried out at the University College Dublin's Animal Genomics Laboratory and Conway Institute using new technology that allows billions of base pairs of DNA to be...
  • Giant cattle to be bred back from extinction

    01/18/2010 6:38:36 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 54 replies · 2,078+ views
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | Jan. 18, 2010 | Nick Squires
    Aurochs were immortalised in prehistoric cave paintings and admired for their brute strength and "elephantine" size by Julius Caesar. But despite their having gone the way of the dodo and the woolly mammoth, there are plans to bring the giant animals back to life. The huge cattle with sweeping horns which once roamed the forests of Europe have not been seen for nearly 400 years. Now Italian scientists are hoping to use genetic expertise and selective breeding of modern-day wild cattle to recreate the fearsome beasts which weighed around 2,200lb and stood 6.5 feet at the shoulder. Breeds of large...
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • Did the Ancient Israelites Drink Beer?

    09/02/2010 6:53:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    BAR 36:05 ^ | Sep/Oct 2010 | Michael M. Homan
    Ancient Israelites, with the possible exception of a few teetotaling Nazirites and their moms, proudly drank beer -- and lots of it. Men, women and even children of all social classes drank it. Its consumption in ancient Israel was encouraged, sanctioned and intimately linked with their religion. Even Yahweh, according to the Hebrew Bible, consumed at least half a hin of beer (approximately 2 liters, or a six-pack) per day through the cultic ritual of libation, and he drank even more on the Sabbath (Numbers 28:7-10). People who were sad were advised to drink beer to temporarily erase their troubles...
  • Now that really would be vintage vodka!Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouch

    06/30/2016 10:27:15 AM PDT · by dware · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 30 June 2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouched for 300 years (tr)

    06/30/2016 10:31:55 AM PDT · by dware · 19 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 06.30.2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.