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Astronomy (Bloggers & Personal)

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  • NASA Confirms The Plausibility of Reactionless Drives??!!

    08/01/2014 4:13:21 PM PDT · by servo1969 · 51 replies
    Ace of Spades HQ ^ | 8-1-2014 | Ace
    Let me geek out on you (I love science) and explain to you the science (I love science) and why this had previously been confined to the pages of science fiction (I am a nerd; and oh Dear Sweet Bunsen-Burner Lighting Lord, do I love science). So it's a pretty firmly established principle that every act causes, and requires, an equal and opposite reaction. If I understand this right (did I mention I love science?), this means that any space vessel will have to carry with it an enormous amount of reaction mass. You can't -- we think, or thought...
  • Ancient Earth Remnant Is Inside Earth, Study Says

    06/28/2014 6:53:52 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 64 replies
    The Guardian Liberty Voice ^ | June 28, 2014 | Gregory Baskin
    A team from Harvard University presented a study this month that remnants from an ancient Earth exists, right now, inside contemporary Earth. The group believes that their comparisons of isotopic ratios of noble gases from materials deep inside Earth with those near the surface provide testimony that the deep-down material is actually from the Earth that existed before its massive collision with another planet. That immense impact – the largest in geologic history – is what many believe led to creation of the Moon. The currently favored theory about how the Moon originated says that it was formed 4.5 billion...
  • Cassini Observes TITAN: Methane Lakes, Natural Plastic, Mysterious Radio Signals, and 'Magic Island'

    06/25/2014 9:14:25 AM PDT · by Reaganite Republican · 21 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | 24 June 2014 | Reaganite Republican
    TITAN: rendering of methane lake, view of host planet saturn at night If you haven't been following, the NASA-ESA Cassini space mission has recently passed-by the largest of Saturn's 150 moons/moonlets: Titan is a natural satellite 1.5x the size of our own moon that makes up a full 90% of the orbiting mass around the gas giant.  And while Saturn is a large, windy gas ball, its planet-like moon Titan actually has a solid surface compromised of mostly rocks and water ice, retains an atmosphere (majority nitrogen, same as Earth- yet 2x the pressure), and features massive lakes of methane/ethane -one the size of Lake...
  • 'Magic Island' Possibly Seen in Seas of Saturn's Huge Moon Titan

    06/23/2014 7:18:31 AM PDT · by lbryce · 23 replies
    Space .com ^ | June 23, 2014 | Charles Q Choi
    A mysteriously bright anomaly winked in and out of existence on the seas of Saturn's largest moon, Titan — potentially the first time waves, bubbles or some other unknown features have been seen there, scientists say. Scientists usually call this spot a "transient feature," but the researchers have playfully dubbed it "Magic Island." Titan, the largest of Saturn's 62 known moons, is 50 percent wider than Earth's moon and 80 percent more massive. "What I think is really special about Titan is that it has liquid methane and ethane lakes and seas, making it the only other world in the...
  • Mars' minerals could be microbe made

    06/19/2014 4:35:53 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 14 replies
    ABC Science ^ | 5/23/2014 | Stuart Gary
    Friday, 23 May 2014 Stuart Gary ABC New Australian research suggests Martian minerals may have formed from biological rather than geological origins. The findings, reported in the journal Geology, indicate the mineral stevensite, which is found on both Earth and Mars, can be created either in hot, highly alkaline volcanic lakes, or by mineralisation in living microbes. Stevensite is a magnesium-silicate mineral, used a Nubian beauty treatment for several centuries.
  • Friday the 13th and a full moon can lead to real fears for some

    06/13/2014 6:10:07 PM PDT · by deport · 14 replies
    Fox News ^ | 6-13-2014
    Friday the 13th and a full moon can lead to real fears for some If you’re a selenophobic— people who fear the moon— or suffer from friggatriskaidekaphobia— fear of Friday the 13th— you may not want to leave the house today. For the first time in nearly a century, there will be a full moon rising on Friday the 13th. And for some, superstitions of these two phenomena are very real. “In the U.S. there are millions and millions of people who just want to stay home and not take any chances on either one of these – Friday the...
  • NASA reveals latest designs for spacecraft that could make interstellar travel a reality

