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Posts by Homer_J_Simpson

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  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 7:01:48 PM PDT · 25 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to fso301

    The FB friend suspects it is staged for the camera. I am beginning to think he is right.

  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 12:37:04 PM PDT · 21 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to fso301
    I’d be interested in seeing the original p11 photo of the GIs and the knocked out tank in the ditch. Something strikes me as suicidal about firing a bazooka at that range from an exposed position.

    My FB friend came through. I speculated over there as to whether the bazooka man just fired a second shot, since it looks like the tank was already in the ditch with a tread off. It might have been farther away for the first shot.

     photo 1025-halsey30_zpsebbc4587.jpg
  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 7:10:19 AM PDT · 19 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to fso301

    I put in a request with the facebook World War II 70th Anniversary group administrator who manages to find the originals of many of the photos I post.

  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 5:03:46 AM PDT · 7 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/9/25.htm

    October 25th, 1944 (WEDNESDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM: Shortly after take off from a base England, the pilot of the 486th BG, USAAF, B-17 “Deepseat - Baker” was informed that a ground man, a Corporal, had stowed away on board. The pilot radioed the Air Leader for advice and was told to continue the emission as there was flight clothing aboard and an oxygen mask in the bomber. The Corporal was originally in a distressed state but appeared to settle down in the rear fuselage.

    When the bomber had reached 19,000 feet on its way to the target, and while the waist gunner was looking out his window, the stowaway suddenly released the side door and jumped out. He was not wearing a parachute. (Skip Guidry)

    NETHERLANDS: US troops attack the German pocket south of Maas. In the Canadian First Army’s II Corps area, the Canadian 2d Division, working slowly west along the Beveland Isthmus, reaches Rilland. In the British I Corps area, the U.S. 104th Infantry Division drives north with three regiments abreast toward Zundert.

    FRANCE: In the U.S. Seventh Army’s XV Corps area, the 44th Infantry Division withstands repeated counterattacks against its positions east of Forét de Parroy. The French 2d Armoured Division is ordered to attack on the right flank of the corps in support of the VI Corps before 1 November. In VI Corps area, the 36th Infantry Division attempts in vain to relieve an isolated battalion of the 141st Infantry Regiment north of La Houssière.

    Headquarters, USAAF First Tactical Air Force (Provisional) is established, but not yet organized, therefore Headquarters Ninth Air Force continues to administer, supply, and control all XII Tactical Air Command and assigned units until mid- November when the First Tactical Air Force assumes full control. The First Tactical Air Force (First TACAF) is assigned to the U.S. Strategic Air Forces in Europe which has some operational control of the Eighth and Fifteenth Air Forces and some administrative control of the Eighth and Ninth Air Forces. Composed of both French Air Force and USAAF units, the new air force will provide tactical air support for the U.S. Seventh Army in southern France.

    GERMANY: Berlin: Himmler orders the Reich Anatomical Institute’s collection of Jewish death camp victims’ skeletons to be destroyed.

    The USAAF Eighth Air Force flies Mission 688: 1,250 bombers and 522 fighters are dispatched to hit oil and industrial targets in western Germany; two bombers and a fighter are lost: 718 aircraft hit the Rhenania oil refinery at Hamburg, 216 bomb the Bf 109 repair facility at Neumunster, 92 bomb the Buer and 27 hit the Nordstern synthetic oil refineries at Gelsenkirchen, 100 attack the marshalling yard at Hamm, 37 bomb the marshalling yard at Munster, and six aircraft attack targets of opportunity.

    Shortly after take off from their base at Subury, Suffolk, England, the pilot of the USAAF Eighth Air Force’s 486th Bombardment Group (Heavy) B-17 Flying Fortress named “Deepseat - Baker” is informed that a ground man, a Corporal, has stowed away on board. The pilot radios the Air Leader for advice and is told to continue the mission as there is flight clothing aboard and an oxygen mask in the bomber. The Corporal is originally in a distressed state but appears to settle down in the rear fuselage. When the bomber has reached 19,000 feet (5 791 meters) on its way to the target, and while the waist gunners are looking out the windows, the stowaway suddenly releases the side door and jumps out. He is not wearing a parachute. (Skip Guidry)

    USAAF Ninth Air Force’s 9th Bombardment Division’s missions are cancelled because of bad weather. Fighters fly sweeps, hit rail and military targets in the Saarbrucken area, and support the U.S. XIX Corps in western Germany.

    During the day, RAF Bomber Command sends 771 aircraft, 508 Lancasters, 251 Halifaxes and 12 Mosquitos, to attack Essen; 740 aircraft bomb the city withe the loss of two Halifaxes and two Lancasters. The bombing is aimed at skymarkers, because the target area is covered by cloud. The Bomber Command report states that the attack became scattered, but the local Essen report shows that more buildings are destroyed, 1,163, than in the heavier night attack which had taken place 36 hours previously. A photographic reconnaissance flight which took place after this raid shows severe damage to the remaining industrial concerns in Essen, particularly to the Krupps steelworks. Some of the war industry has already moved to small, dispersed factories but the coal mines and steelworks of the Ruhr are still important. The Krupps steelworks are particularly hard-hit by the two raids and there are references in the firm’s archives to the “almost complete breakdown of the electrical supply network” and to “a complete paralysis.” The Borbeck pig-iron plant ceases work completely and there is no record of any further production from this important section of Krupps. Much of Essen’s surviving industrial capacity is now dispersed and the city lost its role as one of Germany’s most important centres of war production. A second target is the Meerbeck synthetic oil plant at Homberg. A total of 243 aircraft, 199 Halifaxes, 32 Lancasters and 12 Mosquitos are dispatched to this target and 228 attack without loss. The target is covered by cloud and bombing is scattered in the early stages but later became more concentrated on the skymarkers. No aircraft are lost.

    U-1306, U-2523, U-3014 launched.

    U-3527 laid down.

    AUSTRIA: Weather again interferes with USAAF Fifteenth Air Force operations and only seven B-17 Flying Fortresses bomb three targets: three each bomb the Main marshalling yard at Innsbruck an aircraft factory at Klagenfurt while one hits the marshalling yard at St. Viet.

    NORWAY: Soviet units capture Kirkenes. There is support from Soviet naval units in this far north campaign.

    YUGOSLAVIA: During the night of 25/26 October, 25 bombers of RAF’s No. 205 (Heavy Bomber) Group fly supplies to the partisans.

    ITALY: The British V Corps reaches the River Ronco.

    In U.S. Fifth Army area, elements of the South African 6th Armoured Division wade Setta Creek and take Hill 501, below Mt. Sole. In the II Corps area, further efforts to deepen the Mt. Grande salient, during the night of 25/26 October, are costly failures. In the British XIII Corps area, the 61st Brigade of the 6th Armoured Division gets elements to Mt. Taverna, night of 25/26 October, but withdraws them because of tenuous supply situation.

    In the British Eighth Army area, V Corps reaches the Ronco River from heights across from Meldola to Highway 9. The 4th Division takes Forlimpopoli without a fight. In an attack across the Ronco River during the night of 25/26 October, the Indian 10th Division establishes small bridgeheads south and north of Meldola and the 4th Division crosses two companies northwest of Selbagnone and two others at Highway 9. The Canadian I Corps continues to pursue Germans toward the Ronco River, with coastal elements reaching the Bevano River.

    Weather continues to ground USAAF Twelfth Air Force medium bombers; fighter-bombers attack guns, vehicles, and communications in the battle area south of Bologna while fighters destroy 20+ locomotives in the Piacenza area. .

    ROMANIA: Transylvania is completely cleared by Soviet advances.

    CHINA: Seven USAAF Fourteenth Air Force P-38 Lightnings and P-51 Mustangs hit the Mongyu bridges and destroy the Kawnghka bridge; four others strafe Nawnghkio Airfield; 20+ P-51s and P-40s on armed reconnaissance attack targets of opportunity at Tengyun, Kweiping, and Ssuanghsu, and about 50 strike targets throughout the Menghsu area.

    BURMA: Subadar Ram Sarup Singh (b.1919), 1st Punjab Regt., led his platoon in seizing an objective and then repelling a fierce attack. Already shot, he went on until he was fatally wounded. (Victoria Cross)

    The Northern Combat Area Command’s (NCAC’s) offensive continues against light resistance. The 29th Brigade of the British 36th Division, which has progressed 23 miles (37 kilometers) from Namma against negligible opposition, skirmishes with the Japanese in the Mawpin area.

    THAILAND: Six USAAF Fourteenth Air Force B-25 Mitchells and four P-38 Lightnings damage railroad tracks at Dara bridge.

    JAPAN: Fifty nine USAAF XX Bomber Command B-29 Superfortresses, flying out of Chengtu, China, bomb an aircraft plant at Omura on Kyushu; several other B-29s hit alternate targets and targets of opportunity.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: Twenty nine USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb Iwo Jima during the morning.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES: The US 1st Cavalry Division continues its advance in the NE of Leyte. To the south US advances are held up due to lack of supply.

    In the U.S. Sixth Army’s area on Leyte, patrol contact is established between X and XXIV Corps at 1430 hours. In the X Corps area, on northern Leyte, Japanese aircraft attack Babatngon harbor. The 1st Squadron of the 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, during the next few days explores the coast of Carigara Bay and finds few Japanese there. In the Palo area, the 3d Battalion of 34th Infantry Regiment takes Hill C. The 2d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, gains the crest of Hill B after Japanese defenders have followed their customary practice of retiring from it for the night. The 1st Battalion, 19th, takes Hill 85. Reduction of these heights clears the entrance into the northern Leyte Valley. 3d Battalion, 19th Infantry Regiment, starts toward Pastrana, reaching Castilla. In the XXIV Corps area, a patrol of the 383d Infantry Regiment, 96th Infantry Division, moves north through Tanauan and makes contact with Company K of the 19th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. Company K, reinforced, attacks Tabontabon but withdraws when it finds the town too strongly held to take. The 382d Infantry Regiment seizes Aslom and Kanmonhag. After preparatory bombardment, 2d and 3d Battalions of the 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, preceded by tanks, continue their attack toward Buri airstrip. The 3d Battalion reaches the edge of the airfield but the 2d is halted by elaborate defenses at edge of woods to the north. The 17th Infantry Regiment, opposed from a ridge north of Burauen and east of the road to Dagami, makes limited advance while concentrating for another drive toward Dagami, clearing the eastern spur of the ridge and probing the road to barrio of Buri.

    USN submarine USS Nautilus (SS-168) lands men and supplies on the east coast of Luzon.

    The Battle of Leyte Gulf continues with the sinking of the USS Midway (CVE-63). (Ken Friedman)

    The battleship USS Mississippi shuts down its big guns just after 4.09am, presumably the last main battery battleship to battleship round. (Stanley Sandler)

    The Battle for Leyte Gulf continues as Task Group 77.2 (TG 77.2) with six battleships, four heavy cruisers (one Australian), four light cruisers and 28 destroyers (one Australian) under Rear Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf, augmented by TG 77.3 [Australian heavy cruiser, two light cruisers and 13 destroyers (one Australian)] under Rear Admiral Russell S. Berkey) and TG 70.1 (39 motor torpedo boats) execute the classic maneuver of “crossing the tee” of the Japanese “Southern Force” (Vice Admiral NISHIMURA Shoji and Vice Admiral SHIMA Kiyohide) in the Battle of Surigao Strait. The PT boats begin the action against the Japanese ships. PT-137 torpedoes light cruiser HIJMS Abukuma, but PT-493 is sunk by Japanese secondary battery gunfire. The destroyers then attack; USS McDermut (DD-677) sinks destroyer HIJMS Yamagumo about 53 nautical miles (98 kilometers) south-southeast of Tacloban, Leyte, and damages destroyers HIJMS Asagumo and Michisio. Subsequently, light cruiser USS Denver (CL-58) sinks HIJMS Asagumo at entrance of Surigao Strait about 73 nautical miles (136 kilometers) south-southeast of Tacloban. Destroyer Squadron 24 (DESRON 24) enters the fray and USS Hutchins (DD-476) sinks destroyer HIJMS Michisio about 54 nautical miles (101 kilometers) south-southeast of Tacloban; DESRON 56 attacks; USS Albert W. Grant (DD-649) is damaged by both friendly and Japanese gunfire at this phase of the battle. Two Australian warships take part in this fleet action, heavy cruiser HMAS Shropshire (83) in TG 77.3 and destroyer HMAS Arunta I 30) in DESRON 24, that see the destruction of battleships HIJMS Fuso and Yamashiro about 53 nautical miles (98 kilometers) south-southeast of Tacloban. Heavy cruiser HIJMS Mogami and destroyer Shigure are damaged.

    Meanwhile, the “Center Force” (Vice Admiral KURTIA Takeo), which includes four battleships and five heavy cruisers, having passed into the Philippine Sea during the night, surprises the Escort Carrier Group, TG 77.4 (Rear Admiral Thomas L. Sprague), off Samar. Kurita’s force wreaks havoc on the six escort aircraft carriers, three destroyers, and four destroyer escorts of TU 77.4.3 (northernmost carrier force) (Rear Admiral Clifton A. F. Sprague). In this battle, which becomes a precipitate flight in the face of an overwhelming Japanese force, Kurita’s ships inflict severe damage but emerge bloodied by the Homeric efforts of the “small boys” (destroyers and destroyer escorts) and planes from the escort aircraft carriers (CVEs) that compel Kurita to retire, inexplicably, without destroying the CVEs and their consorts in detail. In the Battle off Samar, Japanese surface gunfire sinks destroyers USS Hoel (DD-533) about 88 nautical miles (163 kilometers) east of Tacloban, Leyte; Johnston about 65 nautical miles (120 kilometers) east of Tacloban; and destroyer escort USS Samuel B. Roberts (DE-413) about 71 nautical miles (131 kilometers) east of Tacloban; and damages destroyer USS Heermann (DD-523) and destroyer escort USS Dennis (DE-405). USS Johnston damages heavy cruiser HIJMS Kumano before being sunk.

