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  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:26:55 AM PDT · 9 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/8/17.htm

    September 17th, 1944 (SUNDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM: The blackout is replaced by the “dim-out”, permitting a modified form of street lighting.

    EUROPE

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS: The last UK-USSR-Italy-UK shuttle mission (Operations FRANTIC) is completed as 72 US Eighth Air Force B-17s and 59 P-51s fly without bombs from Italy to the UK; 2 B-17s and a P-51 abort and a P-51 crash lands southwest of Paris; 70 B-17s 57 P-51s land safely in the UK. The Eighth Air Force flies Mission 637 supporting Operation

    MARKET-GARDEN: 875 B-17s are dispatched bomb 117 flak batteries and installations and an airfield, all in the Netherlands; 815 B-17s attack the primaries and 6 hit Eisenach; 2 B-17s are lost; escort is provided by 141 P-51s; 1 P-51 is lost.

    503 P-38s, P-47s and P-51s escort aircraft of the First Allied Airborne Army making a parachute and glider drop of 20,000 troops into the Netherlands to secure the axis of advance toward the Zuider Zee for the British Second Army, as part of Operation MARKET-GARDEN, 17-30 September; troops dropped are the I Airborne Corps, consisting of the British 1 Airborne Division (with Polish Parachute Brigade) and US 82d and 101st Airborne Divisions; the fighters also bomb and strafe flak positions and other ground targets, encountering intense flak and about 30 fighters; they claim 7-0-0 aircraft in the air, 1-0-0 on the ground and the destruction of 107 flak positions; 6 P-47s and 7 P-51s are lost.

    AIRBORNE OPERATIONS: Between 17-26 September, the US IX Troop Carrier Command, assigned to the First Allied Airborne Army, supports Operation MARKET-GARDEN as follows:

    Aircraft dispatched: 3,996 of which 3,634 are successful

    Gliders dispatched: 1,899 of which 1,635 are successful (320 of these gliders are Airspeed Horsas)

    Losses: 98 aircraft and 137 gliders

    Troops dropped or landed: 30,481

    Vehicles dropped or landed: 1,001

    Artillery weapons dropped or landed: 463

    Tons of equipment, including fuel, dropped or landed: 3,559

    In support of Operation Market Garden during the day, RAF Bomber Command sent : 112 Lancasters and 20 Mosquitos to attack three targets: 34 aircraft bombed coastal installations at Westkapelle, 32 hit gun emplacements at Biggerkerke and 30 attacked gun emplacements at Flushing. During the night of 17/18 September, 241 aircraft made two diversionary sweeps, one to the Dutch coast and one into the Netherlands, in order to draw up German fighters from Southern Holland. This intention is not achieved. No aircraft lost.

    TACTICAL OPERATIONS: The US Ninth Air Force flies no combat bomber missions; weather permits 1 leaflet mission. XIX Tactical Air Command supports US VIII Corps in the Brest, France area and in Germany, flies armed reconnaissance over the Trier and Saarbrucken areas and IX Tactical Air Command flies armed reconnaissance in the Dusseldorf, Duren, Cologne, and Linz/Rhine areas, supports the US 2d and 5th Armored Divisions and 4th Infantry Division in the Netherlands, and participates in Operation MARKET-GARDEN.

    BELGIUM: The British I Corps starts to clear the Schelde Estuary in order to open the port of Antwerp.

    NETHERLANDS: As the British Second Army nears the border, the government orders a general strike.

    General Montgomery launches Operation Market-Garden today with parachute and glider drops aimed at capturing bridges over the Dutch rivers near the German border. This will be followed up with the advance of the British XXX Corps. The front will then be at Arnhem, Holland. It will be a long salient, but due to the ground in Holland, defensible.
    He plans to seize a series of 5 bridges with the use of 3 airborne divisions. This will enable him to bypass the fortified Siegfried Line and drive Allied forces into Germany by the lightly-defended back door. Montgomery says that the war will be over by Christmas.

    British XXX Corps has the mission of moving up the road between the two cities within 48 hours. The German situation is estimated to be favourable to the Allies but it is extremely strong. Elements of the II SS Panzer Corps, the First Airborne Army and Fifteenth Army and other units are committed to the battle.

    American paratroopers have been assigned to seize a series of bridges across the Maas and the Waal while the British paras have been dropped at Arnhem, the farthest target, to seize the two Lower Rhine bridges. The 1st Parachute Reconnaissance Squadron came down at 1.15pm without opposition, eight miles west of Arnhem. It was three-quarters of an hour in advance of the main force, the 1st Parachute and 1st Air Landing Brigade of the 1st Airborne Division. Dutch civilians welcomed the men, but their greetings delayed the paras’ deployment.

    In addition the 1st Air Landing Regiment, Royal Artillery, with its pack 75 mm howitzers, elements of the division tactical headquarters and division troops are landed. The landings are unopposed. 1st Air Landing Brigade secures the landing and drop zones for the arrival of the remainder of the division. Soon after 1500 hours local, 2 Parachute Regiment and 3 Parachute Regiment move out to secure the bridge at Arnhem, 8 miles (13 kilometers) away. 1 Parachute Regiment is in reserve. Resistance is unexpectedly strong but by 2100 hours local, 2 Parachute Regiment along with Company, 3 Parachute Regiment, the 1st Forward Observation Unit Royal Artillery, and elements of Engineer and Royal Army Service Corps (RASC) units. “A” Company attacks to seize the southern end of the bridge but is driven back.

    By the time the paras attacked the railway bridge it was being blown up, while another group, attacking from the northern approaches of the road bridge, found a strong German force in position at the southern end. There was worse to come. Not only had the British landed within two miles of the HQ of Field Marshal Model but the 9th and 10th SS Panzer Divisions had recently arrived north of Arnhem for regrouping.

    To the south the U.S. 82d Airborne Division has the mission of securing the bridges between Grave and Nijmegan a distance of 10 miles (16 kilometers). It must also secure high ground to the southwest of Nij

    megan from which the Germans could control much of the road over which the British XXX Corps is to move. The 82d lands the 504th, 505th and 508th Parachute Infantry Regiments, the 376th Parachute Field Artillery Battalion, elements of the division headquarters, its anti-tank battalion and Engineers. With the exception of the bridge over the Waal River and two small bridges over the Maas-Waal Canal which are blown by the Germans, all objectives are secured. Due to a misunderstanding of his orders from the division commander, the commander of the 508th does not move on the bridge at Nijmegan until nightfall at which time he commits a battalion. The attack by the battalion is repulsed. Nevertheless in its area the 82nd has secured a road between Grave and the southern part of Nijmegman. The division which is to make the initial linkup with XXX Corps units, the U.S. 101st Airborne, has the mission of securing bridges over rivers and canals between Eindhoven and Veghl. All objectives north of Zon are secured. At Zon the bridge over the Wilhelmina Canal is blown by the German as units of the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment are within 50 yards (46 meters). Four men swim to the opposite bank while others obtain small boats and row across. Engineers of the 326th Airborne Engineers Battalion construct a foot bridge over the canal and by 2400 hours local, the regiment is across. It then stops for the night. The British Guards Armoured Division attacks north out of its bridgehead over the Meuse-Escart Canal. It is aided by a heavy Artillery preparation and rocket-firing RAF Typhoons. Initial resistance is stiff but is overcome and lead elements of the division reach Valkenswaard at 1930 hours local and halt 7 miles (11 kilometers) short of Eindhoven. The British Guards Armoured and the U.S. 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment are to meet in Eindhoven on this day but are now approximately 13 miles (21 kilometers) apart. This will have serious consequences for the 1st Airborne Division at Arnhem. Further south in the area of the U.S. 101st Airborne Division during the night of the 17/18 September, the 501st Parachute Infantry Regiment beats off attacks a several points.

    The British CO, Major-General Robert Urquhart, narrowly escaped capture by hiding in a house. He ventured to the front when he lost contact with the landings. He has ended up trapped there, and still out of touch with his staff.
    Jay Stone (a veteran of Market Garden) adds: On 17 September 1944 units of the British 1st Airborne Corps parachute and land by glider in the Netherlands. The mission of the corps, which consists of the US 101st Airborne Division, the US 82nd Airborne Division and the British 1st Airborne Division, is to seize bridges over waterways between Eindhoven and Arnhem so that British XXX Corps can move 60 miles between those two cities within 48 hours and out flank the Siegfried Line in Germany.

    The mission of the the 101st is to seize bridges over rivers and canals between Eindhoven and Veghel The 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment lands vicinity of Zon (Son). Forward Observers of the 321st Glider Field Artillery jump with the three battalions of the 506th. Their mission is to fire Artillery units of XXX Corps in support of the 506th. The most immediate and vital objective of the 506th is the seizure of the bridge over the Wilhelmia Canal in Zon. Immediately upon landing and without assembling, members of the 1st Battalion move south toward the bridge.

    Colonel Robert Sink, regimental commander, accompanied by riflemen of the 1st Battalion and engineers of the 326 Engineer Battalion, is in the lead group. The bridge is blown as they are 100 yards away. Engineers of the Third Platoon of Company C, 326th Airborne Engineer Battalion (the battalion’s parachute company) throw a foot bridge across the canal on the wreckage of the vehicular bridge.

    To the north the 82nd lands between Grave and Nijmegen. Its mission is to seize the bridge over the Maas River at Grave and the huge multispan bridge over the Waal at Nijmegen. This bridge with its approaches is one hall mile long. The seizure of this proves costly to the 82nd. The British 1st Airborne Division is to land six miles from its objective, the steel and concrete bridge at Arnhem. Because of concerns about conflicts with the traffic of the airlift of the 82nd to the south and because the leaders of the RAF believes that there are anti units to the north of Arnhem, these leaders of the ‘few,’ the vaunted, refuse to drop their comrades of the 1st closer than six miles from the objective. While there are many reasons for the failure of Market-Garden, this proves to be the lynch-pin of the failure which includes the loss of 75% of the 1st Airborne Division.

    Here’s Jay’s personnel memoir of that day:

    HOLLAND

    As the C-47 in which we were riding on the September 17th gained altitude I turned around, looked out the small window and saw many other C- 47’s, along with ours, gathering into formation. There were approximately 25 C-47’s carrying the 3rd Battalion. Our pilot climbed for altitude through the clouds which were ever present over England. This time they were not thick but wispy. As we gained altitude we joined aircraft of other units and together we made a formation which stretched to the horizon.

    First Lieutenant Francis Canham and I were flying in with the commander of the 3rd Battalion. He was our jump master and number one man in the stick. Number two was the battalion operations officer (S3), Canham was number three and I was number four man. The battalion commander spent a lot of time standing near the open door while the S3 spent his time standing on the opposite side of the cabin. I don’t know what Canham was doing but I spent a lot of time praying. A chaplain had given me a small paperback book which contained some prayers which had given me comfort in times past and so I read some of this book. The S3 must have seen the concern in my face and when I looked up at him one time he smiled at me and winked. Two days later during the attack on Eindhoven he was lying on a sidewalk in a pool of blood with a small hole in his head.

    Our route to Holland was over Belgium which was in allied hands. South of Holland we turned north for the final run to the drop zone at Zon. As we flew over Holland the Germans began firing anti aircraft shells and heavy machine gun rounds at us. When I heard that for the first time I asked the soldier next to me what it was. He calmly replied that they were firing at us with machine guns. I had heard them on the ground but never in the air.

    Fifteen minutes before an aircraft is scheduled to arrive over the drop zone, the crew chief notifies the jump master of that fact and the pilot turns on the red light just inside the open door. The jump master orders the men to stand up, hook up, check equipment, and then sound off for equipment check. When the pilot turns the light to green the jump master goes out closely followed by the rest of the stick. The crew chief gave the word to the battalion commander and the pilot turned on the red light. The battalion commander ordered us to stand up and go through the drill. We were one tense group of soldiers. I had been in combat but this was my first combat jump. However, some of these soldiers had not been in combat and would make their entrance via parachute. The battalion commander stood in the door looking for his check points so that he would know where he was when we jumped. The rest of us kept on waiting. Eighteen minutes later the crew chief came back and told the battalion commander that the navigator had made a mistake and that we were then 15 minutes out. When we heard that there were many unpleasant words for the navigator. Now we had to go through that awful wait again.

    This time the navigator got it right and fifteen minutes later the green light went on and we went out the door. Paratroopers are always anxious to get out an aircraft but this time we were more anxious than usual. We could see puffs of black smoke made by anti aircraft shells as they sought out our planes and exploded. Nobody wanted to be in an airplane when it was struck by an anti aircraft shell and so we were on each others backs as we went out. I later found out that we had jumped at an altitude of 450 feet. I believed it because no sooner did my parachute canopy open than I landed on the ground.

