Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $83,553
94%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $4.5k to go!! Let's git 'er done!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: dietandcuisine

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Britain Imported Wheat 2,000 Years Before Growing It

    02/26/2015 6:45:03 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    scientificamerican.com ^ | Cynthia Graber
    Early farming began in the Near East about 10,500 years ago. Farming first reached the Balkans in Europe some 8 to 9,000 years ago, and then crept westward. Locals in Britain, separated from the mainland by the relatively newly formed English Channel, did not start farming until about 6,000 years ago. But an analysis of sediment from a submerged British archaeological site called Bouldner Cliff found something unexpected. “Amongst our Bouldner Cliff samples we found ancient DNA evidence of wheat at the site, which was not seen in mainland Britain for another 2,000 years.” Robin Allaby of the University of...
  • Forget Pizza Delivery: How Drones in Construction and Agriculture Help Save Time and Money

    02/24/2015 1:49:12 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    Autodesk ^ | February 12, 2015 | Jeff Walsh
    When people discuss business uses for drones, they tend to jump to the novelty end of the consumer market—from the drone hobbyist with a GoPro camera to a complete overhaul of delivery services. “In the press, you always hear that Amazon will deliver a book, or pizzas will come to your house,” says Amar Hanspal, senior vice president at Autodesk, during a recent discussion on drones at Gigaom Structure Connect. “That is a cute thing to talk about, but the real action is in B2B industrial applications. That is where we’re watching the democratization of a broad use of drones...
  • Eating peanuts in early years can prevent allergy, scientists find

    02/24/2015 2:21:02 PM PST · by rickmichaels · 32 replies
    Toronto Sun ^ | Feb. 24, 2015 | KATE KELLAND, REUTERS
    LONDON - In research that contradicts years of health advice, scientists said on Monday that babies at risk of developing a childhood peanut allergy can avoid it if they are given peanuts regularly during their first 11 months.
  • Letter from Ireland: Mystery of the Fulacht Fiadh

    02/19/2015 2:24:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2012 | Erin Mullally
    On a typically misty morning in the west of Ireland, just outside the medieval town of Athenry, County Galway, archaeologist Declan Moore... is taking me to visit an unexcavated fulacht fiadh (pronounced FULL-ahk FEE-add), or fulachtaí fia in plural, the most common type of prehistoric archaeological site in Ireland. Better known as a "burnt mound" in the neighboring United Kingdom, where they are also found, there are nearly 6,000 recorded fulacht fiadh sites dotted around Ireland alone... When we arrive at the site, Moore shows me the basic features of a fulacht fiadh -- a horseshoe-shaped mound of soil and...
  • Ancient artefacts at Tullaghoge [Ireland, 5000 BC]

    02/19/2015 1:31:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | February 15, 2015 | unattributed
    An archaeological bid to discover more about the hilltop where Ulster chieftains were crowned 700 years ago has uncovered artefacts dating back more than 7,000 years. Tullaghoge Fort in rural Co Tyrone was the place leaders of the dominant O'Neill clan came to be crowned from around the 14th Century to just before the arrival of the planters at the start of the 17th Century. Targeted excavation work around the picturesque tree encircled earthen mound ahead of the planned development of new visitor facilities hoped to find and preserve buried artefacts from that period -- but it ended up unearthing...
  • Butchered Bones Found in Yukon Cave Bear Marks of Early Americans, Study Finds

    02/13/2015 12:15:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Western Digs ^ | February 12, 2015 | Blake de Pastino
    They're probably about half as old as scientists once thought they were. But a pair of butchered bones found in a cave near the Alaska-Yukon border are "definite" evidence of human presence in North America just after the end of the last Ice Age, perhaps as much as 14,000 years ago, according to a new study. The bones were originally discovered in the late 1970s by Canadian archaeologist Dr. Jacques Cinq-Mars at a site known as Bluefish Caves, high in northwestern Yukon Territory. In one of the caves, dubbed Cave 2, archaeologists found more than 18,000 fragments of bones from...
  • ...Why was the wine of the Negev so renowned in the Byzantine Empire...

