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Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • U.S. Cattle Futures Slide Limit-Down, Sending Hog Prices Sharply Lower

    11/21/2015 11:40:43 AM PST · by jjotto · 32 replies
    NASDAQ ^ | November 16, 2015 | Kelsey Gee
    [Excerpt and link] ...Live-cattle futures for December fell 3 cents, or 2.3%, to $1.27675 a pound, after declining 3.1% over the past week on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Cattle futures for February were also limit-down, dropping 2.3% to $1.2965 a pound. Feeder-cattle futures for November fell 2.775 cents to $1.7230 a pound. Other feeder-cattle futures were limit-down... ...December lean hogs fell 3 cents, or 5.5%, to 51.80 cents a pound, a fresh six-year low...
  • Ancient Canals Reveal Underpinnings of Early Andean Civilization

    05/12/2007 6:38:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 444+ views
    Newswise ^ | Tuesday, November 29, 2005 | Vanderbilt University
    The discovery by Vanderbilt University anthropologist Tom Dillehay and his colleagues, Herbert Eling, Instituto Naciona de Anthropolotica e Historia in Coahulila, Mexico, and Jack Rossen, Ithaca College, was reported in the Nov. 22 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The anthropologists discovered the canals in Peru's upper middle Zana Valley, approximately 60 kilometers east of the Pacific coast. Preliminary results indicate one of the canals is over 6,700 years old, while another has been confirmed to be over 5,400 years old. They are the oldest such canals yet discovered in South America... Dillehay and his team...
  • Evidence Found for Canals That Watered Ancient Peru

    01/03/2006 3:43:00 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 23 replies · 823+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 3, 2006 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Photograph courtesy of Tom D. DillehayRUNNING WATER The sites of ancient irrigation canals. People in Peru's Zańa Valley dug the canals as early as 6,700 years ago to divert river water to their crops. In the Andean foothills of Peru, not far from the Pacific coast, archaeologists have found what they say is evidence for the earliest known irrigated agriculture in the Americas. An analysis of four derelict canals, filled with silt and buried deep under sediments, showed that they were used to water cultivated fields 5,400 years ago, in one case possibly as early as 6,700 years ago,...
  • 'Fourth strand' of European ancestry originated with hunter-gatherers isolated by Ice Age

    11/16/2015 1:14:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Monday, November 16, 2015 | University of Cambridge, Nature
    The first sequencing of ancient genomes extracted from human remains that date back to the Late Upper Palaeolithic period over 13,000 years ago has revealed a previously unknown "fourth strand" of ancient European ancestry. This new lineage stems from populations of hunter-gatherers that split from western hunter-gatherers shortly after the 'out of Africa' expansion some 45,000 years ago and went on to settle in the Caucasus region, where southern Russia meets Georgia today. Here these hunter-gatherers largely remained for millennia, becoming increasingly isolated as the Ice Age culminated in the last 'Glacial Maximum' some 25,000 years ago, which they weathered...
  • Volcanic Soils Offer New Clues About The Emergence Of Powerful Chiefdoms In Hawaii

    06/11/2004 4:26:36 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 263+ views
    Eureka Alert/Stanford University ^ | 6-11-2004 | Mark Shwartz
    Contact: Mark Shwartz mshwartz@stanford.edu 650-723-9296 Stanford University Volcanic soils yield new clues about the emergence of powerful chiefdoms in Hawaii When the first Europeans arrived in the Hawaiian Islands in 1778, they found a thriving, complex society organized into chiefdoms whose economies were based primarily on farming. On the islands of Kauai, O'ahu and Molokai, the principal crop was taro – a starchy plant grown in irrigated wetlands where the supply of water was usually abundant. But on Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii, the main staple was the sweet potato – a more labor-intensive crop planted in relatively...
  • Deep history of coconuts decoded (Colonization of the Americas?)

