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Posts by Homer_J_Simpson

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  • July 1856

    07/23/2016 12:23:46 PM PDT · 61 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to rdl6989

    So - Jackson is touring Europe. While Lincoln is campaigning for John C. Fremont’s presidential bid, U.S. Grant is trying to eke out a living in St. Louis, Robert E. Lee is scouting Comanche territory in Texas and Jefferson Davis is running the War Department in Washington. I think William T. Sherman is in the banking business in San Francisco, but that is just from skimming some pages. I should have details and a book report to share next month.

  • July 1856

    07/23/2016 11:00:14 AM PDT · 58 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to rdl6989

    Not going to click. Wouldn’t be prudent. I am now working on a William T. Sherman bio and I want to get one for Nathan B. Forrest before I move on to general Civil War histories (thinking of Bruce Catton and Shelby Foote). I hope if you come across any news of General Jackson from whatever month we happen to be working on you can share it.

  • July 1856

    07/23/2016 10:55:47 AM PDT · 56 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to Squantos

    Upon further review I believe I was right the first time. Cooper is marked on the fort map I linked above north of Ft. Mason and there is a fork in the Brazos up there. I was looking at the wrong fork near the present day Ft. Hood.

  • July 1856

    07/23/2016 9:12:29 AM PDT · 53 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to Squantos

    On closer look the two could be the same. The text describes Camp Cooper as being 170 mi, north of Ft. Mason. It also says it was on the clear fork of the Brazos River, 35 miles from the point of its junction with the main stream. According to the Texas fort map I found that would make Camp Cooper almost due east of Ft. Mason. Comparing the modern day map of Texas that could be about mid-way between Austin and Waco.

    http://www.lib.utexas.edu/maps/historical/tex_fedforts_1848.jpg

    http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=map+of+texas&view=detailv2&&id=704CCC3A08840CFACBBE1A5D0F158D76FDBD1B9C&selectedIndex=0&ccid=w1VZPm0b&simid=608042305047957219&thid=OIP.Mc355593e6d1b90ea6118c4345a11607aH0&ajaxhist=0

    Note that the fort map doesn’t show any forts in the area described above. Maybe Lt. Hood and Lt. Col. Lee scouted a site for a fort that wouldn’t be built until the 20th century.

  • July 1856

    07/23/2016 7:56:25 AM PDT · 50 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to Squantos
    Same location ?

    Not quite. Camp Cooper was near Abilene while Fort Hood is between Austin and Waco. Still, another of those fascinating details. Like the one I ran across in the Grant biography where the best man and ushers as his wedding in Missouri would later surrender to him at Appomattox.

  • July 1856

    07/23/2016 6:01:05 AM PDT · 48 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Book report!

     photo 0723-lee_zpsjpnzmvm8.jpg

    This book is a one-volume abridgement of the 4-volume original biography of Robert Edward Lee by Douglas Southall Freeman. The abridgement was done by Richard Harwell. According to a preface by James M. McPherson the original Freeman multi-volume set is the gold standard of Lee biographies.

    I considered acquiring the Lee bio by Michael Korda. I liked his “Ike” and “With Wings Like Eagles,” on the Battle of Britain. But I recalled that his style, while informative and entertaining, does not lend itself well to the day-by-day excerpting helpful in a project like this. The Freeman-Harwell book meets that requirement just fine. My problems with it are of a different sort, and I don’t know if my criticism should be aimed at the original or the abridgement, or a combination of the two. The narrative focuses so closely on Lee that it tends to miss what is going on around him. This is less a “life and times” account than a “life of” account. An example of this is the story of Lee’s time at West Point. We learn that Lee made it through all four years without a demerit but little more than that except who were his main competitors in class standing from one semester to the next. By contrast, I am now reading a bio of Jefferson Davis, who was one class ahead of Lee. The Davis biography (by William J. Cooper Jr.) gives the reader a lot of good background information on the West Point of the early 19th century and its most influential superintendent – Col. Sylvanus Thayer. There are some funny and revealing stories about Jefferson Davis during his West Point years included in Coopers book. Can the same be said of Lee’s time there? Freeman/Harwell doesn’t say.