    02/13/2015 12:07:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Israel Antiquities Authority ^ | February 2015 | unattributed
    For the first time, grape seeds from the Byzantine era have been found. These grapes were used to produce "the Wine of the Negev" -- one of the finest and most renowned wines in the whole of the Byzantine Empire. The charred seeds, over 1,500 years-old, were found at the Halutza excavation site in the Negev during a joint dig by the University of Haifa and the Israel Antiquities Authority. "The vines growing in the Negev today are European varieties, whereas the Negev vine was lost to the world. Our next job is to recreate the ancient wine, and perhaps...
  • Ancient Romans ate meals most Americans would recognize.

    02/10/2015 1:07:35 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    Inside Science ^ | February 3, 2015 | Joel N. Shurkin
    Let's pretend it is 56 B.C. and you have been fortunate enough to be invited to a party at the home of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a great social coup. Piso, after all, was Julius Caesar's father-in-law and a consul of Rome. What's for dinner? You need to prepare for pig. Archaeologists studying the eating habits of ancient Etruscans and Romans have found that pork was the staple of Italian cuisine before and during the Roman Empire. Both the poor and the rich ate pig as the meat of choice, although the rich, like Piso, got better cuts, ate meat...
  • Barley and wheat residues in Neolithic cemeteries of Central Sudan and Nubia

    02/10/2015 12:15:00 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | February 9, 2015 | PLOS ONE
    A research team successfully identified ancient barley and wheat residues in grave goods and on teeth from two Neolithic cemeteries in Central Sudan and Nubia, showing that humans in Africa were already exploited domestic cereals 7,000 years ago and thus five hundred years earlier than previously known. Dr. Welmoed Out from Kiel University said, “With our results we can verify that people along the Nile did not only exploit gathered wild plants and animals but had crops of barley and wheat.” These types of crops were first cultivated in the Middle East about 10,500 years ago and spread out from...
  • Malocclusion and dental crowding arose 12,000 years ago with earliest farmers

    02/07/2015 10:06:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | February 4, 2015 | University College Dublin
    Hunter-gatherers had almost no malocclusion and dental crowding, and the condition first became common among the world's earliest farmers some 12,000 years ago in Southwest Asia... By analysing the lower jaws and teeth crown dimensions of 292 archaeological skeletons from the Levant, Anatolia and Europe, from between 28,000-6,000 years ago, an international team of scientists have discovered a clear separation between European hunter-gatherers, Near Eastern/Anatolian semi-sedentary hunter-gatherers and transitional farmers, and European farmers, based on the form and structure of their jawbones... In the case of hunter-gatherers, the scientists from University College Dublin, Israel Antiquity Authority, and the State University...
  • Dinner At Piso's: Ancient Romans ate meals most Americans would recognize

    02/07/2015 9:01:27 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Inside Science ^ | Tuesday, February 3, 2015 | Joel N. Shurkin, Contributor
    Let's pretend it is 56 B.C. and you have been fortunate enough to be invited to a party at the home of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a great social coup. Piso, after all, was Julius Caesar's father-in-law and a consul of Rome... You need to prepare for pig. Archaeologists studying the eating habits of ancient Etruscans and Romans have found that pork was the staple of Italian cuisine before and during the Roman Empire. Both the poor and the rich ate pig as the meat of choice, although the rich, like Piso, got better cuts, ate meat more often and...
  • Tuberculosis genomes track human history

    01/21/2015 6:34:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Nature ^ | 19 January 2015 Corrected: 20 January 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Although M. tuberculosis probably first emerged some 40,000 years ago in Africa, the disease did not take hold until humans took to farming... A previous analysis by his team had shown that the common ancestor of all the M. bacterium strains circulating today began spreading around 10,000 years ago in the ancient Fertile Crescent, a region stretching from Mesopotamia to the Nile Delta that was a cradle of agriculture... 4,987 samples of the Beijing lineage from 99 countries... the information to date the expansion of the lineage and show how the strains are related... the Beijing lineage did indeed emerge...
  • Ireland's Dairies Date Back 6,000 Years