    Japanese surface gunfire (either battleship HIJMS Haruna or Kongo) straddles the escort aircraft carrier USS White Plains (CVE-66), St.Lo (CVE-63), and Kitkun Bay (CVE- 71) but scores no direct hits. Heavy cruisers HIJMS Chikuma, Haguro, and Chokai; light cruiser HIJMS Noshiro; and a destroyer sink escort aircraft carrier Gambier Bay (CVE-73) about 69 nautical miles (128 kilometers) east-southeast of Tacloban; the ship capsizes and sinks at 0907 hours; nearly 800 sailors are rescued. Japanese surface gunfire also damages the escort aircraft carriers USS Fanshaw Bay (CVE-70) and Kalinin Bay (CVE-68); the latter claims one hit on a Japanese heavy cruiser with her single 5-inch (12,7 centimeter) gun. Navy carrier-based aircraft damage battleships HIJMS Kongo (from near-misses) and Yamato and heavy cruisers HIJMS Chikuma, Chokai, and Suzuya.

    Subsequently, Japanese planes attack the escort aircraft carriers of TU 77.4.1 (Rear Admiral Thomas L. Sprague). USS Suwannee (CVE-27) is damaged by kamikazes, and Santee (CVE-29) by suicide plane and Japanese submarine HIJMS I-56. Kamikazes near-miss escort aircraft carriers USS Sangamon (CVE-26) and Petrof Bay (CVE-80) while destroyer escort USS Richard M. Rowell is damaged by strafing.

    Following its ordeal off Samar, TU 77.4.3 (Rear Admiral Clifton A.F. Sprague) comes under Japanese air attack. Kamikazes sink the escort aircraft carrier USS St.Lo (CVE-63) about 69 nautical miles (128 kilometers) east-southeast of Tacloban; one plane crashed through her flight deck at 1051 hours, and explodes her torpedo and bomb magazine, setting the ship on fire and she sinks about 30 minutes later. USS Kalinin Bay (CVE-68) and Kitkun Bay (CVE-71) are also damaged by Kamikazes.

    In the Battle off Cape Engano, Luzon, carrier aircraft from the Third Fleet (Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr.) strike the Japanese “Northern Force” (Vice Admiral OZAWA Jisaburo). Planes from aircraft carriers USS Essex (CV-9) and Lexington (CV-16) sink Japanese carriers HIJMS Zuikaku Chitose about 218 nautical miles (404 kilometers) east-northeast of Aparri on northern Luzon, Philippine Islands; aircraft carrier HIJMS Chiyoda, damaged by planes from aircraft carriers USS Lexington (CV-16) and Franklin (CV-13) and small aircraft carrier Langley (CVL-27), is sunk by heavy cruisers USS New Orleans (CA-32) and Wichita (CA-45) and light cruisers USS Santa Fe (CL-60) and Mobile (CL-63) about 292 nautical miles (540 kilometers) east of Aparri. The aircraft carrier HIJMS Zuiho is sunk by planes from Essex (CV-9), Franklin (CV-13), Lexington (CV-16), Enterprise (CV-6), and small aircraft carrier USS San Jacinto (CVL-30) about 247 nautical miles (457 kilometers) east-northeast of Aparri.

    U.S. aircraft, during the Battle for Leyte Gulf, damage Japanese battleships HIJMS Yamato and Nagato and heavy cruiser HIJMS Myoko in San Jose Strait; battleship HIJMS Haruna, east of Samar; light cruiser HIJMS Yahagi off Leyte; destroyer HIJMS Kiyoshimo off Leyte. Heavy cruiser HIJMS Chikuma, damaged by carrier-based aircraft (TU 77.4.2) off Samar, is scuttled by destroyer HIJMS Nowaki about 72 nautical miles (133 kilometers) east of Tacloban, Leyte; heavy cruiser HIJMS Suzuya, damaged by carrier- based aircraft off Samar, is scuttled by destroyer Okinami about 88 nautical miles (162 kilometers) east-northeast of Tacloban; heavy cruiser HIJMS Chokai, damaged by carrier-based aircraft (TU 77.4.2) off Samar, is scuttled by destroyer Fujinami about 71 nautical miles (132 kilometers) east of Tacloban; heavy cruiser HIJMS Mogami, damaged by heavy cruisers USS Minneapolis (CA-36), Portland (CA-33), Louisville (CA-28), light cruisers USS Columbia (CL-56) and Denver (CL-58), and collision with Japanese heavy cruiser HIJMS Nachi, south of Bohol Island, is scuttled by destroyer HIJMS Akebono about 60 nautical miles (112 kilometers) northwest of Butuan, Mindanao; light cruiser HIJMS Tama is sunk by aircraft from USS Essex (CV-9) and Lexington (CV-16) and submarine USS Jallao (SS-368) about 166 nautical miles (308 kilometers) northeast of Aparri, Luzon; destroyer HIJMS Hatsuzuki is sunk by the gunfire of four heavy cruisers and 12 destroyers about 85 nautical miles (158 kilometers) northeast of Aparri; and submarine USS Halibut (SS-232) sinks Japanese destroyer HIJMS Akizuki about 99 nautical miles (184 kilometers) northeast of Aparri. (Skip Guidry and Jack McKillop)

    Japanese air attacks continue against shipping off Leyte: U.S. freighter SS Adoniram Judson is attacked by Japanese planes off Tacloban; Armed Guard gunners claim splashing six aircraft. One bomb explodes close aboard, causing fragmentation damage and wounding two of the embarked stevedores. There are no casualties to the ship’s company, 43 merchant seamen and 28 Armed Guards. Freighter SS John W. Foster, anchored in San Pedro Bay, is strafed; seven of the 27-man Armed Guard, three of 170 embarked troops, and an officer, are wounded.

    Allied aircraft and submarines are active:

    - At 0900 hours in the Sea of Okhotsk, USS Seal (SS-183) sinks a Japanese transport about 163 nautical miles (303 kilometers) west-northwest of Onnekotan Island in the Kurile Islands in position 50.18N, 150.50E. (Skip Guidry)

    - At 044 hours, USS Sterlet (SS-392) sinks a Japanese merchant tanker about 91 nautical miles (168 kilometers) south-southwest of Kagoshima, Kyushu, Japan, in position 30.15N, 129.45E. (Skip Guidry)

    - Around 0230 in waters in the northwest corner of the Formosa Straits, USS TANG fires her last torpedo at a transport and the crew watches in horror as the torpedo makes a circular run and striking the ship portside aft near the maneuvering room. The stern sinks immediately and rests on the bottom with the bow sticking out of the water like a buoy. Motor Machinist Mate Second Class Clayton O. Decker opens the forward ballast tanks and Tang rests upright on the bottom in 180 feet (55 meters) of water. This leads the way for the only instance in WWII where submariners escape from the bottom using the Momsen Lung. A total of 13 make the attempt from the forward torpedo room with only five surviving the ascent and swimming through the night. One man escapes from the flooded conning tower and three others including the captain, Commander Dick O’Kane, survive by being thrown into the water from the bridge. (Sheldon Levy)

    - A Japanese fleet tanker Matsumoto Maru sinks as the result of damage inflicted by submarine USS Tang (SS-306) in Formosa Strait the day before about 62 nautical miles (115 kilometers) south-southeast of Fuzhou, China, in position 25.07N, 119.45E.

    - British submarine HMS/M Tantivy (P 319) sinks a Japanese motor sail ship in the Flores Sea in the East Indies north of Timor. (Jack McKillop_.

    - USN F4U Corsairs sink a Japanese auxiliary submarine chaser north of the Palau Islands in the Caroline Islands.

    - 50+ USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators, supported by P-38 Lightnings and P-47 Thunderbolts, attack naval forces in the Mindanao Sea of the Philippine Islands, firing small vessels and claiming a light cruiser damaged. They actually sink a merchant tankers in the South China Sea about 328 nautical miles (608 kilometers) north-northwest of Jesselton, British North Borneo in position 11.18N, 114.50E.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators attack shipping in the Makassar-Kendari area. In the Halmahera Islands, fighter-bombers hit barges and villages in areas of Dodinga and Dodinga. B-25 Mitchells, A-20 Havocs, and fighter-bombers hit Piroe and Saparoea in the Moluccas Islands, Boela Aerodrome and Halong and Amboina on Ceram, Haroekoe on Haroekoe Island, and northern Ceram coastal targets.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20 Havocs attack supply and fuel dumps in the Sarmi area.

    AUSTRALIA: 10 Group (RAAF) is renamed as the First Tactical Air Force, RAAF. Headquarters of this new unit, which controls eight RAAF squadrons, is established on Morotai Island. (Daniel Ross)

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: During the day four USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators, on an armed reconnaissance missions, bomb Yap Island. .

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Around 0230 in waters in the northwest corner of the Formosa Straits, USS TANG fires her last torpedo and the crew watches in horror as it makes a circular run and striking the ship portside aft near the manoeuvring room. The stern sinks immediately and rests on the bottom with the bow sticking out of the water like a buoy.

    MM2 Clayton O. Decker opens the forward ballast tanks and TANG rests upright on the bottom in 180 feet of water. This leads the way for the only instance in WWII where submariners escape from the bottom using the Momsen Lung. A total of 13 make the attempt from the forward torpedo room with only five surviving the assent and swimming through the night. One man escapes from the flooded conning tower and three others including Cdr Dick O’Kane survive from being thrown into the water from the bridge. (Sheldon)

    0400 hours: USS Sterlet (SS-392) sinks and a cargo ship at 30-15 N, 129-45 E.

    0900 hours: USS Seal (SS-183) sinks an armed transport at 50-21 N, 150-20 E.

    1900 hours: USS Halibut (SS-232) sinks a destroyer (Akitzuki) at 20-29 N, 126-30 E.

    2200 hours: USS Jallao (SS-368) sinks a light cruiser (Tama) at 21-33 N, 127-19 E east of Luzon Strait. (Skip Guidry)

    U.S.A.: Authorization is given for US forces to fire proximity fuzed shells over land for Anti-Aircraft and antipersonnel uses. (Will O’Neil)(218 pp.277 et seq)

    Minesweeper USS Quest commissioned.

    Destroyer escort USS Thaddeus Parker commissioned.

    Submarine USS Tigrone commissioned.

    Destroyer USS Zellars commissioned.

    ATLANTIC OCEAN: Destroyer HMCS Skeena anchored at Reykjavik dragged her anchor and is driven ashore on Videy Island. Bad weather prevented salvage, and she was written off as a total loss in December. (Alex Gordon)(108)

    An escort attacked U-246 with depth charges and damaged her so seriously that she had return to base.

    ICELAND: Canadian destroyer HMCS Skeena (D 59) anchored at Reykjavik dragged her anchor and is driven ashore on Videy Island. Bad weather prevents salvage, and she is written off as a total loss in December. Fifteen ratings (enlisted men) are lost. (Alex Gordon)

  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 5:00:32 AM PDT · 6 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://onwar.com/chrono/1944/oct44/25oct44.htm

    American victory in Leyte Gulf
    Wednesday, October 25, 1944 www.onwar.com

    A Kamikazi strikes an American escort carrier at Leyte Gulf [photo at link]

    In the Philippines... On land, the US 1st Cavalry Division continues advancing on the northeast coast of Leyte. Other elements of US 10th and US 24th Corps, to the south, are inactive because of a lack of supplies. At sea, the Japanese Southern Force (Nishimura) and the 2nd Striking Force (Shima) engage American forces, commanded by Admiral Oldendorf, blocking the Surigao Strait. After suffering losses the Japanese withdraw. The Center Force (Kurita) passes through the San Bernardino Strait and engages US Task Force 77.4.3 (Sprague) which is then reinforced by aircraft from TF77.4.2 as it attempts to retreat. Center Force suffers some losses and Admiral Kurita chooses to withdraw because he believes the aircraft are from US Task Force 38. While Center Force turns back, TF77.4.3 is struck by Kamikaze strikes which sink 4 escort carriers. These are the first significant Kamikaze attacks recorded. At the same time, TF77.4.1 is also attacked by Kamikazes. Meanwhile, the Northern Force (Ozawa) is attacked TF38. Only the carrier-battleships (Ise and Hyuga) survive the day. During the engagement, two groups of TF38 turn back to attack Center Force but fail to arrive in time.

    In Norway... In the far north, Soviet forces capture the port of Kirkenes. Naval forces provide fire support and transport for several small amphibious operations.

    On the Eastern Front... In the south, Soviet led forces have cleared Transylvania.

    In Italy... The British 5th Corps (part of British 8th Army) crosses the Ronco River.