    The Freeman/Harwell account of the Mexican War is similarly limited. Lee had a highly distinguished record in that war. He behaved courageously, exhibiting good leadership skills, fortitude under adverse conditions and used his engineering skills to achieve decisive results. (In doing so, incidentally, he became a personal favorite officer of the U.S. Army commander, Gen. Winfield Scott.) But it is all seen in close up. The big picture of what happened around him is missing. Again, I compare “Lee” to a similar book – “Grant,” by Jean Edward Smith (introduced by me March 17, reply #93 ) U.S. Grant played a much less exalted role in the Mexican War than Lee – not surprising, as Grant had 14 fewer years of seniority than his future nemesis – but I learned a great deal more about the Mexican war from reading “Grant” than I did from “Lee.” It seems to me that learning about the world the subject lives in is crucial to understanding the person. Maybe that background information was included in the 75% of the original 4 volume set and was cut for the abridged version. Too bad, if so.

    McPherson explained in his preface that Freeman eschewed the omniscient narrator method of writing for the majority of the book that deals with the Civil War in favor of a “fog of war” style. That is, the reader learns only what Lee knew at any particular point during a battle or campaign. The idea is to help the reader understand Lee’s thought process as he made decisions and exercised command. That could work well for us when we get to 1861 and beyond, since we will be getting “the rest of the story” from any number of other sources.

    Here are some facts about Lee’s life before 1856: Born January 19, 1807 in Virginia to Ann Carter Lee and Henry Lee. Henry “Lighthorse Harry” Lee had been a hero of the American Revolution and a friend of George Washington, but didn’t fare well in peacetime. Business setbacks cost him most of his property and left his family in a precarious position. Ann Lee admonished her son Robert to practice discipline and self-denial to avoid similar pitfalls. He took the lessons to heart. Lee won an appointment to West Point and attended 1825-29, graduating with honors. He worked in the Corps of Engineers until the Mexican War. On June 30, 1831 he married Mary Custis. For his distinguished service in the war he was breveted colonel. After two more years with the Corps of Engineers he was made Superintendent of the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. In that capacity he initially had trouble with discipline because well-connected cadets could get Lee’s decisions countermanded by friends in the War Department. That ended when fellow Mexican War veteran Franklin Pierce became President and appointed Mexican War veteran Jefferson Davis Secretary of War.

    In March 1855 he was assigned to the cavalry and became second in command, as a Lt. Col., of the 2nd Cavalry Regiment, under Col. Albert Sydney Johnston.

    With that, here is the first excerpt from “Lee.”

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    Douglas Southall Freeman, Lee, an abridgement by Richard Harwell

  • July 1856

    07/19/2016 5:46:39 AM PDT · 47 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Book report!

     photo index_zpscsdbeoa0.jpg

    Jefferson Davis, American, by William J. Cooper Jr. (2000)

    In my opinion this is a satisfying biography of the U.S. Representative and Senator, regimental commander in the U.S. Army, Secretary of War under President Pierce, and finally, President of the Confederate States of America. It presents a good combination of details of the life of the subject and the times in which he lived. (I have read through the first 11 chapters, which cover the period through the end of 1861.) Now that I have delved into a number of biographies of important characters from the Civil War era I can see that the life/times balance is a crucial factor for me since otherwise my knowledge of the period is limited. In a few days I will be posting a book report on a biography of Robert E. Lee I started just before this one. That book focused much more closely on the life than on the events he was living through than this book does and it is less enlightening as a result. Part of the difference may be due to the fact that Davis had a more interesting life than Lee, in some respects.

    Jefferson Davis was born on June 3, 1808 in Christian County Kentucky. He was the 10th and last child of Samuel Emory and Jane Cook Davis. He was named after his father’s hero, Thomas Jefferson. None of his older siblings received much formal education but his father wanted it to be different for Jefferson. When he was 8 he went to St. Thomas College, the first Roman Catholic school west of the Alleghenys. He spent 3 years there. From ages 14-16 he attended Transylvania University in Lexington, Kentucky. At the time that now extinct institution was considered the equal of Harvard. During this period his father died and the paternal duties were taken up by Jefferson’s oldest brother, Joseph Davis. Joseph would become a surrogate father to and major influence on the much younger Jefferson. One of big bro’s first efforts was to land Jefferson an appointment to West Point.

