Keyword: aurochs

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  • Following the last Neanderthals: Mammal tracks in Late Pleistocene coastal dunes of Gibraltar

    02/16/2019 12:18:51 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Gibraltar National Museum ^ | February 12, 2019 | admin
    The prestigious international journal Quaternary Science Reviews has just published a paper which has involved the participation of Gibraltarian scientists from the Gibraltar National Museum alongside colleagues from Spain, Portugal and Japan. The results which have been published come from an area of the Catalan Bay Sand Dune. This work started ten years ago, when the first dates using the OSL method were obtained. It is then that the first traces of footprints left by vertebrates were found. In subsequent years the successive natural collapse of sand has revealed further material and has permitted a detailed study including new dates....
  • USA! USA! Neil deGrasse Tyson claims humans ‘invented’ cows, Ben Shapiro’s mockery is MOO-rific

    08/08/2017 6:35:55 AM PDT · by Sir Napsalot · 34 replies
    Twitchy ^ | 8-8-2017 | Sam J.
    eil deGrIf you had told this editor she would spend two days in a row writing about cows at Twitchy, sheÂ’d have laughed and asked you to stop eating paint chips Â… and yet here we are. Day two covering cows, all because PETA decided it was SEXIST to eat cheese. Oh you didnÂ’t see that one? Promise weÂ’re not making that up, see for yourself. And now THIS: Neil deGrasse Tyson âś”@neiltyson A cow is a biological machine invented by humans to turn grass into steak. 6:38 PM - Aug 7, 2017 2,914 Replies 19,215 Retweets 62,451 likes (snip)...
  • Ancient giant cattle genome first

    02/20/2010 5:30:54 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 28 replies · 878+ views
    bbc ^ | 17 February 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago. They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring....... One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands.... The species became extinct when a female animal died in a forest in Poland in 1627. Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar was said to have been impressed...
  • Jurassic Farm: Can we bring prehistoric bovines back from extinction?

    09/10/2014 1:40:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    modernfarmer.com ^ | September 10, 2014 | By Kristan Lawson
    The 21st-century back-to-the-farm movement stems from our yearning to escape the artificiality of modern urban life. Yet the domesticated plants and animals now found in most gardens and farms are themselves artificial, the results of extensive human meddling, cross-breeding and genetic manipulation. Mankind began engineering what we now call “farm animals,” including cattle, all the way back in the Neolithic period, between 10,000 and 5,000 B.C. Try as you might, you won’t find an untamed Jersey cow that originated naturally in the wild, because no such thing exists — just like there’s no such thing as a wild labradoodle. Cattle...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs – a breed twice the size of bulls – predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...
  • Archaeology: The milk revolution

    08/02/2013 11:45:10 AM PDT · by Renfield · 40 replies
    Nature ^ | 7-31-2013 | Andrew Curry
    In the 1970s, archaeologist Peter Bogucki was excavating a Stone Age site in the fertile plains of central Poland when he came across an assortment of odd artefacts. The people who had lived there around 7,000 years ago were among central Europe's first farmers, and they had left behind fragments of pottery dotted with tiny holes. It looked as though the coarse red clay had been baked while pierced with pieces of straw. Looking back through the archaeological literature, Bogucki found other examples of ancient perforated pottery. “They were so unusual — people would almost always include them in publications,”...
  • Scientists in aurochs genome sequence first (wild cattle)

    02/18/2010 3:33:47 AM PST · by decimon · 10 replies · 405+ views
    BBC ^ | Feb 17, 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago.They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring. One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands. The work was carried out at the University College Dublin's Animal Genomics Laboratory and Conway Institute using new technology that allows billions of base pairs of DNA to be...
  • Predecessor of Cows, The Aurochs, Were Still Living In The Netherlands Around AD 600

    12/21/2008 10:02:49 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies · 4,518+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Monday, December 15, 2008 | University of Groningen
    Archaeological researchers at the University of Groningen have discovered that the aurochs, the predecessor of our present-day cow, lived in the Netherlands for longer than originally assumed. Remains of bones recently retrieved from a horn core found in Holwerd (Friesland, Netherlands), show that the aurochs became extinct in around AD 600 and not in the fourth century. The last aurochs died in Poland in 1627... The aurochs was much larger than the common cows we know today, with aurochs bulls measuring between 160 and 180 cm at the withers, and aurochs cows between 140 and 150 cm. The cattle bred...
  • Giant cattle to be bred back from extinction

    01/18/2010 6:38:36 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 54 replies · 2,078+ views
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | Jan. 18, 2010 | Nick Squires
    Aurochs were immortalised in prehistoric cave paintings and admired for their brute strength and "elephantine" size by Julius Caesar. But despite their having gone the way of the dodo and the woolly mammoth, there are plans to bring the giant animals back to life. The huge cattle with sweeping horns which once roamed the forests of Europe have not been seen for nearly 400 years. Now Italian scientists are hoping to use genetic expertise and selective breeding of modern-day wild cattle to recreate the fearsome beasts which weighed around 2,200lb and stood 6.5 feet at the shoulder. Breeds of large...