    As soon as I landed I collapsed the canopy of my chute, looked around and saw Canham. I looked for our equipment bundle, found it immediately and attempted to untie to rope which held the opening closed. It was a tight knot and I was unable to open it so I took my knife from its sheath on my leg and cut the rope, opened the bundle and took out our radio and batteries. By then Galant and Brasswell had joined Canham and me. The roar of the C47s overhead was load. A few had been shot down by German anti-aircraft fire. Shell fragments from spent anti-aircraft rounds fell close to us. The odd C47 that was shot down might fall near us. Both could be dangerous and so the drop zone was becoming an unhealthy place. We had completed the assembly of our FO team, secured our equipment and so we headed for the assembly area of the 3rd Battalion in a portion of near by woods marked with blue smoke.

    There was a touch of euphoria in our group. None of us had the experience of mass jump during our training but we knew that we had just taken part in a successful one. Everything was working like clockwork. It couldn’t have been better. The adrenalin was pumping so much that it was only after we had been in the assembly area for several minutes that I noticed that I had sliced off a bit of my left thumb cutting the rope on our radio equipment pack. Canham found the battalion commander and we joined his command group. I placed our radio on my back and the batteries on my chest, hooked up the antenna and turned the power on. The mission of our FO team was to adjust the fires of British XXX Corps Artillery in support of the 3rd Battalion. Other FOs from the 321st were with the other two battalions. I attempted to check into its net but was unsuccessful. We thought that perhaps we were out of range of the British and so turned the radio off to conserve batteries. When we were closer to them we would try again.

    The 3rd Battalion was the reserve battalion for the 506th Parachute Infantry Regiment. The regiment’s mission was to seize the bridge over the Wilhelmena Canal in Zon. Colonel Robert Sink, the regimental commander had given the 1st Battalion the mission of securing the regimental objective. As soon as 15 - 25 men came into the battalion’s assembly area they were sent south through the woods. Just before they arrived at the canal they were to swing left and move on the bridge and capture it before the Germans blew it. Major James L. LaPrade, the commander, had the battalion on the way in 45 minutes. General Maxwell Taylor, the division commander, accompanied the battalion. Meanwhile the 2nd Battalion had completed its assembly and on Colonel Sink’s order moved south on the Zon road toward the bridge. We in the 3rd Battalion followed. On the road to Zon we again tried to raise the British but were unsuccessful.

    The 1st Battalion should have been at the bridge before the 2nd Battalion but it was delayed by fire from a group 88mm guns. The guns were silenced and the advance continued. Because of this delay the 2nd Battalion arrived to within 50 yards of the bridge just as did the 1st Battalion came within 150 yards from the flank. At that moment Germans blew the bridge. Just about everything but the center pillar was gone. A moment after the bridge blew LaPrade, Lieutenant Millford F. Weller and Sergeant Donald B. Dunning came running up, took a look, dove into the water and swam to the other side.

    Meanwhile, our FO team moved south on the Zon road with the 3rd Battalion. It was typical of any approach march. Some forward movement interspersed with many stops. During this Canham told me to take the radio to the Division Artillery (DivArty) communications section and see if its members could get our radio going. The DivArty headquarters was in a wood about one-half a mile west of the road. They were unable to fix my radio and thought that it had been damaged in the drop. They were probably right as we had not had any special packing for such a sensitive radio as the SCR 610 was. I asked for a replacement and they looked at me as though I were playing with 51 cards.

    I hustled back to the road and found my guys as they were continuing the march with the 3rd Battalion. The 3rd Platoon, Company C, 326 Airborne Engineer Battalion (the battalion’s parachute company) had jumped with the 506th. It quickly through a wooden foot bridge across the canal. The bridge was not as stable as it could have been and only a few men at a time could cross on it. This caused slow movement throughout the column of the 506th.

    At about 9:00 P.M. darkness came and it found us tired. We had gone to bed late on the 16th and had been up early on the 17th. Since the jump we had been on the move carrying that heavy radio and extra batteries in addition to our normal equipment. As we moved through Zon I could hear on the radioa of the residents the BBC broadcasting news of the success of the airborne operation. After having the bridge blow up on us and our slow movement south I couldn’t understand was so successful. Certainly the 1st Airborne Division at Arnhem was not meeting with success, either. There really wasn’t much success that first day. Perhaps the BBC meant that the drop had been successful. For the 506th the rest of the operation had not been.as successful it it might have been. After all, our mission was to seize the bridge over the Wilhelmenia Canal andthe Germans had blown it.

    Because of the slow movement and my fatigue whenever we stopped in Zon I moved to the side of the road, leaned against a window of a house and rested the bottom of the radio on the window ledge. This took the weight off my shoulders but didn’t relieve my fatigue and several times I woke up from a quick sleep while walking down the road. We finally crossed the bridge and moved off to the right into a drainage ditch where we fell asleep immediately. This was a violation of that sacred rule, “Dig in for the night.” Canham was a careful leader and I can’t understand why he did not insist that we dig in.

    See also: The Battle of Arnhem Archive.

    FRANCE: In southern France, the US Seventh Army’s French II Corps makes contact with the US Third Army’s French 2d Armored Division near Bains-les-Bains, southeast of Epinal.

    In northern France, the Canadian 3rd Division, with strong air and artillery support, begins a six-day battle for Boulogne, making slow progress against strong fortifications. The U.S. VIII Corps continues the battle for Brest.

    The USAAF Ninth Air Force XIX Tactical Air Command supports the U.S. VIII Corps in the Brest area.

    One hundred two USAAF Eighth Air Force bombers deliver supplies from England to Chartres but bad weather hampers all but eight of 54 USAAF Fifteenth Air Force B-24 Liberators flying supplies from Italy to southern France.

    During the day, RAF Bomber Command sends 762 aircraft, 370 Lancasters, 351 Halifaxes and 41 Mosquitos, to attack German positions around Boulogne; 688 aircraft dropped more than 3,000 tons of bombs in preparation for an attack by Allied troops. The German garrison surrendered soon afterwards. A Halifax and a Lancaster lost. In a second mission, 27 Lancasters and five Mosquitos attacked a V1 rocket depot at Eikenhorst without loss.

    GERMANY: Rastenburg: Told of the Allied airborne landing at Arnhem today, Hitler collapsed with a suspected mild heart attack and took to his bed. Even on his best days, the Fuhrer suffers from headaches, stomach cramps and dizziness, and wavers between fits of rage and deep depression.

    He exists on an assortment of drugs prescribed by his physician, Theodor Morell: Vitamins A and D and glucose to stimulate his appetite; anti-gas pills and digestive aids; Vitamultin-Ca to alleviate depression; caffeine and pervitin tablets to stimulate the brain; injections of heart and liver extracts; cocaine for headaches; sedatives for sleeping.

    He harangues his generals about the new armies he will raise, the secret weapons that will appear, and the quarrels that will break out among the Allies; these factors will enable Germany to gain a victory that will endure for a hundred years, he says.

    But anxiety over the looming defeat, the unhealthy existence in the underground bunker and Morell’s drugs have made Hitler a physical and mental wreck. On the rare occasions when he leaves the bunker he sways and stumbles. Greyfaced, trembling, blinking his bloodshot eyes, he retreats into the Wolfsschanze.

    The U.S. 30th Infantry Division crosses the German border east of Simpelveld.

    The USAAF Ninth Air Force’s XIX Tactical Air Command flies armed reconnaissance over the Trier and Saarbrucken areas and IX Tactical Air Command flies armed reconnaissance in the Dusseldorf, Duren, Cologne, and Linz/Rhine areas.

    During the night of 17/18 September, RAF Bomber Command Mosquitos bombed two targets: 42 hit Bremen and six bombed Dortmund.

    U-2514 launched.
    A U-1302 crewmember took his own life with a pistol in the port of Gotenhafen.

    HUNGARY: B-17 Flying Fortresses and B-24 Liberators of the USAAF Fifteenth Air Force in Italy attack five targets in the Budapest area in an attempt to hit Germany’s principal remaining oil supply and to aid the Soviets and other friendly forces on the southern front: 209 aircraft bomb the Rakos marshalling yard, 72 bomb the Ferencvaros marshalling yard, and 40 attack the Kobanya marshalling; two oil refineries are hit with 55 aircraft bombing the Shell refinery and 48 hitting the Magyar refinery. Eight other aircraft bomb the Baja railroad bridge as a target of opportunity.

    NORWAY: U-855 is listed as lost. (Type IXC/40) Missing since 11 September, 1944 in the area west of Bergen, Norway. 56 dead (all crew lost). The boat was returning from a weather reporting patrol when she possibly hit a mine on or about the 17 September in the Iceland-Faroes mine barrage. (Alex Gordon)

    Miniature submarine X-8 is scuttled in the Norwegian Sea after it has been found necessary to jettison both her explosive side cargoes which have flooded. There are no casualties. X-8, and five other miniature submarines are being towed to Northern Norway to undertake attacks on the German battleships Scharnhorst and Tirpitz and the heavy cruiser Lützow. One of the group had been lost with its passage crew the previous day. (Alex Gordon)

    MEDITERRANEAN

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS: The US Fifteenth Air Force dispatches 440+ B-17s and B-24s, with fighter escort, to attack 2 oil refineries and 4 marshalling yards in the Budapest, Hungary area in an attempt to hit Germany’s principal remaining oil supply and to aid the Soviet and other friendly forces on the southern Russian front by pounding the focal rail traffic point in that area; some of the escorting fighters strafe targets of opportunity in the general target area. Bad weather hampers all but 8 of 54 B-24s flying supplies to southern France. 25 bombers return from Cairo, Egypt to Italy with Allied airmen formerly imprisoned in Bulgaria; 2 B-17s, escorted by 41 P-51s, evacuate wounded airmen from Czechoslovakia to Italy.

    YUGOSLAVIA: USAAF Fifteenth Air Force bombers in Italy bomb two marshalling yards: eight aircraft hit the Vincovici marshalling yard and five bomb the Osijek marshalling yard. One other bomber attacks a railroad bridge. .

    ITALY: In the mountains south of the Po Valley, US Fifth Army forces break through the Gothic Line at Il Giogo Pass, take Monte Altuzzo and Pratone, finish clearing Monte Veruca, and gain the crest of Monte Monticelli.

    During the night of 17/18 September, the Germans begin a withdrawal from the Gothic Line.

    US Twelfth Air Force B-25s hit troop concentrations in the British Eighth Army battle area in the vicinity of Rimini; B-25s pound railbridges in the western Po Valley, while fighter-bombers operating in the Po Valley attack rails, roads, rolling stock, road bridges, motor transport and other targets.

    Twenty two USAAF Fifteenth Air Force bombers return from Cairo, Egypt, to Italy with Allied airmen formerly imprisoned in Bulgaria while two B-17 Flying Fortresses, escorted by 41 P-51 Mustangs, evacuate wounded airmen from Czechoslovakia to Italy.

    During the night of 17/18 September, 92 RAF heavy bombers of No. 205 (Heavy Bomber) Group bomb the Brescia West marshalling yard.

    CHINA-BURMA-INDIA

    BURMA: Tuitum falls to the Indian 5th Division.

    8 US Tenth Air Force P-47 Thunderbolts bomb Katha, 8 hit Momauk and Wanling, and 8 others attack Bhamo; 6 B-25s hit Mangshih while 3 others bomb Indaw; 16 B-24s haul fuel to Liuchow, China; C-47 Skytrains fly 200+ sorties delivering personnel and supplies to various points in the CBI.

    CHINA: 29 US Fourteenth Air Force B-24s bomb Changsha; 27 B-25s hit Hwangshapu, Kiyang, and Nanyo; 130+ P-51 Mustangs and P-40s on armed reconnaissance attack town areas, strongpoints, shipping, railway targets, gun positions, trucks, and other targets of opportunity from NE of Ichang southward through Hunan Province and beyond; areas hit include Changsha, Kiyang, Lingling, Chuanhsien, Siangtan, Hengshan, Kweiyang, and Lingkuantien, plus scattered targets of opportunity elsewhere.

    EAST INDIES: Royal Navy carriers Indomitable and Illustrious launched an air strike on Japanese facilities in Sumatra.

    U.S. Army action on Morotai Island in the Netherlands East Indies subsides to patrolling in order to locate small Japanese parties.

    B-24s, B-25s, and P-38s hit Langoan Airfield on Celebes Island. B-25s and P-39s, fighting bad weather, attack a variety of targets, including airfields and villages in Amboina-Ceram Islands area.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES: USAAF Far East Air Force B-25 Mitchells bomb Buayan Aerodrome on Mindanao.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, P-47s and P-40s pound the airfield on Samate Island.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: The US 8th Infantry Division and the 321st and 322d Infantry Regiments of the US Army’s 81st Infantry Division land on Angaur in the Palaus Islands. Resistance is strong from the 1600 man Japanese garrison, but the army capture the north-eastern third of the island. Most of the south end of Peleliu Island is held by the Marines. Attacks on the Japanese positions on Mount Umurbrogol begin, marking the tough fighting ahead, but US forces are finding the resistance lighter than on Peleliu, six miles to the north. There, 24,300 marines have been pinned down by 10,500 Japanese operating from a high ridge. Ironically, the Palaus are no longer essential to US war plans. The islands, 800 miles southwest of Guam, were intended as a staging area for an attack on Mindanao. However, two days ago General MacArthur told Washington that he now intends to attack the Philippines directly.