    The book steps back to describe the U.S.M.A. that Davis entered in 1824. The academy was “literally the creation of the superintendent . . ., Lieutenant Colonel Sylvanus Thayer . . .” Thayer was assigned to the post in 1817 and redesigned the academy virtually from the ground up. His influence is still felt at West Point. One of his innovations was the system of demerits handed out to cadets for a wide array of misdeeds. That was to be an important consideration to Cadet Davis, who seems to have had a problem with authority. Two miles from West Point was an establishment called Benny Havens’s Tavern. Cadets willing to risk their careers went there to obtain alcoholic beverages. Davis was caught there by an officer on one occasion and almost got kicked out of the academy as a result. He was also involved as a planner in the infamous episode known as the Christmas eggnog riot of 1826. He managed to escape punishment for that one, even though many cadets were dismissed from the corps. Between those scrapes and indifferent performance in the hard sciences Davis finished toward the bottom of his class and so was assigned to the infantry upon graduation. He served at various locations in the Mississippi River valley, including briefly in Illinois during the Black Hawk War. After about 7 years on active duty Davis resigned his commission to pursue a civilian career as a cotton planter. Before that, however, he met and became romantically involved with the daughter of his superior officer, Col. Zachary Taylor. Jefferson and Sarah Knox Taylor were married June 17, 1835. Sadly the young couple became ill with a particularly virulent strain of malaria in Louisiana three months after the wedding and Knox, as she was known, died on September 15. The date struck a chord for me so I checked the David Donald bio of Lincoln and confirmed it: Ann Rutledge, Lincoln’s fiancé and one true love – died of typhoid fever on August 25, 1835, three weeks exactly before Davis’ wife died.

    Jefferson’s brother Joseph owned a large plantation on the Mississippi between Vicksburg and Natchez, MS. The land formed a big peninsula filling a sharp bend in the river. It carried the name Davis Bend. He gave Jefferson use of enough land to start a plantation of his own. The land was undeveloped so he (his slaves, actually) had to clear out the briers. The plantation which emerged he named Brierfield. Over several years Davis built up his plantation while sticking his toe into Democratic politics in Mississippi. That culminated with his election to congress in 1845, the same year he married his second wife, Varina Howell Davis. Before his first term ended he resigned his seat to take command of a Mississippi regiment bound for the Mexican War. He was given the rank of Colonel, higher than he had been during his earlier service. The Mississippi Rifles under his command went to northern Mexico to join Davis’ former father in law General Zachary Taylor’s campaign. Jefferson Davis served with distinction in the battles for Monterrey in October 1846 and then the Battle of Buena Vista on February 23, 1847. In the latter battle he was wounded in the foot. During the war most of Zachary Taylor’s troops were sent south to join Gen. Winfield Scott’s campaign to take Mexico City. This left Taylor vulnerable to attack, which the Mexicans did. Only a heroic defense by the American forces – including the Mississippi Rifles – staved off complete destruction of Taylor’s command. Bad blood resulted between Taylor and Scott that made for a feud between Scott and Davis when Davis became Secretary of War while Scott was the army’s commanding general.

    After Buena Vista Davis turned down a promotion to Brigadier General and further war service to return to civilian life and a seat in the U.S. Senate, his for the asking as a newly minted war hero. He remained in the senate until 1852, when he resigned his seat to run for Governor as a Unionist against the secessionist Henry Foote. He lost. He campaigned for Democratic presidential nominee Franklin Pierce in the campaign of 1852 and when that was successful Davis was rewarded with a cabinet seat as Secretary of War in the Pierce administration. Other than bickering with General Scott Davis did a good job in the position. The War Department was almost paralyzed by its bureaucracy and seniority system, and Davis worked hard to improve it. He sent a team to Europe to study the latest in military operations. He tried to expand the army so it would have a better chance of success with its primary task of protecting settlers on the frontiers of American expansion. He tried to get the transcontinental railroad completed (or started). Since there was no railroad to provide army transport to the west coast he ordered experimentation with camels to fill the gap. He also kept an eye on technological developments that might provide new tools for the army. In many cases the tight-fisted congress thwarted his effort by withholding funds, but he did what he could.