    06/11/2014 7:01:30 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | June 11, 2014 | Jonathan O'Callaghan
    Last month, Dark Knight director Christopher Nolan unveiled his next science-fiction blockbuster. Called Interstellar, it envisages a future where travel to other stars is not only a possibility but a necessity, and tasks actor Matthew McConaughey with leading the main mission. But a Nasa scientist claims such a mission isn’t necessarily just something reserved for science fiction - and has revealed a Star Trek-style ship that could make interstellar travel a reality. Dr Harold White is famous for suggesting that faster than light (FTL) travel is possible. Using something known as an Alcubierre drive, named after a Mexican theoretical physicist...
  • 3D Solar System Simulator

    04/21/2014 1:24:14 PM PDT · by lbryce · 21 replies
    Solar System ^ | April 21, 2014 | Solar System
    3D Solar system Simulator For Fun and Navigational Assistance http://solarsystem.appzend.net/
  • Awesome Image of Saturn's Moon Iapetus and Its Incredible Back-bone Looking Mountain Range

    04/21/2014 9:57:50 AM PDT · by lbryce · 56 replies
    Phys.org ^ | April 21, 2014 | NASA
    Orginal Title:Study of Equatorial Ridge on Iapetus Suggests Exogenic OriginYou Really Don't Prefer The Original Title, Do You? A combined team of researchers from Brown University in Rhode Island and the Lunar and Planetary Institute in Texas is suggesting in a paper they've uploaded to the preprint server arXiv, that an equatorial mountainous ridge on one of Saturn's moons has an exogenic origin. They are basing their theory on 3D models of the moon they've created and an analysis of the types of peaks present. Iapetus, the 3rd largest of Saturn's approximately 60 moons, is distinct for two reasons. One...
  • The Blood Moon Has Been Canceled

    04/08/2014 5:08:33 PM PDT · by Errant · 118 replies
    Messianic TV via Youtube ^ | 8 April 2014 | Michael Rood
    The "blood moons", or so they are called, are a set of eclipses taking place over the next year. There have been several books written about them; even a DVD or two produced about them. But, are they what we think they are? If not, is this a gigantic, prophetic, misunderstanding of astronomical proportions?
  • Should NASA Send Astronauts On Voluntary One-Way Missions?

    04/06/2014 3:18:26 PM PDT · by Usagi_yo · 54 replies
    slashdot ^ | 4/6/2014 | slashdot
    Title is the subject, link is to the results. Go to slashdot.org if you want to take the poll, it changes every day, but the results should hang around alot longer than the poll.
  • PASSOVER / Tax Day : Total Lunar Eclipse = Blood Moon

    03/30/2014 11:21:05 PM PDT · by LeoWindhorse · 20 replies
    Sword and Shield of Hawaii ^ | March 30 , 2014 | Sword and Shield of Hawaii
    something really strange is about to happen …………
  • What Would Happen If A Giant Tsunami Hit Florida?

    03/29/2014 5:56:55 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 93 replies
    Freedom Outpost ^ | March 29, 2014 | Michael Snyder
    Can you imagine the devastation that would be caused if a massive wall of water several hundred feet high slammed into Florida at more than 100 miles an hour? To many people such a scenario is impossible, but that is what people living along the Indian Ocean thought before the 2004 tsunami and that is what people living in Japan thought before the 2011 tsunami. Throughout history, giant tsunamis have been relatively rare events, but they do happen. Scientists tell us that a mega-tsunami can race across the open ocean at up to 500 miles an hour, and when they...
  • 'Cosmos' 2nd episode: Neil deGrasse Tyson condescends toward doubters of evolution

    03/17/2014 11:17:25 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 189 replies
    March 17, 2014
    Last night, I watched the second episode of "Cosmos: A Spacetime Odyssey" (the reboot of the 1980 series). It was entitled, "Some of the Things That Molecules Do." One of the things Tyson dealt with in this episode was evolution. Now, I myself do subscribe to the theory of evolution, but I found Tyson's treatment to be offensive, condescending, and smarmy. I thought it was an in-your-face chip-on-the-shoulder response against skeptics of evolution. I thought this was supposed to be a science show, not a political show. But this is just my opinion. What is your opinion? If you missed...
  • Why We Need to go to Europa