    06/24/2011 2:06:33 PM PDT · by decimon · 39 replies
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | June 24, 2011 | Diana Lutz
    Written in coconut DNA are two origins of cultivation, several ancient trade routes, and the history of the colonization of the AmericasThe coconut (the fruit of the palm Cocos nucifera) is the Swiss Army knife of the plant kingdom; in one neat package it provides a high-calorie food, potable water, fiber that can be spun into rope, and a hard shell that can be turned into charcoal. What’s more, until it is needed for some other purpose it serves as a handy flotation device. No wonder people from ancient Austronesians to Captain Bligh pitched a few coconuts aboard before setting...
  • Leaked Photos Spell Bad News for Michelle Obama

    11/01/2015 7:23:31 PM PST · by UMCRevMom@aol.com · 101 replies
    tellmenow ^ | Mar 24, 2015
    Michelle Obama got the wind taken out of her sails recently when some photos surfaced that expose her school lunch plan for the disaster it is. When 13 year-old Tanner Glenney received his lunch from his Texas middle school cafeteria on taco day, he was shocked by what he saw. He took pictures to show his mother Shelley, and she was enraged to see that there was barely a teaspoon of meat inside her son’s taco. “I first thought it had to be a mistake or the kids were messing around,” Shelley Glenney said. “And then when he told me...
  • Chickens are evolving 15 TIMES faster than expected:

    10/27/2015 7:41:08 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 121 replies
    Dailymail.co.uk ^ | 27 October 2015 | By Sarah Griffiths for MailOnline
    Scientists discover the birds have developed two mutations in just 50 years Genes of White Plymouth Rock chickens mutated twice in 50 years Scientists previously thought rate of change in mitochondrial genomes was never faster than about two per cent per million years Mutations suggest rate of evolution in the chickens is 15 times faster Study goes against theory evolution can only be seen over long periods
  • Ancient winery discovered in central Israel region during storm

    10/27/2015 1:29:46 PM PDT · by Lera · 14 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | 10/26/2015 | DANIEL K. EISENBUD
    Large 1,500-year-old winepress unearthed in area once known for wine production. A large, well-preserved 1,500-year-old winery has been exposed during a violent storm in the Sharon Plain region, located between the Mediterranean Sea and Samarian Hills, the Antiquities Authority announced Monday. According to IAA archeologist Alla Nagorski, the discovery was made off the Eyal Interchange several weeks ago when flooding and hail disrupted an excavation at the site, where natural gas lines are scheduled to be embedded. The northern part of the Sharon Plain is considered the most historical wine region in Israel, and is where the first roots of...
  • Analysis: Some hot dog brands contain human DNA

    10/26/2015 9:37:39 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 52 replies
    upi ^ | Oct. 26, 2015 | Ben Hooper
    MENLO PARK, Calif., - A California startup analyzing food on a molecular level announced some hard news about one of the most beloved foods in the United States: 2 percent of hot dogs contain human DNA. Clear Food, the consumer guide wing of Menlo Park startup Clear Labs, said it analysed 345 hot dogs and sausages from 75 brands sold at 10 different retailers and discovered 14.4 percent of the products included ingredients that were not listed on the label. The startup said several of the tested brands had "hygienic" issues. "Hygienic issues occur when some sort of non-harmful contaminant...
  • Hazelnut shells found at Skye Mesolithic site

    10/25/2015 12:19:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | October 22, 2015 | Steven McKenzie
    The remains of hazelnuts eaten by some of Skye's earliest inhabitants were found at a dig on the island, archaeologists have revealed. Hazelnuts were a favourite snack of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, according to archaeologists at the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI). The shells found at an excavation above Staffin Bay could be 8,000-years-old. UHI carried out the dig along with Staffin Community Trust, school children and volunteers. Dan Lee, lifelong learning and outreach archaeologist at UHI, said: "We have found lots of fragments of charred hazelnut shells in the lower soil samples. "They are the ideal thing to date...
  • Aboriginal Female Hunters Aided By Dingoes

    10/24/2015 6:23:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ScienceNetwork WA ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | Michelle Wheeler
    In modern society dogs are often referred to as "man's best friend" but according to an archaeological review early Aboriginal society sported a similar relationship between women and dingoes (Canis lupus dingo). The study by UWA and ANU suggests people formed close bonds with dingoes soon after the dogs' arrival on the mainland roughly 4000 years ago, with the dogs enabling women to contribute more hunted food. UWA archaeologist Jane Balme, who led the research, says it is thought the first dingoes arrived on watercraft with people from South East Asia. "What they're doing on the boat is not clear...
  • The benefits of eating bugs