    01/19/2015 4:45:29 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, January 16, 2015 | editors
    Ninety percent of the fats found in Neolithic cooking pots from Ireland came from dairy products, according to a new study conducted at the University of Bristol. "We know from previous research that dairying was an important part of many early farming economies, but what was a big surprise was the prevalence of dairy residues in Irish pots. It looks to have been a very important food source," said Jessica Smyth of the School of Chemistry. The remaining ten percent of the residues came from beef or mutton fat, or a mixture of milk and meat. "People can obviously cook...
  • World’s Largest Indoor Farm is 100 Times More Productive

    01/12/2015 11:06:39 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 70 replies
    Web Urbanist ^ | January 11, 2015 | Staff
    The statistics for this incredibly successful indoor farming endeavor in Japan are staggering: 25,000 square feet producing 10,000 heads of lettuce per day (100 times more per square foot than traditional methods) with 40% less power, 80% less food waste and 99% less water usage than outdoor fields. But the freshest news from the farm: a new facility using the same technologies has been announced and is now under construction in Hong Kong, with Mongolia, Russia and mainland China on the agenda for subsequent near-future builds. In the currently-completed setup, customized LED lighting developed with GE helps plants grow up...
  • Ancient maize followed two paths into the Southwest

    01/11/2015 6:11:38 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | January 8, 2014 | University of California - Davis
    The study, based on DNA analysis of corn cobs dating back over 4,000 years, provides the most comprehensive tracking to date of the origin and evolution of maize in the Southwest and settles a long debate over whether maize moved via an upland or coastal route into the U.S. Study findings, which also show how climatic and cultural impacts influenced the genetic makeup of maize, will be reported Jan. 8 in the journal Nature Plants. The study compared DNA from archaeological samples from the U.S. Southwest to that from traditional maize varieties in Mexico, looking for genetic similarities that would...
  • Top food was olives in time of the ancient mariner

    08/15/2010 10:35:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    al-Reuters ^ | Thursday, August 12, 2010 | Michele Kambas (ed by Paul Casciato)
    A huge quantity of olive stones on an ancient shipwreck more than 2,000 years old has provided valuable insight into the diet of sailors in the ancient world, researchers in Cyprus said Thursday. The shipwreck, dating from around 400 B.C. and laden mainly with wine amphorae from the Aegean island of Chios and other north Aegean islands, was discovered deep under the sea off Cyprus's southern coast. Excavation on the site, which started in November 2007, has determined that the ship was a merchant vessel of the late classical period. "An interesting piece of evidence that gives us information on...
  • Three cheers for the onion

    01/04/2015 1:26:00 AM PST · by moose07 · 73 replies
    BBC ^ | 4 January 2015 | BBC
    Onions are eaten and grown in more countries than any other vegetable but rarely seem to receive much acclaim. It's time to stop taking the tangy, tear-inducing bulb for granted and give it a round of applause, writes the BBC's Marek Pruszewicz. Deep in the archives of Yale University's Babylonian Collection lie three small clay tablets with a particular claim to fame - they are the oldest known cookery books. Covered in minute cuneiform writing, they did not give-up their secrets until 1985, nearly 4,000 years after they were written. The French Assyriologist and gourmet cook Jean Bottero - a...
  • Eggs of intestinal parasites identified in Late Iron Age site

    01/02/2015 2:26:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | December 30, 2014 | from Journal of Archaeological Science
    The settlement was inhabited around 100 B.C. and is one of the most significant Late La Tene sites in Central Europe. The team found the durable eggs of roundworms (Ascaris sp.), whipworms, (Trichuris sp.) and liver flukes (Fasciola sp.). The eggs of these intestinal parasites were discovered in the backfill of 2000 year-old storage and cellar pits from the Iron Age. The presence of the parasite eggs was not, as is usually the case, established by wet sieving of the soil samples. Instead, a novel geoarchaeology-based method was applied using micromorphological thin sections, which enable the parasite eggs to be...
  • Matter: Gene Linked to Obesity Hasn’t Always Been a Problem, Study Finds

    01/01/2015 9:28:04 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    But the gene doesn’t seem to have always been a problem. If scientists had studied FTO just a few decades ago, they would have found no link to weight whatsoever. A new study shows that FTO became a risk only in people born after World War II. The research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, raises questions that extend far beyond obesity. Genes clearly influence our health in many ways, but so does our environment; often, it is the interplay between them that makes the difference in whether we develop obesity or cancer or...
  • Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits

    09/23/2004 7:24:12 PM PDT · by blam · 40 replies · 1,168+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 9-23-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Sept. 23, 2004 Mummy hair has revealed the first direct evidence of alcohol consumption in ancient populations, according to new forensic research.The study, still in its preliminary stage, examined hair samples from spontaneously mummified remains discovered in one of the most arid regions of the world, the Atacama Desert of northern Chile and southern Peru. The research was presented at the 5th World Congress on Mummy Studies in Turin, Italy, this month. “ In modern human hair the levels would generally be in the ranges of social drinking, but we...
  • Century-old butter found in Scott's Antarctic hut

    12/16/2009 5:43:33 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 28 replies · 1,383+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 12/16/09 | AFP
    WELLINGTON (AFP) – Two blocks of butter have been found intact after nearly a century in an Antarctic hut used by British explorer Robert Falcon Scott on his doomed 1910-12 expedition, a report said. Television New Zealand reported that conservators found the two blocks of New Zealand butter in bags in stables attached to the expedition Hut at Cape Evans in Antarctica. The extreme cold of the polar region has preserved the hut and expedition equipment inside, but recent signs of deterioration had prompted the Antarctic Heritage Trust to launch a preservation project. The trust's Lizzie Meek said the butter...
  • Is eating behavior manipulated by the gastrointestinal microbiota?

    12/27/2014 12:18:08 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 42 replies
    Wiley Online Library ^ | August 7, 2014 | Joe Alcock, Carlo C. Maley and C. Athena Aktipis
    Abstract Microbes in the gastrointestinal tract are under selective pressure to manipulate host eating behavior to increase their fitness, sometimes at the expense of host fitness. Microbes may do this through two potential strategies: (i) generating cravings for foods that they specialize on or foods that suppress their competitors, or (ii) inducing dysphoria until we eat foods that enhance their fitness. We review several potential mechanisms for microbial control over eating behavior including microbial influence on reward and satiety pathways, production of toxins that alter mood, changes to receptors including taste receptors, and hijacking of the vagus nerve, the neural...
  • Human Ancestors Were Consuming Alcohol 10 Million Years Ago

    12/25/2014 4:40:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 83 replies
    Discover 'blogs ^ | December 1, 2014 | Carl Engelking
    Using the tools of paleogenetics, scientists have recently traced the evolutionary history of an enzyme that helps us metabolize ethanol, the principal type of alcohol found in adult beverages. Scientists believe early human ancestors evolved their ethanol-digesting ability about 10 million years ago to fortify their diet as they shifted from a tree-based lifestyle to a more ground-based lifestyle... To help narrow that range, researchers studied the genetic evolution of alcohol-metabolizing enzyme ADH4, which has been present in primates, in one form or another, for at least 70 million years. Using genetic sequences from 28 different mammals, including 17 primates,...
  • Prehistoric Knives Suggest Humans Competed

    02/02/2005 10:06:38 AM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 863+ views
    Discovery ^ | 2-1-2005 | Jennifer Viegas
    Prehistoric Knives Suggest Humans Competed By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Feb. 1, 2005 — A recent excavation of 400,000-year-old stone tools in Britain suggests that two groups of early humans could have competed with each other for food and turf. In the past, anthropologists have argued that only one group of ancient humans lived in Britain, and that these hominids created and used both axes and flake knives, which were made by flaking off small particles from a larger rock, or by breaking off a large flake that was then used as the tool. Some form of prehistoric human had...
  • (English) Channel's Key Role In Pre-History

    09/16/2006 4:31:38 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies · 701+ views
    BBC ^ | 9-16-2006 | Paul Ricon
    Channel's key role in pre-history By Paul Rincon Science reporter, BBC News, Gibraltar The remains we find today tell a story of Britain's ancient past A study of prehistoric animals has revealed the crucial role of the English Channel in shaping the course of Britain's natural history. The Channel acted as a filter, letting some animals in from mainland Europe, but not others. Even at times of low sea level, when Britain was not an island, the Channel posed a major barrier to colonisation. This was because a massive river system flowed along its bed, UK researchers told a palaeo-conference...
  • Last Ice Age happened in less than year say scientists