  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 4:59:26 AM PDT · 5 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Halsey Meets Foe (Horne) – 2-3
    Filipino Guerrillas Led the Way for Our Forces in Leyte Landing – 3
    War News Summarized – 3
    25-Mile Leyte Line Gains; Step North Reported Taken – 4-5
    Release Findings, Kimmel Demands – 5
    Hawaii Relieved of Martial Law – 5
    Our Forces Advance in Philippines and Navy Airmen Keep Watch over the Pacific (photos) – 6-7
    Trap on Foe Forms (Daniel) – 8-9
    ‘s Hertogenbosch is 50% Occupied (MacDonald) – 9
    Our Forces Blasting the Germans from the Air and on the Ground (photos) – 10-11
    Red Army Widens East Prussia Grip – 12-13
    President Hopeful on Moscow Talks – 13
    The Situation on Leyte (Baldwin) – 14
    Big Supply Fleet Needed in Pacific – 14
    B-29’s Bomb Japan; Hit Kyushu Again – 14
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 15-17
    Ball is Doubtful on Senate Action – 17
    Ball’s Political Record (Krock) – 17
    Youngsters Flock to Sinatra Speech – 18
    Café Man Fights Limit on Diners – 18
  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 4:57:22 AM PDT · 4 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 1025-halsey21_zpsd8413731.jpg

     photo 1025-halsey22_zps3afd55a3.jpg

     photo 1025-halsey23_zps97b038b9.jpg

     photo 1025-halsey24_zpscf3ddd31.jpg

     photo 1025-halsey25_zps51b78276.jpg

     photo 1025-halsey26_zps5486ec57.jpg

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     photo 1025-halsey29_zpse35eb3f5.jpg

    John Toland, The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, 1936-1945

  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 4:53:20 AM PDT · 3 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 4:51:52 AM PDT · 2 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Selections from West Point Atlas for the Second World War
    The Western Pacific, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands: The Invasion of Leyte (KING II), 17-20 October 1944 and the Battle for Leyte Gulf, 23-25 October 1944
    The Philippine Islands: Leyte Island and the Visayas, 1944 – Sixth Army Operations on Leyte and Samar, 17 October-30 December 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 6th and 12th Army Group Operations, 15 September-7 November 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 21st Army Group Operations, 15 September-15 December 1944
    Eastern Europe, 1941: Russian Balkan and Baltic Campaigns – Operations, 19 August-31 December 1944
    Northern Italy 1944: Allied Advance to Gothic Line, 5 June-25 August and Gains 29 August-31 December
    China, 1941: Operation Ichigo, April-December 1944 and Situation 31 December
    China-Burma, 1941: Third Burma Campaign – Slim’s Offensive, June 1944-March 1945
  • U.S. PLANES ATTACK 2 BIG JAPANESE FLEETS; SHOWDOWN BATTLE LIKELY IN PHILIPPINES (10/25/44)

    10/25/2014 4:51:19 AM PDT · 1 of 26
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 3:44:58 PM PDT · 23 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to occamrzr06; colorado tanker
    I first learned about Leyte Gulf around 1979 when I first read Herman Wouk's fictionalized account in "War and Remembrance." He places one of his characters semi-prominently in the battle, but otherwise he accurately describes the action. One aside gives the reader an idea of how Wouk (who served in a minesweeper at the time) regarded the battle:

    "The vision of Sprague's three destroyers - the Johnston, the Hoel, and the Heermann - charging out of the smoke and the rain straight toward the main batteries of Kurita's battleships and cruisers, can endure as a picture of the way Americans fight when they don't have superiority. Our schoolchildren should know about that incident, and our enemies should ponder it."

  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 1:52:06 PM PDT · 14 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to occamrzr06; colorado tanker
    I would guess that was the thought going through the ground troops mind about the naval battle going on.

    The troops on Leyte might have been more engaged if they knew the Japanese plan was to enter Leyte Gulf with battleships and lay waste the American beachhead with their 18" guns.

  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 9:16:20 AM PDT · 10 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to Hebrews 11:6

    Thanks for the link. I tweeted the slide show to @WWIIMuseum and @wwiiToday. News of the battle will start filtering back to the states beginning tomorrow.

  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 4:29:28 AM PDT · 7 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/9/24.htm

    October 24th, 1944 (TUESDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM: Frigate HMS Wigtown Bay laid down.

    NORTH SEA: U-673 sank at 0115hrs in the North Sea, north of Stavanger, Norway, in position 59.20N, 05.53E, after running aground near Smaaskjär following a collision with U-382. Raised on 9 Nov 1944 and moved to Stavanger. Surrendered to Norway. Broken up.

    NETHERLANDS: The 2nd Canadian Division is advancing long the Beveland Isthmus. Inland the British XII Corps reach Hertogenbosch.

    When S.D. (Sicherheitsdienst, the security service of the SS) officer Herbert Oelschagel is murdered by the Dutch resistance on 23 October in Amsterdam, the German reprisal is swift and severe. Today, 29 civilians are arrested and pedestrians on the Apolloaan are forced at gunpoint to witness their execution. At the same time, several buildings are deliberately set on fire.

    RAF Hawker Typhoons of Nos. 193, 197, 257, 263 and 266 Squadrons, led by Gp. Capt. D. E. Gillam raid the Headquarters of the German Fifteenth Army at Dordrecht. Attacking with both 500-lb and 1,000-lb bombs, the Typhoons completely destroy the target, killing over 70 enemy staff officers. (22)

    FRANCE: French automaker and accused German collaborator Louis Renault dies on this day in a Paris military prison hospital of undetermined causes. During World War I, Renault served his nation with the “Taxis de la Marne,” a troop-transport vehicle, and in 1918, with the Renault tank. With the German occupation of France during World War II, the industrialist, who had served his country so well during World War I, mysteriously offered his Renault tank factory and his services to the Germans, perhaps believing that the Allies’ cause is hopeless. The liberation of France in 1944 saw the arrest of Louis Renault as a collaborator, and the Renault company is nationalized. The 67-year-old Renault, who likely suffered torture during his post-liberation detainment, died soon after his arrest and before he is tried.

    In the U.S. Seventh Army’s VI Corps area, the 3d Infantry Division commits its full strength to a drive on St Die as the 30th Infantry Regiment, having moved north, joins in an attack to right of 7th Infantry Regiment. The 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, takes the town of Mortagne, on the German side of the Mortagne River.

    In the French 1stArmy area, General Jean de Lattre, commander of the 1st Army, issues secret instructions to I Corps for an offensive toward Belfort, Operation INDEPENDENCE. I Corps is to be strongly reinforced for the operation. Extensive deceptive measures are taken to conceal the place of projected attack and take the Germans by surprise.

    GERMANY: The USAAF Eighth Air Force dispatches 415 P-47 Thunderbolts and P-51 Mustangs to attack aircraft and ground targets in the Hannover-Kassel area; 73 bomb flak positions at Elburg, a factory near Nienburg, and miscellaneous ground targets; bad weather causes other fighter-bombers to jettison bombs in the English Channel and Zuider Zee in the Netherlands; the fighter-bombers strafe transportation and other ground targets with good results.

    Bad weather cancels all USAAF Ninth Air Force operations except fighter patrols by the IX and XXIX Tactical Air Commands over western Germany; the fighters attack rail targets.

    During the night of 24/25 October, RAF Bomber Command sends 57 Mosquitos to bomb Hannover; 54 bomb the city without loss. Other Mosquito targets are: four bomb Oberhausen, three hit Aschaffenburg, two hit the marshalling yard at Aschaffenburg and one bombs Rheine; there are no losses. Lancasters and Halifaxes lay mines in the Kattegat.

    U-2538, U-3029 laid down.

    U-2344 launched.

    U-2516 commissioned.

    NORWAY: Eight RAF Bomber Command aircraft lay mines off Oslo without loss.

    GREECE: British units enter Lamia, about 95 miles (153 kilometers) northwest of Athens.

    ITALY: In the U.S. Fifth Army area, Mt Termine falls to the South African 6th Armoured Division. In the II Corps area, the Germans regain Vedriano and capture most of Company G, 351st Infantry Regiment, 88th Infantry Division. The 88th and 85th Infantry Divisions continue an attack the on right flank of corps during the night of 24/25 October but make little headway. In the British XIII Corps area, the 78th Division consolidates positions on Mt. Spadura while the 61st Brigade, 6th Armoured Division, pushes toward Mt. Taverna, reaching Orsara.

    In the British Eighth Army’s V Corps area, the Indian 10th Division drives quickly toward the Ronco River on the south flank of the corps; the 4th Division advances its left flank to a road junction of Madonna di Cerbiano and its right, along Highway 9, to Castellaccio. The Canadian I Corps pursues retreating Germans toward the Ronco River.

    Weather grounds USAAF Twelfth Air Force medium bombers but 300+ XXII Tactical Air Command fighters and fighter-bombers attack targets in support of the U.S. Fifth Army south of Bologna and hit communications and shipping in the Turin-Genoa and eastern Po Valley areas, destroying 14 locomotives and 100+ railroad cars.

    INDIA: The U.S. Army China-Burma-India Theater is split into two theaters, India- Burma Theater (IBT) and China Theater (CT). Headquarters India-Burma Theater is established at New Delhi with Lieutenant General Daniel I. Sultan in command.

    CHINA: The U.S. Army China-Burma-India Theater is split into two theaters, India- Burma Theater (IBT) and China Theater (CT). The China Theater headquarters is established at Chungking Major General Albert C. Wedemeyer. Major General Claire Chennault, Commanding General USAAF Fourteenth Air Force, is temporarily in charge of China Theater, pending assumption of command by General Wedemeyer. Headquarters USAAF Fourteenth Air Force is reassigned from US Army Forces, China-Burma-India Theater to US Forces, China Theater.

    About 80 USAAF Fourteenth Air Force P-40s, P-51 Mustangs and P-38 Lightnings on armed reconnaissance over southeast China, southwest China, and eastern Burma hit runways, storage facilities, town areas, troops, horses, gun positions, and other targets of opportunity around Amoy, Lohochai, Tanchuk, Sinthe, Menghsu, Pingnam, Mangshih and Chefang, China and Lashio, Burma.

    BURMA: Headquarters Tenth Air Force is reassigned from US Army Forces, China-Burma-India Theater to US Forces, India-Burma Theater.

    Between 24 and 27 October, USAAF Tenth Air Force fighter-bombers and B-25 Mitchells steadily support Allied troops on the northern Burma front, attacking road and rail communications, troop concentrations and supply dumps, and sweeping airfields; the strikes include close support of British troops advancing on the right flank of the front known as the “Rail Corridor,” and of Chinese forces pushing down the left flank along the Myitkyina-Bhamo road.

    JAPAN: On Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands, three USAAF Eleventh Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb Kashiwabara and Kurabu Cape; four B-25 Mitchells weather-abort a photo mission to the island; two others on a shipping sweep off Kurabu hit a freighter, which is observed listing and smoking, and strafe two submarine chasers.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES:

    In the X Corps area on Leyte Island, the 1st Squadron of the 7th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Cavalry Division, moves by water to Babatngon and sets up a defense perimeter, from which patrols move along the coast. Troop C, reinforced, of the 8th Cavalry Regiment, after a delay because of a Japanese air attack on shipping in Tacloban harbor, witch causes minor damage, sails to La Paz, on Samar Island and establishes a beachhead and blocks the road to Basey; after nightfall they repel a Japanese thrust against the block. The main body of the 1st Squadron, 8th Cavalry Regiment, begins an overland journey northward along Highway1 and reaches Guintiguian. The control of Juanico Strait is thus secured. In the Palo area, the 1st Battalion of 34th Infantry Regiment takes Hill Nan without opposition and is passed through by the 3d Battalion, which takes the next Hill, Mike, before Hill C, also without opposition, preliminary fire having been highly effective. The 2d Batta

    lion, 19th Infantry Regiment, continues efforts to take Hill B, finding the Japanese well entrenched on a crest higher than its own. The 19th Infantry Regiment, moving south along Highway1 in an effort to make contract with the XXIV Corps, takes San Joaquin, south of Palo. In the XXIV Corps area, the 96th Infantry Division’s 383d Infantry Regiment, still beset by supply problems, holds their current positions and patrols to locate possible supply routes to the rear. A patrol finds the Japanese established at Tabontabon. The 382d takes Anibung and Hindang. In the 7th Infantry Division zone, the 17th Infantry Regiment clears Burauen and, after a brief pause, starts toward Dagami. The 32d Infantry Regiment, turns northwest toward Bun airstrip from San Pablo airfield but is so strongly opposed that it falls back to San Pablo with assistance of 3d Battalion.

    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators bomb Buayoan Airfield on Mindanao Island while B-25 Mitchells on armed reconnaissance hit small shipping and troops.

    U.S. freighter SS Augustus Thomas, anchored in San Pedro Bay, Leyte, is attacked by a Japanese plane. The ship’s Armed Guard gunfire sets the aircraft ablaze but the kamikaze presses home his attack, a wing striking the stack of the nearby tug USS Sonoma (ATO-12) before it crashes the freighter’s starboard side. The bombs detonate in the water between the two ships, and the exploding suicider sets Sonoma afire. There are no casualties on board Augustus Thomas (41-man merchant complement, 27-man Armed Guard and 480 troop passengers), which is subsequently beached by tugs USS Chowanoc (ATF-100) and Whippoorwill (ATO-169). Sonoma subsequently sinks off Dio Island, near Dulag.

    Admiral Sherman’s TG 38.3 is the target of Japanese land based air strikes. USS Princeton is fatally damaged.

    TG 38.2 scout planes find Admiral Kurita’s Center Force which include the super battleships YAMATO and MUSASHI. During the day several attacks from 3 of TF 38s task groups strike. Amongst the weapons deployed to defend against the US air attack are the “San-Shiki” incendiary shrapnel projectiles. These shells (nicknamed “Beehive”) were fired from the 18.1-inch guns and consisted of 6,000 twenty millimetre steel balls that would explode by using a time fuse. Battleship Musashi sinks after taking multiple torpedo and bomb strikes, in the early afternoon. One cruiser is damaged and turns back. Due to the weight of these attacks, Kurita turns back. Then during the evening, he again turns east to find the US invasion forces. Nishimura’s Southern Force takes only negligible damage from air strikes during the day. (Ken Friedman and Edward J. Rudnicki and Michael Turton)

    Admiral Oldendorf assembles battleships from his bombardment forces to intercept Nishimura. These include several battle ships which were returned to service from Pearl Harbor.