    03/09/2014 5:28:18 PM PDT · by lbryce · 46 replies
    FRom Quarks To Quasars ^ | March 7, 2014 | Staff
    NASA really wants to go to Europa, and anyone who knows anything about exobiology really wants NASA to go to Europa. Why? Water. On Earth, water is what fuels life. Of course, there are a lot of other things that fuel life on our planet, but water is an integral part of life as we know it. Indeed, so far all of our research has indicated that–where there is water, there is life (Earth isn’t called “the Pale Blue Dot” for nothing). And while it is possible that alien life could exists on other worlds and thrive off of...
  • First Colorado County Reports Pot Taxes

    02/26/2014 3:02:49 PM PST · by Usagi_yo · 9 replies
    CBS - Denver ^ | 2/26/2014 | News Desk
    DENVER (AP) – A southern Colorado county with two recreational marijuana stores has become the first in the state to announce tax totals from the new industry. Pueblo County finance authorities announced Monday that its two shops had about $1 million in total sales in January, producing about $56,000 in local sales taxes. ... snip ...
  • Great Mars Exploration Tools Featuring HIRISE High Resolution Imaging Experiment

    I apologize for the uncharacteristic way I've presented this. It's just that I've gotten involved in some project that's going to be taking amounts of my time for the foreseeable future. And having seen these sites, I've been trying to post it here in some organized, efficient way but just haven't been able to get to it as I usually do, being as involved as I am in this new endeavor, actually just couldn't get around to posting them but was feeling really guilty about not doing the right thing and my very favorite place in the whole world. Hope...
  • Who Wants A One-Way Trip To Mars? Meet Three People Applying For Mars One

    02/12/2014 1:44:14 PM PST · by lbryce · 21 replies
    Univese Today ^ | February 12, 2014 | Elizabeth Howell
    Three Mars One applicants that made it to the second round. From left, Max Fagin, Brian Hinson and Andrew Rader. If you were to find yourself on the Red Planet, what would you do when you get there? Those who made the second round of the Mars One mission (which aims to establish a colony on Mars in the next decade) are a step closer to answering that question. In interviews with Universe Today, applicants Andrew Rader, Max Fagin and Brian Hinson explained what they’ll do if they embark on a planned one-way trip to the Red Planet. It’s impossible...
  • NASA's Cassini Spacecraft Obtains Best Views of Saturn Hexagon (Videos)(Awesome Is Inadequate)

    02/06/2014 3:56:45 PM PST · by lbryce · 28 replies
    JPL NASA ^ | December 4, 2013 | Staff
    This colorful view from NASA's Cassini mission is the highest-resolution view of the unique six-sided jet stream at Saturn's north pole known as "the hexagon." This movie, made from images obtained by Cassini's imaging cameras, is the first to show the hexagon in color filters, and the first movie to show a complete view from the north pole down to about 70 degrees north latitude. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/SSI/Hampton University This colorful view from NASA's Cassini mission is the highest-resolution view of the unique six-sided jet stream at Saturn's north pole known as "the hexagon." This movie, made from images...
  • Saturn:The Bringer of Old Age

    01/21/2014 3:39:38 PM PST · by lbryce · 6 replies
    YouTube:Saturn:The Planets Op.32 Saturn YouTube:Saturn:The Planets Op.32 Saturn:Bringer of Old Age
  • The Mighty and Magnificient Planet Jupiter, the Bringer of Jollity

    01/21/2014 3:15:05 PM PST · by lbryce · 4 replies
    https://plus.google.com/ | January 19, 2014 | Marbeax Cosa
    YouTube:Gustav Holst - The Planets - Jupiter, and the Orchestral Bringer of Jollity In this composite images from the New Horizon mission, Jupiter was captured in three bands of infrared light making the Great Red Spot look white. Complex hurricane-like ovals, swirls, and planet-ringing bands are visible in Jupiter's complex atmosphere. A volcanic plume is erupting from Io's volcano Tvashtar. Frost and sulfuric lava cover the volcanic moon, while red-glowing lava is visible beneath the blue sunlight-scattering plume. The robotic New Horizons spacecraft is on track to arrive at Pluto in 2015.It is to the sheer size of Jupiter...
  • The Bill Arrives for Cosmology's Free Lunch (NASA Should Be Islam's PR Firm)