    08/02/2008 2:28:28 PM PDT · by Renfield · 78 replies · 261+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 8-02-08 | angus howarth
    THE last ice age 13,000 years ago took hold in just one year, more than ten times quicker than previously believed, scientists have warned. Rather than a gradual cooling over a decade, the ice age plunged Europe into the deep freeze, German Research Centre for Geosciences at Potsdam said. Cold, stormy conditions caused by an abrupt shift in atmospheric circulation froze the continent almost instantly during the Younger Dryas less than 13,000 years ago – a very recent period on a geological scale. The new findings will add to fears of a serious risk of this happening again in the...
  • The moment Britain became an island

    02/14/2011 6:31:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 64 replies
    BBC News Magazine ^ | Monday, February 14, 2011 | Megan Lane
    The coastline and landscape of what would become modern Britain began to emerge at the end of the last Ice Age around 10,000 years ago. What had been a cold, dry tundra on the north-western edge of Europe grew warmer and wetter as the ice caps melted. The Irish Sea, North Sea and the Channel were all dry land, albeit land slowly being submerged as sea levels rose. But it wasn't until 6,100BC that Britain broke free of mainland Europe for good, during the Mesolithic period -- the Middle Stone Age. It is thought a landslide in Norway triggered one...
  • Stone Age Elephant Found at Ancient U.K. Hunt Site

    07/10/2006 2:01:44 PM PDT · by ZULU · 33 replies · 1,071+ views
    National Geographic ^ | July 7, 2006 | James Owen
    The 400,000-year-old remains of a massive elephant discovered near London provide the first evidence that Stone Age humans in Britain hunted and ate the ancient animals, scientists say. The early humans butchered the elephant at the kill site and ate the meat raw, the archaeologists add. The male straight-tusked elephant—a member of the extinct species Palaeoloxodon antiquus—weighed about 9 tons (9.1 metric tons), twice as large as elephants living today. Workers unearthed the remains in 2004 in the town of Ebbsfleet, about 20 miles (30 kilometers) east of London (see map of the United Kingdom), during construction of a new...
  • Stone Age Elephant Remains Found (England, Slain By Humans)

    06/21/2004 5:37:15 PM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 808+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-21-2004
    Stone Age elephant remains foundThe skeleton was found at the site of a new station Construction work on the Channel Tunnel Rail Link (CTRL) in Kent has unearthed the 400,000-year-old remains of an elephant. The skeleton was found on the site of the new Ebbsfleet station, an area thought to be an early Stone Age site. Bones from other large animals, including rhinoceros, buffalo and wild horses, have also been found nearby. The remains were preserved in muddy sediment near what was once the edge of a small lake, a spokesman said. The elephant, which has been identified as a...
  • Dental plaque reveals key plant in prehistoric Easter Island diet

    12/19/2014 11:22:29 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Tuesday, 16 December 2014 | Ms Monica Tromp
    Known to its Polynesian inhabitants as Rapa Nui, Easter Island is thought to have been colonised around the 13th Century and is famed for its mysterious large stone statues or moai. Otago Anatomy PhD student Monica Tromp and Idaho State University’s Dr John Dudgeon have just published new research clearing up their previous puzzling finding that suggested palm may have been a staple plant food for Rapa Nui’s population over several centuries. However, no other line of archaeological or ethnohistoric evidence supports palm having a dietary role on Easter Island; in fact evidence points to the palm becoming extinct soon...
  • Remains of 8,000-year-old olive oil found in Lower Galilee

    12/19/2014 1:59:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Jerusalem Post ^ | December 17, 2014 | Daniel K. Eisenbud
    The earliest evidence of the use of olive oil in the country, and possibly the entire Middle East, was unearthed at an excavation site in the Lower Galilee, the Antiquities Authority announced Wednesday. The discovery was made after Dr. Ianir Milevski and Nimrod Getzov directed an archeological salvage excavation at Ein Tzipori between 2011 and 2013. The excavation led to research that indicated that olive oil was already being used in the country 8,000 years ago, during the 6th millennium BCE... These tests revealed that the pottery, dating to the Early Chalcolithic period, contained olive oil, the researchers concluded... Of...
  • Anthropologists: Ancient man was an opportunist, not a paleo dieter