    That is where we find Jefferson Davis in July 1856 – Secretary of War during the final year of the Pierce administration. I have no excerpts from Jefferson Davis, American to post until next year.

  • July 1856

    07/14/2016 6:45:19 AM PDT · 45 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Now to help fill the time between excerpts in this slow month, here are some selections from this month’s Harper’s Magazine. Due to no new printer we are still limited to current events and the all-important fashion news. I also included a series of images of folks celebrating the Fourth of July. The big news is from Kansas, with accounts of the sack of Lawrence and other troubles in that state. The results of the DNC in Cincinnati are also covered. The fellow on the cover is a poet named Joel Barlow. The July issue leads with his poem “The Hasty Pudding” (1793). It was too long for my defective printer to handle so his cover picture is all we get.

    1

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    2

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    3

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    4

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    5

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    6

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    7

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    8

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    9

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  • July 1856

    07/12/2016 2:25:07 PM PDT · 43 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to henkster
    Legislature dissolved by the Federal military. Things are bad in our country, but we haven’t gone that far...

    I just read in a biography of Jefferson Davis that, as Secretary of War, he reprimanded Sumner for the action. As a cabinet official Davis seems to have done a fairly decent job. Not counting his really juvenile feud with Winfield Scott.

  • July 1856

    07/04/2016 9:48:34 AM PDT · 42 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to henkster

    They picked quite a day for the action - the 80th anniversary of July Fourth, 1776. The rationale for it was that the free-state legislature was “extra-legal,” there being a pro-slavery legislature in place when the Topeka legislature was formed.

  • July 1856

    07/04/2016 7:33:47 AM PDT · 40 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
     photo bleeding kansas_zpsghjtvtkg.jpg

    Continued from June 30 (reply #45)

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    Nicole Etcheson, Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 9:16:45 AM PDT · 34 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to Lonesome in Massachussets; DiogenesLamp
    Here is part of an earlier discussion of Dred Scott from the January 1856 thread, reply #37

    On April 6, 1846, Dred and Harriet Scott filed petitions in the Missouri circuit court at St. Louis seeking to establish their right to freedom based on their residence on free soil. Under Missouri law they had a strong case. As Fehrenbacher says, "again and again, the highest curt of the state had ruled that a master who took his slave to reside in a state or territory where slavery was prohibited thereby emancipated him." Unfortunately for the Scotts, their lawyer allowed a technical weakness in his case to sabotage the verdict. He didn't provide a witness that could establish that Mrs. Emerson owned the Scotts, even though all concerned knew that to be the case. Because of that defect the verdict went against the Scotts. They filed a motion for a retrial, but the defendant filed something called a bill of exceptions and the case was sent to the supreme court of Missouri. It was not until March 22, 1852 that the state supreme court handed down a decision. The Scotts still had the facts on their side and probably would have prevailed except that the issue of slavery had become so heated in the nation by 1852 that the proslavery justices of Missouri were not disposed to give the anti-slavery side their way. The court ruled against the Scotts.

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 7:12:00 AM PDT · 16 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to DiogenesLamp
    How do you stop slave owners from going into the territories or free states with their slaves?

    I see that as the question that drove the debate on slavery from our founding until the Civil War.

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 7:06:49 AM PDT · 14 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to DiogenesLamp
    So pretty much we need to restrict our discussion to the 1856 and earlier time period?

    No hard and fast rules, but that is the general idea. It is okay to relate events of the "current" time to resulting outcomes in the "future." When we had the World War II series going discussion about a few events - I'm thinking of Pearl Harbor and Barbarossa - began years before their 70th anniversaries. Also, as we move along new characters enter the picture who will become more important as time goes on. In 1856 Robert E. Lee was a Lt. Col. in the U.S. Cavalry. I have an excerpt from his biography scheduled for this month. It could be instructive and entertaining to compare the early Lee with the later one.