    During the night Admiral Halsey turns north with the US 3rd Fleet for Ozawa’s carriers; the decoy force. Kurita has had ships sunk and damaged and has withdrawn and Oldendorf will handle Nishimura.

    Submarine USS Darter grounded in the Palawan Passage while tracking the Japanese Center Force fleet and scuttled by her crew to prevent her capture. Her crew was taken onboard the submarine USS Dace and taken to Fremantle, arriving there on 7 November 1944.

    BORNEO: USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators, B-25 Mitchells, and fighter-bombers hit the Sandakan, British North Borneo area and sink a Japanese sink army cargo ship off Sandakan.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Forces P-38 Lightnings bomb the Amboina reservoir areas on Ceram Island.

    NEW GUINEA: USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20 Havocs and fighter-bombers again attack Babo, Moemi, Sagan, Manokwari, Otawir Airfields and other Vogelkop Peninsula area targets in Dutch New Guinea.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: Guam-based USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb Yap Island. .

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Battle of Leyte Gulf.

    The Battle for Leyte Gulf continues as planes from Task Groups 38.2, 38.3 and 38.4, sailing to the east of the Philippine Islands, attack the Japanese “Center Force” (Vice Admiral KURTIA Takeo) in the Sibuyan Sea in the central Philippine Islands. TG 38.2 scout planes find Admiral KURITA’s Center Force. Planes from the aircraft carriers USS Enterprise (CV-6), Intrepid (CV-11), and Franklin (CV-13), and small aircraft carrier USS Cabot (CVL-29) sink battleship HIJMS Musash about 141 nautical miles (262 kilometers) southeast of Manila, Luzon, in position 12.50N, 122.35E. Aircraft from the three task groups also damage battleships HIJMS Yamato and Nagato, heavy cruiser HIJMS Tone, and destroyers HIJMS Kiyoshimo, Fujinami and Uranami. Battleship Musashi sinks after taking multiple torpedo and bomb strikes, in the early afternoon. One cruiser is damaged and turns back. Due to the weight of these attacks, Kurita turns back. Then during the evening, he again turns east to find the US invasion forces.

    Vice Admiral NISHIMURA Shoji and Vice Admiral SHIMA Kiyohide’s Sourthern Force takes only negligible damage from air strikes during the day. TG 38.4 planes attack the”Southern Force” as it proceeds through the Sulu Sea; planes from USS Franklin sink destroyer HIJMS Wakaba off the west coast of Panay about 168 nautical miles (311 kilometers) south of Manila, Luzon, in position 11.50N, 121.25E; aircraft from USS Enterprise and Franklin damage battleships HIJMS Fuso and Yamashiro.

    Rear Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf, commander of the Bombardment and Fire Support Group, Seventh Fleet, assembles battleships from his bombardment forces to intercept NISHIMURA. These include six pre-WWII battleships, USS California (BB-44), USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Mississippi (BB-41), USS Pennsylvania (BB-38), USS Tennessee (BB-43), and USS West Virginia (BB-48), four heavy cruisers (one Australian), four light cruisers and 28 destroyers (one Australian). Five of the six battleships are at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941.

    During the day, Japanese aircraft attack TG 38.3; combat air patrol and effective use of rain squalls as cover limits the damage to small carrier USS Princeton (CVL-23). Shortly before 1000 hours, a lone Japanese dive-bomber comes out of the clouds above USS Princeton and at 1,500 feet (457 meters) the pilot releases his bomb and it hits between the elevators, crashes through the flight deck and hanger, then explodes. Initial fires soon expand as further explosions send black smoke rolling off the flight deck and red flames along the sides from the island to the stern. Covering vessels provide rescue and fire-fighting assistance and shield the stricken carrier from further attack. At 1524 hours, another, much heavier explosion, possibly the bomb magazine, blew off the carrier’s stern and with it the after flight deck. The light cruiser USS Birmingham (CL-62), alongside to fight fires, suffers heavy damage and casualties. The cruiser’s decks literally run red with blood:

    229 men are killed, four missing, and 211 seriously wounded and 215 with minor wounds. Efforts to save Princeton continue, but at 1604 hours the fires win. Boats are requested to take off remaining personnel and shortly after 1706 hours, the destroyer USS Irwin (DD-794) begins to fire torpedoes at the burning hulk. At 1746 hours, light cruiser USS Reno (CL-96) relieves Irwin and at 1749 hours, the last, and biggest, explosion occurs. Flames and debris shot up1000-2000 feet (305-610 meters). Princeton’s forward section is gone and her after section appears momentarily through the smoke. By 1750 hours she sinks about 154 nautical miles (285 kilometers) east-northeast of Manila, Luzon, Philippine Islands, in position 15.21N, 123.31E, but 1,361 of her crew survive. Included in that number is Captain John M. Hoskins, who had been the prospective commanding officer of the ship and lost his right foot with her, but who, despite the loss, would become the first commanding officer of the fifth Princeton (CV-37).

    During the aerial action today, Commander David McCampbell, Commander Air Group Fifteen (CVG-15), flying from the aircraft carrier USS Essex (CV-9), again distinguishes himself in combat. With only one wingman, McCampbell attacks what is estimated as being over 60 hostile aircraft and downs nine, breaking up the attacking formation before it even reaches the fleet. For his “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life” on this occasion and on 19 June, McCampbell is awarded the Medal of Honor. McCampbell later becomes the Navy’s leading ace with 34 aerial victories.

    Late today, Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr., Commander Third Fleet, orders Task Force 38 (Vice Admiral Marc A. Mitscher) to proceed north to be in position to strike the “Northern Force” (Vice Admiral OZAWA Jisaburo) on the morning of 25 October, but does not inform Commander Seventh Fleet (Vice Admiral Thomas C. Kinkaid) of his action. Unbeknown to the Americans, remnants of the “Center Force” transit San Bernadino Strait and head for Leyte Gulf. Commander Seventh Fleet meanwhile makes his dispositions to meet the expected Japanese onslaught: bombardment and support group Task Group 77.2 (Rear Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf) is augmented by close covering group TG 77.3 (Rear Admiral Russell S. Berkey). Local airfields, however, are not yet ready to base night reconnaissance aircraft, and the only carrier equipped to operate such planes, small carrier USS Independence (CVL-22), with Night Carrier Air Group Forty One [CVLG(N)-41], is proceeding north with TF 38.

    USN hospital ship USS Comfort (AH-6), fully illuminated in accordance with the dictates of the Geneva Convention, is bombed 22 miles (41 kilometers) southeast of Leyte Island.

    USN destroyer escort USS Richard M. Rowell (DE-403) sinks Japanese submarine HIJMS I-54 about 135 nautical miles (250 kilometers) southeast of Tacloban, Leyte Island, Philippine Islands, in position 09.45N, 126.45E.

    Yesterday, the USN submarine USS Darter (SS-227) made contact with the Japanese Center Force approaching Palawan Island and a radio message is flashed to the U.S. fleet. Just after 0000 hours today, Darter ran aground on Bombay Shoal in Palawan Passage. After attempts by the submarines USS Nautilus (SS-168) and Dace (SS-247) to float the sub failed, and all confidential material and equipment is destroyed and the entire crew taken off to Dace. When the demolition charges planted in Darter failed to destroy her, Dace fired torpedoes which exploded on the reef due to the shallow water. As Dace submerged, Darter is bombed by a Japanese plane.

    Off the west coast of the Philippine Islands, coordinated submarine attack group TG 17.15 operates against Japanese shipping in South China Sea west of Luzon Strait: The target is a convoy of 17 ships sailing from Manila, Luzon, Philippine Islands, to Japan. USN submarine USS Snook (SS-279) sinks two Army cargo ships; one of the ships is the merchant freighter SS Arisan Maru. This 6,886 ton ship is one of the unmarked “Hell Ships” transporting Allied POWs. In the holds are about 100 civilians and 1,782 American POWs being transported as slave laborers to work in the mines and factories of Japan. Crowded so close together they could not lie down, the holds soon became a hell-hole as the temperature soared to over 100 degrees F (38 degrees Centigrade). The lack of fresh air caused many to go mad as the holds became fouled by the stench of sweating bodies, urine and human excrement. The ship is hit by torpedoes fired by the Snook and it splits in two but the two parts remain afloat for about two hours. Most of the Japanese crew and guards are the first to escape by the few available lifeboats. Those guards left behind are set upon by the enraged POWs and killed. Only seven men survive the sinking by clinging to wreckage. Five reached the Chinese coast and two are picked up by a Japanese destroyer. Other ships sunk are: USS Icefish (SS-367) sinks an army cargo ship and USS Seadragon (SS-194) sinks a transport, a cargo ship and a merchant passenger/cargo ship. One of the attackers, USS Shark (SS-314), is sunk, probably by Japanese destroyer HIJMS Harukaze, about 155 nautical miles (288 kilometers) southwest Kao-hsiung, Formosa, in position 20.41N, 118.27E. (Skip Guidry)

    0100 hours: USS Icefish (SS-367) sinks a cargo ship at 19-58 N, 118-33 E.

    0200 hours: USS Snook (SS-279) sinks a cargo ship at 20-46 N, 118-18 E.

    0300 hours: USS Croaker (SS-246) sinks a cargo ship at 32-56 N, 125-54 E.

    0400 hours: USS Besugo (SS-321) sinks a patrol frigate at 30-19 N, 13249 E.

    0500 hours: USS Snook (SS-279) sinks a cargo ship at 20-25 N, 118-44 E.

    0800 hours: USS Drum (SS-228) sinks a cargo ship at 20-09 N, 118,35 E.

    1100 hours: USS Seadragon (SS-194) sinks an armed cargo ship at 20-23 N, 118-47 E.

    1100 hours: USS Kingfish (SS-234) sinks a cargo ship at 27-15 N, 143-19 E.

    1200 hours: USS Seadragon (SS-194) sinks a transport-cargo ship at 19-34 N, 118-32 E.

    1400 hours: USS Seadragon (SS-194) sinks a transport at 20-35 N, 118-32 E.

    1900 hours: USS Tang (SS-306) sinks two transports, two tankers and a destroyer at 25- N, 119- E.

    USS Shark (SS-314) sinks a cargo ship at 20-41 N, 118-27 E. (Skip Guidry)

    Submarine USS Shark sunk by destroyer HIJMS Harukaze in the Luzon Strait. All hands lost. 11 years to the day after the keel was laid for Shark.

    Submarine USS Tang sunk by her own circular-running torpedo near Turnabout Island near Taiwan. There were 9 survivors, including her captain. They became POWs.

    U.S.A.: Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-404 was commissioned at San Francisco. LTJG R. S. Hall, USCGR, was her commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Southwest Pacific and Western Pacific areas. She was decommissioned 31 October 1945.

    Minesweeper USS Peregrine laid down.

    ATLANTIC OCEAN: U-673 (Type VIIC) runs aground near Smaaskjär (north of Stavanger, Norway) at position 59.20N, 05.53E. following a collision with U-382, and sinks at 0115. Raised on 9 Nov 1944 and moved to Stavanger. Surrendered to Norway and broken up. (Alex Gordon)

    U-958 sank SS Linnea and SS Piikiö.

  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 4:27:30 AM PDT · 6 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/oct44/24oct44.htm#

    Battle of Leyte Gulf
    Tuesday, October 24, 1944 www.onwar.com

    In the Philippines... On land, elements of US 1st Cavalry land on Samar. The fighting on Leyte continues. At sea, Japanese aircraft, based on Luzon, attack US Task Group 38.3 (Sherman), critically damaging the carrier Princeton. The Japanese Center Force (Kurita) is discovered by scout planes from US Task Group 38.2 and attacked throughout the day by all the carrier groups. The Japanese battleship Musashi is sunk and a cruiser is damaged and turns back. Center Force withdraws during the day. The Japanese Southern Force (Nishimura) is also sighted but American air strikes fail to cause significant damage. Admiral Oldendorf assembles a force in the Surigao Strait to block Southern Force. Meanwhile, Northern Force (Ozawa) locates TG38.2 and launches an air strike. The Japanese planes do not find the objective and land on Luzon. Late in the day, Admiral Halsey (commanding US 3rd Fleet) assembles his carriers and battleships to attack Northern Force, leaving Admiral Oldendorf to defend against Southern Force. During the night, Center Force reverses course.

    On the Eastern Front... Soviet forces capture Augusto near the prewar East Prussian border with Poland.

    On the Western Front... The Canadian 2nd Division, an element of Canadian 1st Army, advances along the Beveland Isthmus. The British 12th Corps (part of British 2nd Army) reaches Hertogenbosch.

    In Greece... British forces enter Lamia.

    From Washington... The China-Burma-India Theater (General Stilwell) command is divided into the India-Burma Theater (General Sultan) and the China Theater (General Wedemeyer) commands

    In Berlin... Hitler informs his generals of his intention to launch a surprise counteroffensive on the against the weakly held Ardennes area of the Allied line.