    03/02/2014 7:16:51 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 57 replies
    The Week ^ | March 1, 2014 | Daniella Martin
    YOU'VE PROBABLY HEARD of the Stone Age diet craze known as the Paleolithic Diet, made popular most recently by Dr. Loren Cordain's best-seller The Paleo Diet. The premise is simple: If our early human ancestors couldn't have eaten it, we shouldn't, either. It's the one time, it seems, that being like a caveman is a good thing. The theory goes (and archaeological evidence corroborates) that early hunter-gatherers, while they may not have lived as long, still had some major health advantages on most of us modern humans. They were much taller, averaging 6-foot-5 to our 5-foot-11; had stronger, heavier bones;...
  • Got Incompetence? The Federal Gov't Has Misled Public About Milk For Decades

    10/08/2015 3:18:52 AM PDT · by RockyTCB · 70 replies
    Investor's Business Daily ^ | 10/7/2015 | John Merline
    If you look up "whole milk" in the government's official Dietary Guidelines, it states pretty definitively that people should only drink skim or 1% milk. "If you currently drink whole milk," it says, "gradually switch to lower fat versions." This is the same advice the government has been issuing for many years. And it's wrong
  • Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs: the Roman diet revealed

    06/14/2011 4:45:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | Tuesday, June 14, 2011 | Nick Squires
    Dormice, sea urchins and fresh figs were among the delicacies enjoyed by ordinary Romans, British archaeologists have revealed after discovering a giant septic tank at one of the ancient cities destroyed by the eruption of Mt Vesuvius... Archaeologists found a treasure trove of everyday artefacts after digging up nearly 800 sacks of compacted human waste from the tank, which lies beneath the remains of a Roman apartment block in Herculaneum, destroyed after it was buried by ash from the volcano in AD79. The British team has found hundreds of objects, including bronze coins, precious stones, bone hair pins and an...
  • Fish Sauce Used to Date Pompeii Eruption [ garum / liquamen]

    09/30/2008 4:30:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 6,769+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Monday, September 29, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Remains of rotten fish entrails have helped establish the precise dating of Pompeii's destruction, according to Italian researchers who have analyzed the town's last batch of garum, a pungent, fish-based seasoning. Frozen in time by the catastrophic eruption that covered Pompeii and nearby towns nearly 2,000 years ago with nine to 20 feet of hot ash and pumice, the desiccated remains were found at the bottom of seven jars. The find revealed that the last Pompeian garum was made entirely with bogues (known as boops boops), a Mediterranean fish species that abounded in the area in the summer months of...
  • Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese

    10/10/2002 11:02:29 AM PDT · by chance33_98 · 49 replies · 681+ views
    Clues to Roman Illnesses in 2,000-Year-Old Cheese Oct. 9 — By E. J. Mundell NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - A tiny piece of cheese, carbonized in the volcanic eruption that killed the citizens of Pompeii, is yielding up secrets as to how ancient Romans ate, lived and died. Using an electron microscope, anthropological researcher Dr. Luigi Capasso of the State University G. d'Annunzio in Chieti, Italy, has been able to pinpoint goats' milk cheese as a prime source of brucellosis--a debilitating joint disease that ravaged the ancient world. "Roman cheese was an important and continuous source of possible infectious...
  • What the Inuit can tell us about omega-3 fats and 'paleo' diets

    09/27/2015 12:44:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Berkeley News ^ | September 17, 2015 | Robert Sanders
    The traditional diet of Greenland natives -- the Inuit -- is held up as an example of how high levels of omega-3 fatty acids can counterbalance the bad health effects of a high-fat diet, but a new study hints that what's true for the Inuit may not be true for everyone else... Those genetic mutations, found in nearly 100 percent of the Inuit, are found in a mere 2 percent of Europeans and 15 percent of Han Chinese, which means that these groups would synthesize omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids differently from the Inuit... These genetic mutations in the Inuit have...
  • Living with humans has taught dogs morals, say scientists

    08/21/2008 6:11:16 AM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 63 replies · 183+ views
    The Daily Mail UK ^ | 21st August 2008 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Dogs are becoming more intelligent and are even learning morals from human contact, scientists claim. They say the fact that dogs' play rarely escalates into a fight shows the animals abide by social rules. During one study, dogs which held up a paw were rewarded with a food treat. When a lone dog was asked to raise its paw but received no treat, the researchers found it begged for up to 30 minutes. But when they tested two dogs together but rewarded only one, the dog which missed out soon stopped playing the game. Dr Friederike Range, of the University...
  • Have humans made dogs STUPID? Pets are 'lazy thinkers' compared to wild wolves