    01/20/2014 7:16:54 PM PST · by lbryce · 3 replies
    Evolutionary News and Views ^ | January 20, 2014 | Denyse O'Leary
    ID theorists say that information is the foundation of the universe. Others say matter is. Our choice of who to believe will shape our future. First, suppose the materialists are right. If materialism (naturalism) is simply true, because everything comes down to matter in the end, what future might we expect? Stephen Hawking insists in a recent interview that "Science will win." If we take his current non-realist views seriously, science as we have known it is finished and there is nothing to win. That doesn't mean, of course, that everything shuts down. Some projects will continue as if immortal...
  • 8 Best Universe Atlas/Planetary Exploration Tools

    01/18/2014 5:36:37 PM PST · by lbryce · 25 replies
    Thanks and gratitude for creating this list of Universe Atlases, Planetary Exploration tools goes to fellow FReeper, lefty-lie-spy, for being the inspiration for me to create this list. Listed below are some of the best sites for viewing the Universe, exploring the Moon, Mars #1 Click Here:WikiSky.org:Best Views of The Universe Make Sure To Explore All The Various Tabs #2 Asterank:Asteroid Database Asterank:Asteroid Database Plus Lots More Asternak does a lot more than offer scientific an economic database of asteroids. Make sure to click through all the available links for all sorts of space-related information About Asterank Asterank is a...
  • Powers of Ten - The Effect of Adding Another Zero

    01/16/2014 5:17:40 PM PST · by rickmichaels · 13 replies
    Charles Eames, Ray Eames
    These are two fascinating films about the scale of the universe. I remember seeing the 1968 version at the Science Centre here in Toronto when I was a child. Another version was made in 1977. Powers of Ten - A Rough Sketch (1968)Powers of Ten (1977)
  • RIP John Dobson

    01/16/2014 10:00:10 AM PST · by DBrow · 14 replies
    Sky and Telescope ^ | 1/16/2014 | Kelley Beaty
    John Dobson, 1915–2014 The long-lived master of sidewalk astronomy died peacefully on January 15th. Emerging from obscurity in 1968, he introduced simple ideas that revolutionized how amateurs make and use large reflecting telescopes.
  • Very Cool Atlas of the Universe

    01/13/2014 7:22:28 PM PST · by lbryce · 26 replies
    Atlas of the Universe ^ | January 13, 2014 | Staff
    This web page is designed to give everyone an idea of what our universe actually looks like. There are nine main maps on this web page, each one approximately ten times the scale of the previous one. The first map shows the nearest stars and then the other maps slowly expand out until we have reached the scale of the entire visible universe. This atlas does a very good job of providing the proper persepctive in demonstrating the vast distances that encompass our known universe. Of course, like most people, you will find yourself being able to maintain focus, losing...
  • Billyuns and Billyuns of Galaxy Images and More Portend The End of The Boring Space Picture

    01/10/2014 8:14:31 PM PST · by lbryce · 18 replies
    National Optical Astronomy Obsevatory ^ | January 10, 2014 | Staff
    Breathtaking space pictures don't necessarily start snd end at APOD. There are countless astronomy sources that offer imagery of the Cosmos catalogued in different ways, like the National Optical Astronomy Obsevatory, NOAO. NOAO is the US national research & development center for ground-based night time astronomy. In particular, NOAO is enabling the development of the US optical-infrared (O/IR) System, an alliance of public and private observatories allied for excellence in scientific research, education and public outreach. Our core mission is to provide public access to qualified professional researchers via peer-review to forefront scientific capabilities on telescopes operated by NOAO as...
  • Sun Goes Wild: NOAA Issues Alert: Earth Directed X-Class Flare Is On Its Way; Chance Of More