    12/19/2014 8:55:32 AM PST · by Gamecock · 46 replies
    UPI ^ | Dec. 18, 2014 | Brooks Hays
    ATLANTA, Dec. 18 (UPI) -- A new survey by anthropologists calls into question the scientific and historical justification for the paleo diet. Early man, they say, was an opportunist, not a nutritionist or dieter. By now, most people have heard of the paleo diet. The popular diet is named for the Paleolithic Age, the expansive period of prehistory characterized by so-called cavemen and primitive stone tools. Its followers forgo grains and processed foods in favor of meat, fish and vegetables. Its emphasis on protein and whole foods isn't without merit, but its genesis is based on the idea that humans...
  • Jack FM turkey 'cook or save' vote slammed by Brian May [Queen guitarist]

    12/14/2014 8:59:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    BBC ^ | December 11, 2014 | unattributed
    A radio station that asked listeners to vote on whether two turkeys should be killed has been criticised by animal lovers - including Queen guitarist Dr Brian May. And the RSPCA has urged Jack FM to rethink the online vote on whether the turkeys should be cooked or kept alive. The RSPCA said it opposed any practice with the "potential to cause animals pain... in the name of entertainment". Currently, 62% of people have voted to save the turkeys, named Sage and Onion. The Oxfordshire station said if listeners voted to kill the pair in the "cook it or keep...
  • Water's role in the rise and fall of the Roman Empire

    12/13/2014 6:19:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Science Daily ^ | December 11, 2014 | European Geosciences Union
    Smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network enabled the Romans to thrive in the water-limited environment of the Mediterranean, a new study shows. But the stable food supply brought about by these measures promoted population growth and urbanisation, pushing the Empire closer to the limits of its food resources... Brian Dermody, an environmental scientist from Utrecht University, teamed up with hydrologists from the Netherlands and classicists at Stanford University in the US. The researchers wanted to know how the way Romans managed water for agriculture and traded crops contributed to the longevity of their civilisation. They were also curious...
  • Peter Stuyvesant's rules for drinking responsibly (NYC opens historical records)

    12/11/2014 5:04:01 AM PST · by NYer · 34 replies
    Bowery Boys ^ | December 3, 2014
    From A New and Accurate Map of the Entire New Netherland, engraving believed to be by Carolus Allard, courtesy the Department of Records   Over the Thanksgiving holiday, the New York City Department of Records just blew the minds of history geeks everywhere.  They released the first batch of digitized documents from the first years of the city's existence, back when it was the Dutch colony of New Amsterdam. You can find the first batch of released documents at the city's attractive new portal here. This is the equivalent of pulling out old photo albums of you playing with...
  • Virginia brewery taps 300-year-old beer recipe

    12/05/2014 7:35:05 AM PST · by C19fan · 10 replies
    AP ^ | December 4, 2014 | Michael Felderbaum
    What do you get when you combine water, American persimmons and hops and ferment it with yeast? A beer based on a 300-year-old recipe scribbled in a cookbook kept by Virginia's prominent Randolph family. Ardent Craft Ales in Richmond recently brewed "Jane's Percimon Beer" unearthed from the book in the Virginia Historical Society's collections from the 1700s that contains food, medicinal remedies and beer recipes. The formula for the Colonial-era concoction is one of thousands of alcoholic recipes in the society's collection that provide a glimpse into what Virginians and others were drinking in the 18th century and other points...
  • Connecting dots of migration in ancient Southwest [ Anasazi star orientation? ]

    07/03/2009 5:09:44 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 437+ views
    George Johnson ^ | Wednesday, July 1, 2009 | STL Today / St. Louis Post-Dispatch / Associated Press
    From the sky, the Mound of the Cross at Paquime, a 14th-century ruin in the Mexican state of Chihuahua, looks like a compass rose -- the roundish emblem indicating the cardinal directions on a map. About 30 feet in diameter and molded from compacted earth and rock taken near the banks of the Casas Grandes River, the crisscross arms point to four circular platforms. They might as well be labeled N, S, E and W...
  • Ancient Chihuahuas in Southeastern U.S.?