    09/16/2015 6:45:14 PM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 63 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 16 September 2015 | RICHARD GRAY
    They may be man's best friend, but dogs have little to thank humans for it seems. Research suggests the domesticated pets can't solve problems as well as their wild cousins because living with us has made them 'incapable of thinking for themselves.' In tests, experts presented a 'puzzle box' containing food to a group of dogs, and a group of wolves and while the wolves were capable of breaking inside, the dogs looked to humans for help.
  • Stone Age, Canaanite, Arrowheads and Blades Found in Judean Foothills

    07/04/2013 1:22:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | June 30th, 2013 | Staff
    Archaeological excavations of the Israel Antiquities Authority done prior to laying down a sewer line turned up evidence of human habitation 9,000 years ago... in the Judean foothills moshav (cooperative village) of Eshta'ol... According to Benjamin Storchen, the excavation director on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority, "the ancient findings we unveiled at the site indicate that there was a flourishing agricultural settlement in this place, and it lasted for as long as 4,000 years." The archaeological artifacts discovered in the excavation site indicate that the first settlers arrived here about 9,000 years ago. This period is called by archaeologists...
  • Archaeological team prepares 4,000-year-old Hittite meals

    09/14/2015 5:20:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    The Daily Sabah Food ^ | September 8, 2015 | Daily Sabah with Anadolu Agency
    An archaeological team excavating the ancient site of Alacahöyük, one of the most significant centers of the ancient Hittite civilization, cooked pastries belonging to Hittite cuisine that dates back 4,000 years. The foods found on Hittite tablets were cooked without modern technology or equipment. The 4,000-year-old Hittite cuisine was cooked in Alacahöyük, an important Neolithic settlement and Turkey's first nationally excavated area. Aykut Çınaroğlu, the head of the excavations and professor of archaeology at Ankara University, told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Chef Ömür Akkor, an excavation team member, prepared a special Hittite menu in light of the available archaeological findings....
  • Mesopotamian Climate Change (8,000 Years Ago)

    02/15/2004 11:18:28 AM PST · by blam · 72 replies · 5,365+ views
    Geo Times ^ | 2-15-2004
    Mesopotamian climate change Geoscientists are increasingly exploring an interesting trend: Climate change has been affecting human society for thousands of years. At the American Geophysical Union annual meeting in December, one archaeologist presented research that suggests that climate change affected the way cultures developed and collapsed in the cradle of civilization — ancient Mesopotamia — more than 8,000 years ago. Archaeologists have found evidence for a mass migration from the more temperate northern Mesopotamia to the arid southern region around 6400 B.C. For the previous 1,000 years, people had been cultivating the arable land in northern Mesopotamia, using natural rainwater...
  • Ancient farmers swiftly spread westward

    01/15/2011 7:18:08 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Science News ^ | January 29th, 2011 | Bruce Bower
    Croatia does not have a reputation as a hotbed of ancient agriculture. But new excavations, described January 7 in San Antonio at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, unveil a Mediterranean Sea-hugging strip of southern Croatia as a hub for early farmers who spread their sedentary lifestyle from the Middle East into Europe. Farming villages sprouted swiftly in this coastal region, called Dalmatia, nearly 8,000 years ago, apparently with the arrival of Middle Easterners already adept at growing crops and herding animals, says archaeologist Andrew Moore of Rochester Institute of Technology in New York... Plant cultivation and...
  • Excavation throws up earliest evidence of rice cultivation [ in Vietnam ]

    07/03/2009 5:39:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 301+ views
    The Hindu ^ | Friday, July 3, 2009 | a Hindu
    Excavation of an ancient Vietnamese site has thrown up the earliest evidence of rice cultivation, while shedding new light on how the death of young children was viewed by community members. The excavation, led by professor Peter Bellwood and Marc Oxenham from the Australian National University (ANU) School of Archaeology and Anthropology, studied the site, some 3,000-4,000 years old, named An Son. The findings suggest that death in young children was so common that community members were unlikely to revere the death of their offspring until they had survived for more than five years. "The burial of a new born...
  • Start Of Banana Farming In Africa Pushed Back 2000 Years

