Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $84,600
96%  
Woo hoo!! And now over 96%!! Less than $3.4k to go!! We can do this. Thank you all very much! God bless.

Keyword: curcumin

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Science Finding Medical Promise In Kitchen Cabinets

    06/11/2008 9:24:36 AM PDT · by Incorrigible · 23 replies · 131+ views
    Newhouse News ^ | 6/11/2008 | Brie Zeltner
    Science Finding Medical Promise In Kitchen Cabinets By BRIE ZELTNER   Spices lend food wonderful flavors and also impart health benefits. (Photo by Sean Simmers)     [Cleveland, OH] -- In 1993, an eager biochemist at the University of Texas struggled to put the brakes on a protein he had discovered a few years earlier, a protein that can trigger cancers and inflammatory diseases.Bharat Aggarwal knew that the protein, tumor necrosis factor, or TNF, could cause a whole cascade of inflammation in the human body — a very bad thing. He also knew that turmeric, the yellow curry spice, was...
  • 'Holy powder' ingredient makes membranes behave for better health

    03/07/2009 9:15:48 AM PST · by decimon · 40 replies · 973+ views
    University of Michigan ^ | Mar. 6, 2009 | Unknown
    ANN ARBOR, Mich.---Revered in India as "holy powder," the marigold-colored spice known as turmeric has been used for centuries to treat wounds, infections and other health problems. In recent years, research into the healing powers of turmeric's main ingredient, curcumin, has burgeoned, as its astonishing array of antioxidant, anti-cancer, antibiotic, antiviral and other properties has been revealed. Yet little has been known about exactly how curcumin works inside the body. Now, University of Michigan researchers led by Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy have discovered that curcumin acts as a disciplinarian, inserting itself into cell membranes and making them more orderly, a move that...
  • Compound derived from curry spice is neuroprotective against stroke and traumatic brain injury

    12/15/2010 10:14:26 AM PST · by decimon · 19 replies · 1+ views
    Salk Institute ^ | December 15, 2010 | Unknown
    LA JOLLA, CA--A synthetic derivative of the curry spice turmeric, made by scientists at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, dramatically improves the behavioral and molecular deficits seen in animal models of ischemic stroke and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Two new studies suggest that the novel compound may have clinical promise for these conditions, which currently lack good therapies. Ischemic stroke is the leading cause of disability and the third leading cause of death of older people in the United States, while TBI is the leading cause of death and disability in both civilians and military personnel under the age...
  • Take Turmeric! Indian Spice Improves Bone Density by up to 7%, Study Reveals

    05/10/2017 10:18:15 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 80 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10 May 2017 | Alexandra Thompson
    Worried about osteoporosis? Take turmeric! Indian spice improves bone density by up to 7%, study revealsTurmeric helps to build and repair bone mass in the elderly, a new study reveals. Taking a supplement of the popular Indian spice improves bone density by up to seven per cent over six months, researchers found. A compound in turmeric, known as curcumin, is thought to balance out cells that remove ageing parts of bone before it is replaced, according to previous findings. Almost three quarters of elderly people suffer declining bone density, which can cause osteoporosis and is responsible for around 65,000 potentially...
  • Popular Asian spice can cure Alzheimer's disease

    09/17/2010 6:58:35 AM PDT · by Scythian · 152 replies · 1+ views
    (NaturalNews) Nature is full of various herbs and spices that protect against disease and even treat and cure it. And according to Chris Kilham, an ethnobotanist and Fox News' "Medicine Hunter", turmeric root -- also known in its extract form as curcumin -- is one such powerful spice that appears to both prevent the onset of Alzheimer's disease and even cure it. "People who develop Alzheimer's disease get a sticky plaque in the brain called amyloid beta," explained Kilham to Dr. Manny Alvarez in a recent Fox News interview. Such plaques either develop as a result of Alzheimer's, or they...
  • UCLA-VA study names India dietary staple as potential Alzheimer's weapon

    12/28/2004 10:21:28 PM PST · by Moonman62 · 14 replies · 3,090+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 12/28/04 | UCLA
    Yellow pigment in curry spice blocks, breaks up brain plaques in mice A dietary staple of India, where Alzheimer's disease rates are reportedly among the world's lowest, holds potential as a weapon in the fight against the disease. The new UCLA-Veterans Affairs study involving genetically altered mice suggests that curcumin, the yellow pigment in curry spice, inhibits the accumulation of destructive beta amyloids in the brains of Alzheimer's patients and also breaks up existing plaques. Reporting in the Dec. 7, 2004, online edition of the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the research team also determined curcumin is more effective in inhibiting...
  • Curry 'may slow Alzheimer's'

