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Keyword: diabetes

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  • Two-drug combo more effective at lowering blood sugar in diabetes patients

    09/18/2019 12:59:13 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 72 replies
    UPI ^ | Sept. 18, 2019 / 11:08 AM | By Tauren Dyson
    Prescribing metformin and vildagliptin to people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes reduced their long-term blood sugar levels more than single-drug therapy in a recent study. Sept. 18 (UPI) -- When it comes to controlling early symptoms of type 2 diabetes, two drugs are better than one, a new study says. Prescribing metformin and vildagliptin to people newly diagnosed with type 2 diabetes reduced their long-term blood sugar levels more than single-drug therapy, according to findings published Wednesday in The Lancet. The patients also had lower rates of treatment failure than those who only used Metformin, the current first-line drug...
  • The Ketogenic Diet and Diabetes

    09/09/2019 6:32:38 AM PDT · by FtrPilot · 143 replies
    ruled.me ^ | Oct 12th, 2018 | Craig Clarke
    The ketogenic diet was originally developed almost 100 years ago to treat epilepsy. Nowadays, it is used as a nutrition plan by health-conscious men and women to optimize body composition and athletic performance. Recent research suggests that high fat, very-low carb diets have another benefit: They may help control glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and body weight in people with diabetes. The research below shows the ketogenic diet may be an effective tool you can use to manage symptoms of Diabetes, alongside exercise and medication.
  • Man Dies After Taking Cheaper Insulin to Save Money

    08/05/2019 8:53:48 PM PDT · by ransomnote · 74 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | August 5, 2019 | The Mighty
    After aging out of his family health insurance and switching to a cheaper over-the-counter insulin sold at Walmart, a young man with type 1 diabetes has died. Josh Wilkerson was 27 when he died this past June, The Independent reported Monday. When he turned 26 and became too old to remain on his stepfather’s health insurance, his other option was health insurance provided by his workplace, a dog kennel in Virginia. But that plan didn’t cover his $1,200 per month insulin costs. So in late 2018 he began using the ReliOn brand insulin sold over the counter at Walmart, which...
  • Whole body vibration shakes up microbiome, reduces inflammation in diabetes

    08/05/2019 7:39:45 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 36 replies
    /medicalxpress.com ^ | Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University
    In the face of diabetes, a common condition in which glucose and levels of destructive inflammation soar, whole body vibration appears to improve how well our body uses glucose as an energy source and adjust our microbiome and immune cells to deter inflammation, investigators report. For the first time they have described how regular use of whole body vibration can create this healthier mix by yielding a greater percentage of macrophages—cells that can both promote or prevent inflammation—that suppress rather than promote. In their mouse model, investigators at the Medical College of Georgia and Dental College of Georgia at Augusta...
  • The Fundamental Link Between Body Weight and the Immune System

    08/05/2019 6:57:02 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 34 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 2 Aug 2019 | JAMES HAMBLIN
    They found that healthy mice have plenty of bacteria from a genus called Clostridia, but few from Desulfovibrio, and that their guts let most fat pass right through. Those with an altered immune system had fewer Clostridia and more Desulfovibrio, and this microbial balance helped the gut absorb more fats from food. These mice gained more weight and exhibited signs of type 2 diabetes. “Whether this applies in humans, we don't know,” Hooper says, “but this is a tantalizing clue.” The role of the immune system in the gut is to maintain balance. Changes to the body’s defenses, which can happen as a result of...
  • Can an Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes Make the Olympic Track Team?

    07/27/2019 10:56:58 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 8 replies
    Runner's World ^ | July 25, 2019 | Scott Douglas
    You’ll want to be ready if you find yourself on the receiving end of a Kate Hall medicine ball toss. I wasn’t. During a midday early May workout, Hall recruited me to catch her throws and roll the ball back to her. I moved to the middle of the infield at Fitzpatrick Stadium in Portland, Maine. From just inside the track, Hall sprang forward and heaved the 8-pound ball. Next thing I knew, the ball landed just in front of me, bounced, and crashed into my chest. It left a red mark on my sternum that lingered for a week....
  • Most older adults with 'prediabetes' don't develop diabetes: Study

    07/06/2019 1:26:03 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    channel news asia ^ | 06/06/2019
    Researchers followed 2,575 men and women aged 60 and older without diabetes for up to 12 years. At the start of the study, 918 people, or 36 per cent of the group, did have higher-than-normal blood sugar levels that were still below the threshold for diabetes. Only 119 people, 13 per cent of those who started out with elevated blood sugar, went on to develop diabetes. Another 204, or 22 per cent, had blood sugar levels drop enough to no longer be considered prediabetic. Worldwide, about 352 million adults have elevated blood sugar that's not high enough to warrant a...
  • Promising approach: Prevent diabetes with intermittent fasting