  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 4:24:28 AM PDT · 5 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    British near Hub (Daniel) – 2-3
    Berlin Rescinds Mass Evacuation of Civilians in Rhineland Area (Denny) – 3
    Nazis Destroying Rotterdam’s Port – 3-4
    The Germans Call Their Civilians into the Army (photo) – 4
    War News Summarized – 4
    Stalin Lists Gains (Lawrence) – 5-6
    British in Greece Push to Lamia; Island of Euboea Now Liberated (Sedgwick) – 6
    5th Army Grinds nearer Bologna (Bracker) – 7
    Norwegians Hope to Avoid Battle – 8
    ‘Retouching’ by an American ‘Artist’ (photo) – 8
    Anti-Franco Units Deepen Incursions – 9
    Japanese Set Back – 10-11
    American’s Thunder Rolled at Leyte (Parrott) – 11-12
    Tokyo Says British Land on Nicobars – 12
    Chinese at Bay, Launch Offensive – 12
    Promise Fulfilled: M’Arthur Returns to Philippines (photos) – 13
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 14-16
    Books of the Times (by Orville Prescott) – 17
  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 4:23:18 AM PDT · 4 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Continued from October 22.

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     photo 1024-british27_zps6c316ca1.jpg

    John Toland, The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, 1936-1945

  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 4:21:46 AM PDT · 3 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 4:20:50 AM PDT · 2 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Selections from West Point Atlas for the Second World War
    The Western Pacific, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands: The Invasion of Leyte (KING II), 17-20 October 1944 and the Battle for Leyte Gulf, 23-25 October 1944
    The Philippine Islands: Leyte Island and the Visayas, 1944 – Sixth Army Operations on Leyte and Samar, 17 October-30 December 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 6th and 12th Army Group Operations, 15 September-7 November 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 21st Army Group Operations, 15 September-15 December 1944
    Eastern Europe, 1941: Russian Balkan and Baltic Campaigns – Operations, 19 August-31 December 1944
    Northern Italy 1944: Allied Advance to Gothic Line, 5 June-25 August and Gains 29 August-31 December
    China, 1941: Operation Ichigo, April-December 1944 and Situation 31 December
    China-Burma, 1941: Third Burma Campaign – Slim’s Offensive, June 1944-March 1945
  • ALLIES CRUMBLING NAZI LINES IN HOLLAND; LEYTE DRIVE GAINS (10/24/44)

    10/24/2014 4:19:58 AM PDT · 1 of 32
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:54:13 AM PDT · 10 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Tax-chick
    For some reason, I feel the urge to run out and buy a Buick ...

    To paraphrase Oddball (as somebody was doing the other day), an M-18 Hellcat can give you an edge in your morning commute.

  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:28:37 AM PDT · 9 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/9/23.htm

    October 23rd, 1944 (MONDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM: London: The Allies recognise de Gaulle’s cabinet as the provisional government of France.

    Destroyer HMS Zodiac commissioned.

    WESTERN EUROPE: Weather prevents all USAAF Ninth Air Force commands, including the 9th Bombardment Division, from flight operations.

    BELGIUM: The British 4th Armored Division begins an attack from the east end of the Beveland Isthmus.

    NETHERLANDS: In the Canadian First Army’s British I Corps area, the U.S. 104th Infantry Division, inexperienced in combat, begins moving into line along the Antwerp-Breda highway between the 49th Division and the Polish 1st Armored Division. On the left flank of the corps, the Canadian 4th Armoured Division swings west from Esschen toward Bergen-op-Zoom to seal off the Beveland Isthmus, along which the Canadian 2d Division of II Corps is preparing to drive.

    Sicherheitsdienst (S.D. or security service of the SS) officer Herbert Oelschagel is murdered by the Dutch resistance in Amsterdam and the German reprisal is swift and severe. The next day, 29 civilians are arrested and pedestrians on the Apolloaan are forced at gunpoint to witness their execution. At the same time, several buildings are deliberately set on fire.

    During the day, RAF Bomber Command sends 112 Lancasters to attack the Flushing battery positions; 92 bomb but visibility is poor and the bombing is scattered. Four Lancasters are lost.

    FRANCE: Paris: Treason trials open, with a journalist sentenced to death for collaborating with the Nazis.

    The US 7th Army is still fighting around Bruyeres and St. Dies.

    General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Commander, Allied Expeditionary Forces, in a personal letter to Lieutenant General Jacob Devers, Commanding General 6th Army Group, order the Group to protect the southern flank of 12th Army Group in a coming offensive toward the Rhine River.

    In U.S. Seventh Army’s VI Corps area, the 3d Infantry Division is meeting stronger resistance as it approaches Les Rouges Eaux, on the road to St Die. To the corps’ left, the180th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, succeeds in establishing a bridgehead across the Mortagne River east of Fremifontaine, from which they will push northeast toward Raon-l’Etape. On the right flank, the 36th Infantry Division extends positions east of Bruyres to Biffontaine; a battalion of the 141st Infantry Regiment, attempting to secure the heights north of La Houssière, becomes isolated in Forêt Domaniale de Champ.
    During the night of 23/24 October, the USAAF Eighth Air Force flies Mission 686: three B-17 Flying Fortresses and six B-24 Liberators drop leaflets over the country.

    GERMANY: USAAF Fifteenth Air Force bombers hit five targets: 79 bomb the M.A.N. diesel engine factory at Augsburg; 67 bomb the BMW aircraft engine factory at Munich; 63 attack the Winterhafen oil storage facility at Regensburg; 34 bomb the industrial area at Plauen; and 32 bomb the marshalling yard at Rosenheim.

    During the night of 23/24 October, RAF Bomber Command dispatches 1,055 aircraft, 561 Lancasters, 463 Halifaxes and 31 Mosquitos, to bomb to Essen; 955 bomb the city. This is the heaviest raid on this target so far in the war and the number of aircraft dispatched is also the greatest number to any target so far; five Lancasters and three Halifaxes are lost. The aircraft drop 4,538 tons (4 117 metric tonnes) of bombs. More than 90 per cent of this tonnage is high explosive and includes five hundred nine 4,000-pound (1 814 kilogram) bombs because it is now considered that most of the burnable buildings in Essen have been destroyed in earlier raids. The greater proportion of high explosive, against all the trends in earlier area-bombing raids, is now quite common in attacks on targets which has suffered major fire damage in 1943. Mosquitos are also sent to various targets: 32 hit Berlin, ten bomb Wiesbaden and two bomb Aschaffenburg

    U-2534 laid down.

    CZECHOSLOVAKIA: One hundred twenty five USAAF Fifteenth Air Force B-17 Flying Fortresses bomb the Skoda armament factory at Pilsen. Two aircraft are lost.

    NORWAY: U-256 stricken in Bergen, Norway. Captured there and cannibalized. Broken up later.

    FINLAND: Russian units clear the area around Petsamo.

    SWEDEN: An international Jewish conference held at Stockholm thanks the Finnish government and people for their attitude towards the Jews during the war.

    ITALY: In the U.S. Fifth Army area, the South African 6th Division, attacking in force toward Mt. Salvaro, drives to the summit; elements to the right begin assault on Mt. Termine. In the II Corps area, the Germans counterattack and recover Hill 459 from the 85th Infantry Division. Elsewhere on the right flank of corps, counterattacks are repulsed and bypassed pockets cleared. At night, the 2d Battalion of the 351st Infantry Regiment, 88th Infantry Division, attacks toward Vedriano and takes Vedriano by dawn of 24 October. The 133d Infantry Regiment, 34th Infantry Division, seizes Mt. Belmonte. In British XIII Corps area, 78th Division, renewing their assault on Mt. Spadura with the 11th and 38th Brigades, clears this feature. The 1st Division takes Mt. Cornazzano without opposition and gains ground north of Mt. Ceco. The 21st Brigade, Indian 8th Division, seizes Mt. Giro and pushes on toward Mt. Colombo; the 17th Brigade takes Mt. Casalino.

    In the British Eighth Army’s V Corps area, the Indian 10th Division reaches the crest of Mt. Cavallo ridge, which extends northward to Bertinoro, commanding Highway 9; the Germans begin to pull back. The Savio River is subsiding and reinforcements are crossed into the 4th Division’s bridgehead. In the Canadian I Corps area, the Canadian 1st Division maintains a bridgehead across the Savio River but is unable to strengthen it. The 11th Brigade, Canadian 5th Armoured Division, reaches the Savio River.

    Bad weather grounds USAAF Twelfth Air Force medium bombers; fighters and fighter-bombers, although cancelling many operations, cause much damage to transportation, destroying or damaging numerous locomotives, railroad cars, and motor transport, and damaging vessels in the Savona, Turin, Padua, and Genoa areas.

    USAAF Fifteenth Air Force bombers hit various targets: 27 bomb the railroad in the Brenner Pass; 19 hit the industrial area of Trieste; 12 attack a railroad bridge at Casarsa; two hit the railroad bridge at Latisana; one attacks the railroad at Treviso; and 28 bomb targets of opportunity.

    During the night of 23/24 October, USAAF Twelfth Air Force A-20 Havocs attack targets of opportunity in the Po Valley.

    CHINA: Three USAAF Fourteenth Air Force B-25 Mitchells knock out a bridge at Lobochai while seven P-40s hit trucks and locomotives nearby; six B-25 Mitchells and 11 P-51 Mustangs hit the town area of Menghsu; 50+ P-40s and P-51s hit small towns and other targets of opportunity in the Menghsu area; 40+ others attack shipping, bridges, and general targets of opportunity around Anfu, Kweiping, Shepchung, Kuanyang, Ssuwangshu, Mangshih, Chefang, Panghkam, Takhing, Tanchuk, Dosing, Wuchou, and Tengyun and Wanling, Burma.

    BURMA: Twenty USAAF Tenth Air Force P-47 Thunderbolts hit Japanese concentrations at Nanhlaing and Kyungyi while 16 support ground forces at Mawlu and Henu and in nearby areas. A bivouac area south of Indaw is attacked by four fighter-bombers while seven knock out a bypass bridge at Panghkam while three B-25 Mitchells blast train cars and sidings at Kyaukme, three hit a nearby motor pool, two hit a motor pool at Namhsim, and one blasts a rail line at Nawngpeng.

    JAPAN: In the Kurile Islands, three USAAF Eleventh Air Force B-24 Liberators hit Kashiwabara on Paramushiru Island; three more B-24s bomb Otomari and fly a photographic mission over Onnekotan Island; and five B-25 Mitchells bomb the Asahi Bay area.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: During the night of 23/24 October, a USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberator bombs Iwo Jima.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES: On Leyte, at a ceremony in Tacloban, General Douglas MacArthur, Supreme Commander, Southwest Pacific Area, restores Philippine Civil Government under President Sergio Osmena. In the X Corps area, the 8th Cavalry Regiment, 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, charged with the task of securing control of San Juanico Strait between Leyte and Samar and cutting off Japanese movement, begins operations toward this end. Elements of the regiment move to the Diit River and secure a bridge in preparation for drive on Santa Cruz, on Carigara Bay. A Japanese party raids Palo at night, using Filipinos to deceive the Americans, but is dispersed and leave behind 60 dead. The 1st Battalion, 34th Infantry Regiment, begins an attack on Hill C, blocking the passage into the Leyte Valley on north side of Highway 2 at western edge of Palo, a strongly defended feature. In the XXIV Corps area, the 96th Infantry Division is facing an acute supply shortage, which limits forward movement. The 383d Infantry Regiment, less the 1st Battalion, attacks at noon, crosses the Guinarona River and reaches positions west of Pikas. Tanks of 767th Tank Battaion act as a spearhead for the 7th Infantry Division as it continues a drive on Burauen in an effort to take San Pablo Airfield. The tanks arrive at Burauen and scatter the Japanese forces. Infantrymen drive through Julita and San Pablo and seize San Pablo airfield. .

    USAAF Far East Air Force aircraft attack vehicles and small vessels in the Mindanao area while B-25 Mitchells attack small shipping in the Sulu Archipelago.

    USN submarine USS Nautilus (SS-168) lands men and supplies on the east coast of Luzon; she will repeat the operation on 24 and 25 October.

    Admiral Kurita’s naval force is sighted by submarines, USS Darter and USS Dace off Palawan. They pass the sighting info on and proceed to sink the Japanese heavy cruisers ATAGO and MAYA and hit the cruiser TAKAO. Aircraft from TF 38 will be waiting as he comes into range.

    EAST INDIES: In the Netherlands East Indies, USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators and P-38 Lightnings maintain shipping sweeps in the Makassar area on the southwestern tip of Celebes Island. B-25 Mitchells, A-20 Havocs, and fighter-bombers hit oil storage at Boela and Amboina town on Ceram Island and two airfields and other targets in the Ceram Island area. Fighter-bombers over Halmahera Island hit scattered bivouacs.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force fighter-bombers hit Sagan while A-20 Havocs support ground forces further east in the Sawar Rive-Orai River area.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: In the Palau Islands, Antitank and Cannon Companies relieve the infantry of responsibility for eliminating the few remaining Japanese on Angaur Island.

    Eight USAAF Seventh Air Force 8 B-24 Liberators from Guam Island bomb Yap Island.

    SOLOMON ISLANDS: The USN’s Special Air Task Group One (STAG-1) operations continue in two missions; three TDR-1 target drones each guided by TBF-1C Avengers are flown against beached Japanese ships in Moisuru Bay and off the south end of the Kahili airstrip on Bougainville Island. In the first mission, one TDR scores a direct hit on “Kahili Maru” the beached Japanese freighter serving as an antiaircraft gun site off the Kahili airstrip; in the second, one TDR scores a direct hit on “Kahili Maru” while another hits a beached merchantman in Moisuru Bay.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The BATTLE OF LEYTE GULF opens. While the submarine USS Darter (SS-227) continues to trail Japanese ships detected the previous day, submarine USS Bream (SS-243) torpedoes heavy cruiser HIJMS Aoba in the South China Sea about 85 nautical miles (157 kilometers) west-southwest of Manila, Luzon, Philippines Islands, in position 14.06N, 119.37E. Subsequently, USS Darter and Dace (SS-247) attack what proves to be the “Center Force” (Vice Admiral KURITA Takeo), one of the three main bodies of the Japanese fleet moving toward Leyte in a major effort to drive U.S. forces from the Philippines. In the South China Sea, USS Dace sinks heavy cruiser HIJMS Maya about 84 nautical miles (156 kilometers) west of Puerto Princesa, Palawan, Philippine Islands, in position 09.28E, 117.20E, while Darter sinks heavy cruiser HIJMS Atago and damages her sistership HIJMS Takao about 94 nautical miles (174 kilometers) west-southwest of Puerto Princesa in position 09.24N, 117.11E. (Skip Guidry and Jack McKillop)

    USS Tang (SS-306) sinks a tanker at 25- N, 122- E.