    08/07/2006 5:59:36 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 766+ views
    inibap ^ | unknown
    Start of banana farming in Africa pushed back 2000 years According to recent evidence from Uganda, the banana may have arrived on the African continent more than 4000 years ago, some 2000 years before the accepted introduction of the fruit on the continent. The finding was published in the January 2006 issue of the Journal of Archaeological Science (Vol. 33(1):102-113). The authors base their claim on banana phytoliths - distinctive microscopic silica bodies that accumulate in plant cells - which they found in sedimentary layers estimated to be 4000-4500 years old. Earlier findings in Cameroon of 2500 year-old banana phytoliths...
  • Taking molecular snaps of ancient crops

    09/16/2010 3:04:27 AM PDT · by decimon · 10 replies
    Nature ^ | September 13, 2010 | Ewen Callaway
    Archaeologists interested in the genetics of ancient organisms have a new molecular tool at hand — RNA. Two teams of scientists have decoded RNA from ancient crops in the hope of understanding the subtle evolutionary changes that accompanied the process of plant domestication. Unlike DNA, which remains largely unchanged throughout the life of an organism, RNA molecules offer a snapshot of the activity of a cell, indicating which genes are turned on and off, and to what extent. "With ancient DNA you can see what an ancient organism might have looked like. With ancient RNA we can see what it...
  • Scientists discover Neolithic wine-making

    11/29/2005 3:38:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 671+ views
    UNLV Rebel Yell ^ | 11/28/2005 | Lora Griffin
    The discovery that Stone Age humans were interested in growing fruit and developing fermentation processes provides many clues into the lifestyle of early Homo sapiens. The production of wine requires a relatively "stable base of operations," McGovern stated. His research suggests that these early Near East and Egyptian communities would have been more permanent cultures with a stable food supply and domesticated animals and plants. With this abundance of food came the need for containers that were durable and made from a material that was easily pliable—like clay. The porous structure of these clay vessels is what has made it...
  • Agriculture arose in many parts of the Fertile Crescent at once

    07/06/2013 10:25:24 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    L A Times ^ | July 5, 2013, 6:53 p.m. | Melissa Pandika
    For decades, archaeologists believed agriculture took root in a part of the Fertile Crescent called the Levant, which includes present-day Israel, Lebanon and Jordan, as well as parts of Syria, Iraq, Saudi Arabia and other countries. From there, it was thought to have spread eastward to present-day Iran. “The eastern Fertile Crescent has been treated as backwater,” said Melinda Zeder, a senior scientist at the Smithsonian Institute’s Program in Human Ecology and Archaeobiology, who was not involved in the study. Now, the understanding that people in the Zagros grew and ground cereal grains as early as their counterparts in the...
  • Discovery Of Oldest Known Art And Agriculture Calendar In New World

    05/11/2006 2:17:48 PM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 701+ views
    Newswise ^ | 5-11-2006
    Discovery of Oldest Known Art and Agriculture Calendar in New World MU Researcher Unearths Earliest Known Western Sculptures and Astronomical Alignments in Peru's Temple of the Fox. Andeans Used Myth and Astronomical Markers to Determine Agricultural Calendar. Project Buena Vista unearths a personified disk flanked by foxes at the Temple of the Fox in Peru. Newswise — In one of the most significant archaeological and anthropological finds in recent history, Robert Benfer, professor emeritus of anthropology at the University of Missouri-Columbia, has discovered the earliest astronomical alignments and sculptures in the round, which is a sculpture designed to be viewed...
  • Ancient cooking pots reveal gradual transition to agriculture

    10/24/2011 4:43:41 PM PDT · by decimon · 7 replies
    University of York ^ | October 24, 2011
    Humans may have undergone a gradual rather than an abrupt transition from fishing, hunting and gathering to farming, according to a new study of ancient pottery. Researchers at the University of York and the University of Bradford analysed cooking residues preserved in 133 ceramic vessels from the Western Baltic regions of Northern Europe to establish whether these residues were from terrestrial, marine or freshwater organisms. The research led by Oliver Craig (York) and Carl Heron (Bradford) included an international team of archaeologists from The Heritage Agency of Denmark, The National Museum of Denmark, Moesgĺrd Museum (Denmark), Christian-Albrechts-Universität, Kiel (Germany) and...
  • Remarkable Discovery Could Push Back Human Agriculture by 11,000 Years