    06/10/2004 12:41:20 PM PDT · by SupplySider · 40 replies · 991+ views
    BBC News ^ | 21 December 2001
    Curry 'may slow Alzheimer's' A spicy ingredient of many curries may be an effective treatment for Alzheimer's disease, say researchers. A team from the University of California at Los Angeles believes that turmeric may play a role in slowing down the progression of the neurodegenerative disease. The finding may help to explain why rates of Alzheimer's are much lower among the elderly in India than in their Western peers. Previous studies have found that Alzheimer's affects just 1% of people over the age of 65 living in some Indian villages. Vindaloos Turmeric is found in everything from mild Kormas to...
  • Rem'ber haldi, forget Alzheimer's

    06/08/2004 6:27:21 PM PDT · by CarrotAndStick · 35 replies · 449+ views
    The Times of India ^ | TUESDAY, JUNE 08, 2004 08:54:39 PM | CHIDANAND RAJGHATTA
    WASHINGTON : Too bad Ronald Reagan never developed a taste for curry. It might have saved him from Alzheimer's disease. As the former President's death focuses attention on the degenerative brain condition that devastates memory, recent studies have shown that diets rich in curcumin, a compound found in the common Indian curry spice turmeric ( haldi ) can help prevent Alzheimer's. In fact, American researchers reckon the high incidence of turmeric use is one reason why the disease is rare in India . Studies have noted that the elderly living in Indian villages appear to have the lowest incidence of...
  • Curcumin improves memory and mood, new study says

    01/23/2018 8:35:24 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 83 replies
    UCLA ^ | Leigh Hopper
      “Exactly how curcumin exerts its effects is not certain, but it may be due to its ability to reduce brain inflammation, which has been linked to both Alzheimer’s disease and major depression,” said Dr. Gary Small, director of geriatric psychiatry at UCLA’s Longevity Center and of the geriatric psychiatry division at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA, and the study’s first author. The double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 40 adults between the ages of 50 and 90 years who had mild memory complaints. Participants were randomly assigned to receive either a placebo or 90 milligrams of curcumin twice...
  • Taking ibuprofen for long periods found to alter human testicular physiology

    01/09/2018 11:24:57 AM PST · by Red Badger · 53 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | January 9, 2018 | by Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers from Denmark and France has found that taking regular doses of the pain reliever ibuprofen over a long period of time can lead to a disorder in men called compensated hypogonadism. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their study, which involved giving the drug to volunteers and monitoring their hormones and sperm production. To learn more about the possible impacts of the popular anti-inflammation drug Ibuprofen on male fertility when taken for long periods of time, the researchers asked 31 men between the ages of 18 and...
  • Researchers identify the molecular target of J147...nearing clinical trials...Alzheimer's disease

    01/09/2018 12:49:23 PM PST · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | January 9, 2018 | Salk Institute
    The experimental drug J147 is something of a modern elixir of life; it's been shown to treat Alzheimer's disease and reverse aging in mice and is almost ready for clinical trials in humans. Now, Salk scientists have solved the puzzle of what, exactly, J147 does. In a paper published January 7, 2018, in the journal Aging Cell, they report that the drug binds to a protein found in mitochondria, the energy-generating powerhouses of cells. In turn, they showed, it makes aging cells, mice and flies appear more youthful. "This really glues together everything we know about J147 in terms of...
  • Woman, 67, who battled blood cancer for five years 'recovers after treating it with TURMERIC'

    01/03/2018 6:56:28 AM PST · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 04:33 EST, 3 January 2018 | By Ben Spencer, Medical Correspondent
    A woman who battled blood cancer for years without success finally halted the disease with turmeric, it has been reported. Dieneke Ferguson is now leading a normal life after giving up on gruelling treatments that failed to stop it. Doctors say her case is the first recorded instance in which a patient has recovered by using the spice after stopping conventional medical treatments. With her myeloma spreading rapidly after three rounds of chemotherapy and four stem cell transplants, the 67-year-old began taking 8g of curcumin a day – one of the main compounds in turmeric. The cancer, which has an...
  • Turmeric Produces ‘Remarkable’ Recovery in Alzheimer’s Patients

    10/22/2016 5:32:19 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 91 replies
    The Epoch Times ^ | October 13, 2016 | Sayer Ji
    A diagnosis of AlzheimerÂ’s, sadly, has become almost like a rite of passage in so-called developed countries. AlzheimerÂ’s is considered the most common form of dementia, which is defined as a serious loss of cognitive function beyond what is expected from normal aging in previously unimpaired persons. A 2006 study estimated that 26 million people throughout the world suffer from this condition, and that by 2050, the prevalence will quadruple, by which time one in 85 people worldwide will be afflicted with the disease. Given the global extent of the problem, interest is growing in safe and effective preventive and...
  • Curcumin's ability to fight Alzheimer's studied