    01/08/2014 3:56:40 PM PST · by Kartographer · 52 replies
    SHTF Plan ^ | 1/8/14 | Mac Slavo
    Then at 12:32 Central Time it went wild: Massive sunspot AR1944 has erupted. The X1 flare has sent a coronal mass ejection into space, and it’s heading towards Earth. … NOAA has upped the risk from further X-class flares to 50% for the next 24 hours. Risk of M-class up to 80%
  • Hubblecast 70 Explains How Gravitational Lensing Will Help Uncover the Secrets of the Universe

    12/27/2013 3:36:07 PM PST · by lbryce · 13 replies
    SCiTech Daily ^ | December 27, 2013 | Staff
    Original Title:Hubblecast 70 Explains How Gravitational Lensing Will Help Uncover the Secrets of the Universe This eight minute Hubblecast video takes a look at gravitational lensing, explaining how it works and how it can help astronomers uncover the secrets of the Universe.
  • To Respond to Chang'e 3 NASA Should Show RESOLVE

    12/04/2013 5:03:26 PM PST · by Marcus · 5 replies
    Yahoo Voices ^ | December 3, 2013 | Mark R. Whittington
    As the Chinese lunar lander Chang'e 3, carrying the Jade Rabbit rover, voyages to the moon, the question arises what should NASA's response be, aside from congratulations to a rival space power. RESOLVE might just fit the bill. RESOLVE or Regolith and Environment Science and Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction is designed to prospect for lunar resources mounted on a rover. "RESOLVE includes a drill, a chemical plant (with an oxygen and volatiles extraction node, gas chromatograph, and mass spectrometer), a neutron spectrometer, and a near infrared spectrometer." It has been tested on Earth as part of a joint American/Canadian...
  • Gravity assist (spacecraft slingshot maneuver... how it works)

    09/28/2013 1:49:13 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 18 replies
    The Planetary Society ^ | 9/27/13 | David Shortt
    With the recent announcement by NASA that the 36 year-old spacecraft Voyager 1 has officially entered interstellar space at a distance from the Sun about four times further than Neptune's orbit, and with Voyager 2 not far behind, it seems worthwhile to explore how humans managed to fling objects so far into space. Interplanetary spacecraft often use a maneuver called a gravity assist in order to reach their targets. Voyager 2 famously used gravity assists to visit Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune in the late 1970s and 1980s. Cassini used two assists at Venus and one each at Earth and...
  • Black Holes Feed On Quantum Foam, Says Cosmologist

    09/12/2013 6:29:02 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 43 replies
    Nobody knows how the universe’s biggest black holes grow so large. Now one astrophysicist says it’s because they feed on the quantum foam that makes up the fabric of spacetime One of the more fascinating astrophysical discoveries in recent years is that almost all galaxies hide supermassive black holes at their cores. Indeed, astronomers believe that galaxies and black holes have a kind of symbiotic relationship so that one cannot form or grow without the other. The evidence comes from observations of galaxies both near and far—almost all contain huge black holes. But that raises an interesting question. We see...
  • America's biggest rocket blasts spy satellite into space

    09/05/2013 12:48:36 AM PDT · by TexGrill · 11 replies
    Daily Telegraph ^ | 08/29/2013 | Daily Telegraph
    A massive rocket carrying a spy satellite for the US government launched from the California coast on Wednesday. The Delta IV Heavy rocket left the launch pad at Vandenberg Air Force Base and sped towards low-Earth orbit, officials said. The rocket carried a satellite for the National Reconnaissance Office, which oversees the USA's constellation of intelligence-gathering satellites. At 23 stories, the Delta IV Heavy is the largest rocket in the country. The last time it launched from Vandenberg - in 2011, the roar of the engines shook the nearby city of Lompoc. Some people reported hearing the engine roar from...
  • Amazon’s Jeff Bezos Confirms Salvaged Engine is from Apollo 11

    07/19/2013 4:13:18 PM PDT · by servo1969 · 22 replies
    Legal Insurrection ^ | 7-19-2013 | Mandy Nagy
    Bear with me, LI readers – I’m a little bit of a geek, so I find stories like these exciting. It might not be of interest to everyone, but I do think there’s one point about it that will resonate with all of you. Amazon founder Jeff Bezos started Bezos Expeditions (as well as the space exploration venture Blue Origin) out of his “passions for science, engineering, and exploration.” Bezos, like so many others, watched Apollo 11′s launch from his television as a child in 1969. Days prior, the mission began when five F-1 rocket engines fired together in a...
  • Sequestered Gore satellite apparently not affected by ‘sequester’