    07/05/2019 5:25:06 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 54 replies
    Science Daily ^ | July 2, 2019 | Source: Deutsches Zentrum fuer Diabetesforschung DZD
    Intermittent fasting is known to improve sensitivity to the blood glucose-lowering hormone insulin and to protect against fatty liver. DZD scientists from DIfE have now discovered that mice on an intermittent fasting regimen also exhibited lower pancreatic fat. Fatty liver has been thoroughly investigated as a known and frequently occurring disease. However, little is known about excess weight-induced fat accumulation in the pancreas and its effects on the onset of type 2 diabetes. Intermittent fasting reduces pancreatic fat The team of scientists divided the overweight animals, which were prone to diabetes, into two groups: The first group was allowed to...
  • Low-carb diet may reduce diabetes risk independent of weight loss

    06/22/2019 9:43:14 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 60 replies
    Medical XPress ^ | June 20, 2019 | Misti Crane, The Ohio State University
    A low-carb diet may have benefits for people at risk of developing type 2 diabetes even if they don't lose any weight, a new study suggests. Researchers found that more than half of study participants no longer met the criteria for metabolic syndrome immediately following a four-week low-carb diet. About a third of American adults have the syndrome, according to the American Heart Association. After eating a low-carb diet, more than half the participants saw their metabolic syndrome reversed even though they were fed diets that intentionally contained enough calories to keep their weight stable. After eating the low-carb diet,...
  • People who post ‘God’ and ‘pray’ on Facebook are more likely to develop these...conditions

    06/18/2019 9:48:12 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 55 replies
    MarketWatch ^ | 06/18/2019 | James Wellemeyer
    Facebook... posts may be able to predict whether someone will develop diabetes and other conditions including depression, anxiety, alcohol abuse, sexually-transmitted diseases, and drug abuse better than demographic information like age, sex, and race. People who often use the words “God” and “pray” in their Facebook posts are 15 times more likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than people who rarely use those terms on the platform, a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine finds. Raina Merchant, the lead author of the study and the director of Penn Medicine’s Center for Digital Health, said she didn’t...
  • Undetected diabetes linked to heart attack and gum disease

    06/16/2019 5:36:56 PM PDT · by ConservativeMind · 28 replies
    Medical XPress ^ | June 10, 2019 | Karolinska Institutet
    People with undetected glucose disorders run a higher risk of both myocardial infarction and periodontitis. The results demonstrate the need of greater collaboration between dentistry and healthcare, say the researchers, and possibly of screening for diabetes at dental clinics. Severe periodontitis is already known to be associated with a higher risk of myocardial infarction and lowered glucose tolerance, and diabetes to be more common in people who have suffered a heart attack. The researchers behind these earlier findings have now studied whether undetected glucose disorders (dysglycaemia) - that is, a reduced ability to metabolise sugar—is linked to both these conditions:...
  • FUR REAL Plot to grow human organs inside RATS ‘could cure diabetes’ for some patients...

    06/11/2019 7:13:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    The Sun - UK ^ | 10 Jun 2019, 16:50Updated: 10 Jun 2019, 16:50 | By Sean Keach, Digital Technology and Science Editor
    FULL TITLE: FUR REAL Plot to grow human organs inside RATS ‘could cure diabetes’ for some patients – but branded ‘waste of life’ by animal experts =============================================================== SCIENTISTS will try to grow human organs inside rats and mice, which could then be transplanted to hospital patients. But the controversial experiment – which will attempt to create a pancreas inside – has already been condemned by animal welfare experts as a "waste of life". Scientists plan to create mouse babies that grow human pancreases inside their bodies ============================================================== It attempts to solve a major healthcare problem: the short supply of human...
  • Neotame Market Analysis, Trends, Forecast, 2017 – 2027

    05/30/2019 12:29:56 PM PDT · by Red Badger
    bestmarketherald.com ^ | May 28, 2019 | B. Abishek
    Neotame Market: Global Industry Analysis 2012 – 2016 and Opportunity Assessment; 2017 – 2027 Neotame is an artificial sweetener with off-white to white powder and an intensely sweet taste. Neotame is manufactured from 3,3 –dimethylbutyraldehyde and aspartame. Neotame purification and isolation is carried out by distillation of a portion of the methanol followed by addition of water. Neotame comes in the second generation of artificial sweetener followed by sucralose. Neotame delivers great taste and enhances flavors when used as a sweetener. However, neotame clean, sweet taste like sugar is used in small amount to sweeten foods and beverage. This is...
  • Is high-fructose corn syrup worse than regular sugar? [HFCS]