    09/15/2015 12:38:16 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 17 replies
    io9 ^ | 7/24/15 12:40pm | George Dvorsky
    Archaeologists in Israel have uncovered evidence of early cereal cultivation at a 23,000-year-old site in Galilee, effectively doubling the timespan humans are believed to have practiced farming.
  • Aztecs Cooked, Skinned, Ate Humans (Barbequed long pig)

    01/27/2005 10:37:51 PM PST · by quidnunc · 110 replies · 3,210+ views
    Discovery News ^ | January 25, 2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    New finds from an archaeological site near Mexico City support certain written and pictorial evidence concerning Aztec human sacrifice that historians previously doubted because the accounts seemed too exaggerated to be true. The discovery adds to the growing collection of evidence supporting human sacrifice and cannibalism among the founders of the Mexican empire. It also suggests that researchers might now be able to verify some 16th century Spanish accounts on the subject. The Spanish and the Aztecs documented at least four observations of cannibalism in the 16th and 17th centuries. Spanish conquistador Hernán Cortés (1485-1547), whose men conquered the Aztecs...
  • Outdoor BBQ: A 700,000-year-old Ritual

    07/04/2008 5:35:17 PM PDT · by decimon · 22 replies · 220+ views
    LiveScience ^ | Jul 3, 2008 | Meredith F. Small
    July Fourth is a celebration of outdoor cooking, as well as our nation's birthday. It's time to brush off the barbecue and throw masses of processed meat on the grill. As we all stand around waiting for the fire to die down so that we can make s'mores, it's also a time to ponder the notion that the barbecue is a ritual 700,000 years old or more, and it might have something to do with our big brains.
  • Ancient Americans Liked It Hot: Mexican Cuisine Traced To 1,500 Years Ago

    07/09/2007 5:47:32 PM PDT · by blam · 40 replies · 711+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 7-9-2007 | Smithsonian
    Source: Smithsonian Date: July 9, 2007 Ancient Americans Liked It Hot: Mexican Cuisine Traced To 1,500 Years Ago Science Daily — One of the world's tastiest and most popular cuisines, Mexican food also may be one of the oldest. These chili peppers from the Guila Naquitz cave in Oaxaca Mexico date to between A.D. 490 and 780, and represent two cultivars or cultivated types. A Smithsonian scientist analyzed the chili pepper remains and determined that Pre-Columbian inhabitants of the region hundreds of years ago enjoyed a spicy fare similar to Mexican cuisine today. (Credit: Linda Perry, Smithsonian Institution) Plant remains...
  • Pre-Columbian Tribes Had BBQs, Parties on Grave Sites

    12/05/2008 7:54:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies · 355+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | Friday, December 5, 2008 | Alexis Okeowo
    Some pre-Hispanic cultures in South America had elaborate celebrations at their cemeteries, complete with feasting and drinking grounds much like modern barbecue pits, according to a new archaeological study. Excavations of 12th- and-13th-century burial mounds in the highlands of Brazil and Argentina revealed numerous earthen ovens. The finds suggest that the graves were also sites of regular festivals held to commemorate the death of the community's chief.
  • Scientists report Stone Age flour production

    09/09/2015 1:29:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, September 7, 2015 | PNAS
    Researchers report early evidence of flour production by ancient humans. Recent interest in ancient diets has led to the collection of extensive data about the variety of plants eaten by early humans and ancient food processing capabilities. Marta Mariotti Lippi of the University of Florence and colleagues analyzed the residues from an ancient grinding tool to gain further insight into food processing practices of the Early Gravettian culture of ancient Europe. The tool was found in Grotta Paglicci in Southern Italy in 1989 and dates to more than 32,000 years ago. Residue samples from the tool contained a variety of...
  • Common origins of Neolithic farmers in Europe traced

    09/04/2015 12:28:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, September 03, 2015 | Spanish National Research Council
    Thanks to this newly sequenced genome, researchers have been able to determine that farmers from both the Mediterranean and inland routes are very homogeneous and clearly derive from a common ancestral population that, most likely, were the first farmers who entered Europe through Anatolia... Analysis of the genome from Cova Bonica has made it possible to determine the appearance of these pioneer farmers, who had light skin and dark eyes and hair. This contrasts with previous Mesolithic hunters who, as the man from La Brańa in León (Spain)—recovered in 2014 by the same research team—has demonstrated, had blue eyes and...
  • A serving of Philistine culture: Boar, dog and fine wine