    0100 hours: USS Croaker (SS-246) sinks a cargo ship at 35-30 N, 126-15 E.

    0400 hours: USS Tang (SS-306) sinks three cargo ships and one transport at 24-49 N, 120-26 E.

    0600 hours: USS Darter (SS-227) sinks a heavy cruiser (Takao) at 09-24 N, 117-11 E west of Palawan.

    0600 hours: USS Dace (SS-247) sinks a heavy cruiser (Maya) at 09-22 N, 117-97 E west of Palawan.

    1700 hours: USS Sawfish (SS-276) sinks a seaplane tender at 18-58 N, 118-46 E.

    2400 hours: USS Snook (SS-279) sinks a tanker at 19-46 N, 118-30 E. (Skip Guidry)

    CANADA: Corvette HMCS Trail completed forecastle extension refit Liverpool , Nova Scotia.

    U.S.A.: Escort carrier USS Sicily laid down.

    Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-385 was commissioned at Decatur with LT Peter Marcoux, USCG, as commanding officer. She was assigned to and operated in the Pacific area during the war.

  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:25:32 AM PDT · 7 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/oct44/23oct44.htm#

    Germans joining the Volkssturm
    Monday, October 23, 1944 www.onwar.com

    In Berlin... The official German news agency reports that vast numbers of volunteers are joining the Volkssturm militia, including men older than the specified age group and boys younger than specified.

    On the Eastern Front... Soviet forces now hold a 137 km frontage in East Prussia.

    In Finland... Soviet forces clear the Petsamo region.

    On the Western Front... The Canadian 1st Army continues the battle of the Scheldt. British 4th Armored Division attacks at the east end of the Beveland Isthmus. To the south, forces of the US 7th Army are engaged around Bruyeres and St. Die.

    In Italy... Troops of the US 5th Army capture Monte Salvaro.

    In the Philippines... The US 1st Cavalry Division (part of US 10th Corps) attacks northwest form Toclaban. To the right, armored forces attached to 7th Division (part of US 24th Corps) capture Burauen. At sea, the Japanese Center Force (Kurita) is sited off Palawan by two American submarines. The Japanese lose 2 cruisers to the submarines and sink 1 American submarine. The report of the sighting, however, alerts the three groups of Task Force 38, east of the Philippines.

  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:24:45 AM PDT · 6 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Breskens is Taken (Daniel) – 2-3
    Americans Move Cautiously through Germany (page 1 photo) – 2
    Belgians’ Demand for Change Soars (Anderson) – 3
    War News Summarized – 3
    ‘Inside on D-Day: Allied Engineering Feat Called ‘The Eighth Wonder of the World’ (photos) – 4-6
    Tilsit Line Cracks – 8-9
    Iran is Condemned by Moscow Paper (Lawrence) – 9-10
    U.S. Plants Make Robot Bombs; Tests against Japanese Possible – 10
    Island Base Begun – 10-11
    Spirit of Iron Men Voyaged to Leyte (Kluckhohn) – 11
    The Burma Campaign (Baldwin) – 13
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 14-16
  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:23:20 AM PDT · 5 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    The first of the following excerpts is continued from October 20.

     photo 1023-breskens20_zps8b1d1d25.jpg

    Winston S. Churchill, Triumph and Tragedy

  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:22:48 AM PDT · 4 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 1023-breskens18_zps5dfa36c3.jpg

     photo 1023-breskens19_zpse43329c0.jpg

    Stephen E. Ambrose, Band of Brothers

  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:21:19 AM PDT · 3 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:20:39 AM PDT · 2 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Selections from West Point Atlas for the Second World War
    The Western Pacific, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands: The Invasion of Leyte (KING II), 17-20 October 1944 and the Battle for Leyte Gulf, 23-25 October 1944
    The Philippine Islands: Leyte Island and the Visayas, 1944 – Sixth Army Operations on Leyte and Samar, 17 October-30 December 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 6th and 12th Army Group Operations, 15 September-7 November 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 21st Army Group Operations, 15 September-15 December 1944
    Eastern Europe, 1941: Russian Balkan and Baltic Campaigns – Operations, 19 August-31 December 1944
    Northern Italy 1944: Allied Advance to Gothic Line, 5 June-25 August and Gains 29 August-31 December
    China, 1941: Operation Ichigo, April-December 1944 and Situation 31 December
    China-Burma, 1941: Third Burma Campaign – Slim’s Offensive, June 1944-March 1945
  • CANADIANS SEIZE PORT IN SCHELDE DRIVE; JAPANESE PUSHED TOWARD LEYTE HILLS (10/23/44)

    10/23/2014 4:20:09 AM PDT · 1 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • CBS World News Today Ė October 22, 1944

    10/23/2014 4:16:11 AM PDT · 2 of 2
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    This is presented on tape delay because I totally forgot to post it yesterday.

    The description of this broadcast from https://www.otrcat.com/world-news-today-radio-show2.html follows.

    “Douglas Edwards: American troops now hold the capital city of Leyte Island in the Philippines. Fleet Headquarters Pearl Harbor: Webley Edwards talks about the battleships Pennsylvania and California, which were both damaged during the Pearl Harbor attack, and which participated in the bombardment of Leyte Island [on October 20th] prior to the American landing in the Philippines. Supreme Allied Headquarters, France (Larry LeSeure): the American line is firmly established at Aachen [which surrendered on October 21st.] The ground in Holland is soaked and muddy and not suitable for large-scale operations. The Rhine-Ruhr area is being pounded from the air. A spot for the post-war, “newly-styled” Admiral 2-Temperature refrigerator mentions that it will allow fruits and vegetables to be purchased in bulk while in season and then frozen. Belgium: Richard C. Hottelet with the 1st Army talks about the surrender of Aachen. German officers have been warned that if they surrender, reprisals will be carried out against their families in Germany. CBS London (Charles Shaw): Churchill is back from a 10-day conference with Stalin. The two leaders agreed that the war should be over “by the end of winter” which means in March. CBS Moscow: George Morat discusses the Churchill-Stalin conference and the benefits of a 2-way friendship between these two leaders. CBS Madrid: Ann Stadler discusses recent clashes between Spanish Communists and Franco’s troops. CBS Washington: Joe McCaffree interviews Rear Admiral E. L. Corcoran on the coordination that was required during the amphibious landing at Peleliu Island. Corcoran defines an APA as an Attack Troop Ship, and an AKA as an Attack Cargo Ship. 5 to 10 tons of supplies are needed for every Marine that is landed. Major Eliot reports that Canadian troops have just captured the Dutch port of Breskens. Today was the first day of registration for Germany’s “Peoples’ Army.” A spot for the post-war Admiral record changer mentions the new styling and a “fool proof” record changer that is sturdy in construction and practically child-proof. PSA encouraging listeners to buy only what they need and pay only ceiling prices to help hold down inflation.”

    To listen to the broadcast click on the link below.

    CBS World News Today, October 22, 1944

  • CBS World News Today Ė October 22, 1944

    10/23/2014 4:14:23 AM PDT · 1 of 2
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/22/2014 5:12:07 PM PDT · 26 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to 1010RD

    As to the first part of your question, I hope we don’t have to find out.

  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 3:13:04 PM PDT · 15 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to colorado tanker; Hebrews 11:6; Steven Scharf; henkster
    And so the Battle of Leyte Gulf begins.

    From the Nimitz Graybook:

    "The DACE placed 4 torpedo hits in a KONGO class battleship at 09-29N . . ."

    From Toland:

    "Behind was a bigger target he mistook for a Kongo-class battleship."

    I love it when sources work together.

  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:48:59 AM PDT · 8 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/9/22.htm

    October 22nd, 1944 (SUNDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM: Corvettes HMCS Leaside and Humberstone departed Londonderry as escort for the 37-ship Southend to New York Convoy ON-261. ON-261 arrived safely in New York City on 5 Nov 44.

    WESTERN EUROPE: Weather prohibits USAAF Ninth Air Force bomber operations; fighter sweeps and armed reconnaissance support US Third and Seventh Army elements in eastern France and western Germany.

    NETHERLANDS: Breskens on the south bank of the Scheldt Estuary finally falls to repeated attacks of Canadian Units.

    Elements of Company E, 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment, accompanied by two forward observer teams of the 321st Glider Field Artillery Battalion, crossed the Lower Rhine east of Arnhem in British small boats. They brought back 125 members of the British 1st Airborne Division, ten Dutch resistance fighters and five USAAF pilots from the German occupied north side of the river. These men had been hiding out since the night of September 26th when 2,163 survivors of the 1st Airborne had been withdrawn across the river. The Germans were unaware of the operation and not a round was fired. This was the end of the Battle of Arnhem. (Jay Stone)

    In the Canadian First Army’s II Corps area, Breskens falls to the Canadian 3d Division. The Breskens Pocket is now less than half its original size. In the British I Corps area, the Canadian 4th Armoured Division reaches Esschen.

    In the British Second Army area, XII Corps begins a westward offensive to clear the region west of the Maas River. The 15th Division heads for Tilburg and the 7th Armoured and 53d Divisions, followed by the 51st Division, towards Hertogenbosch.

    Advance Headquarters of the USAAF Ninth Air Force’s XXIX Tactical Air Command (Provisional) and HQ 84th and 303d Fighter Wings move from Arlon, Belgium to Maastricht to maintain close association with the US Ninth Army.

    FRANCE: General de Gaulle’s administration is recognized by the Allies as the “de jure” Provisional Government of FRANCE.

    100th Infantry Battalion takes Biffontaine, suffering many casualties attempting to hold Biffontaine. (Gene Hanson)
    While fighting here, US 442nd Regimental Combat Team soldier, Barney Hajiro, and a fellow soldier concealed themselves in an outpost security position about 50 yards to the right front of their platoon and ambushed an 18-man, heavily armed German patrol. They killed two, wounded one and took the rest as prisoners. (MOH)

    In the U.S. Third Army’s XII Corps area, the 26th Infantry Division, untried in combat as a unit, makes a limited attack to gain experience and to improve positions east of Arracourt, securing ground west of Moncourt with support of troops from 704th Tank Destroyer Battalion.

    In the U.S. Seventh Army’s XV Corps area, the 79th Infantry Division finishes clearing the high ground east of Forêt de Parroy. In the VI Corps area, the 3d Infantry Division advances steadily northeast along the Mortagne River toward St Die. The 179th Infantry Regiment, 45th Infantry Division, completes the mop up of Brouvelieures; the 180th forces the Mortagne River east of Fremifontaine but falls back under German fire.

    GERMANY: East Prussia: Soviet forces stop short of Insterburg, 45 miles from Hitler’s Rastenburg headquarters.

    The USAAF Eighth Air Force flies Mission 685: 1,131 bombers and 785 fighters are dispatched on PFF attacks on targets in western Germany; two bombers and a fighter are lost. Two marshalling yards (M/Ys) are hit: 353 bombers attack the M/Y at Munster and 343 bomb the M/Y at Hamm and two armored vehicle factories are hit: 171 aircraft attack the Hannomag factory at Hannover and 149 hit the NAG plant at Brunswick. Targets of opportunity are: 35 aircraft bombing the industrial area at Bielefeld, ten hit the industrial area at Recklinghausen and 13 aircraft hit miscellaneous targets.

    During the day, 97 RAF Bomber Command Lancasters bomb Neuss; none lost. This G-H raid is not as concentrated as the recent Bonn raid and bombing is scattered. The local report says that 94 houses and three industrial buildings are destroyed and 545 houses, 18 industrial buildings and a public building are seriously damaged.

    During the night of 22/23 October, 44 RAF Bomber Command Mosquitos bomb Hamburg, four hit Wiesbaden and two each attack Düsseldorf and Cologne. Meanwhile, 38 Lancasters and Halfaxes lay mines in the Kattegat.

    U-2522 launched.

    U-3007 commissioned.

    FINLAND: Advance units of the Russian 14th Army reach the Norwegian border in the far north.

    ARCTIC SEA: U-737 is attacked by a Soviet aircraft. Three crewmembers were injured and the boat suffered slight damage.

    YUGOSLAVIA: With the fall of Sombor, southwest of Subotica, Soviet forces control most of the east bank of the Danube as far north as the Hungarian town of Baja.

    ITALY: Cervia falls to Canadian units of the British 8th Army.

    In the U.S. Fifth Army area, the South African 6th Armoured Division continues toward the crest of Mt. Salvaro in a drenching rain. The II Corps receives verbal orders to continue their offensive on the right flank to a line Ribano Hill-Mt. Castelazzo, then to Highway 9. Accordingly, the 88th and 85th Infantry Divisions jump off, on the night of 22/23 October, and get about a mile (1,6 kilometers) beyond Mt. Grande by dawn, taking Hill 568, Mt. Castellaro, and Hill 459. The British XIII Corps is ordered to take Mt. Spadura and continue northward between Imola and Castel San Pietro roads. The 78th Division places fire on Mt. Spadura. The German withdrawal to the east permits other units of the corps to advance. The 21st Brigade, the Indian 8th Division, takes Mt. Romano without opposition.