    During the afternoon, USN carrier-based F6F Hellcats attack US Army ground troops killing 7 and wounding 46. All close-air support missions are temporarily halted on Angaur.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: A US Seventh Air Force B-24 on a snooper mission from Saipan Island bombs Iwo Jima Island; armed reconnaissance over Marcus Island is unsuccessful due to bad weather. Gilbert Islands-based B-25s pound Nauru Island.

    NAURU ISLAND: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-25 Mitchells bomb the island. Nauru Island is a 21 square kilometer (8 square mile) island in the South Pacific Ocean, located about halfway between the Gilbert and Solomon Islands. The island is rich in phosphate deposits and was occupied by the Japanese on 25 August 1942.

    JAPAN: In the Kurile Islands, 2 US Eleventh Air Force B-24s abort a mission to Suribachi due to weather and 4 B-25s fly an unsuccessful shipping sweep. Four PV-1 Venturas of the USN’s Bombing Squadron One Hundred Thirty Six (VB-136) based on Attu attack Parmushiru and Shimushu Islands. The aricraft flown by the squadron commander is damaged and forced to land in the USSR where the crew is interned. As a result of this mishap, further Empire Express missions are canceled and VB-136 missions are restricted to sector searches or special photo missions where the speed of the PV-1 is required.

    CANADA: Frigate HMCS Poundmaker commissioned.

    U.S.A.: While British airborne troops are landing at Arnhem, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill travels by train to President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s home at Hyde Park, New York. From Hyde Park he returns to New York City where he boards the RMS Queen Mary for the voyage home to England. Upon his return he immediately prepares to leave for Moscow.

    The USN’s second large cruiser, the USS Guam (CB-2), is commissioned at Camden, New Jersey.

    Destroyers USS Compton, Frank Knox and Gainard launched.
    Minesweeper USS Embattle launched.

    Provisional HQ, Fleet Marine Force is designated HQ, Fleet Marine Force, Pacific. (Gordon Rottman)

  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:24:23 AM PDT · 8 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/sep44/17sep44.htm#

    Paratroopers secure bridges
    Sunday, September 17, 1944 www.onwar.com

    Allied paratroopers dropping over Holland [photo at link]

    On the Western Front... Operation Market Garden begins. The Allied intention is to secure key bridges over a series of rivers and canals in Holland to achieve a rapid advance onto the north German plain. On the first day, the US 101st Airborne Division secures bridges at Veghel and Zon. The US 82nd Airborne Division secures the bridge at Grave but not the one at Nijmegen. The British 1st Airborne Division, dropped near Arnhem, fails to secure the bridge there because of unexpected German resistance. Unknown to Allied planners, the 9th SS Hohenstaufen and 10th SS Frundsberg Panzer Divisions are located in Arnhem for rest and refit from combat on the Eastern Front. Meanwhile, the British 30th Corps (part of British 2nd Army) attacks northward toward Eindhoven to relieve the paratroopers. To the west, Canadian forces, also part of British 21st Army Group, launch an attack on Boulogne after a preparatory bombing by the RAF.

    In the Palau Islands... US 8th Infantry Division (General Mueller) lands on Angaur. There is limited resistance by the Japanese garrison, numbering about 1600 men. On Pelelieu, American forces have consolidated their hold on the south side of the island and begin attacks on the well developed Japanese positions on Mount Umurgrobol. Despite naval bombardment supporting the advance, only limited progress is achieved by the attacks.

    In Occupied Denmark... A general strike continues in protest of recent deportations by German authorities.

  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:23:11 AM PDT · 7 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Unity is Stressed (Crider) – 2-3
    Marines Capture Peleliu Airdrome (Trumbull) – 3
    Peleliu Lay Silent Prior to Invasion (Horne) – 4
    War News Summarized – 4
    Foe is Near Panic (Middleton) – 5-6
    Maginot Line Guns Fired at Germans (Graham) – 7
    GI’s Drop Banter as They Near Metz – 7
    In Germany: The Barrage and Then the Follow Through (photos) – 8
    Red Army in Bulgar Capital, Widens Gains near Warsaw – 9-10
    Soviet Still Balks Peace Agreement (Warren) – 10
    Aircraft Industry Seen in Big Slump – 10-11
    Outlook in Germany (by Hanson W. Baldwin) – 12
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 13-15

    The News of the Week in Review
    Into the Westwall (w/map) – 16-20
    Fifteen News Questions – 20
    Philippines Held Next Hurdle in Pacific War (by Sidney Shalett) – 21-22
    We Get into Position to Strike at the Philippines (map) – 21
    Answers to Fifteen News Questions – 22
    Ten Key Points in the Battle of Europe (map) – 23

  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:21:42 AM PDT · 6 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:20:32 AM PDT · 5 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:19:45 AM PDT · 4 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Continued from yesterday.

     photo 0917-unity27_zpsae4d91d6.jpg

     photo 0917-unity28_zps0d433bad.jpg

    Stephen E. Ambrose, Band of Brothers

  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:19:07 AM PDT · 3 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    1

     photo 0917-unity25_zps5a85dac7.jpg

    2

     photo 0917-unity26_zps3b28e4d4.jpg

    The West Point Military History Series, Thomas E. Griess, Editor, The Second World War: Europe and the Mediterranean

  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:17:27 AM PDT · 2 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0917-unity24_zps10179711.jpg
  • ROOSEVELT AND CHURCHILL PLEDGE QUICK SHIFT OF FORCES TO CRUSH ‘BARBARIANS OF PACIFIC’ (9/17/44)

    09/17/2014 4:16:29 AM PDT · 1 of 13
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 3:56:47 PM PDT · 26 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to henkster
    Ike could have avoided a lot of the Monty troubles after Market-Garden, and particularly during the Bulge if he’d just listened to me.

    That Eisenhower tunnel vision, prolonging the war.

  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:52:27 AM PDT · 11 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    PATTON SEIZES NANCY

    He'll be hearing from Nancy's lawyer any time, now. At least the soldier slapping incident didn't make a front-page headline.

  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:31:40 AM PDT · 9 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/8/16.htm

    September 16th, 1944 (SATURDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM: Destroyer HMS Cadiz launched.

    The US Eighth Air Force in England flies 2 missions:

    - Mission 635: 178 P-47 Thunderbolts and 149 P-51s are dispatched to bomb and strafe the Hannover-Bremen-Osnabruck areas and bomb Ahlhorn Airfield and the Mannheim-Kaiserslautern area, all in Germany; they claim 6-0-1 aircraft on the ground; 1 P-51 is lost.

    - Mission 636: 7 B-17s drop leaflets in France, Germany and the Netherlands during the night.

    - 32 B-24s and C-47 Skytrains are dispatched on CARPETBAGGER missions; 1 B-24 is lost.

    US Ninth Air Force tactical operations in Europe: In the Netherlands, 150+ B-26s and A-20s, escorted by fighters, attack the Bath dike and Arnemuiden road and rail embankment. In France, fighters fly sweeps, and armed reconnaissance over Rastatt, Germany and Haguenau, and support the US Third Army’s XII and XV Corps in repelling counterattacks in northeastern France.

    NETHERLANDS: The USAAF Ninth Air Force dispatches 150+ B-26 Marauders and A-20 Havocs, escorted by fighters, to attack the Bath dike and Arnemuiden road and rail embankment.

    During the night of 16/17 September, RAF Bomber Command’s main operations are in support of the landings by British and American airborne troops at Arnhem and Nijmegen which took place the following morning. Two hundred Lancasters and 23 Mosquitos bombed three airfields: 54 hit Havelte Airfield at Steenwijk, 51 bombed Hopsten Airfield and 50 attacked Leeuwarden Airfield. A second mission 54 Lancasters and five Mosquitos are sent to bomb a flak position at Moerdlik Bridge; 54 aircraft bombed . The runways of all the airfields are well cratered but there are only near misses at the flak position, although its approach road is cut. 2 Lancasters lost from the Moerdijk raid.

    FRANCE: Beaugency: In the first capitulation on the western front, General Botho Elster surrenders to the US Ninth Army with 18,850 men of Group Elster of the XVI Luftwaffe Field Division.

    The USAAF Fifteenth Air Force in Italy dispatches 54 B-24 Liberators to fly supplies to southern France.

    DENMARK: Copenhagen: All Denmark stopped work today in protest against the shooting of 23 demonstrators by German soldiers in City Hall Square last night. The demonstrators were protesting at the removal of 190 Danes to concentration camps. Railways, trams and factories are still. The strike was called by the Danish Freedom Council, which co-ordinates the resistance with the discreet support of King Christian and the majority of his subjects.

    GERMANY: During the night of 16/17 September, RAF Bomber Command attacks four targets: 51 aircraft bombed Hopsten Airfield and another 51 hit Rheine Airfield; 26 of 29 Mosquitos sent to Brunswick bomb the city with the loss of one aircraft; and three of four Mosquitos dispatched to the Hoesch synthetic oil refinery at Dortmund hit the plant.

    USAAF Ninth Air Force fighters fly sweeps, and armed reconnaissance over Rastatt and Haguenau.

    U-3507 launched.

    U-2526 laid down.

    U-1014 suffered an accident during its trials at Libau in the Baltic Sea where 2 men were killed and 3 wounded.

    ESTONIA and LATVIA: The Soviets begin new attacks, in the Baltic states, towards Riga and Tallinn.

    The Red Army launched a new offensive on the Baltic front yesterday. Some 40 divisions with strong tank and air support are attacking the German positions on a 130-mile front running from Valga on the Estonian border to Bauska, south of Riga, the Latvian capital. The Russians are trying to drive through the narrow German-held corridor on the Gulf of Riga in order to trap the much-battered Army Group North under General Schorner. They are also seeking to give themselves “elbow room” to build up their forces in preparation for their next campaign: the invasion of East Prussia.

    ROMANIA: The 3rd Ukraine Front turns west after crossing the Danube River to threaten the retreating Germans from Greece.

    POLAND: Warsaw: Stalin has at last come to the aid of the Poles who have been fighting the German occupation for the last six weeks. The Red Army has halted at the gates of the city while Stalin has either refused, or been unable, to help the Poles whom he describes as “reactionary”.

    The Soviet leader has actively obstructed British and American efforts to drop supplies. More than 200 Polish, American, South African and British airmen have died in attempts to supply Warsaw. Flying from bases in Italy, they have been refused permission by Stalin to land on Russian airstrips.

    In the last 48 hours, Stalin’s forces have dropped two heavy machine-guns, 50 pistols and a quantity of ammunition for the freedom fighters, a meagre offering made even more negligible by the Russian failure to use parachutes. With nothing to break their fall, most of the arms were damaged and made useless when they hit the ground.

    Stalin’s half-hearted aid has coincided with the opening of a Russian assault on Warsaw. The First Infantry Division of a Polish army raised in Russia has captured the suburb of Praga.

    BULGARIA: In accordance with the terms of the Bulgarian armistice, Soviet forces occupy Sofia.

    ITALY: The territorial demands on Italy by Yugoslavia’s Marshal Josip Tito, Commander-in-Chief Yugoslav Liberation Army, including Istria and Trieste, causes dismay among Italians.

    Bad weather cancels bombing operations by the US Fifteenth Air Force but 2 P-38 Lightnings fly weather reconnaissance.

    US Twelfth Air Force medium bombers attack fuel and supply dumps and defensive positions in the Bologna and Rimini areas while fighter-bombers and fighters bomb and strafe rail and road targets north of the battle areas in the northern Apennine Mountains as US Fifth Army forces struggle to break through strong enemy defenses in the hills north of Prato, along the main Monte Altuzzo ridge, on Monte Veruca, Monte Monticelli, and other mountain positions.

    CHINA: In China, 19 US Tenth Air Force B-24s haul fuel from Burma to Liuchow.
    In spite of bad weather in Burma, 4 P-47s sweep the Lungling, China-Wanling-Loiwing road and 5 damage a bridge approach at Manyut.
    The US Fourteenth Air Force dispatches 20 B-24s to bomb Hengyang; 12 B-25s to bomb Kutkai; 28 B-25s hit targets including the Yuangshaho ferry, Pakmushih, Chuanhsien, and Lengshuitang; 130+ P-40s and P-51 Mustangs on armed reconnaissance hit targets of opportunity in the Mangshih and Lungling area and from north of Tangyang and along the Yangtze River southward including areas around Changsha, Kiyang, Samshui, Chuanhsien, Lingling, and Kwongning.