    05/30/2019 11:03:27 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 99 replies
    Popular Science ^ | May 13, 2019 | By Sara Chodosh
    Many of us believe some kinds of sugar are somehow healthier. High-fructose corn syrup has been a scapegoat for American obesity for the past decade and a half, so you might be surprised to learn that sugar and honey both have more fructose than high-fructose corn syrup. Let’s break down the numbers here. Despite its misleading name, the most commonly used form of HFCS only has 42 percent fructose in comparison to table sugar’s 50 percent. Honey, the beloved natural sweetener, has 49 percent. Standard corn syrup doesn’t have any fructose because it’s 100 percent glucose, which explains how HFCS...
  • Millennials' health plummets after the age of 27: Study finds the generation has unprecedented…[tr]

    05/16/2019 9:48:08 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 99 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 13:21 EDT, 1 May 2019 | Natalie Rahhal
    It’s all downhill from 27, new research reveals. At least if you’re a millennial, chronic conditions and diseases start to rear their heads in your late-20s, and from there things continue to deteriorate, according to a new Blue Cross/Blue Shield report. Millennials as a generation are in overall poorer health than their predecessors, Gen X-ers, with higher rates of depression, hyperactivity, substance misuse, type 2 diabetes and Crohn’s disease, among other chronic conditions. The report authors warn that the healthcare community needs to be aware that millennials are facing growing and perhaps unprecedented health concerns that could cost them years...
  • The wonder drug that could reverse the ageing process

    04/03/2019 11:35:30 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 87 replies
    uk.news.yahoo.com ^ | 3 April 2019 | Sarah Knapton
    With its pudgy body, tired eyes and hair loss, the lower mouse could easily be the father of the sprightly and alert animal nestling alongside. But they are actually the same age, the result of extraordinary trials of drugs which are slowing down or even reversing the ageing process. Scientists now believe that ageing itself is responsible for many major conditions such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, arthritis, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. And they think they have found a way to turn it off. Anti-ageing drugs - dubbed ‘senolytics’ - are currently being trialled in humans and unlike previous tests which...
  • Study ties heart disease, diabetes to cannabis exposure in utero

    02/05/2019 1:29:38 PM PST · by Pining_4_TX · 54 replies
    Medical Express ^ | 02/05/19 | Adela Talbot
    Just because it's legal, doesn't mean it's safe. Exposure to cannabis – and, specifically, to THC – while in utero leads to heart defects and metabolic limitations likely to result in heart disease and diabetes later in life, according to a Western-led study. "My obstetrical colleagues started telling me how patients were self-medicating with cannabis. It's thought to be good to reduce anxiety, nausea and (to increase) appetite," said Daniel Hardy, a Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry professor. "All the studies to date have tried to address how exposure to cannabis in pregnancy influences offspring have been limited to...
  • Insulin costs doubled over five-year period: study

    01/22/2019 11:26:02 AM PST · by yesthatjallen · 38 replies
    The Hill ^ | 01/22/19 | Jessie Hellmann
    Per-person spending on insulin doubled in a recent five-year period, according to a report released Tuesday. Individuals with type 1 diabetes spent an average of $5,705 on insulin in 2016, compared to $2,864 in 2012, according to a study from the Health Care Cost Institute. The dollar amount represents the combined amount paid by a patient and their insurer, and doesn't include discounts given later. The spending jump is largely driven by price increases, the authors wrote, and not because more people are using insulin. Between that period, average daily insulin rose a modest 3 percent, the report says. For...
  • The Strange Marketplace for Diabetes Test Strips

    01/17/2019 10:45:35 AM PST · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    outline.com ^ | January 14, 2019 | Ted Alcorn
    Jeenah Moon for The New York Times On most afternoons, people arrive from across New York City with backpacks and plastic bags filled with boxes of small plastic strips, forming a line on the sidewalk outside a Harlem storefront. Hanging from the awning, a banner reads: “Get cash with your extra diabetic test strips.” Each strip is a laminate of plastic and chemicals little bigger than a fingernail, a single-use diagnostic test for measuring blood sugar. More than 30 million Americans have Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes, and most use several test strips daily to monitor their condition. But...
  • Starbucks is installing Drugs and syringe disposal boxes in bathrooms

    01/09/2019 6:26:05 PM PST · by magellan · 35 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 9 January 2019 | Kate Taylor
    Drugs and syringes have become such a problem in Starbucks bathrooms that the company is installing needle-disposal boxes in certain locations Starbucks is installing boxes for safe disposal of syringes in the bathrooms of certain locations, following workers' reports of discarded needles and sometimes concerning conditions. The coffee giant is exploring remedies after employees expressed fears about being pricked by uncapped needles and experiencing related health risks. Starbucks is testing solutions, including installing sharps-disposal boxes, using heavier-duty trash bags to prevent needle pokes, and removing trash cans from certain bathrooms.