    In the British Eighth Army’s V Corps area, the Indian 10th Division expands its Savio River bridgeheads westward, the 20th Brigade pushing almost to the crest of Mt. Cavallo. The 4th Division is unable to progress from its bridgehead until heavy equipment can be crossed to it. In the Canadian I Corps area, the Canadian 1st Division is handicapped by the swollen Savio River and is unable to cross supporting weapons into the bridgehead.

    On the Savio River, Seaforth Highlanders Private Ernest Alva ‘Smoky’ Smith shows conspicuous heroism, holding the Savio River crossing against German counter-attacks and destroying at least two German tanks; awarded the Victoria Cross.

    Bad weather grounds all USAAF Twelfth and Fifteenth Air Force bombers; Twelfth Air Force fighters and fighter-bombers, flying less than 20 sorties, hitting rail lines and trains in northern Italy.

    CHINA: Two USAAF Fourteenth Air Force B-25 Mitchells knock out two railroad bridges at Pingnam while eight P-51 Mustangs attack the town area; 54 P-40s and P-51s on armed reconnaissance attack town areas and general targets of opportunity at Nampang, Kuanyang, Shekpo, Pingnam, Kweiping, near Menghsu, China, and Wanling, Burma.

    BURMA: Over 40 USAAF Tenth Air Force P-47 Thunderbolts hit a variety of targets including bridges at Panghkam, and at two other points along the northern Burma rail corridor, the towns of Manna and Kyaungle, a bivouac in the Indaw area, and various targets of opportunity.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES: On Leyte, In the U.S. Sixth Army’s X Corps area, the 7th Cavalry Regiment (General George Custer’s outfit) of the 2d Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, mops up Tacloban and takes the rest of the hill to the southwest. The 5th Cavalry Regiment of the1st Brigade, after laborious effort to advance over difficult terrain west of Caibaan, is ordered to halt and maintain current positions. The 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division, assisted by artillery fire and naval aircraft, secures the Pawing area with the capture of a hill to west. The 19th Infantry Regiment repels counterattacks against Palo, killing 91 Japanese, and mops up. In the XXIV Corps area, after night- long shelling of Labiranan Head, the 1st Battalion of the 383d Infantry Regiment, 96th Infantry Division, recaptures it while other elements of the regiment seize San Roque on Highway 1. The 382d Infantry Regiment takes Tigbao and Canmangui and sets up three night perimeters: one at Mati, one 800 yards (732 meters) east of Bolongtohan, and one 500 yards (457 meters) southeast of Tigbao. The 32d Infantry Regiment, 7th Infantry Division, gets about halfway to Burauen against sporadic resistance. The 84th, assisted by aircraft of the Seventh Fleet, advances more rapidly, gaining 2,800 yards (2 560 meters) before being ordered to halt until the 32d Infantry Regiment can come abreast.

    The Japanese naval forces under Vice Admirals KURITA Takeo, commander of the Second Fleet, and NISHIMURA Shoji, commander of the Southern Force, sail from Brunei, British Borneo, for Leyte Gulf. The decoy carrier unit under Vice Admiral OZAWA Tokusaburo, commander of the Northern Force, is already at sea from Japan. Between them, Kurita and Nishimura, command 7 battleships, 13 cruisers and 19 destroyers. The plan is for Ozawa to draw off Admiral William F. Halsey’s Third Fleet aircraft carriers and fast battleships, so these heavy units can attack the vulnerable invasion transports. The invasion force is escorted by Admiral Thomas C. Kinkaid’s Seventh Fleet; six battleships, 14 escort carriers, eight cruisers and 40 destroyers.

    USAAF Far East Air Force B-25 Mitchells and P-38 Lightnings attack shipping in the Sulu Archipelago and Jolo harbor on Jolo Island and Zamboanga harbor on Mindanano Island while B-24 Liberators hit Opon and Lahug Airfields on Cebu Island; B-25s hit Ternate on Samar Island and B-24s pound Matina Airfield in the Cagayan Islands, and Likanan on Mindanao Island.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Force B-25 Mitchells hit Piroe Bay supply dumps on Ceram Island and gun positions and fighter-bombers hit Kairatoe Airfield on Halmahara Island, Amahai Airfield on Amahai Islands south Ceram Island and targets of opportunity in Binnen Bay.

    NEW GUINEA: USAAF Fifth Air Force A-20 Havocs blast pillboxes and occupied areas in the Metimedan-Sawar Rivers sector of Dutch New Guinea.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb Yap Island with harassment raids during the day, operating singly or in groups of two or three aircraft.

    NAURU ISLAND: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-25 Mitchells bomb Nauru Island. Nauru Island is a 21 square kilometer (8 square mile) island in the South Pacific Ocean, located about halfway between the Gilbert and Solomon Islands. The island is rich in phosphate deposits and was occupied by the Japanese on 25 August 1942.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: In the South China Sea, USN submarine USS Darter (SS-227) detects a group of Japanese warships about 76 nautical miles (140 kilometers) north-northwest of Jesselton, British Borneo, in position 07.31N, 115.22E. This is Vice Admiral NISHIMURA Shoji’s Southern Force, that sailed from Brunei, British Borneo, for Leyte Gulf earlier today. (See below.) The sub trails the Japanese reporting their position.

    At 0700 hours, the USN submarine USS Sea Dog (SS-401) sinks a Japanese cargo ship about 161 nautical miles (298 kilometers) south-southwest of Kagoshima, Kyushu, Japan, in position 29.19N, 129.44E. Later in the day, the sub sinks a gunboat about 144 nautical miles (267 kilometers) south-southwest of Kagoshima in position 29.18N, 129.44E. (Skip Guidry)

    U.S.A.: Coast Guard-manned Army vessel FS-272 was commissioned at New York with LT E. Ayers, USCGR, as commanding officer. She departed New York on 15 November 1944 for the Southwest Pacific where she operated during the war at Parang, Philippines.

    ATLANTIC OCEAN: U-985 hit a mine and was damaged so seriously that she was decommissioned some weeks later.

  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:48:00 AM PDT · 7 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/oct44/22oct44.htm#

    Red Army reaches Norway
    Sunday, October 22, 1944 www.onwar.com

    In Finland... Soviet forces of the 14th Army (part of Karelian Front) reach the Norwegian border.

    On the Eastern Front... In Hungary, forces of the Soviet 2nd Ukrainian Front (Malinovski) reach Baja on the Danube, south of Budapest.

    On the Western Front... Elements of Canadian 1st Army complete the capture of Breskens on the south bank of the Scheldt estuary. In southern Holland, the British 12th Corps (part of British 2nd Army) attacks toward Tilburg.

    In Italy... Canadian troops of the British 8th Army capture Cervia.

    In Liberated France... The administration of General de Gaulle is recognized as the de jure Provisional Government.

    In the Philippines... On Leyte, US 10th and US 24th Corps both record advances. The US 7th Division, on the right flank, approach Abuyog.

    In North Borneo... The Japanese fleet assembled at Brunei sets sail for the Philippines with the intention of destroying the American invasion fleet. The Center Force (Admiral Kurita) includes 5 battleships (including Yamato and Musashi), 12 cruisers and 15 destroyers. The Southern Force (Admiral Nishimura) includes 2 battleships, 1 cruiser and 4 destroyers. It is to rendezvous with the 2nd Striking Force (Admiral Shima) from Japan.

  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:44:00 AM PDT · 6 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Road Hub is Seized – 2-3
    M’Arthur Warns Japan on Captives – 3-4
    Aid to China Flown a Year without Accident on Long Route from West Africa to India – 3
    War News Summarized – 4
    Red Army Scores – 5-6
    All Aachen Resistance Ends as 1,000 More Surrender (Denny) – 6-7
    Canadians Push On North of Antwerp (Daniel, Johnston) – 7-8
    C-82 Can Fly 10 Tons a Vast Distance – 9
    To Speed the Tools of War to Our Fighting Fronts (photo) – 9
    Veterans’ Intelligence (Hurd) – 10
    Storm Subsiding; Today to Be Clear – 10
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the War – 11-13
    10,000 at Tour End in Washington Sq. – 13

    The News of the Week in Review
    The Road Back to the Philippines (map) – 14
    We Return – 15-16
    Into the Reich – 16-18
    Abroad – 18-19
    Quotations – 19
    Fifteen News Questions – 20
    “In Fulfillment of a Pledge” (cartoons) – 20
    Philippine Invasion Opens New Phase of War (Kluckhohn, Sidney Shalett) – 21-22
    “Coming Home to Roost” (cartoon) – 22
    Allied Armies in the West Prepare For a Final Assault on the Reich (map) – 24
    Supply Problem Delays Final Drive on Reich (Daniel) – 25
    Answers to Fifteen News Questions – 25
    Germans Seen as Robots in Hands of Nazi Chiefs (by George Axelsson) – 26
    Germans Are Still Striving to Perfect New V Weapons (by Harry Vosser) – 27
    Speedy Punishment for War Criminals (by Sydney Gruson) – 27-28
    “The Morale Booster” (cartoon) – 28

  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:42:20 AM PDT · 5 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    The second of the following excerpts is continued from October 16.

     photo 1022-road34_zps40d766b6.jpg

     photo 1022-road35_zps14651603.jpg

    Winston S. Churchill, Triumph and Tragedy

  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:41:27 AM PDT · 4 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Continued from yesterday.

     photo 1022-road30_zpsabfc51a7.jpg

     photo 1022-road31_zpsca561865.jpg

     photo 1022-road32_zps48019784.jpg

     photo 1022-road33_zps038fe826.jpg

    John Toland, The Rising Sun: The Decline and Fall of the Japanese Empire, 1936-1945

  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:39:27 AM PDT · 3 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:36:47 AM PDT · 2 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Selections from West Point Atlas for the Second World War
    The Western Pacific, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands: The Invasion of Leyte (KING II), 17-20 October 1944 and the Battle for Leyte Gulf, 23-25 October 1944
    The Philippine Islands: Leyte Island and the Visayas, 1944 – Sixth Army Operations on Leyte and Samar, 17 October-30 December 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 6th and 12th Army Group Operations, 15 September-7 November 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 21st Army Group Operations, 15 September-15 December 1944
    Eastern Europe, 1941: Russian Balkan and Baltic Campaigns – Operations, 19 August-31 December 1944
    Northern Italy 1944: Allied Advance to Gothic Line, 5 June-25 August and Gains 29 August-31 December
    China, 1941: Operation Ichigo, April-December 1944 and Situation 31 December
    China-Burma, 1941: Third Burma Campaign – Slim’s Offensive, June 1944-March 1945
  • AMERICANS CAPTURE TACLOBAN IN LEYTE DRIVE; WIN TWO AIRFIELDS IN FOUR-MILE ADVANCES (10/22/44)

    10/22/2014 4:36:12 AM PDT · 1 of 18
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 12:23:41 PM PDT · 22 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to henkster

    Maybe not just you. I am currently working on the news of November 14. The story on Leyte is on page 4. OTOH, since that is the day my father landed on Leyte, my personal interest is mounting.

  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 8:40:11 AM PDT · 20 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to goodnesswins

    You can request his service record from this site.

    http://www.archives.gov/veterans/military-service-records/

    Unfortunately, most of the records of WWII vets were destroyed by a fire at the St. Louis archive around 1970. They still might have some basic information on your father.

  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 8:14:54 AM PDT · 18 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to goodnesswins

    I found a transport named Genera. H.L. Scott that could easily have been in the P.I. at this time. Was your father in the Coast Guard?

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_General_H._L._Scott_%28AP-136%29

  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 6:34:09 AM PDT · 13 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to goodnesswins

    Do you know what ship he was on?

  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 5:49:30 AM PDT · 11 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to Sivad

    It looks like the 11th Airborne will arrive at Leyte on November 11. My father will arrive with the 32nd ID three days later. They had to wait until then because the transports that brought the initial landing force had to turn around and go back to New Guinea to pick up the reinforcements.

  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 4:50:42 AM PDT · 9 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/9/21.htm

    October 21st, 1944 (SATURDAY)

    NORTH SEA: The German patrol boat F 631 attacked U-245 in the North Sea by error.

    WESTERN EUROPE: Bad weather grounds USAAF Ninth Air Force bombers. Fighters fly armed reconnaissance and attack railroads in western Germany and support elements of the U.S. Third and Seventh Armies in eastern France and western Germany.

    NETHERLANDS: During the day, 75 RAF Bomber Command Lancasters carry out an accurate visual bombing of a coastal battery at Flushing; one Lancaster is lost.

    FRANCE: U.S. Lieutenant General Omar Bradley, Commanding General 12th Army Group, orders the U.S. Ninth, First, and Third Armies to prepare for a drive to the Rhine, with 5 November as the target date for the Ninth and First Armies and 10 November for the Third Army.

    In the U.S. Seventh Army’s XV Corps area, the 79th Infantry Division launches a full scale assault on the heights east of Foret de Parroy, with the 313th Infantry Regiment on the left, the 315th in the center, and the 314th on the right. Some progress is made against strong opposition. In VI Corps area, the 179th Infantry Regiment of the 45th Infantry Division enters Brouveleures after the main body of Germans has withdrawn and begins to clear rear-guard opposition. As the 7th Infantry Regiment continues toward St Die, clearing Domfaing, the 3d Infantry Division commits the 15th Infantry Regiment to the left. The 36th Infantry Division is improving positions east of Bruyêres.