    JAPAN: In the Kurile Islands, 3 US Eleventh Air Force B-24s bomb Kataoka naval base on Shimushu Island and 4 B-25s abort a shipping sweep due to weather and mechanical difficulties.

    EAST INDIES: The British Eastern Fleet begins 4 days of air strikes on Sigli in northern Sumatra.

    Japanese aircraft make light raids on US ground and naval forces involved in the invasion of Morotai.

    The US Far East Air Force attacks various islands. On Celebes Island, B-24s bomb Kendari air depot and Ambesia Airfield while B-25s attack a large warehouse at Gorontalo and B-24s and B-25s hit Kairatoe and Kamarian. B-25s and B-24s pound Namlea on Buru Island, Liang on Ambon Island, Haroekoe on Haroekoe Island, and Laha on Amboina Island.

    NEW GUINEA: In Dutch New Guinea, the USAAF Far East Air Forces dispatches fighter-bombers to hit Manokwari, Sagan 3, Moemi, and Warren Aerodromes.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: Peleliu, Palaus Islands: The beachhead is consolidated by US Marines, including capturing part of the airfield.

    The first night ashore was gruelling: small Japanese infiltration parties hit the Marine lines repeatedly. The cruiser Honolulu and three destroyers provided star shell illumination to help the Marines turn the infiltrators back, but the rest of the fleet withdrew to avoid enemy submarines. The Marines fought the night away, well dug in, in their foxholes. In the south, the foxholes filled with stinking swamp water.

    Today the 5th and 7th Marines advance relentlessly; the 1st Marines more slowly, encountering fierce resistance from the northern ridges they were assigned to take. (Paul and Jean Beach)

    PACIFIC OCEAN: Five Japanese ships are sunk by USN aircraft and submarines: (1) South of Formosa, USS Picuda (SS-382) sinks an army cargo ship in Bashi Channel and USS Redfish (SS-395) sinks a fleet tanker; (2) USS Sea Devil (SS-400) sinks submarine HIJMS I-364 off Yokosuka, Japan; (3) an army cargo ship is sunk by aircraft southwest of Mindanao, Philippine Islands; and (4) a cargo vessel is sunk by a mine south of Mindanao.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: The US Seventh Air Force sends 17 Saipan Island-based B-24s to bomb Iwo Jima Island; 3 others on training and armed reconnaissance missions bomb Pagan Island.

    MARCUS ISLAND: Three USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb Marcus Island. The island is located in the North Pacific about 768 nautical miles (1 422 kilometers) west-northwest of Wake Island and is used as a refueling point for Japanese aircraft en route to the Central Pacific.

    MARSHALL ISLANDS: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators in the Marshall Islands bomb Emidj Island, Jaluit Atoll.

    CANADA: The Second Quebec Conference (Octagon) attended by US President Franklin D Roosevelt, British Prime Minister Winston Churchill and the Combined Chiefs of Staff (CCS) ends.
    At a press conference concluding this, the eighth summit of the war, President Roosevelt said that after Germany’s surrender “the British Empire and the United States will work together” against Japan.

    Much of the conference was taken up, however, with three different great questions: Anglo-US co-operation on the “atom bomb”; the British prime minister’s fear of Russian influence in central Europe after the war; and the plans of the US treasury secretary, Henry Morgenthau, for turning Germany into an “agrarian” country after the war. Sitting on the terrace of the citadel here knows as “the deck”, Mr. Churchill called Japan an “evil and barbarous nation”.

    Mr. Churchill has confided to Mr. Roosevelt his fears of the “dangerous spread of Russian influence” in the Balkans, especially Greece and Yugoslavia, and FDR is beginning to agree.

    The CCS approves Admiral William F Halsey’s plan to move the date of the Leyte invasion from 20 December to 20 October. Agreement is also reached on invading Japan; Kyushu will be invaded in October 1945 and Honshu in December 1945.

    USA: Heavy cruiser USS St Paul launched.

    Frigate USS Gulfport commissioned.

    ARCTIC OCEAN: The German submarine U-703 is last heard from in the Arctic east of Iceland today, position unknown. All 54 hands on the U-boat are lost. This is her 13th patrol during which she sank seven ships for a total of 31,952 tons. There is no explanation for her loss.

  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:30:23 AM PDT · 8 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/sep44/16sep44.htm#

    Red Army occupies Sofia
    Saturday, September 16, 1944 www.onwar.com

    Citizens of Sofia welcome the Soviet soldiers [photo at link]

    On the Eastern Front... In the Baltics, Soviet forces launch an offensive toward Riga and Tallinn. In the Balkans, elements of 3rd Ukrainian Front occupy Sofia in Bulgaria which now turn west in an attempt to block the retreat of German forces in Greece.

    In the Palau Islands... The US marine forces consolidate their beachhead and are engaged in a battle for control of the airfield on the island.

    In the Occupied Dutch East Indies... The British Eastern Fleet sends 2 carriers and 1 battleship to raid Sigli in northern Sumatra.

    In Occupied Denmark... A general strike begins in protest of recent deportations by German authorities.

    In Canada... The Octagon Conference ends. Churchill and Roosevelt and their staffs conclude their meeting in Quebec to discuss strategy. There is general agreement on continuing the campaigns underway in Europe. A campaign in Burma is agreed upon. There is also agreement on British forces joining the American forces in the final campaigns in the Pacific.

  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:28:57 AM PDT · 7 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Defenses Crumble (Middleton, Sedgwick) – 2-3
    21-Year-Old Officer Leads Way through Siegfried Line (Wolfert) – 4-5
    American Troops on German Soil (page 1 photo) – 5
    German Response to U.S. Army Ranges from Relief to Full Flight (by William Smith White, first-time contributor, Gorrell) – 5
    United States Armor and Troops Carry the War to Germany (photos) – 6-7
    Red Army Shells Enemy in Warsaw – 8
    8th Army Captures Key Adriatic Ridge (by Herbert L. Matthews) – 8-9
    Latest Casualties Reported by Navy – 9
    Landing on Peleliu (by Robert Trumbull and Frank L. Kluckhohn) – 10-11
    M’Arthur Says Japan is Doomed – 11
    War News Summarized – 11
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Theatres – 12-14
  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:27:51 AM PDT · 6 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Billboard Top Ten for the Week of September 16, 1944

    #1 - “Swinging on a Star” – Bing Crosby
    #2 - “I’ll Walk Alone” – Dinah Shore
    #3 - “You Always Hurt the One You Love” – Mills Brothers
    #4 - “I’ll Be Seeing You” – Bing Crosby
    #5 - “Time Waits for No One” – Helen Forrest
    #6 – “Is You Is or Is You Ain’t (Ma’ Baby)” – Bing Crosby, with the Andrews Sisters
    #7– “I’ll Walk Alone” – Martha Tilton
    #8 – “His Rocking Horse Ran Away” – Betty Hutton
    #9 – “It Had to Be You” - Dick Haymes/Helen Forrest
    #10 - “G.I. Jive” – Louis Jordan

  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:25:34 AM PDT · 5 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0916-defenses19_zps93345046.jpg

     photo 0916-defenses20_zps4c209000.jpg

    Winston S. Churchill, Triumph and Tragedy

  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:24:48 AM PDT · 4 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Continued from August 30.

     photo 0916-defenses17_zps1d714728.jpg

     photo 0916-defenses18_zps2c77dad1.jpg

    Stephen E. Ambrose, Band of Brothers

  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:23:20 AM PDT · 3 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:22:32 AM PDT · 2 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Selections from West Point Atlas for the Second World War
    Plan for MARKET-GARDEN
    American Capture of Peleliu, September 15-26, 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 6th and 12th Army Group Operations, 15 September-7 November 1944
    Northwestern Europe, 1944: 21st Army Group Operations, 15 September-15 December 1944
    Eastern Europe, 1941: Russian Balkan and Baltic Campaigns – Operations, 19 August-31 December 1944
    The Western Pacific, New Guinea, and the Philippine Islands: Allied Advances to the Palaus and Morotai, 30 July-17 September 1944 and Air Attacks on the Philippines, 7-22 September 1944
    Northern Italy 1944: Allied Advance to Gothic Line, 5 June-25 August and Gains 29 August-31 December
    China, 1941: Operation Ichigo, April-December 1944 and Situation 31 December
    China-Burma, 1941: Third Burma Campaign – Slim’s Offensive, June 1944-March 1945
  • HODGES BREAKS SIEGFRIED LINE AT AACHEN, MOVES ON COLOGNE; PATTON SEIZES NANCY (9/16/44)

    09/16/2014 4:21:45 AM PDT · 1 of 34
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 9:58:57 AM PDT · 25 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to PapaNew

    Baldwin. Page 11.

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 8:06:13 AM PDT · 19 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Hebrews 11:6; PapaNew; BroJoeK
    You have me confused with someone else--

    PapaNew maybe?

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 7:14:27 AM PDT · 16 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to iowamark

    Thanks. I had wondered if there was a connection between the military strategy Baldwin mentioned and the brand of socialism with the same name. So there is. Now I know something more about both.

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 5:57:30 AM PDT · 12 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; fso301; colorado tanker; Tax-chick
    Baldwin writes on a very timely subject for the eve of Market-Garden.

    Anyone know what "German Fabian tactics of delay" means?

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:29:50 AM PDT · 9 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/8/15.htm

    September 15th, 1944 (FRIDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM: EUROPEAN OPERATIONS

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS: The US Eighth Air Force in England flies Mission 632: As part of Operation FRANTIC, 110 B-17s are dispatched to drop supplies to Warsaw patriots and then proceed to bases in the USSR; a weather front is encountered over the North Sea and the bombers are recalled. Escort is provided by 149 P-51 Mustangs; 2 P-51s collide in a cloud and are lost.

    TACTICAL OPERATIONS: In northern France, bad weather prevents US Ninth Air Force bomber operations; the US IX Tactical Air Command supports US First Army troops and in Germany, flies armed reconnaissance around Cologne and from Trier to the Rhine River area; the US XIX Tactical Air Command supports the US Third Army and flies armed reconnaissance in the Nancy-Strasbourg area. HQ XII Tactical Air Command, based in southern France, remains assigned to the US Twelfth Air Force but is put under operational control of the Ninth Air Force.

    Liverpool: Over a thousand British PoWs return from Germany on the liner ARUNDEL CASTLE.

    FRANCE: Marshal Petain and others of the Vichy government are ordered to be arrested by François de Methon, the justice minister, on charges of collaboration.

    In northern France, the U.S. 2d and 29th Infantry Divisions continue to make slow progress at Brest. Units of the Task Force Sebree move into Nancy from Toul without opposition.

    In northern France, bad weather prevents US AAF Ninth Air Force bomber operations; the US IX Tactical Air Command supports US First Army troops and in Germany, flies armed reconnaissance around Cologne and from Trier to the Rhine River area; the USAAF XIX Tactical Air Command supports the US Third Army and flies armed reconnaissance in the Nancy-Strasbourg area. HQ XII Tactical Air Command, based in southern France, remains assigned to the USAAF Twelfth Air Force but is put under operational control of the Ninth Air Force.

    In southern France, the 6th Army Group becomes operational at 0001 hours local and assumes control of the Allied Forces Headquarters (AFHQ) forces that are in France. At the same time, operational control of the 6th Army Group passes AFHQ to Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force, a move previous agreed upon between American General Dwight D. Eisenhower, Commander-in-Chief Supreme Headquarter Allied Expeditionary Force, and British General Henry Wilson, Supreme Allied Commander Mediterranean. French Army B acquires autonomy and is on a par with the U.S. Seventh Army. French Army B regroups during the next few days for a drive eastward.

    In southern France, 53 USAAF Fifteenth Air Force B-24 Liberators fly a supply mission from Italy.

    BELGIUM: The Canadian 4th Armoured Division establishes a bridgehead across Canal de Derivation near Balgerhoek.

    NETHERLANDS: In preparation for Market-Garden, the British 2nd Army crosses the Meuse-Escaut canal. The US 1st Army takes Eisden and Maastrich. The US 3rd Army takes Nancy and Epinal. The US 7th Army and the French 1st Army, from the south of France, come under General Eisenhower’s command today.

    GERMANY: American troops enter Germany for the first time as elements of the U.S. VII and V Corps reach the southwestern frontier.

    The U.S. 1st Infantry Division almost encircles Aachen. The U.S. 3d Armored Division heads east toward Eschweiler battling the second defense belt of the West Wall, called the Schill Line. Task Force Lovelady of the 3d Armored Division cross the Vicht River upon completion of a bridge and with little difficulty achieves complete breakthrough of West Wall fortifications driving through Mausbach toward Eschweiler.