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 6:55:19 AM PDT · 10 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to HiTech RedNeck
    What we now call Oklahoma was for Indians, huh. Would that have worked? All American Indians would be given Oklahoma?

    That might have been the plan, but my knowledge is deficient in that part of our history. No doubt some smart passing stranger can fill us in. If the idea was to move all Indians in U.S. territory to that one central location I think the folks in Washington didn't think it through very well.

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 6:50:30 AM PDT · 8 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to DiogenesLamp
    What is it that we are intended to discuss regarding 1856? Is this to be another Civil War thread?

    This series covering the events of 160 years ago began at the end of last year (1855). The purpose is to learn about U.S. history leading up to and including the Civil War. I didn't put that in the monthly description appearing in reply #1 of every thread because the war won't start for another five years and I don't want to jinx the plan by promising something that far off. But if all goes well we will be here in April of 1861/2021 when Fort Sumter is bombarded.

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 6:44:14 AM PDT · 6 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to OttawaFreeper
    Happy Canada Day!

    Yes there was slavery-related violence going on in Kansas from 1855 on. The Missouri Compromise was 1820 and was a major element in the story. The direct cause of the current troubles was the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854, which effectively repealed the Missouri Compromise and made Kansas the focal point in the argument of whether slavery could be extended from where it existed in the southern states (including Missouri) to newly created federal territories.

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 6:28:27 AM PDT · 3 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...

    New Month, new thread. I have three excerpts scheduled for July, including one from a new addition to our series. We will also see samples from the July Harper’s Magazine. As usual, timely posts from other sources are appreciated.

  • July 1856

    07/01/2016 6:24:15 AM PDT · 1 of 61
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents U.S. History, 1855-1860: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: November 21, 2015. Last date to add: Sometime in the future.
    Reading: Self-assigned. Recommendations made and welcomed. To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by reply or freepmail.
  • June 1856

    06/30/2016 5:17:01 AM PDT · 45 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Continued from June 4 (reply #12).

     photo BK0630_zpsd2u1dnhv.jpg

    Nicole Etcheson, Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era

  • June 1856

    06/24/2016 7:37:10 AM PDT · 43 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to drop 50 and fire for effect
    So your printer is the last casualty of that war?

    It was a member of the Last Peripheral club. My modum gets to drink the bottle of brandy they have been saving all these years.

  • June 1856

    06/24/2016 6:11:34 AM PDT · 41 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    I splurged and subscribed to Harper’s Magazine to gain access to their archive going all the way back to the mid-19th century. This could be fun. I need to get a new printer before I can do major posting since it is necessary to print out the pages in pdf format. World War II just about did in my old Dell printer so I need to replace it. Here is just a taste of what we will have to look forward to. Notice that the Current Events section includes some of the events we have been reading about in Bleeding Kansas

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    2

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    3

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    4

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  • June 1856

    06/21/2016 2:13:48 PM PDT · 40 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to rustbucket
    If she sticks to actual history in the book you chose and doesn’t slant the book, it might be worth a read.

    I invite everyone to read the excerpts I post and judge for themselves. Of course, the next one isn't scheduled until nine months from now.

  • June 1856

    06/21/2016 12:32:03 PM PDT · 38 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to rustbucket; StoneWall Brigade

    Thanks for the link. The article is dated 2002 and ‘Team of Rivals’ was published in 2005, so hopefully she got her “mechanical processes” straightened out in time for that book.

  • June 1856

    06/21/2016 8:07:23 AM PDT · 36 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to StoneWall Brigade; CougarGA7
    Doris Goodwin is a well-known plagiarized her work is not to be trusted.

    Not well known to me. Can you support that claim? I don't want to post bad information.

  • June 1856

    06/21/2016 7:21:01 AM PDT · 35 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to Pelham

    My reading schedule is full for the next couple years. Feel free to post relevant excerpts from “A Disease in the Public Mind” at the appropriate dates. We can always use fresh discussion material.

  • June 1856

    06/19/2016 9:43:22 AM PDT · 29 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to BroJoeK; central_va; EternalVigilance; henkster

    When Trump got the big win in Alabama I was struck with the thought that there might be a throwback situation in process. I didn’t connect it to the Whigs but I thought it might involve southern resentment still lingering after all this time. The nativist element also reminds me of the American (Know-Nothing) party that was influential in today’s rust-belt/coal producing regions.