    11/30/2014 5:29:34 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Lost Worlds ^ | February 14, 2012 | Gary C. Daniels
    Do three dog effigy pots excavated in Georgia in the 1930s at the Bull Creek Site and one from the Neisler Mound site represent the Chihuahua breed, a native dog of Mexico? Is the tribe most likely associated with these pots the Kasihta/Cussetta Creek Indians whose migration legends strongly suggest an origin in west Mexico, likely the state of Colima which is also known for similar dog effigy pots? Did the Kasihta raise Chihuahuas for food which they fattened up for this purpose as depicted by the pots and as recorded by early Spanish eye-witness accounts? Finally, does this evidence...
  • Archaeologists Virtually Recreate Ancient Egyptian Brewery

    08/11/2013 10:37:07 AM PDT · by Renfield · 13 replies
    ancient-origins.net ^ | 8-7-2013 | April Holloway
    A Polish archaeologist at the Jagiellonian University Institute of Archaeology has made a 3D reconstruction of a 5,500-year-old brewing installation which was found at Tell el-Farcha, an archaeological site in Egypt dating back to approximately 3700 BC when it functioned as a centre of local Lower Egyptian Culture. The virtual reconstruction has brought to life the ancient scene in which Egyptians practiced a traditional form of beer making. The reconstruction was created based on preserved structures of similar analogous buildings at both Tell el-Farcha and other brewing centres in Upper Egypt. The Tell el-Farcha brewery, the oldest ever brewery found...
  • Archaeologists Rewrite Timeline Of Bronze And Iron Ages, Alphabet

    12/24/2001 5:04:31 AM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 613+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 12-19-2001 | Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
    Archaeologists rewrite timeline of Bronze and Iron Ages, including early appearance of alphabet FOR RELEASE: Dec. 19, 2001 Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr. Office: 607-255-3290 E-Mail: bpf2@cornell.edu ITHACA, N.Y. -- Using information gleaned from the sun's solar cycles and tree rings, archaeologists are rewriting the timeline of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The research dates certain artifacts of the ancient eastern Mediterranean decades earlier than previously thought. And it places an early appearance of the alphabet outside Phoenicia at around 740 B.C. Writing in two articles in the forthcoming issue of the journal Science (Dec. 21), archaeologists from Cornell University ...
  • Nordic Grog Is Latest of Dogfish Head's Ancient Brews

    12/25/2013 2:50:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, December 23, 2013 | editors
    Residues of pottery sherds from ancient Scandinavian settlements dating as far back as 1200 B.C. are the inspiration for Delaware-based brewey Dogfish Head's latest ancient ale, Kvasir. Patrick McGovern, a bioarchaeolgist at the University of Pennsylvania Museum and frequent collaborator with Dogfish Head on these brews calls the drink a Nordic grog. The recipe for Kvasir, which is available in limited quantities now, involves yarrow, lingonberries, cranberries, bog myrtle, and birch syrup. Prior to Kvasir, Dogfish Head brewed Midas Touch, influenced by residues taken from 2,700-year-old pottery found in Turkey, and Chateau Jiahu, an ale that traces its history back...
  • Chemistry Used to Unlock Secrets in Archeological Remains

    04/30/2002 6:10:04 PM PDT · by vannrox · 5 replies · 1,037+ views
    VOA News ^ | 27 Apr 2002 12:35 UTC | Written by Laszlo Dosa , Voiced by Faith Lapidus
    Patrick McGovern "The site is very rich archeologically, has been excavated for the last 50 years by the University of Pennsylvania Museum. It has a large palace area with rooms, some of which are thought to have been kitchens for making the food for the palace, with jars of barley and other goods. Also, it has a whole series of tombs in which the burial was done in a special wooden chamber beneath a very large mound. It's almost as if you cut it yesterday and put the structure together. It is the earliest intact human building made of...
  • King Midas' Modern Mourners

    11/28/2004 6:23:26 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 618+ views
    Science News ^ | Nov. 4, 2000; Vol. 158, No. 19 , p. 296 | Jessica Gorman
    The modern diners sitting before Sams were about to eat the first reconstruction of that feast—a celebration that had remained undiscovered for decades after archaeologist Rodney S. Young first excavated Midas' tomb in 1957. Ancient Roman, Greek, or even Maya banquets had been re-created previously, but generally from texts and ancient recipes. Not so with the Midas feast. "It's the first time that somebody tried to do it working just from the chemical evidence," says Patrick E. McGovern, the museum's molecular archaeologist who led the analyses. In other words, from the pan scrapings.
  • Ancient DNA shows earliest European genomes weathered the Ice Age