    04/12/2013 11:59:31 PM PDT · by Rocky · 8 replies
    Watts Up With That ^ | April 11, 2013 | Anthony Watts
    There’s no money to run White House tours, but apparently there’s money to pull one of Al’s pet projects out of mothballs. Satellite shelved after 2000 election to now fly By SETH BORENSTEIN WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama is proposing dusting off and finally launching an old environmental satellite championed by Al Gore but shelved a dozen years by his 2000 rival George W. Bush. Obama proposed Wednesday spending nearly $35 million in his 2014 budget to refurbish a satellite, nicknamed GoreSat by critics, that’s been sitting in storage after it was shelved in 2001, months after Bush took...
  • Company making plans for asteroid mining

    01/22/2013 9:19:46 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    CBS News ^ | January 22, 2013 | William Harwood
    Hoping to take the commercialization of space to a higher level, a second company has jumped into what the founders hope will be a lucrative emerging market, prospecting for raw materials among near-Earth asteroids using fleets of low-cost robotic spacecraft, senior executives said Tuesday. The long-range goal is to develop an in situ manufacturing capability, harvesting raw materials and building components in space using high-tech mini foundries built around sophisticated 3D printers. "This is about the future. This is about making something happen," company chairman Rick Tumlinson told reporters during a news conference in Santa Monica, Calif. "Deep Space Industries...
  • Quantum theory is wrong.

    03/07/2013 5:44:05 AM PST · by ABrit · 62 replies
    A word in your ear ^ | March 7th 2013 | Mark
    Particles do not retain "information", don't have "knowledge". It is not that the act of observation that alters reality. In fact the physical nature of the "observation" small though it may be is sufficient to alter the metrics of sub atomic particles.
  • Is Phobos a Mined Asteroid? A Sitchinite’s Take on the Hollow Object

    03/13/2013 7:44:50 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 37 replies
    whofortedblog.com ^ | March 11, 2013 11:56 am | Lee Covino
    On March 25, 2010, the European Space Agency (ESA) announced on their blog that ESA’s study of the mass of Phobos had been accepted for publication in the scientific journal Geophysical Research Letters. The announcement excerpted startling conclusions of ESA’s findings: “We conclude that the interior of Phobos likely contains large voids. When applied to various hypotheses bearing on the origin of Phobos, these results are inconsistent with the proposition that Phobos is a captured asteroid.” (1,2) Since that time, a number of prominent ancient astronaut blogs have had plenty to say about the findings. The ESA findings were most...
  • Russian 'meteor' was actually a tiny asteroid, NASA says (45 feet across, 10,000 tons & 40,000 mph)

    02/15/2013 11:28:48 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 150 replies
    The Los Angeles Times ^ | February 16, 2013 | Monte Morin
    At a news conference Friday, NASA scientists said the object that exploded over Russia was a “tiny asteroid” that measured roughly 45 feet across, weighed about 10,000 tons and traveled about 40,000 mph. The object vaporized roughly 15 miles above the surface of the Earth, causing a shock wave that triggered the global network of listening devices that was established to detect nuclear test explosions. The force of the explosion measured between 300 and 500 kilotons, equivalent to a modern nuclear bomb, according to Bill Cooke, head of the Meteoroid Environment Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,...
  • 500+ Injured, Major Havoc Wreaked as Russians Reportedly Intercept Meteorite with Missiles

    02/15/2013 2:51:13 AM PST · by Reaganite Republican · 59 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | 15 February 2013 | Reaganite Republican
    ATTN MODERATOR: This article is NOT copied, but authored 100% by myself (and x-posted at Reaganite Republican) with the exception of one small quote from Russia Today near the bottom (duly noted and linked) All orginal Russian info/data sources noted and linked at the bottom, as always... _________________________________________________________ Some pretty serious damage was delivered upon six Russian towns -and hundreds injured- when a hefty meteorite streaked across the sky, approached the Earth's surface in Chelyabisk Oblast (region) of the southern Ural Mountains near the border with Kazakhstan, then exploded early this morning, cca 9:30-10AM local time. Fragments fell and windows shattered as many...
  • Powers of Ten