    GERMANY: Aachen finally surrenders to US forces. The extended battle by elite German formations including paratroopers, and ten day siege leaves much of it in ruins.
    The city was taken only after close-quarter battles fought from house to house. Five brave attempts to break the siege line were made last night, all broken by American fire-power. This morning the garrison commander, Col. Gerhardt Wilck, sent two US captives as messengers to negotiate surrender. With about 400 men he marched to the headquarters of Lt-Col. John Cortez to insist upon proper treatment for his defeated soldiers.
    From the back of a US Jeep he told his men: “I believe further fighting is useless. I have acted against my orders, to fight to the last man. The American commander says I cannot give you ‘Sieg Heil’ or ‘Heil Hitler’, but we say it in our hearts.”

    The garrison, totalling 1,626 men, had run out of food, ammunition and water. Most of the town’s ancient streets had become impassable because of debris. In the centre only the mediaeval cathedral was still basically intact. The civilian population demanded a surrender ten days ago.

    Berlin: Once again Grand Admiral Donitz has shown himself to be a formidable opponent. The Royal Navy hoped that the war at sea would be virtually over as soon as the Allied forces captured the heavily-armoured French bases which have harboured the U-boats for most of the war.

    Donitz was ahead of them. He moved the main U-boat fleet out to bases in Norway and has been rapidly refitting the fleet with a newer and more sophisticated Schnorkel. Yet despite the new device, the Allies managed to sink 19 U-boats last month.

    The advantages of the Schnorkel were demonstrated by Count von Matuschka in U-482. He did a round voyage from Norway of 2,729 miles, over 90% of which was under water. He preyed undetected on the main sea route north of Ireland and sank the corvette HMS HURST CASTLE and four ships.

    The Schnorkel is a long tube which extends up to the surface and enables air to be drawn into the submarine while it is submerged. It has a valve which closes if a large wave sweeps over the tube. The valve stops water getting in - but it also cuts off the air, brings the U-boat crew near to suffocation, and hurting their eardrums when the air rushes in again. The Germans first started experimenting with Schnorkel devices as early as 1940.

    Donitz started to fit them in large numbers as soon as he realized that British aircraft were decimating the U-boats. The Schnorkel not only allows them to stay submerged but also enables them to pick up long-range wireless signals undetected by the British. It does tend to slow a U-boat by several knots. So far German successes have been small in number. But the presence of the Schnorkel boats is still tying up a large number of Royal Navy ships in escort duties for merchant ships.

    During the night of 21/22 October, RAF Bomber Command sends 242 Halifaxes and 21 Pathfinder Lancasters to bomb Hannover but they are recalled because of deteriorating weather in England. All aircraft landed safely. Meanwhile RAF Mosquitos attack four targets: four bomb Pforzheim, two hit Dusseldorf , and one each attack Cologne and Leverkusen. There are no losses.

    U-2356, U-2357, U-2536 laid down.

    U-3513, U-3514 launched.

    U-2341 commissioned.

    HUNGARY: Elements of the Soviet Second Ukrainian Front pushing west from Szeged reach the Danube River at Baja, south of Budapest.

    B-24 Liberators of the USAAF Fifteenth Air Force bombs two marshalling yards (M/Y): 104 aircraft bomb the M/Y at Szombathely and 49 bomb the Main M/Y at Gyor without loss. Almost 100 P-38 Lightnings and P- 51 Mustangs escorts strafe Szombathely and Seregelyes Airfields and rail lines between Sajoszentpeter to Ipolyszog.

    During the night of 21/22 October, an RAF bomber of No. 205 (Heavy Bomber) Group drops leaflets over Budapest.

    YUGOSLAVIA: During the night of 21/22 October, 60 RAF bombers of No. 205 (Heavy Bomber) Group bomb the marshalling yard at Maribor; four aircraft are lost. Three other RAF bombers drop supplies to partisans.

    ITALY: The British V and Canadian I Corps continue crossing the Savio River.

    Pte. Ernest Alvia Smith (b.1914), Canadian Army, destroyed two tanks and two self-propelled guns and routed a number of German troops. (Victoria Cross)

    In the U.S. Fifth Army area, the South African 6th Armoured Division commits fresh troops on Mt. Salvaro and completes the capture of Mt. Alcino. In the British XIII Corps area, the 38th Brigade of the 78th Division makes another unsuccessful attempt to take Mt. Spadura. The 21st Brigade, Indian 8th Division, pushes almost to the summit of Mt. Romano.

    In the British Eighth Army’s Polish II Corps area, the 5th Kresowa Division, pressing northwest toward Route 67, which leads to Forli, takes Strada St. Zeno in the Rabbi River valley and the summit of Mt. Grosso. V Corps expands its three bridgeheads across the Savio River despite heavy rainfall and rapidly rising water. The Indian 10th Division’s 20th Brigade pushes toward Mt. Cavallo on the left flank of the corps while the 25th Brigade attacks to expand the bridgehead from St. Carlo. The 4th Division completes the capture of Cesena and crosses additional forces over the Savio River there, although handicapped by lack of a permanent bridge. In the Canadian I Corps area, The Canadian 1st Division at 2000 hours begins an attack across the Savio River with the 2d Brigade, supported by diversionary fire of the 3d Brigade, and secures a bridgehead.

    USAAF Twelfth Air Force B-26 Marauders, in the days only medium bomber mission, attack the Nervesa della Battaglia railroad bridge and causeway; fighters and fighter-bombers operate in close support of the U.S. Fifth Army forces south of Bologna and fighter-bombers also hit communications in northern Italy as far north as Verona and as far west as Turin.

    CHINA: Three USAAF Fourteenth Air Force B-25 Mitchells and 130+ P-40s and P-51 Mustangs attack shipping, gun positions, troop areas, bridges, town areas, road traffic, and other targets of opportunity around Yuma, Takhing, Dosing, Konghow, Shawan, Kuanyang, Kweiping, Tungpingchi, Tingka, Muse, Wan Lai-Kam, Shekpo, Menghsu, and Amoy.

    BURMA: Fifteen USAAF Tenth Air Force P-47 Thunderbolts damage at least three bridges throughout the railroad corridor in northern Burma; 15 other P-47s support ground forces in the Mohnyin area, hitting gun positions and defensive works at Ywathit; 12 others attack positions and occupied areas around Bhamo and Muse, six knock out the Paungni River bridge, and four attack the town of Mawhun; about 270 sorties are flown by Tenth Air Force transports in the China-Burma-India Theater.

    NEW GUINEA: In Northeast New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force B-25 Mitchells and fighter-bombers hit Misami Island.

    In Dutch New Guinea, USAAF Fifth Air Force fighter-bombers attack Mongosah (Cape Tanahmerh) and Sagan Aerodromes. Meanwhile, 81 (P-40) Kittyhawks of three Australian squadrons dive bomb the town of Mumi.

    EAST INDIES: USAAF Far East Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb Parepare on Celebes Island.. Other fighter-bombers hit Kaoe Bay supply areas on Halmahera Island; Boela Aerodrome and Amboina town area on Ceram Island.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES: On Leyte Island, the Japanese decide to make a strong effort to defeat the Americans instead of fighting a delaying action as planned. Generals Walter Krueger, Franklin Sibert, and John Hodge take command ashore of Sixth Army, X Corps, and XXIV Corps, respectively. In X Corps area, 2d Brigade of the 1st Cavalry Division seizes Tacloban and southern half of hill to the southwest; the 1st Brigade drives west, taking Utap and Caibaan. The 34th Infantry Regiment, on the northern flank of the 24th Infantry Division, undergoes a determined Japanese counterattack, beginning at 0100 hours, in the Pawing area. Artillery and USN Seventh Fleet aircraft assist after daylight in routing the Japanese, more than 600 of whom are killed. The 2d Battalion then attacks the ridge to the west but cannot take it. The 19th Infantry Regiment clears the far slope of Hill 522 and, with strong fire support, takes Palo. In the XXIV Corps area, the 96th Infantry Division’s 383d Infantry Regiment begins working around Catmon Hill, which is actually a series of hill positions. 1st Battalion secures Labiranan Head but, since the Japanese remain in this area, pulls back to the Labiranan River. The 2d Battalion gains positions 300 yards (274 meters) north of Tigbao and the 3d Battalion, positions 1,110 yards (1 015 meters) north of the barrio. The 382d Infantry Regiment drives on Tigbao but is slowed by pillboxes as well as swampy terrain. The 7th Infantry Division attacks toward Dulag and Burauen Airfields with the 32d and 184th Infantry Regiments. The 32d, against considerable opposition, gets forward elements (2d and 3d Battalions) to the regimental beachhead line. The 184th Infantry Regiment easily takes Dulag Airstrip by 0900 hours and continues west to positions about 1,000 yards (914 meters) beyond the beachhead line, but a gap exists between it and 32d Infantry Regiment.

    Naval support is from the US Seventh Fleet and one group of Task Force 38. Air strikes on Cebu, Panay, Negros and Masbate Islands are made by two other groups of TF 38.

    At 0605 hours in the Leyte Gulf, a Japanese “Val” dive bomber (Aichi D3A, Navy Type 99 Carrier Bomber) crashes into the foremast of the heavy cruiser HMAS Australia (D 84). A fire starts but is put out by 0635 hours. The ship’s captain and 21 others are killed or die of injuries and 64 others are injured. The commodore’s staff transfers to the heavy cruiser HMAS Shropshire and HMAS Australia retires to Manus Island in the Admiralty Islands.

    USAAF Far East Air Forces B-24 Liberators bomb Cagayan and B-25 Mitchells attack a truck convoy near Kibawe on Mindanao Island.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: Twenty eight USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators from Saipan Island bomb Iwo Jima.

    PALAU ISLANDS: The Japanese resistance on Angaur Island ends. Losses are: Japanese 1,300 KIA and 45 POW; US 264 KIA and 1355 WIA. US heavy bomber units are already operating from Angaur. The Palaus were declared secure on September 30 by US Admiral Fort.

    CANADA: Light cruiser HMCS Uganda (ex-HMS Uganda) commissioned Charleston, South Carolina.

    U.S.A.: Major General Clayton L. Bissell becomes Assistant Chief/Air Staff, Intelligence (A-2) in Washington, DC. He was formerly CG of the US 10th Air Force.

    A new command, Marine Carrier Air Groups, is established under Aircraft, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific, to direct the formation and training of Marine Corps squadrons destined to operate from air support escort carriers. Current plans called for the formation of six Marine Carrier Air Groups, each composed of a fighter and a torpedo squadron, four of them to be assigned to escort carriers and two to function as replacement and training groups.

    Submarine USS Chub commissioned.

  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 4:48:57 AM PDT · 8 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/oct44/21oct44.htm#

    Aachen surrenders to Americans
    Saturday, October 21, 1944 www.onwar.com

    American troops enter Aachen [photo at link]

    On the Western Front... Aachen is surrendered to American forces.

    In Italy... British 5th Corps and Canadian 1st Corps continue to cross the Savio River.

    In the Palau Islands... Organized Japanese on Angaur ends. A total of 1300 Japanese are killed and 45 are captured. American forces have suffered 265 dead and 1335 wounded. US heavy bombers are operating from the airfield. The Japanese garrisons on the remaining isldands in the group are left isolated.

    In the Philippines... Elements of US 24th Corps capture Dulag Airfield; Tacloban village is taken by forces of US 10th Corps. American forces are unable to link the two beachheads. Ships of the US 7th Fleet and one group of US Task Force 38 (part of US 3rd Fleet) provide naval and air support to the land battles. Meanwhile, two groups of TF38 launch air strikes against targets on Panay, Cebu, Negros and Masbate.

  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 4:48:01 AM PDT · 6 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Drives Under Way – 2-3
    Leyte Invasion Opens Way to Cut Life Lines of Japan (Kluckhohn) – 3
    45 U.S. Writers See Philippine Landing – 3
    Two Ghost Ships of Pearl Harbor Come Back to Haunt the Japanese (Wilson, Schedler) – 4
    Terauchi is Identified as MacArthur’s Foe; War Lord Has Reputation for Ruthlessness – 4
    Diseases Menace Philippine Force – 4
    We Return to the Philippines: Invasion Armada, Its Objective and Commanders (photos) – 5-8
    War News Summarized – 8
    Hodges Takes City (Middleton) – 9-10
    Canadians Strike North of Antwerp – 10
    Soviet Gains Grow – 11-12
    1,750 Big Bombers Rip Reich Cities (by Richard J.H. Johnston) – 12
    De Gaulle Divides France into Zones (by Harold Callender) – 13
    At the Funeral of Field Marshal Gen. Erwin Rommel (photo) – 14
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 15-17
  • HUGE ARMY SWEEPING FORWARD ON LEYTE, WITH GREAT BATTLE FLEET POUNDING FOE (10/21/44)

    10/21/2014 4:47:01 AM PDT · 5 of 27
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Billboard Top Ten for the Week of October 21, 1944

    #1 - “You Always Hurt the One You Love” – Mills Brothers
    #2 – “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t (Ma’ Baby)” – Bing Crosby, with the Andrews Sisters
    #3 - “I’ll Walk Alone” – Dinah Shore
    #4 - “Swinging on a Star” – Bing Crosby
    #5 – “I’ll Walk Alone” – Martha Tilton
    #6 - “I’ll Walk Alone” – Mary Martin
    #7 - “Together” – Dick Haymes and Helen Forrest
    #8 – “And Her Tears Flowed Like Wine” – Stan Kenton, with Anita O’Day
    #9– “It Had to Be You” - Dick Haymes/Helen Forrest
    #10 - “The Trolley Song” – Pied Pipers