  • June 1856

    06/19/2016 6:16:12 AM PDT · 27 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    New book!

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    I’m really enjoying Team of Rivals. As the title suggests it deals with the relationship among Lincoln and the men who competed with him for the Presidential nomination. These were primarily William H. Seward, Salmon P. Chase and Edward Bates. It has also touched briefly on Edwin Stanton, future Secretary of War. (I have reached p. 230, at a point leading up to the 1860 Republican National Convention.) The book provides mini-biographies of each of these characters that make nice complements to what I have previously read in the Lincoln biography by David H. Donald. I will continue to read Team of Rivals to the point where the war begins, then switch to one of the bios I just got from Amazon – Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis.

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    Doris Kearns Goodwin, Team of Rivals

  • June 1856

    06/19/2016 6:13:32 AM PDT · 26 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Continued from reply #17.

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    Don E. Fehrenbacher, The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics

  • June 1856

    06/19/2016 6:11:02 AM PDT · 25 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Continued from reply #20.

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    David Herbert Donald, Lincoln

  • June 1856

    06/17/2016 7:27:30 AM PDT · 22 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to EternalVigilance

    Michael Metz Jr.?

  • June 1856

    06/17/2016 5:44:51 AM PDT · 20 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
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    Continued from May 29 (reply #75)

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    David Herbert Donald, Lincoln

  • May 1856

    06/13/2016 12:37:20 PM PDT · 81 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to rdl6989; colorado tanker; henkster
    Someone in Topeka told me a few years ago that more Kansas pioneers came from Indiana than any other state.

    I recently took a closer look at my family tree than I had before and determined that my great-great-grandfather moved from Davis, Indiana - near Michigan City - to La Cygne, Kansas some time after his last child was born in 1861 He died there in 1886. His son - my great-grandfather - was born in Indiana in 1852 so would have moved with the family as a youth. He died across the border in Adrian, Missouri in 1928.

  • June 1856

    06/06/2016 5:01:32 AM PDT · 17 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
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    Don E. Fehrenbacher, The Dred Scott Case: Its Significance in American Law and Politics

  • May 1856

    06/05/2016 5:55:39 PM PDT · 78 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to colorado tanker; henkster; EternalVigilance
    It's interesting to see Osawatomie referred to as in Southeastern Kansas; I think of it as East Central.

    I've been trying to nail down my family history in KS to see if any of my forebears were involved in this part of our history. My great-great grandfather was born in Stark Co. OH in 1818 and died in La Cygne KS in 1886. That is close to the MO state line. His son, my great grandfather, was born in Davis IN in 1852 and died in Adrian MO in 1928. That is just a short distance from La Cygne KS. With those dates and the fact that La Cygne was not founded until the railroad was established there in 1869 I suspect that the Simpsons, er, Deardorffs didn't arrive in the area until after the Civil War.

  • June 1856

    06/04/2016 7:05:59 AM PDT · 12 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
     photo bleeding kansas_zpsghjtvtkg.jpg

    Continued from May 25 (reply #71).

     photo BK0604_zpsdiglrntx.jpg

    Nicole Etcheson, Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era

  • June 1856

    06/01/2016 6:24:53 AM PDT · 5 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to IYAS9YAS; knarf

    Added. Welcome aboard the long march.

  • June 1856

    06/01/2016 4:48:12 AM PDT · 2 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...

    New Month, new thread. I will continue with excerpts from the authors named above. Feel free to add items from other sources. It turns out that the May 24 edition of the Chicopee Mass. Weekly Journal was their last. I hope to replace it with selections from Harper’s Magazine in the near future, but I’m not set up for that just yet. I finally figured out that Harper’s Magazine is not related to Harper’s Weekly, which is available on line beginning in 1858.