    12/22/2012 7:36:08 AM PST · by Former Fetus · 3 replies
    YouTube ^ | Charles and Ray Eames
    Video at this LINK
  • Several Nights Only- All Seven Planets Visible in One Night

    12/20/2012 8:30:00 AM PST · by virgil283 · 52 replies
    "For those of you with even a small refractor telescope, the next few nights present a once in a blue moon opportunity to spot all seven planets in the same evening. Five of them are visible without even binoculars, while the other two will require you to reference the charts below. While Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn will "move" faster in the sky, Uranus and Neptune will stay relatively fixed in their positions in Pisces and Aquarius for some time. The closest five planets all yield some features through a small amateur telescope, the largest, Saturn and Jupiter, even...
  • MAYAN PROPHECY REVEALED!

    12/17/2012 2:16:50 PM PST · by Weedle · 12 replies
    You Tube ^ | 12-17-2012 | John Douglas
    Mystery of the Mayan Calendar finally revealed
  • Dug this out of the Deep- for current or recovering Trekkies (Vanity)

    11/30/2012 8:15:06 PM PST · by One Name · 13 replies
    N/A ^ | 1971? | One Name
  • Warp drive looks more promising than ever in recent NASA studies

    11/24/2012 1:33:34 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 113 replies
    GizMag ^ | October 3, 2012 | Dr. Brian Dodson
    The first steps towards interstellar travel have been taken, but the stars are very far away. Voyager 1 is about 17 light-hours distant from Earth and is traveling with a velocity of 0.006 percent of light speed, meaning it will take about 17,000 years to travel one light-year. Fortunately, the elusive "warp drive" now appears to be evolving past difficulties with new theoretical advances and a NASA test rig under development to measure artificially generated warping of space-time. The warp drive broke away from being a wholly fictional concept in 1994, when physicist Miguel Alcubierre suggested that faster-than-light (FTL) travel...
  • Endeavour Shuttle's Flight Deck Photos.

    10/02/2012 11:33:51 AM PDT · by carriage_hill · 16 replies
    Launch Photography.com ^ | September 2012 | Ben Cooper, Photographer
    Main site link: http://www.launchphotography.com/
  • Welcome to our new lizard overlords: Alien worlds could be full of super-intelligent dinosaurs

    09/30/2012 9:34:07 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 56 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | April 12, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    NASA's Kepler telescope scans the skies for 'habitable worlds' - but an American chemist has suggested the whole project might be a terrible idea. Ronald Breslow suggests that life-forms based on slightly different amino acids and sugars could take the form of huge, ferocious dinosaurs that have evolved to have human-like intelligence and technologies. 'We would be better off not meeting them,' says Breslow, who claims that it was a stroke of luck that an asteroid wiped out dinosaurs on earth, leaving the field clear for mammals such as humans. On other worlds, dinosaurs could have evolved into huge, intelligent...
  • First full HD video of Curiosity descent.

    08/23/2012 1:36:34 PM PDT · by servo1969 · 16 replies
    Wimp.com ^ | 8-23-2012 | JPL/NASA
    http://www.wimp.com/curiositydescent/
  • Ursa Major Star Explodes

    08/14/2012 5:18:41 AM PDT · by SatinDoll · 43 replies
    Aug. 14, 2012 | Satin Doll
    Early this morning, about 5:05 AM, my nephew saw a star explode in the constellation Ursa Major. We're not star hounds and do not know the name of the star that blew, but he did see it and he was sober. This is his first ever critical astronomy observation. It is amazing what one can see smoking a ciggie on the back deck.
  • Mars: A New Hope

    NASA’s most ambitious Mars probe is set to land late today (or early tomorrow, depending where you live). NASA is one of the few government programs that actually invests in a major — and important — industry that supports high-tech jobs and science and technology advancement. However, the geniuses in Washington has been throwing NASA under the bus as of late. They’d rather bailout unsuccessful ventures. But I digress. At least NASA is finally relying more on the commercialization of space.