    During the night of 15/16 September, RAF Bomber Command sent 490 aircraft, 310 Lancasters, 173 Halifaxes and seven Mosquitos, to Kiel; 465 bomb the target. Four Halifaxes and two Lancasters are lost. The evidence of returning crews and of photographs caused Bomber Command to record this as “a highly concentrated raid” with “the old town and modern shopping center devastated.” Other targets are also bombed: 24 of 27 Mosquitos bombed Berlin with the loss of one aircraft; 7 of 9 Mosquitos bombed Lübeck; and 7 of 8 Mosquitos bombed the marshalling yard at Rheine. Minelaying missions included 13 aircraft mining Kiel Harbor, nine mining off Pillau, nine mining the Fehmarn Channel, six mining the Elbe River and five mining the Kattegat.

    U-2337 launched.

    POLAND: The USAAF Eighth Air Force in England flies Mission 632: As part of Operation FRANTIC, 110 B-17 Flying Fortresses are dispatched to drop supplies to Warsaw patriots and then proceed to bases in the U.S.S.R.; a weather front is encountered over the North Sea and the bombers are recalled. Escort is provided by 149 P-51 Mustangs; two P-51s collide in a cloud and are lost.

    During the night of 15/16 September, nine RAF Bomber Command aircraft lay mines off Gdynia.

    NORWAY: 28 British Lancaster heavy bombers attack Tirpitz, in Altafjord. Flying from Russia they use 12,000 lb armour-piercing “Tallboy” bombs. Smoke screens effectively screen the German battleship, which is still disabled when one direct hit goes straight through the forecastle, peeling back the deck like the lid of a sardine tin. The two RAF squadrons arrived in Yagodnik, north Russia, two days ago.

    Thirty eight Lancasters and a weather reconnaissance Mosquito of RAF Bomber Command had set out on 11 September to fly to Northern Russia in preparation for this raid on the German 45,000 ton battleship Tirpitz, which is at anchor in Kaa Fjord in Northern Norway. One aircraft returned to the U.K. and six crash-landed in Russia but their crew members are not seriously hurt. Only 27 Lancasters and a further Lancaster with a cameraman on board are available for the raid on the Tirpitz, which eventually took place today. Twenty aircraft are loaded with the 12,000 pound (5 443 kilogram) Tallboy bomb and six (or seven, the records are not clear) carried several ‘Johnny Walker’ mines, of 400-500 pound (181-227 kilogram) weight developed for attacking capital ships moored in shallow water. The attack caught the Tirpitz by surprise and her smoke-screens are late in starting. One Tallboy hit the Tirpitz near the bow and caused considerable damage. The shock caused by the explosion of this bomb, or possibly from other bombs which are near misses, also damaged the battleship’s engines. The Germans decided that repairs to make Tirpitz fully seaworthy are not practicable and she is later moved to an anchorage further south in Norway, but only for use as a semi-static heavy artillery battery. These results of the raid are not known in the U.K. at the time and further raids against Tirpitz would take place. None of the Lancasters are shot down on the raid and all returned safely to the airfield in Russia but one aircraft crashed in Norway while returning to the U.K. two days later with 11 men on board.

    During the night of 15/16 September, six RAF Bomber Command aircraft laid mines in Kaa Fjord.

    FINLAND: This day is the deadline by when all Germans should have evacuated Finland. Southern Finland has been evacuated in time, but in Finnish Lappland (where Germans had manned the frontline since 1941) it has been evident all the time that the Germans could not and would not leave in time. That is why Finns and Germans have secretly agreed to orchestrate the German withdrawal so that there would be no fighting. Despite the agreement, this day sees the first bloodletting between the former “Waffenbröderen”. In northern town of Oulu a three-man German patrol is killed after refusing to surrender.

    In eastern Gulf of Finland a major battle is fought when Germans launch Operation Tanne Ost, capture of the island of Suursaari (today Gogland or Sur-Sari in Russian possession). After midnight some 2000 men invade the island. Germans expect to gain the island without a fight but the Finnish defenders, led by Lt. Col. Miettinen, refuse to surrender and fight back. After dawn it’s clear the German situation is hopeless. They are pinned down on the beach by the Finnish defenders and are strafed by Russian fighters who have also driven away the German ships giving fire support to the operation. In the end Germans surrender. They have lost 153 killed and 1231 POW’s (who are later handed over to the Russians).

    For Finnish political leadership this action is heaven-sent. The peace negotiations are going on at Moscow, and now there’s proof that Finns are seriously fighting Germans. It is hoped (vainly) that this would help the negotiators to get a little better deal. The politicians are unaware of the deal struck in north with Germans, and the soldiers of course hope that the Russians wouldn’t find out either.

    U.S.S.R.: Kronstadt: Captured U-boat U-250 is towed into dry dock here. After sinking this boat on July 30 the Russians discovered that they had a German U-boat captain alive and a sunken U-boat in shallow waters. Russian divers soon discovered that the boat lay at only 27 meter depth with only a slight listing of 14 degrees to the right and a large hole over the top of the diesel room. Two large air tanks, 200 tons each, were transported to the area and the Russians worked behind a smoke-curtain to raise the boat.

    The Germans and the Finns did what they could to prevent the boat with the new secret T5 (Zaunkönig) acoustic-torpedo falling into Soviet hands. Finnish coastal artillery and German torpedo boats made frequent attacks on the salvage site but to no avail.

    Today former Commander Kptlt. Schmidt had to go first into the now dry boat, as the Russian believed some explosive charges might still be on the boat. The 6 survivors then spent some years in Russian captivity. (Alex Gordon)(117)

    GREECE: The USAAF Fifteenth Air Force in Italy bombs four targets in Greece. One hundred nine B-17 Flying Fortresses bomb Kalamaki Airfield in Athens while 51 bomb the German U-boat base at Salamis; 113 B-24 Liberators bomb Tatoi Airfield and 54 bomb Eleusis Airfield, both in Athens. P-38 Lightnings and P-51 Mustangs fly escort, target cover, and sweep target areas; the attacks are aimed at hampering the withdrawal of German forces from the area.

    ITALY: MEDITERRANEAN OPERATIONS (US Air Forces)
    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS: The US Fifteenth Air Force in Italy dispatches 276 B-17s and B-24s to bomb Tatoi, Eleusis, and Kalamaki Airfields and Salamis submarine base in Greece; P-38 Lightnings and P-51s fly escort, target cover, and sweep target areas; the attacks are aimed at hampering the withdrawal of enemy forces from the area. 53 B-24s fly a supply mission to southern France and 24 B-24s begin evacuating aircrews formerly imprisoned in Bulgaria from Cairo, Egypt to Bari, Italy.

    TACTICAL OPERATIONS: All US Twelfth Air Force medium bomber missions are cancelled or aborted due to weather; fighter-bombers, though restricted by weather, carry out armed reconnaissance against enemy communications and defensive positions in the Milan-Genoa-Modena-Pistoia areas, as Allied forces (joined on this date by elements of the Brazilian Expeditionary Force) attempt to penetrate enemy strongholds in the northern Apennines.

    The British 8th Army crosses the Marano River. The U.S. IV Corps occupies Viareggion. The 6th Regimental Combat Team, Brazilian Expeditionary Force (BEF), under command of Brigadier General Euclydes da Costa, enters the line. These are the first Brazilians to fight on European soil and the first echelon of the Brazilian 1st Infantry Division to arrive, the rest of the division is coming later. The British 1st Division completes the capture of Poggio Prefetto. The British Eighth Army drives quickly toward the Rimini Line while the British 46th Division takes Montescudo.

    EGYPT: Twenty four USAAF Fifteenth Air Force 24 B-24 Liberators begin evacuating aircrews formerly imprisoned in Bulgaria from Cairo to Bari, Italy.

    PACIFIC OCEAN: The two great American military drives across the Pacific Ocean converged today as General MacArthur’s forces, moving north from New Guinea, invade Morotain the Dutch East Indies. At the same time Admiral Nimitz lands the US 1st Marine Division in an assault on five beach-heads on Peleliu Island in the Palau group, 430 miles north-east of Morotai. Both islands are within striking distance of the Philippines.

    The landing at Morotai is virtually unopposed, but the situation is different on Peleliu. The Japanese garrison is a regiment from the 14th Division under Col. Nakagawa. Naval forces that have been bombarding, under Admiral Oldendorg, remain in support.

    The American plan is for a landing on the western beaches three regiments abreast. 1st Marines are to assault the beaches on the left, which are designated White 1 and White 2, and push through the enemy toward the northwestern peninsula of the island.

    In the centre, the 5th Marines are to land on Orange beaches 1 and 2 and drive across to the island’s eastern shore. They will be responsible for securing the island’s airfield before moving to seize the northeastern part of the island.

    Three days of naval gunfire had preceded the Marine’s landing, but it proves inadequate against the type of Japanese defenses created on the island. The resistance on the beaches is moderate. The Marines faced enfilading fire from bunkers and from the high ground above the beaches. Fierce fighting begins as the Marines move inland. The Japanese have taken advantage of the rugged, ridged terrain around Umurbrogol Mountain (unreported by American reconnaissance units) to construct a series of interlocking underground shelters and well-concealed concrete bunkers based on a complex of caves. The Japanese fight tenaciously to prevent the Marines from securing a beachhead. At the end of the day the beachhead is only a few hundred yards wide. (Paul and Jean Beach)

    During the assault Lewis Kenneth Bausell, a corporal in the US Marine Corps, risks his life charging a Japanese pillbox and firing his automatic into the aperture. (MOH)

    Ironically, while Morotai is considered strategically important, the seizure of Peleliu is now regarded by many senior officers as no longer necessary.

    The USN submarine USS Guavina (SS-362) sinks a Japanese fast transport Pagubas, southern Mindanao, Philippine Islands.
    The USN submarines USS Pampanito (SS-383) and USS Sealion (SS-315) rescue 73 British and 54 Australian POWs who were aboard the Japanese freighter Rakuyo Maru sunk by the USS Sealion on 12 September. The freighter was carrying 1,300 POWs when she was torpedoed.

    Japanese submarine RO.42 is sunk by the USS Sea Devil (SS-400) east of Japan. (Mike Yared)(144 and 145)

    WESTERN PACIFIC: CAROLINE ISLANDS: In the Palaus Islands, the U.S.1st Marine Division (Reinforced) lands on Peleliu Island at about 0830 hours local after a preparatory bombardment by naval vessels and aircraft. (Operation STALEMATE II). The Japanese garrison is a regiment from the 14th Division under Colonel NAKAGAWA. U.S. naval forces under Rear Admiral Jesse Oldendorf, commander, Cruiser Division Four (CruDiv 4), that have been bombarding the island, remain in support. The resistance on the beaches is moderate but fierce fighting begins as the Marines move inland. At the end of the day the beachhead perimeter measures 2,800 yard (2 560 meters) from north to south but is only 400 to 700 yards (366 to 640 meters) deep, except for a salient in the center. As a diversion for the Peleliu landings, a feint landing is made on Babelthuap Island.

    The US Army’s 81st Division concurrently attacks the island of Angaur, next to Peleliu. (228)

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: A lone US Seventh Air Force B-24 on a snooper mission bombs Iwo Jima Island; all other B-24 missions abort.

    NETHERLANDS EAST INDIES: USN Task Force 77 (Rear Admiral Daniel E. Barbey) lands the U.S. Army’s 41st Infantry Division (Reinforced) (Major General John C. Persons, USA) on Morotai Island, in Operation TRADE WIND; supported by two heavy cruisers, three light cruisers and ten destroyers (TG 77.2) (Rear Admiral Russell S. Berkey) and aircraft from six escort carriers (Task Group 77.1) (Rear Admiral Thomas L. Sprague), screened by eight destroyer escorts. Japanese resistance is negligible and Pitoe Aerodrome is quickly captured. Airfield facilities built on Morotai will be used in operations to support missions against Japanese positions in the Philippines. Forces push inland about 2,000 yards (1 829 meters) to D-Day objectives.
    The USN submarine USS Stingray (SS-186) lands men and stores on Majoe Island, in the Molucca Sea.
    In the air, USAAF Far East Air Forces A-20s, B-24s and P-47s bomb Kaoe, Lolobata and Hate Tabako on Halmahera Island. B-24s sink two small Makassar-bound Japanese cargo vessels off Mongole Island. RAAF Beaufighters and USAAF A-20s bomb Japanese shipping off southeast coast of Ceram, sinking two fishing vessels.

    NEW GUINEA: Far East Air Forces P-39s bomb Manokwari Airfield and the town area.

    U.S.A.: The Joint Chiefs of Staff decide to invade central rather than the southern Philippines and advance the target date for the invasion of Leyte from 20 December to 20 October. Projected operations against Yap Island in the Caroline Islands, Talaud Island in the Netherlands East Indies and Mindanao Island in the Philippines are canceled.