    09/03/2007 8:38:36 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 259+ views
    Ha'aretz ^ | Monday, September 3, 2007 | Ofri Ilani
    Research into the dispersal of Philistine cooking methods among various populations in Israel shows that the Philistines spread their culture beyond the areas under their control... Unlike most of the peoples living in the region in the biblical era, the Philistines were not Semites... They prepared meals in a characteristic sealed pottery vessel suited to long cooking times at low heat, while most inhabitants of Canaan at the time used open pots and faster cooking methods. The bones found at the Philistine cities showed that... the Philistines ate mainly pork, with an occasional meal of dog meat. The Philistines' wine...
  • Was Fig First Fruit Of Man's Agricultural Endeavours?

    06/01/2006 5:48:33 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 535+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6-2-2006 | Roger Highfield
    Was fig first fruit of man's agricultural endeavours? By Roger Highfield, Science Editor (Filed: 02/06/2006) The dawn of agriculture may have come with the domestication of fig trees near Jericho some 11,400 years ago, archaeologists report today. The discovery of ancient carbonised figs suggests that fruit, rather than grains that are traditionally thought to have heralded agriculture, may yield the earliest evidence of purposeful planting. The figs date back roughly 1,000 years before wheat, barley and legumes were domesticated in the region, making the fruit trees the oldest known domesticated crop, a team reports today in the journal Science. Nine...
  • Figs said to be first domesticated crop

    06/01/2006 7:58:10 PM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 4 replies · 126+ views
    WASHINGTON --Gourmets savoring their roasted figs with goat cheese may not realize it, but they're tasting history. Archaeologists report that they have found evidence that ancient people grew fig trees some 11,400 years ago, making the fruit the earliest domesticated crop. The find dates use of figs some 1,000 years before the first evidence that crops such as wheat, barley and legumes were being cultivated in the Middle East. Remains of the ancient fruits were found at Gilgal I, a village site in the Jordan Valley north of ancient Jericho, Ofer Bar-Yosef of Harvard University and Mordechai E. Kislev and...
  • Philistines introduced sycamore, cumin and opium poppy into Israel during the Iron Age

    09/01/2015 2:15:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Science Daily ^ | August 28, 2015 | Bar-Ilan University
    The team compiled a database of plant remains extracted from Bronze and Iron Ages sites in the southern Levant, both Philistine and non-Philistine... The species they brought are all cultivars that had not been seen in Israel previously... edible parts of the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) which originates in western Europe; the sycamore tree (Ficus sycomorus), whose fruits are known to be cultivated in the eastern Mediterranean, especially Egypt, and whose presence in Israel as a locally grown tree is first attested to in the Iron Age by the presence of its fruit; and finally, cumin (Cuminum cyminum), a spice...
  • A pint of water before meals is the secret to losing weight, scientists claim

    08/26/2015 8:19:03 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 52 replies
    The London Mirror ^ | August 26, 2015 | Jennifer Cockerell
    A new study by the University of Birmingham revealed that obese adults who 'pre-loaded- with 500ml of plain tap water lost an average of 9.5lbs in 12 weeks.The key to losing weight could be as simple as drinking a pint of water before mealtimes , researchers have said. A study in which obese adults consumed 500ml of water half an hour before eating main meals saw them report an average loss of 4.3kg (9.48lbs) over a 12-week period. Researchers at the University of Birmingham said the simple trick could be hugely beneficial, and easily promoted by healthcare professionals and through...
  • Screw salads: They're not helping you and may be hurting the planet

    08/26/2015 6:10:30 AM PDT · by rickmichaels · 35 replies
    National Post ^ | August 25, 2015 | Tamar Haspel, Washington Post
    As the world population grows, we have a pressing need to eat better and farm better, and those of us trying to figure out how to do those things have pointed at lots of different foods as problematic. Almonds, for their water use. Corn, for the monoculture. Beef, for its greenhouse gases. In each of those cases, there’s some truth in the finger-pointing, but none of them is a clear-cut villain. There’s one food, though, that has almost nothing going for it. It occupies precious crop acreage, requires fossil fuels to be shipped, refrigerated, around the world, and adds nothing...
  • For Evolving Brains, a ‘Paleo’ Diet Full of Carbs