    11/07/2014 1:36:13 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    phys.org ^ | Nov 06, 2014
    The study also uncovers a more accurate timescale for when humans and Neanderthals interbred, and finds evidence for an early contact between the European hunter-gatherers and those in the Middle East – who would later develop agriculture and disperse into Europe about 8,000 years ago, transforming the European gene pool. Scientists now believe Eurasians separated into at least three populations earlier than 36,000 years ago: Western Eurasians, East Asians and a mystery third lineage, all of whose descendants would develop the unique features of most non-African peoples - but not before some interbreeding with Neanderthals took place. Led by the...
  • Ancient Europeans remained intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    11/02/2014 8:20:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    University College Dublin ^ | 22 October 2014 | UCD University Relations
    By analysing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making among Central European Neolithic farmers. The findings published in the scientific journal Nature Communications (21 Oct) also suggest that major technological transitions in Central Europe between the Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age were also associated with major changes in the genetics of these populations. For the study, the international team of scientists examined...
  • Fossilized maize, rice found in Temanggung

    11/02/2014 7:31:10 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Jakarta Post ^ | Wednesday, October 29, 2014 | Agus Maryono
    Liyangan archaeological site on the slope of Mount Sindoro in Temanggung regency, Central Java, has again proven its position as home to one of main archeological findings in Indonesia after archeologists from the Yogyakarta Archeology Agency found the fossilized remnants of staple foods, comprising maize and rice, still inside a bamboo basket at the site. The archeologists said the finding indicated that Indonesia had long been part of an international agriculture network because maize was not endemic to Java and at the site they had also found many artifacts from other countries, especially China. Head of the Yogyakarta Archeology Agency,...
  • Roman gladiators' diet probably not what you'd expect, researchers find

    10/21/2014 12:59:30 PM PDT · by dware · 42 replies
    Newser via Fox News ^ | 10.21.2014 | Jenn Gidman
    You'd figure a typical Roman gladiator to be a real meat-and-potatoes guy, right? You'd be figuring wrong—at least if you were talking about gladiators from the city of Ephesus.
  • Clues to Prehistoric Human Exploration Found in Sweet Potato Genome

    01/21/2013 8:39:59 PM PST · by Theoria · 25 replies
    Science ^ | 21 Jan 2013 | Lizzie Wade
    Europeans raced across oceans and continents during the Age of Exploration in search of territory and riches. But when they reached the South Pacific, they found they had been beaten there by a more humble traveler: the sweet potato. Now, a new study suggests that the plant's genetics may be the key to unraveling another great age of exploration, one that predated European expansion by several hundred years and remains an anthropological enigma. Humans domesticated the sweet potato in the Peruvian highlands about 8000 years ago, and previous generations of scholars believed that Spanish and Portuguese explorers introduced the crop...
  • Iberian pig genome remains unchanged after five centuries

    09/27/2014 1:49:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 17, 2014 | Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
    A team of Spanish researchers have obtained the first partial genome sequence of an ancient pig. Extracted from a sixteenth century pig found at the site of the Montsoriu Castle in Girona, the data obtained indicates that this ancient pig is closely related to today's Iberian pig. Researchers also discard the hypothesis that Asian pigs were crossed with modern Iberian pigs. The study, published in Heredity, sheds new light on evolutionary aspects of pig species, and particularly on that of the Iberian breed, considered to be representative of original European Mediterranean populations... The sample dates approximately from the years 1520...
  • The evidence of polygamy is in our genes

    09/26/2014 8:14:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 25, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    In the genetic history of our species, the mamas outnumber the papas. A new study in Investigative Genetics reports that females have made a bigger contribution than men. By studying the DNA of 623 males from 51 populations, the researchers found more genetic diversity in the DNA inherited from mothers than they did in the DNA inherited from fathers. At first glance, these results could be taken to mean that there used to be more women than men. But if you know anything about history, it makes more sense to blame reproductive habits: In many cultures, more women reproduced than...