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Keyword: dietandcuisine

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  • Jurassic Farm: Can we bring prehistoric bovines back from extinction?

    09/10/2014 1:40:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    modernfarmer.com ^ | September 10, 2014 | By Kristan Lawson
    The 21st-century back-to-the-farm movement stems from our yearning to escape the artificiality of modern urban life. Yet the domesticated plants and animals now found in most gardens and farms are themselves artificial, the results of extensive human meddling, cross-breeding and genetic manipulation. Mankind began engineering what we now call “farm animals,” including cattle, all the way back in the Neolithic period, between 10,000 and 5,000 B.C. Try as you might, you won’t find an untamed Jersey cow that originated naturally in the wild, because no such thing exists — just like there’s no such thing as a wild labradoodle. Cattle...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...
  • Archaeology: The milk revolution

    08/02/2013 11:45:10 AM PDT · by Renfield · 40 replies
    Nature ^ | 7-31-2013 | Andrew Curry
    In the 1970s, archaeologist Peter Bogucki was excavating a Stone Age site in the fertile plains of central Poland when he came across an assortment of odd artefacts. The people who had lived there around 7,000 years ago were among central Europe's first farmers, and they had left behind fragments of pottery dotted with tiny holes. It looked as though the coarse red clay had been baked while pierced with pieces of straw. Looking back through the archaeological literature, Bogucki found other examples of ancient perforated pottery. “They were so unusual — people would almost always include them in publications,”...
  • Predecessor of Cows, The Aurochs, Were Still Living In The Netherlands Around AD 600

    12/21/2008 10:02:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies · 4,518+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Monday, December 15, 2008 | University of Groningen
    Archaeological researchers at the University of Groningen have discovered that the aurochs, the predecessor of our present-day cow, lived in the Netherlands for longer than originally assumed. Remains of bones recently retrieved from a horn core found in Holwerd (Friesland, Netherlands), show that the aurochs became extinct in around AD 600 and not in the fourth century. The last aurochs died in Poland in 1627... The aurochs was much larger than the common cows we know today, with aurochs bulls measuring between 160 and 180 cm at the withers, and aurochs cows between 140 and 150 cm. The cattle bred...
  • Ancient giant cattle genome first

    02/20/2010 5:30:54 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 28 replies · 878+ views
    bbc ^ | 17 February 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago. They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring....... One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands.... The species became extinct when a female animal died in a forest in Poland in 1627. Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar was said to have been impressed...
  • Scientists in aurochs genome sequence first (wild cattle)

    02/18/2010 3:33:47 AM PST · by decimon · 10 replies · 405+ views
    BBC ^ | Feb 17, 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago.They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring. One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands. The work was carried out at the University College Dublin's Animal Genomics Laboratory and Conway Institute using new technology that allows billions of base pairs of DNA to be...
  • Giant cattle to be bred back from extinction

    01/18/2010 6:38:36 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 54 replies · 2,078+ views
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | Jan. 18, 2010 | Nick Squires
    Aurochs were immortalised in prehistoric cave paintings and admired for their brute strength and "elephantine" size by Julius Caesar. But despite their having gone the way of the dodo and the woolly mammoth, there are plans to bring the giant animals back to life. The huge cattle with sweeping horns which once roamed the forests of Europe have not been seen for nearly 400 years. Now Italian scientists are hoping to use genetic expertise and selective breeding of modern-day wild cattle to recreate the fearsome beasts which weighed around 2,200lb and stood 6.5 feet at the shoulder. Breeds of large...
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • Did the Ancient Israelites Drink Beer?

    09/02/2010 6:53:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    BAR 36:05 ^ | Sep/Oct 2010 | Michael M. Homan
    Ancient Israelites, with the possible exception of a few teetotaling Nazirites and their moms, proudly drank beer -- and lots of it. Men, women and even children of all social classes drank it. Its consumption in ancient Israel was encouraged, sanctioned and intimately linked with their religion. Even Yahweh, according to the Hebrew Bible, consumed at least half a hin of beer (approximately 2 liters, or a six-pack) per day through the cultic ritual of libation, and he drank even more on the Sabbath (Numbers 28:7-10). People who were sad were advised to drink beer to temporarily erase their troubles...
  • Now that really would be vintage vodka!Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouch

    06/30/2016 10:27:15 AM PDT · by dware · 10 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 30 June 2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • Builders stumble on Russian beer tavern that has lain untouched for 300 years (tr)