    08/13/2015 9:17:17 PM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 48 replies
    The New York Times ^ | AUG. 13, 2015 | Carl Zimmer
    You are what you eat, and so were your ancient ancestors. But figuring out what they actually dined on has been no easy task. There are no Pleistocene cookbooks to consult. Instead, scientists must sift through an assortment of clues, from the chemical traces in fossilized bones to the scratch marks on prehistoric digging sticks. Scientists have long recognized that the diets of our ancestors went through a profound shift with the addition of meat. But in the September issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology, researchers argue that another item added to the menu was just as important: carbohydrates,...
  • This Renaissance Painting of Fruit Holds a Modern-Day Science Lesson

    08/09/2015 8:31:31 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 31 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 8-8-15 | Helen Thompson
    Paintings can be a window to more than the outmoded dress and strange customs of the past — sometimes, they have modern-day science lessons to impart, too. That's the case with Giovanni Stanchi’s 17th century still life of fruit, as Phil Edwards points out for Vox — just look for the watermelons. Stanchi’s work, painted between 1645 and 1672 (and now up for auction at Christie’s), includes strange watermelons that look so foreign they could be from outer space in the bottom right corner. If watermelons looked like that in the Renaissance, then why do they look so different today?...
  • Archaeologists find possible evidence of earliest human agriculture

    07/25/2015 3:50:24 AM PDT · by GoneSalt · 6 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | 7/24/2015 | Peter Beaumont
    Israeli archaeologists have uncovered dramatic evidence of what they believe are the earliest known attempts at agriculture, 11,000 years before the generally recognised advent of organised cultivation. The study examined more than 150,000 examples of plant remains recovered from an unusually well preserved hunter-gatherer settlement on the shores of the Sea of Galilee in northern Israel. Previously, scientists had believed that organised agriculture in the Middle East, including animal husbandry and crop cultivation, had begun in the late Holocene period – around 12,000 BC – and later spread west through Europe.
  • Early Fig Farming

    06/30/2006 12:22:26 PM PDT · by furball4paws · 20 replies · 463+ views
    Science ^ | June 2, 2006 | A. Gibbons
    Early Fig Farming Scientists tracing the origins of agriculture have followed the trail of cultivated grains like wheat and barley back to about 10,500 years ago in the Near East . Now a new study reported in the 2 Jun 2006 Science suggests that fig trees could have been the first domesticated crop, preceding cereals by about a thousand years. Kislev et al. ( http://www.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/short/312/5778/1372) described the remains of figs found in several archaeological sites in the Jordan Valley as early as about 11,400 years ago. The carbonized fruits represent a variety of fig in which the fruit forms and...
  • Chicken Bones Suggest Polynesians Found Americas Before Columbus

    09/16/2009 1:07:41 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 86 replies · 1,473+ views
    livescience.com ^ | 04 June 2007 | Heather Whipps
    Chicken Bones Suggest Polynesians Found Americas Before ColumbusBy Heather Whipps, Special to LiveScience Which came first–the chicken or the European? Popular history, and a familiar rhyme about Christopher Columbus, holds that Europeans made contact with the Americas in 1492, with some arguing that the explorer and his crew were the first outsiders to reach the New World. But chicken bones recently unearthed on the coast of Chile—dating prior to Columbus’ “discovery” of America and resembling the DNA of a fowl species native to Polynesia—may challenge that notion, researchers say. “Chickens could not have gotten to South America on their own—they...
  • 'Chicken and Chips' Theory of Pacific Migration

    07/31/2008 12:33:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 82+ views
    Newswise ^ | Tuesday, July 29, 2008 | University of Adelaide
    The study questions recent claims that chickens were first introduced into South America by Polynesians, before the arrival of Spanish chickens in the 15th century following Christopher Columbus. ...the University of Adelaide's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD) Director Professor Alan Cooper says there has been considerable debate about the existence and degree of contact between Polynesians and South Americans, with the presence of the sweet potato throughout the Pacific often used as evidence of early trading contacts... A recent study claimed to have found the first direct evidence of a genetic link between ancient Polynesian and apparently pre-Columbian chickens...