    The aircraft carrier USS Shangri-La (CV-38) is commissioned at Portsmouth, Virginia. The USN now has 16 aircraft carriers (CVs) in commission.

    Two USN commissioned escort aircraft carriers are renamed so that their present names can be used on for Midway Class large aircraft carriers. The two are: USS Coral Sea (CVE-57) which is renamed USS Anzio and USS Midway (CVE-63) which is renamed USS St. Lo.

    Minesweeper USS Nimble commissioned.
    Destroyer USS McKean laid down Seattle, Washington state.
    Minesweepers USS Sprig and Toucan launched.

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:27:47 AM PDT · 8 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/sep44/15sep44.htm#

    Tirpitz survives British attack
    Friday, September 15, 1944 www.onwar.com

    The Tirptiz at anchor in Norway [photo at link]

    In Occupied Norway... A force of 28 British Lancaster bombers, from a Soviet airbase, attack the German battleship Tirpitz at its anchorage in Altafiord. Special 12,000-pound bombs are used. Only one bomb hit is achieved (on the bow) because of a German smoke screen obscuring the target.

    In Liberated France... Francois de Menthon, Justice Commissioner in de Gaulle’s administration, orders the arrest of Marshal Petain and all members of the Vichy French cabinet because of their alleged collaboration with the Nazis.

    In the Moluccan Islands... Elements of the US 11th Corps (Hall) land on the Gila Peninsula on the southwest of Morotai. The initial landing force includes the US 31st Division with an additional regiment (about 19,960 men). There is no Japanese resistance. Naval support is provided by a force commanded by Admiral Barbey which includes 6 escort carriers and cruisers and destroyers. The US 5th Air Force provides additional air cover. General MacArthur is present for the landing. Priority is given to the construction of airfields.

    In the Palau Islands... Elements of the US 1st Marine Division (Rupertus), part of 3rd Amphibious Corps (Geiger), land on the southwest coast of Peleliu. The naval force commanded by Admiral Oldendorf remains in support. The Japanese garrison is consists of a regiment of 14th Division under the command of Colonel Nakagawa. There is limited resistance on the beaches. American attempts to advance inland, however, meet strong resistance. By the end of the day, the beachhead is only a few hundred yards wide.

    On the Western Front... The British 2nd Army (part of British 21st Army Group) secures a second bridgehead over the Meuse-Escaut canal. The US 1st Army (part of US 12th Army Group) captures Maastricht and Eisden while US 3rd Army takes Nancy and Epinal. Meanwhile, the US 7th Army (Patch) and French 1st Army (de Lattre), moving north from southern France, are placed under the authority of Eisenhower and SHAEF.

    In Italy... The British 8th Army establishes a bridgehead over the Marano River.

    In Canada... The Octagon Conference continues. Churchill and Roosevelt and their staffs meet in Quebec to discuss strategy.

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:25:09 AM PDT · 7 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Foe’s Line Dented (Drew Middleton) – 2-3
    Russians Capture Suburb of Warsaw (Lawrence) – 4
    Russia and Poland to Shift Peoples – 4
    Lublin Pole Takes Presidential Role – 5
    Religious Classes Approved in Russia – 5
    War News Summarized – 5
    Greek Airfields Battered by RAF – 6
    Germans Report Thaelmann Dead – 6
    Himmler Purges Berlin Police as Peace Riot Reports Spread – 7
    Tito Seizes Isle on Allies’ Route – 7
    Morotai Invaded (Kluckhohn) – 8
    Halsey Fliers Hit 84 Ships, Wreck Philippine Defenses (Trumbull) – 9
    China Fails to Win Accord with Reds (Atkinson) – 10
    Battle of the Ports (by Hanson W. Baldwin) – 11
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 12-14
  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:23:48 AM PDT · 6 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0915-foes20_zps2b52dda5.jpg

    Winston S. Churchill, Triumph and Tragedy

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:22:53 AM PDT · 5 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0915-foes18_zps3224048e.jpg

     photo 0915-foes19_zps6bcde6d7.jpg

    Major General H.W. Blakeley, USA, Ret., 32d Infantry Division in World War II

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:22:07 AM PDT · 4 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:21:06 AM PDT · 3 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    1

     photo 0915-foes26_zpsf9c7f506.jpg

    2

     photo 0915-foes27_zpsfc4aa6bd.jpg

    The West Point Military History Series, Thomas E. Griess, Editor, The Second World War: Asia and the Pacific

  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:19:33 AM PDT · 2 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0915-foes15_zps6aaa28ab.jpg

     photo 0915-foes16_zps176218a4.jpg

     photo 0915-foes25_zps84fd7d98.jpg
  • U.S. GUNS SHELL AACHEN FROM A MILE AWAY; OUR TROOPS LAND 300 MILES FROM PHILIPPINES (9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:18:12 AM PDT · 1 of 39
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • “Casanova Brown,” “Thunder Rock” (Movie Reviews-9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:15:03 AM PDT · 4 of 6
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...

    Netflix has “Casanova Brown” available for instant viewing, but not on DVD. I watched it solo and have little to add to Crowther’s analysis. I agree with him that Frank Morgan gets all the good lines – HJS.

  • “Casanova Brown,” “Thunder Rock” (Movie Reviews-9/15/44)

  • “Casanova Brown,” “Thunder Rock” (Movie Reviews-9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:12:34 AM PDT · 2 of 6
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • “Casanova Brown,” “Thunder Rock” (Movie Reviews-9/15/44)

    09/15/2014 4:12:03 AM PDT · 1 of 6
    Homer_J_Simpson
  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:33:30 AM PDT · 8 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/thismonth/14.htm

    September 14th, 1944 (THURSDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM:

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS: The US Eighth Air Force in England flies Mission 632: 2 B-17 control aircraft and 2 B-17 CASTOR drones fly an APHRODITE mission to the oil refinery at Hemmingstedt, Germany; the target is missed.

    TACTICAL OPERATIONS: C-47s of the First Allied Airborne Army’s US IX Troop Carrier Command continue large-scale supply and evacuation missions in France.

    Minesweeper HMS Serene commissioned. Destroyer HMS Barfleur commissioned. Minesweeper HMS Chameleon commissioned.

    NETHERLANDS: The U.S. 30th Infantry Division reaches the Maas River and crosses the canal to Maastricht Island late in the day and finds the town undefended.

    During the day, 35 Lancasters and ten Mosquitos of RAF Bomber Command bombed “an ammunition dump” (possibly a suspected V-2 store) near The Hague at Wassenar. The bombing is considered to be accurate until smoke and dust covered the target.

    FRANCE: British Field Marshal Bernard Montgomery, Commander-in-Chief 21st Army Group, issues orders for the next phase of the offensive to begin on 17 September, calling for the British Second Army to secure crossing of the Rhine and Meuse Rivers in preparation for a major drive on the Ruhr and for the Canadian First Army to open the port of Antwerp and seize Boulogne and Calais. Offensive operations are virtually at a standstill while supplies are being brought forward and units regrouped.

    In northern France, the U.S. XII Corps completes the envelopment of Nancy. The French 2d Armoured Division makes contact with a patrol of the French 1st Armoured Division that advanced up from southern France.

    In northern France, the USAAF Ninth Air Force activates HQ XXIX Tactical Air Command (Provisional) at Vermand, in anticipation of operating with the U.S. Ninth Army, shortly to join the Twelfth Army Group; Brigadier General Richard E Nugent is Commanding General; about 140 B-26 Marauders and A-20 Havocs bomb gun emplacements and strongpoints in the Brest area. C-47 Skytrains of the First Allied Airborne Army’s IX Troop Carrier Command continue large-scale supply and evacuation missions in France.

    In southern France, bad weather limits USAAF Twelfth Air Force fighters to a few sweeps but 53 USAAF Fifteenth Air Force B-24 Liberators fly supples from Italy to France.

    GERMANY: The U.S. 3d Armored Division thrusts to the Vicht River southwest of Stolberg and crosses and elements also reach a suburb of Aachen. The U.S. 4th Infantry Division penetrates the West Wall in the Schnee Eifel while the 28th Infantry Division begins major attacks in an effort to breach the Wall in its sector. The 5th Armored Division begins to cross the Sauer River into Germany at Wallendorf.

    During the day, RAF Bomber Command dispatched 184 aircraft, 133 Halifaxes and 51 Lancasters, to Wilhelmshaven but recalled while still over the North Sea; no reason for this is given in Bomber Command records. All aircraft returned safely.

    U-2513 and U-3008 launched.
    U-2346 laid down.

    NORWAY: Bergen: One of Britain’s most successful secret weapons - a midget submarine able to penetrate the best defended waterways - has struck again. This time the target was a big floating dock, blown up in Bergen harbour. Lt. H. P. Westmacott skippered the four-man craft, X24, as it slipped through 30 miles of islands offshore and a minefield and into a fjord to sail at periscope depth to the harbour. After diving to 35 feet to avoid collision with a merchant ship, Westmacott attached delayed-action charges to the target and escaped. It is the second such raid on Bergen by Westmacott in X24.

    POLAND: Units of the Soviet First Belorussian Front assisted by Polish forces enter the Warsaw suburb of Praga. But the Germans are preparing for a stand along the line of the Narew and Vistula Rivers.

    FINLAND: By this date all German troops have left Southern Finland.

    U.S.S.R.: The Finnish peace delegation has waited for a week at Moscow for the negotiations to begin. Delay is caused by disagreements between the Soviets and British over the terms of the interim Peace Treaty (the final treaty will be the one concluded with the Soviet Union, UK and the Dominions at Paris in 1947). Today the two allies finally reach an agreement, and the Fenno-Soviet negotiations are to begin in evening. However, Prime Minister Antti Hackzell, who is the chairman of the Finnish delegation, suffers brain haemorrhage just hours before the first session is to start and is paralysed. Minister of Defence Gen. Rudolf Walden acts as the head of the delegation in the first session. Minister of Foreign Affairs Carl Enckell arrives two days later to replace Hackzell.

    The Soviets attack Army Group North with 130 Divisions. General Schorner asks Hitler to let Estonia to go. This time Hitler allows a retreat. (Gene Hanson)

    YUGOSLAVIA: A British detachment with 25-pounders (87.6 mm) lands on Peljesac Peninsula and shells Trpanj, the German withdrawal point.

    GREECE: During the night of 14/15 September, RAF Liberators of No. 205 (Heavy Bomber) Group attack three airfields in the Athens area: 34 hit Kalamaki Airfield, 31 bomb Eleusis Airfield and 20 bomb Tatoi Airfield.

    ITALY: The Canadian First Division of the British 8th Army continues its advance, crossing the Marano River, after capturing the Gemmano Ridge.

    The U.S. II Corps continues to hammer the Gothic Line defenses of Il Giogo Pass but is unable to break through. The Canadian 1st Division reaches the Marano River and begins crossing it after capturing the Gemmano Ridge.

    US Twelfth Air Force medium bombers attack defensive positions in the east and central parts of the Gothic Line as the enemy fiercely resists, especially at Il Giogo Pass and on Monte Altuzzo; fighter-bombers continue strikes against communications and movement in the Po Valley.

    The sailing yacht EROS is torpedoed and sunk by US PT boats off Genoa. She is ex-mercantile, originally built as a yacht for the Rothschild family. 1,019 tons built 1926 in England with some guns. She was seized by the Germans at Toulon in 1942 and redesignated Kriegsmarine Uj.2216 in 1943. [prior information courtesy of Henri Le Masson’s The French Navy, Volume 2, Macdonald and Co., 1969] (Greg Kelley)

    BURMA: Japanese troops withdraw from the Manipur river line.

    On the Salween front, the Chinese complete the capture of Teng-chung which was entered on 4 August. Since Teng-chung is lost and the Chinese are vigorously resisting in Lung-ling, the Japanese decide to halt their counteroffensive on the Salween front.

    JAPAN: During the night of 13/14 September, 3 US Eleventh Air Force B-24s strike Kurabu Cape shipping and airfield on Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands.

    MARCUS ISLAND: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators on armed reconnaissance bomb Marcus Island. The island is located in the North Pacific about 768 nautical miles (1 422 kilometers) west-northwest of Wake Island and is used as a refueling point for Japanese aircraft en route to the Central Pacific.

    CAROLINE ISLANDS: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators from Eniwetok Atoll, Marshall Islands, bomb Truk Atoll and Gilbert Islands-based B-25 Mitchells hit Ponape Island.

    VOLCANO ISLANDS: USAAF Seventh Air Force B-24 Liberators from Saipan Island, Mariana Islands, bomb Iwo Jima Island.

    SOUTH CHINA SEA: The USN submarine USS Pargo (SS-264) lays mines near Natuna Island.