    06/30/2016 10:31:55 AM PDT · by dware · 19 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 06.30.2016 | Abigail Beall
    With broken beer mugs and copper coins that had slipped through the floorboards, you could be forgiven for thinking its customers had stepped out a few moments ago. But this tavern in the heart of the Russian capital Moscow last served beer nearly 300 years ago. Now the ancient beer bar has been unearthed, revealing broken plates and tankards dating back to the 16th century.
  • The world’s oldest paycheck was cashed in beer

    06/29/2016 7:23:28 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 30 replies
    On one tablet excavated from the area we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning “ration”, and a conical vessel, meaning “beer”. Scattered around are scratches recording the amount of beer for a particular worker. It’s the world’s oldest known payslip.
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history — the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Clemson's first harvest of ancient Southern wheat exceeds expectations

    06/20/2016 10:37:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    phys.org ^ | 06-20-2016 | by Jim Melvin & Provided by: Clemson University
    Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Credit: Scott Miller / Clemson University ================================================================================================= The first step of an ongoing-process designed to bring a valuable heirloom wheat back from the brink of extinction has been completed with flying colors. Last month, Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Purple Straw is the only heirloom wheat to have been cultivated continually in the South from...
  • Oldest noodles unearthed in China

    10/12/2005 1:36:46 PM PDT · by bigmac0707 · 78 replies · 1,386+ views
    BBC News ^ | 9/12/05 | BBC News
    Oldest noodles unearthed in China Late Neolithic noodles: They may settle the origin debate The 50cm-long, yellow strands were found in a pot that had probably been buried during a catastrophic flood. Radiocarbon dating of the material taken from the Lajia archaeological site on the Yellow River indicates the food was about 4,000 years old. Scientists tell the journal Nature that the noodles were made using grains from millet grass - unlike modern noodles, which are made with wheat flour. The discovery goes a long way to settling the old argument over who first created the string-like food. Professor Houyuan...
  • Ancient, still-edible chunk of butter unearthed in Irish bog

    06/14/2016 10:22:57 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    Fox News ^ | Published June 14, 2016 | By James Rogers
    The 2,000 year-old bog butter found in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1 (Cavan County Museum/Copper Tree Photography). ============================================================================================ Would you eat ancient butter? A 2,000-year-old 20-pound chunk of butter has been unearthed from a peat bog in Ireland, which is said to still be edible. The large lump of butter was discovered by farmer Jack Conway while cutting turf for fuel in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1. The strange rugby-ball shaped object was buried about 16 feet down in the bog. Conway quickly realized that he had found what is known as ‘bog butter’ and contacted...
  • 64-year-old tub of lard found in Germany -- still edible

    02/01/2012 4:54:40 PM PST · by Kartographer · 78 replies
    A German pensioner who had kept a tub of lard in his cupboard for 64 years, took it to authorities who pronounced it very much fit for consumption -- if a little tasteless. Retired chemist Hans Feldmeier, 87, told AFP he had received the pig fat as a student in 1948 near the northern city of Rostock as part of the post-war US aid programme.
  • Turf Cutters Unearth Prehistoric Lump Of Bog Butter [Ireland]

    06/12/2016 5:52:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | June 9, 2016 | unattributed
    A prehistoric 10 kilo lump of bog butter thought to have been a gift to the gods has been found by turf cutters. The creamy white dairy product, which smells like a strong cheese and is believed to be about 2,000 years old, was unearthed by Jack Conway, from Maghera, Co Cavan, while he worked on Emlagh bog in Co Meath last week. The find, while not unusual, has been given to the National Museum where it will be preserved. Andy Halpin, assistant keeper in the museum's Irish Antiquities Division, said the discovery was significant because it was found in...
  • 'Bog butter' from 3,000 BC found in ancient underground store

    05/11/2011 1:54:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    IrishCentral.com ^ | Friday, April 29, 2011 | Cathy Hayes
    Peat cutter said the ancient food still smells of dairy Over 100 pounds of "bog butter" have been discovered in Tullamore, County Offaly. This ancient food substance, thought to been buried as a form of refrigeration, is thought to be 5,000 years old, dating from the Iron Age. Brian Clancy and his uncle Joe were cutting turf in Ballard Bog when they made the discovery. Joe explained "We were cutting turf and I found what looked like a huge piece of timber...We took it out with a spade and it turned out to be bog butter." Speaking to the Irish...