  • June 1856

    06/01/2016 4:47:04 AM PDT · 1 of 46
    Homer_J_Simpson
    Free Republic University, Department of History presents U.S. History, 1855-1860: Seminar and Discussion Forum
    First session: November 21, 2015. Last date to add: Sometime in the future.
    Reading: Self-assigned. Recommendations made and welcomed. To add this class to or drop it from your schedule notify Admissions and Records (Attn: Homer_J_Simpson) by reply or freepmail.
  • May 1856

    05/29/2016 7:22:31 AM PDT · 76 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Here is Carl Sandburg’s take on the same event.

    1

     photo PY0529_zpsz6nqyjod.jpg

    2

     photo PY05292_zpspotejlnt.jpg

    3

     photo PY05293_zpsnxj4gsdb.jpg

    Carl Sandburg, Abraham Lincoln: The Prairie Years, Volume II

  • May 1856

    05/29/2016 7:17:57 AM PDT · 75 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Continued from May 10 (reply #36)

     photo Linc0529_zpsw3qugzrs.jpg

    David Herbert Donald, Lincoln

  • May 1856

    05/25/2016 4:53:12 AM PDT · 71 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Continued from yesterday (reply #66).

     photo BK0525_zpsu9hsrdmr.jpg

     photo BK05252_zps2hpocchz.jpg

    . Nicole Etcheson, Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era

  • May 1856

    05/24/2016 5:06:35 AM PDT · 67 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to Homer_J_Simpson
    The Chicopee, Mass. Weekly Journal
    Saturday, May 24, 1856

    A Fearful Adventure – 1
    To the People of Massachusetts – 2
    The Week [Assault on Sen. Sumner] – 2
    Chicopee News – 2

    Link to Chicopee Weekly Journal

    Either the Chicopee Weekly Journal didn’t publish on May 31, 1856 or the Chicopee Public Library didn’t get a copy of it for their archives. Either way, this does it for May.

  • May 1856

    05/24/2016 5:01:58 AM PDT · 66 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Continued from May 21 (reply #62)
    1

     photo BK0524_zpszkse9goc.jpg

    2

     photo BK05242_zpssfpwuabl.jpg

    Nicole Etcheson, Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era

  • May 1856

    05/21/2016 7:06:38 AM PDT · 62 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Continued from May 7 (reply #34)

    1

     photo BK0521_zpsctb4oxy1.jpg

    2

     photo BK05212_zpshl657nis.jpg

    Nicole Etcheson, Bleeding Kansas: Contested Liberty in the Civil War Era

  • May 1856

    05/19/2016 5:13:08 AM PDT · 60 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    Thanks to rdl6989 I can repost Sen. Sumner's speech on the day of his beating.

    Previously we discussed the caning of Senator Charles Sumner. We are approaching the anniverary of that event, May 19, 1856. He was giving a speech titled “The Crime Against Kansas” at the time of the incident. Here is a link from the US Senate website with the text of that speech:

    "The Crime Against Kansas"

  • May 1856

    05/17/2016 6:19:47 AM PDT · 54 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to Squantos
    So grateful for your history lessons Homer ........ thank you.

    I'm happy to pass them along. Grateful to the Chicopee Public Library for making this series available. Did you check out the pg 1 story on 'Cars Crossing the Mississippi'? The latest wonder of the world!

  • May 1856

    05/17/2016 5:00:12 AM PDT · 51 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to chajin; henkster; CougarGA7; BroJoeK; central_va; Larry Lucido; wagglebee; Colonel_Flagg; Amagi; ...
    The Chicopee, Mass. Weekly Journal
    May 17, 1856

    Cars Crossing the Mississippi – 1
    Why Jewesses are Beautiful – 1
    To the People of Massachusetts – 2
    National Conventions – 2
    Killing by a Member of Congress – 2
    Chicopee News – 2
    Kansas Affairs – 2

    Link to Chicopee Weekly Journal

  • May 1856

    05/14/2016 10:10:13 AM PDT · 50 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to rdl6989

    Very cool. I made a note to re-up your post here on the 19th and tweet the link for the approximately zero peoples who follow my #160YearsAgo hashtag thingy.

  • May 1856

    05/11/2016 11:28:08 AM PDT · 47 of 86
    Homer_J_Simpson to henkster
    I will hijack the thread one last time

    Hijack it all you want, but I'm not taking it to Havana.