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC: USN Task Group 38.2 (TG 38.2, Rear Admiral Gerald F. Bogan) attacks Japanese shipping and installations on and around Panay and Negros Islands, supported by TG 38.3 (Rear Admiral Frederick C. Sherman). TG 38.1 (Vice Admiral John S. McCain), en route to support the Morotai landings, carries out strikes on Japanese installations on Mindanao; during the course of these operations, SB2Cs Helldivers of Bombing Squadron Two (VB 2) sink a fast transport in Davao Gulf. Meanwhile, destroyers USS Farenholt (DD-491), USS McCalla (DD-488), and USS Grayson (DD-435), detached from TG 38.1, bombard suspected Japanese radar installation on Cape San Augustin, at the mouth of Davao Gulf.

    NETHERLANDS EAST INDIES: 5620 Dutch, English, Australian and American POWs and Javanese slave labourers are loaded aboard the Japanese cargo ship “Junyo Maru” at Batavia on Java. The ship will be sunk by an RN submarine four days later. (See 18 September)

    CANADA: At the OCTAGON Conference being held in Quebec City, Quebec, (1) representatives of Australia and New Zealand join in conference at and (2) the Combined Chiefs of Staff draw up a new directive for British Admiral Lord Louis Mountbatten, Supreme Allied Commander, South East Asia Command, making his primary mission the recapture of Burma as quickly as possible. Operation DRACULA (plan for the capture of Rangoon, Burma in 1944) and that part of Operation CAPITAL (the attack across the Chindwin River to Mandalay, Burma) requiring an air and land route to China be opened and approved with a target date of 15 March 1945.

    Frigate HMCS Waskesiu departed departed Londonderry with Convoy ONF-253.
    Frigate HMCS Stettler attacked by U-802 Kptlt Helmut Schmoeckel CO. U-802 was a type IXC/40, U-boat, built by Deutsche Schiff und Machinen Bau AG Seebeck Yard Bremen, commissioned 12 Jun 43, in service 23 months, with a record of sinking 1 ship on 14 Sep 44. Stettler together with other frigates were on a routine patrol of Gaspe Passage when they fell within torpedo range of U-802. Assuming a convoy following astern of the sweep, U-802 tried to slip through the screen. Asdic sounds surrounded it as the formation zigzagged around its base course in full view of Schmoeckel’s periscope, “Suddenly a destroyer turns bows on at full speed, making black smoke”. Incorrect though his assumption was, Schmoeckel could only conclude in that split second that HMCS Stettler had gained asdic contact and was commencing her attack. Pressed by the apparently threatening frigate slicing through an “absolutely smooth, leaden sea (at approximately) 20 knots” Schmoeckel hastily fired a T-5 acoustic Gnat at a range of 500 m. An “explosion,” in the words of the Canadian report, “believed to be a torpedo, occurred 40 yards astern of HMCS Stettler in the ship’s wake.” The crew of U-802 heard their torpedo explode, followed by “the sounds of sinking,” and credited themselves with a kill. Lying under protective layers at a depth of 170 m eight minutes after their attack, they listened in safety to the counter-attacks as “destroyers” crossed overhead. U-802 rounded Cap de la Madeleine by late afternoon on 15 Sep, and let itself drift eastward with the prevailing set of the Gaspe stream.

    U.S.A.: The Great Atlantic Hurricane of 1944 made its initial landfall as a Category 3 storm at Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, shortly after 0900 hours. The barometric pressure at Cape Hatteras dropped to 947 millibars (27.97 inches of mercury or 94,71 kPa) with the highest winds clocked at 110 mph (177,0 km/h). From this point forward, the storm began to accelerate to the northeast to a speed in excess of 40 mph (64,4 km/h). By 1200 hours, the hurricane passes 75 miles (120,7 km) to the east of Norfolk, Virginia, and hurricane force winds swept over portions of extreme southeast Virginia. Winds peaked at 73 mph (117,5 km/h) in downtown Norfolk with gusts to 90 mph (144,8 km/h). At Cape Henry in Virginia Beach, Virginia, peak 1-minute winds reached 134 mph (215,7 km/h) with momentary gusts to 150 mph (241,4 km/h), the highest ever observed at any site during the hurricane. The lowest barometric pressure reported at Norfolk during the hurricane was 985.7 millibars (29.11 inches of mercury or 98,58 kPa). The high winds were the result of intensive convective activity which occurred in the western semi-circle of the storm. Over 4 inches (10,2 cm) of rain fell in a three and a half hour period from 1000 hours to 1330 hours. Fortunately for the area the hurricane passed at the time of low tide and tides only reached 6.0 feet (1,8 meters) above mean low tide with little or no flooding reported. The bulk of the damage was due to the hurricane force winds which brought down numerous trees in the area. At 1800 hours, the center of the hurricane was just offshore of Atlantic City, New Jersey. Winds there reached 82 mph (132 km/h) out of the north. Nearly all New Jersey shore communities suffered heavy damage to roofs and chimneys. Three hundred homes were destroyed on Long Beach Island alone and boardwalks in Atlantic City and on Seven Mile Beach, which contains Avalon and Stone Harbor, were literally washed away. Even inland, the storm brought heavy rains and tropical-storm force winds resulting in agricultural losses estimated at US$3.5 million (US$35.7 million in year 2002 dollars) in New Jersey alone. The hurricane made a second landfall on the eastern end of Long Island, New York and as the storm progressed northeastward, it passed to the north of Boston, Massachusetts, and then into the Gulf of Maine. The storm continued to accelerate rapidly to the east-northeast toward Nova Scotia, Canada, on 15 September. In Maine, the storm began as rain at 1600 hours. As the night progressed, the weather got gradually worse, and by 2400 hours, torrential rains were falling. At 0025 hours on the 15th, Civil defence authorities mobilized personnel and equipment to assist the emergency services. By 0230 hours, the winds had reached 50 mph (80,5 km/h) in the Auburn and Lewiston area. At 0400 hours, the center of the storm passed only 50 miles (80,5 km) from Portland and was headed northeast. By 0433 hours, the all clear was sounded. A total of 390 people died in the storm; 340 of them were lost on ships at sea. The U.S. Coast Guard lost three vessels: (1) the patrol boats USCGC Bedloe (WPC-128, ex-USCGC Antietam) and USCGC Jackson (WPC-142) foundered off Cape Hatteras during a hurricane. 26 crewmen are lost on former, 21 on the latter and (2) Lightship No. 73 on Vineyard Sound Station, Massachusetts, foundered during the hurricane; all 12 of her crew perish.

    A USAAF A-20 Havoc is deliberately flown into the hurricane to collect scientific data. This is the first time that an aircraft is deliberately flown into a hurricane.

  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:31:43 AM PDT · 7 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/sep44/14sep44.htm#

    Soviets secure Warsaw suburb
    Thursday, September 14, 1944 www.onwar.com

    The poster reads: Drive out the Geman Invader. The Red Army is now in the surburbs of Warsaw, Poland [photo at link]

    On the Eastern Front... Soviet troops of 1st Belorussian Front capture the Warsaw suburb of Praga.

    In Italy... Forces of British 8th Army capture Zollara and have thereby clear the Gemmano Ridge of German resistance. Lead elements advance to the Marano River.

    In the Philippines... Three groups of US Task Force 38, with 12 carriers, conduct air strikes on Japanese positions on the Visayas or central Philippine islands.

    In the Palau Islands... US naval forces, commanded by Admiral Oldendorf, continue to bombard Peleliu and Angaur islands as well as conducting minesweeping operations offshore.

    In Canada... The Octagon Conference continues. Churchill and Roosevelt and their staffs meet in Quebec to discuss strategy.

  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:30:19 AM PDT · 6 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Siegfried Line Hit (Middleton) – 2-3
    Westwall’s ‘Dragon Teeth’ Ripped Out by U.S. Guns (Denny) – 4
    U.S. 9th Army at Front in France; 4th American Force in the Field – 5
    Germans Fighting Hard on Moselle (Graham) – 5-6
    ‘Bluff Offensive’ Seen by Germans – 6
    War News Summarized – 6
    New Russian Drive Hits Czech Border – 7-8
    2 Reich Cities Hit by 600,000 Bombs (Gruson) – 8
    Back from the Wars over Europe (photo) * – 8
    Halsey Hits Bases (Trumbull) – 9-10
    Aliens in Germany are Urged to Hide – 10
    In Norway: The Underground Goes to Work against Nazis (photo) – 11
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 12-14

    * The “thousand yard stare” doesn’t just emanate from infantrymen.

  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:28:56 AM PDT · 5 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    Prime Minister to General Ismay, for C.O.S. Committee 14 Sept 44

    Pray see this. * Although this matter is being settled at home it would be best that the Chiefs of Staff themselves should express a view.

    2. I have drafted the following for Mr. Lyttelton, on which I should also like their opinion:

    “I am very doubtful myself whether the German war will end by the end of the year. It may struggle over in a reduced condition into 1945. Nevertheless I approve the practical steps you propose to take, subject to Cabinet and Defence Committee agreement. You may therefore submit your paper to the Cabinet as you wish.”

    * Telegram from the Minister of Production about the effect on production of the Cabinet decision that for man-power purposes it could now be assumed that the war against Germany would not continue beyond the end of 1944.

    Winston S. Churchill, Triumph and Tragedy

  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:28:09 AM PDT · 4 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:27:27 AM PDT · 3 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0914-siegfried18_zpsb04964fb.jpg

    The West Point Military History Series, Thomas E. Griess, Editor, The Second World War: Europe and the Mediterranean

  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:24:34 AM PDT · 2 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0914-siegfried17_zps61bd8130.jpg
  • AMERICANS OUTSIDE AACHEN, WIN A REICH TOWN; THIRD ARMY FORGES AHEAD ON MOSELLE FRONT (9/14/44)

    09/14/2014 4:23:21 AM PDT · 1 of 28
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents World War II Plus 70 Years: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: September 1, 2009. Last date to add: September 2, 2015.
    Reading assignment: New York Times articles and the occasional radio broadcast delivered daily to students on the 70th anniversary of original publication date. (Previously posted articles can be found by searching on keyword “realtime” Or view Homer’s posting history .)
    To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by freepmail. Those on the Realtime +/- 70 Years ping list are automatically enrolled. Course description, prerequisites and tuition information is available at the bottom of Homer’s profile. Also visit our general discussion thread.
  • AMERICANS CRASH INTO REICH AT SECOND POINT, HAMMER SIEGFRIED LINE; BRITISH WIN LE HAVRE (9/13/44)

    09/13/2014 11:04:25 AM PDT · 10 of 17
    Homer_J_Simpson to Stosh

    Here is the link etherington.com provided.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-12151715

  • AMERICANS CRASH INTO REICH AT SECOND POINT, HAMMER SIEGFRIED LINE; BRITISH WIN LE HAVRE (9/13/44)

    09/13/2014 5:35:02 AM PDT · 7 of 17
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.etherit.co.uk/month/thismonth/13.htm

    September 13th, 1944 (WEDNESDAY)

    UNITED KINGDOM:

    STRATEGIC OPERATIONS: The US Eighth Air Force in England flies 3 missions. Numbers in parenthesis indicate the number of aircraft bombing the target.

    - Mission 628: 1,015 bombers and 477 fighters,in 3 forces, attack oil and industrial targets in southern Germany by visual means; 15 bombers and 8 fighters are lost.
    (1) B-17s bomb oil refineries at Stuttgart/Sindelfingen (109) and Ludwigshafen (74); secondary targets hit are Darmstadt (95) and Wiesbaden (8); targets of opportunity hit are Mainz (22), a marshalling yard near Wiesbaden (12) and others (3); 4 B-17s are lost; escort is provided by 73 P-47 Thunderbolts, they claim 6-0-2 aircraft on the ground.
    (2) B-24s attack Schwabish Hall Airfield (65), a munitions dump at Ulm (65) and Weissenhorn (45); a target of opportunity hit is Reichelsheim (1); 4 B-24s are lost; escort is provided by 99 P-38s and P-51 Mustangs; they claim 14-0-5 aircraft on the ground; 2 P-51s are lost.
    (3) B-17s hit oil refineries at Merseburg (141) and Lutzkendorf (77); targets of opportunity hit are Giessen (17), Eisenach (12), Altenburg (7), Gera (7) and other (19); they claim 1-0-0 aircraft; 7 B-17s are lost; escort is provided by 233 P-47s and P-51s; they claim 33-0-4 aircraft in the air; 6 P-51s are lost.

    - Mission 629: B-24s are dispatched on an Azon mission to the oil refinery at Hemminstedt (6); 5 hit the secondary target, ammunition dumps at Kropp. Escort is provided by 15 P-51s without loss.

    - Mission 631: 8 B-17s drop leaflets on the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany.