    01/20/2015 12:46:10 PM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | 01/13/2015 | Provided by Vanderbilt University Medical Center
    One of the most promising new treatments for Alzheimer's disease may already be in your kitchen. Curcumin, a natural product found in the spice turmeric, has been used by many Asian cultures for centuries, and a new study indicates a close chemical analog of curcumin has properties that may make it useful as a treatment for the brain disease. "Curcumin has demonstrated ability to enter the brain, bind and destroy the beta-amyloid plaques present in Alzheimer's with reduced toxicity," said Wellington Pham, Ph.D., assistant professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt and senior author of the...
  • Researchers Find No Significant Health Benefits From Vitamin D Supplements

    01/26/2014 8:37:57 PM PST · by chessplayer · 123 replies
    Healthy people taking vitamin D supplements are unlikely to see any significant impact when it comes to preventing broken bones or cardiovascular conditions, claims new research appearing in the latest edition of The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology. According to the AFP news agency, the study authors reviewed more than 40 previous trials in order to determine whether or not use of these vitamin supplements achieved a benchmark of reducing the risk of heart attacks, strokes, cancer or bone fractures by at least 15 percent. “Previous research had seen a strong link between vitamin D deficiency and poor health in these...
  • Branded Curcumin Matches Effects of Prozac on Depression

    07/28/2013 11:19:21 AM PDT · by neverdem · 49 replies
    WholeFoods Magazine ^ | 7/24/13 | NA
    Chester, NJ—A recent clinical trial published in Phytotherapy Research indicated that a high-absorption curcumin (BCM-95 from Dolcas Biotech, based here) had similar effects as a generic form of Prozac (fluoxetine) on depression, sans the adverse effects. “It is a novel and surprising application for this natural medicine,” said Ajay Goel, Ph.D., Baylor Research Institute and Charles A Sammons Cancer Center, Baylor University Medical Center and study co-author. “People with depression have higher levels of inflammation in the brain. Also, people with depression have lower levels of neurogenesis in the brain, meaning they make fewer new brain cells than people with no...
  • Thalidomide teams-up with turmeric to kill myeloma cells

    07/02/2013 8:00:41 PM PDT · by neverdem · 53 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 2 July 2013 | Sonja Hampel
    One of the curcumin–thalidomide hybridsCancer researchers in the US and China have combined the turmeric spice pigment curcumin and the drug thalidomide to create hybrid compounds that can kill multiple myeloma cells.Multiple myeloma is the second most common type of blood cancer, killing 20% of affected patients each year. The drug thalidomide, banned after causing birth defects when given during pregnancy in the 1950s, was recently rediscovered and approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma. Thalidomide works by disturbing the microenvironment of tumour cells in bone marrow. However, it disintegrates in the body. Curcumin, a yellow pigment from the common...
  • Pfizer and J&J end testing of intravenous bapineuzumab Alzheimer’s treatment

    08/08/2012 10:33:52 PM PDT · by neverdem · 15 replies
    Washington ^ | August 6, 2012 | Associated Press
    NEW YORK — Pfizer Inc. and Johnson & Johnson said Monday they are ending development of an intravenous formulation of a drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease after the treatment failed in two late-stage clinical trials. The companies said bapineuzumab intravenous did not work better than placebo in two late-stage trials in patients who had mild to moderate Alzheimer’s disease. The drug is designed to prevent the buildup of plaque in the brain. J&J said it is not discontinuing development of the compound and noted it has ongoing studies including a mid-stage neuroimaging study with bapineuzumab delivered subcutaneously...
  • Curcumin, ingredient of turmeric, stops viruses (and type 2 diabetes, some cancers, etc.)

    08/19/2012 9:48:47 PM PDT · by rjbemsha · 20 replies
    Physorg ^ | 16 Aug 2012 | Michele McDonald
    Curcumin shows promise in fighting devastating viruses. It stopped the potentially deadly Rift Valley Fever virus from multiplying in infected cells, says Aarthi Narayanan, lead investigator on the new study and a research assistant professor with Mason's National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases. "Curcumin is, by its very nature, broad spectrum," Narayanan says. "However, in the published article, we provide evidence that curcumin may interfere with how the virus manipulates the human cell to stop the cell from responding to the infection." Ultimately, curcumin could be part of drug therapies that help defeat these [deadly] viruses, Narayanan says. "I...
  • Primary component in turmeric kicks off cancer-killing mechanisms in human saliva

    09/13/2011 6:35:17 AM PDT · by decimon · 6 replies
    Study could have an impact in fighting head and neck cancersCurcumin, the main component in the spice turmeric, suppresses a cell signaling pathway that drives the growth of head and neck cancer, according to a pilot study using human saliva by researchers at UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center. The inhibition of the cell signaling pathway also correlated with reduced expression of a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines, or signaling molecules, in the saliva that promote cancer growth, said Dr. Marilene Wang, a professor of head and neck surgery, senior author of the study and a Jonsson Cancer Center researcher. "This study...