    - 73 B-17s, escorted by 63 P-51s, continuing the UK-USSR-Italy-UK shuttle-bombing mission, take off from USSR bases, bomb steel and armament works at Diosgyor, Hungary and proceed to US Fifteenth Air Force bases in Italy.

    - 40 P-51s fly a strafing mission south of Munich hitting an aircraft dispersal area, airfield and marshalling yard; they claim 5-0-0 aircraft on the ground; 2 P-51s are lost.

    FRANCE: Dwight D. Eisenhower, Commander-in-Chief Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Force, directs the capture of two objectives: the Ruhr and a deepwater port, either Antwerp or Rotterdam.

    In northern France, the German garrison at Brest refuses a request to surrender although the garrison is being steadily compressed on all sides. In the U.S. XII Corps area, the Germans have decided to abandon Nancy in order to mass forces with which to overwhelm the Dieulouard bridgehead. A regiment of the 79th Infantry Division takes Neufchateau.

    In southern France, the French 1st Armoured Division takes Langres. In the VI Corps area, the Germans surrender Vesoul and the 45th Infantry Division overruns Villersexel. VI Corps takes more than 1,300 POWs during the day.

    First Allied Airborne Army’s IX Troop Carrier Command C-47 Skytrainss fly numerous supply and evacuation missions.

    The USAAF Ninth Air Force’s HQ XIX Tactical Air Command accompanies HQ US Third Army HQ to ChaIons-sur- Marne; B-26 Marauders fly a leaflet mission to coastal northern France and Belgium; fighters support ground forces in the Brest and Nancy-Metz areas (air-ground coordination being especially effective between XIX Tactical Air Command and French 2d Armored Division in defeating the German move on Vittel. .

    Fifty four B-24 Liberators of the USAAF Fifteenth Air Force in Italy fly supplies to southern France.

    GERMANY: The U.S. VII Corps penetrates the West Wall at two points.

    Dachau: Assistant Section Officer Noor Inayat-Khan (b.1914), WAAF, also known as the SOE agent Madelaine is executed at Dachau concentration camp. She had done highly risky work as an agent in France, and told the Nazis nothing after her betrayal. (George Cross) More

    386 RAF bombers drop 400,000 incendiary devices.

    During the day, RAF Bomber Command dispatches 140 aircraft, 102 Halifaxes, 28 Lancasters and ten Mosquitos to attack the Nordstern synthetic oil plant at Gelsenkirchen; 100 bombed the target and 14 bombed the city. Large explosions are seen through the smoke-screen. 2 Halifaxes lost. In a second raid, 98 Halifaxes and 20 Lancasters are dispatched to attack Osnabrück; 80 aircraft bomb the marshalling yard and 37 bomb the city. The marking and bombing are accurate but no details are available. No aircraft lost.

    During the night of 13/14 September, 36 Mosquitos of RAF Bomber Command are sent to Berlin and three to Karlsruhe. All aircraft bomb their targets with the loss of two aircraft bombing Berlin.

    U-2525 laid down.
    U-1305 commissioned.

    CZECHOSLOVAKIA: Seven USAAF Fifteenth Air Force in Italy bomb the marshalling yard at Vrutky.

    HUNGARY: Three USAAF Fifteenth Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb the railroad at Berzence, Papa Airfield and an industrial area.

    POLAND: The 2nd Belorussian Front takes Lomza on the Narew River. Belated Russian supply drops to the Polish Home Army in Warsaw begin

    B-24 Liberators of the USAAF Fifteenth Air Force in Italy bombs two targets: 96 bomb the I.G. Farben oil refinery at Oswiecim and 25 bomb the marshalling yard at Wadowice. The Auschwitz concentration camp is located near Oswiecim and some of the bombs land inside the main camp destroying a barracks, killing 15 SS men and injuring 28. A cluster of bombs is also mistakenly dropped farther west at Birkenau, damaging the railroad but missing the crematoria.

    ROMANIA: The armistice between the Allies and Romania is signed.

    ITALY: The British 8th Army has cleared the Coriano Ridge of German positions.

    For 24 hours it seemed that the Eighth Army was about to break through the Gothic Line at the Germmano and Coriano ridges and pour through onto the plains beyond. Then it came up against its old adversary: the weather. The rivers are flooding. Tanks of the 1st Armoured Division stand impotently in fields of mud at San Savino, while the British 4th Infantry Division has come under heavy artillery and mortar fire, delaying its move up to the start line. The delay has given the German chief, General von Vietinghoff, time to move his infantry into place, closing the gate to the Allies.

    U.S. forces continue attacking the Gothic line but make little progress against stiff resistance.

    US Twelfth Air Force B-25 Mitchells destroy a bridge at Peschiera del Garda, cutting the Milan-Verona line; B-25s and B-26 Marauders bomb guns and defensive positions north of Florence; fighter-bombers attack railroads, rolling stock, and bridges in northern Italy, although a heavy overcast hampers operations in the northwest.

    USAAF Fifteenth Air Force B-24 Liberators bomb three targets: 50 bomb the railroad viaduct at Aviso, 28 bomb the railroad bridge at Ora and 27 bomb the railroad bridge at Mezza Corona.

    COMMONWEALTH OF THE PHILIPPINES: Carrier-based aircraft of the USN’s Task Groups 38.1, 38.2 and 38.3 make unopposed attacks against Japanese faculties in the central Philippines. Because of the lack of a reaction from the enemy, Admiral William F. Halsey, Jr. recommends that the invasion of the Palau Islands be scrapped and the invasion of the Philippines be moved forward.

    JAPAN: During the night of 13/14 September, three USAAF Eleventh Air Force B-24 Liberators strike Kurabu Cape shipping and airfield on Paramushiru Island in the Kurile Islands.

    EAST INDIES: Far East Air Force B-24 Liberators and B-25 Mitchells hit 4 airfields and bomb villages on Morotai Island and Fifth Air Force B-25 Mitchells hit Langgoer Airfield in the Kai Islands .

    SOUTHWEST PACIFIC: In New Guinea, A-20s and fighter-bombers hit 2 airfields on Efman Island; A-20s, B-25s, and fighter-bombers hit Babo AA positions and airfields at Manokwari and Ransiki.

    PALAU ISLANDS: A USN task force under Vice Admiral Jesse B. Oldendorf, comprised of five old battleships, [USS Maryland (BB-46), USS Mississippi (BB-41), USS Pennsylvania (BB-38), USS Tennessee (BB-43) and USS West Virginia (BB-48)], nine cruisers, and destroyers begins two days of bombardment of Peleliu and Angaur Islands. Additional support is from four Third Fleet escort aircraft carriers. Minesweeping begins to clear approaches for the landing craft.
    While sweeping mines 750 yards (686 meters) off the southeast coast of Angaur Island, a violent underwater explosion, starboard side amidships, shakes the high speed minesweeper USS Perry (DMS-17). All steam to her main engines is lost and the forward fireroom is demolished and flooded. Steam and oil sprayed in all directions and the ship takes on a 30 degree list to port. The list increases and, at 1420 hours, the commanding officer ordered “abandon ship”. With the aid of the destroyer USS Preble (DD-345) final attempts to save the vessel are made, but, at 1515 hours, all remaining personnel are ordered off. At 1605 hours, USS Perry capsizes. She brakes in two at the point of damage and, at 1607 hours, sinks in 40 fathoms (240 feet or 73 meters) of water.

    CANADA: Frigate HMCS Prestonian commissioned.

    U.S.A.: The destroyer USS Warrington (DD-383) and the stores ship USS Hyades (AF-28) are caught in the center of a hurricane off the Florida coast in the U.S. In the evening of the 12th, the storm forced the destroyer to heave to while Hyades continued on her way alone. Keeping wind and sea on her port bow, Warrington rode relatively well through most of the night. Wind and seas, however, continued to build during the early morning hours of the 13th. Warrington began to lose headway and, as a result, started to ship water through the vents to her engineering spaces. The water rushing into her vents caused a loss of electrical power which set off a chain reaction. Her main engines lost power, and her steering engine and mechanism went out. She wallowed there in the trough of the swells continuing to ship water. She regained headway briefly and turned upwind, while her radiomen desperately, but fruitlessly, tried to raise Hyades. Finally, she resorted to a plain-language distress call to any ship or shore station. By noon on the 13th, it was apparent that Warrington’s crewmen could not win the struggle to save their ship, and the order went out to prepare to abandon ship. By 1250 her crew had left Warrington; and she went down almost immediately. A prolonged search by USS Hyades, the destroyer escorts USS Frost (DE-144), USS Nuse (DE-145), USS Inch (DE-146), USS Snowden (DE-246), USS Swasey (DE248), USS Woodson (DE-359), USS Johnnie Hutchins (DE-360), ATR-9, and ATR-62 rescued only 5 officers and 68 men of the destroyer’s 20 officers and 301 men.
    (Note: The USS WARRINGTON is named after Lewis Warrington born on 3 November 1782. He entered the USN on 6 January 1800 and on 28 February 1844, he temporarily took over the duties of the Secretary of the Navy. He relinquished the office in March 1844 and served as Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance until he died on 12 October 1851.

    The Warrington was a Somers-Class Destroyer. These vessels were originally intended to comprise a new Destroyer Leader class of vessels. She was 1,850 or so tons and armed with 4 dual 5 inch / 38 calibre single-purpose mounts and twelve 21 inch torpedoes. Unfortunately the heavy guns mounts were not dual-purpose and their AA armament was rather weak with mixtures of 1.1 inch, 40mm, and 20mm weapons. The Warrington served in both the Pacific and Atlantic and was credited with 2 Japanese aircraft downed near Guadalcanal. (Ron Babuka))

    Washington: Enrico Fermi loads the first uranium slug into a plutonium-producing reactor.

  • AMERICANS CRASH INTO REICH AT SECOND POINT, HAMMER SIEGFRIED LINE; BRITISH WIN LE HAVRE (9/13/44)

    09/13/2014 5:33:41 AM PDT · 6 of 17
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson

    http://www.onwar.com/chrono/1944/sep44/13sep44.htm#

    Americans bombard the Palaus
    Wednesday, September 13, 1944 www.onwar.com

    In the Palau Islands... American naval forces begin a preliminary bombardment of Peleliu and Angaur. Admiral Oldendorf is in command of the operation which involves 5 battleships, 9 cruisers and numerous destroyers. An escort carrier forces provides air support and minesweeping is carried out to clear the approach route to the islands.

    In Italy... British 8th Army forces clear German forces from Coriano Ridge and continue attacking the remaining German positions on the Gemmano Ridge.

    On the Western Front... In continuing attacks, the US 3rd Army (part of US 12th Army Group) captures Neufchateau.

    On the Eastern Front... Forces of Soviet 2nd Belorussian Front capture Lomza on the Narew, west of Bialystok.

    In Occupied Poland... Soviet forces begin supply drops to the Polish Home Army (AK) forces engaging German forces in the Warsaw uprising. This action is taken in response to British and American pressure.

    In Canada... The Octagon Conference continues. Churchill and Roosevelt and their staffs meet in Quebec to discuss strategy.

  • AMERICANS CRASH INTO REICH AT SECOND POINT, HAMMER SIEGFRIED LINE; BRITISH WIN LE HAVRE (9/13/44)

    09/13/2014 5:32:04 AM PDT · 5 of 17
    Homer_J_Simpson to r9etb; PzLdr; dfwgator; Paisan; From many - one.; rockinqsranch; 2banana; henkster; meandog; ...
    Allied Spearheads Leveled at the Enemy’s Siegfried Line (page 1 map) – 2
    Strike from Eupen (Middleton) – 3-4
    Americans Crossing the Meuse River under Fire (photo) – 4
    Germans’ Hostility in Eupen Shows Americans How Reich Will React (Denny) – 5
    War News Summarized – 5
    British Kept Busy in Belgian Mop-Up (MacDonald) – 6
    U.S. Planes Erase 105 More of Nazis’ (Gruson) – 6
    Battleships Join in Smash at Palau (Trumbull, Kluckhohn) * – 7
    Hillman as a Liability (by Arthur Krock) – 8
    Maine Sees Dewey Topping Its ’40 Vote – 8
    Air Power and the War (by Alexander P. de Seversky) – 9
    Red Cross Packs 1,250,000 Christmas Boxes for Shipment to Men in Services Overseas – 9
    Westwall No Stronger Than Its Nazis (by Hanson W. Baldwin) – 10
    The Texts of the Day’s Communiques on the Fighting in Various War Zones – 11-13

    * Kluckhohn’s section has two missing lines of text. Not Homer’s fault.

  • AMERICANS CRASH INTO REICH AT SECOND POINT, HAMMER SIEGFRIED LINE; BRITISH WIN LE HAVRE (9/13/44)

    09/13/2014 5:30:50 AM PDT · 4 of 17
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
     photo 0913-strike15_zpsab37aa60.jpg

    Winston S. Churchill, Triumph and Tragedy