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Keyword: animalhusbandry

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  • Extraordinary Pompeii discovery: Racehorse remains found among ancient city's ruins

    05/14/2018 2:29:58 PM PDT · by Kaslin · 31 replies
    Fox News.com ^ | May 14, 2018 | James Rogers
    Archaeologists have unearthed the final resting place of an ancient racehorse among the ruins of the ancient city of Pompeii in Italy. The horse was discovered in Pompeii’s northern outskirts, beyond the walls of the Roman city. The stable where the horse belonged to a villa in Pompeii’s suburb of Civita Giuliana. Experts discovered the horse’s remains when they were investigating tunnels used by tomb raiders, according to a Facebook post.
  • Ancient Remains of Horse Discovered at Pompeii

    05/15/2018 9:34:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    The Local ^ | May 11, 2018 | Jessica Phelan
    For the first time ever, archaeologists have been able to cast the complete figure of a horse that perished in the volcanic eruption at Pompeii. The "extraordinary" discovery was made outside the city walls, in Civita Giuliana to the north of Pompeii proper, the site's directors announced this week. Excavation in the area revealed what archaeologists identified as a stable, complete with the remains of a trough. Using the same technique that has allowed them to recreate the final poses of dozens of Pompeii's victims, whereby liquid plaster is injected into the cavities left behind when bodies encased in volcanic...
  • Sweet Potatoes Might Have Arrived In Polynesia Long Before Humans

    05/12/2018 1:58:52 PM PDT · by blam · 29 replies
    Science News ^ | 5-12-2018 | Dan Garisto
    Sweet potatoes were domesticated thousands of years ago in the Americas. So 18th century European explorers were surprised to find Polynesians had been growing the crop for centuries. New genetic evidence instead suggests that wild precursors to sweet potatoes reached Polynesia at least 100,000 years ago — long before humans inhabited the South Pacific islands, researchers report April 12 in Current Biology. If true, it could also challenge the idea that Polynesian seafarers reached the Americas around the 12th century. For the new study, the researchers analyzed the DNA of 199 specimens taken from sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) and...
  • Dogs lived and died with humans 10,000 years ago in the Americas

    04/17/2018 5:40:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 37 replies
    Science News ^ | April 16, 2018 | Bruce Bower
    A trio of dogs buried at two ancient human sites in Illinois lived around 10,000 years ago, making them the oldest known domesticated canines in the Americas. Radiocarbon dating of the dogs’ bones shows they were 1,500 years older than thought, zooarchaeologist Angela Perri said April 13 at the annual meeting of the Society for American Archaeology. The previous age estimate was based on a radiocarbon analysis of burned wood found in one of the animals’ graves. Until now, nearly 9,300-year-old remains of dogs eaten by humans at a Texas site were the oldest physical evidence of American canines.
  • Why archaeologists are arguing about sweet potatoes

    04/13/2018 9:30:13 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 78 replies
    www.popsci.com ^ | 04/13/2018 | Staff
    A Japanese variety of sweet potato Pixabay _______________________________________________________________________________________________________________ At some point, sweet potatoes crossed the Pacific. This much we know. As for the rest—How? When? Why?—we’re just not sure. Or, to be more clear, some people are sure they’re sure, and others disagree. Sweet potatoes have been at the center of a massive archaeological debate for many decades now, and a new paper in Current Biology has only stoked the flames. It uses genetic data from sweet potatoes and their relatives to establish a phylogenetic tree of their evolution, thereby demonstrating that the tubers existed in Polynesia before humans lived...
  • Winterfyre Norwegian Forest Cats

    01/06/2005 8:32:07 AM PST · by theFIRMbss · 107 replies · 1,500+ views
    Winterfyre website ^ | 2005 | Winterfyre
    Philosophy When our breeding endeavor began, we were fortunate to have the opportunity to gain exposure and knowledge through contacts in both the United States and in Europe. Differing opinions are a staple in any community, and the Norwegian Forest cat lovers/breeders are certainly no exception to this rule. We have learned from observing breeding programs and participating in shows both in the United States and in Europe and have developed our own ideas about the Norwegian Forest cat, but our end goal is ultimately the same as breeders around the globe. Our philosophy is quite simple, taking into consideration...
  • Maine Coon Cat (Straight Dope Mailbag)

    08/05/2004 11:19:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 524+ views
    Straight Dope Science Advisory Board ^ | 29-Jun-1999 | SDSTAFF Jill
    One of the oldest breeds of cats in North America is the Maine Coon Cat, and some say 40% of the originals had extra toes. One article said it evolved as a "snowshoe foot" to help these cats walk in the snow. Cute story, but probably [expletive deleted] ...The breed closest to the Maine Coon Cat is the Norwegian Forest Cat which evolved in the same climate and lends credence to one theory that ancestors of the Coon Cat may have even come to the New World onboard Viking ships. I like that theory best.
  • A Medieval Coin in New England Soil

    09/12/2010 3:35:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    Beachcombing 'blog ^ | September 11, 2010 | eponymous blogger
    It was only when the coin was later identified as Viking that the game heated up. By then poor Mellegren -- who, Beachcombing must say was someone with a reputation for integrity -- had passed away. Beachcombing has no illusions about much of the nonsense written about pre-Columbian visits to North America. But in this case he would give a thumb and a half followed by two cheers and three quarters. There is a good chance that this really is what it seems: A European coin that found its way to North America in the twelfth century. Minted in Norway,...
  • VIKING KITTIES

    09/22/2016 1:31:05 PM PDT · by Einherjar · 32 replies
    FACEBOOK ^ | SEPT 21 | SAMME
    You’ve heard of ancient Egyptian cats. But Viking cats? Scientists studying cat DNA say that they found cat remains at a Viking site dating to between the eighth and eleventh century A.D. in northern Germany.
  • Haifa U. Reveals Role of Pigeons in Turning the Negev Green 1,500 Years Ago

    03/24/2018 8:16:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | March 21, 2018 | JNi.Media
    The study, which focused on the ancient settlements of Shivta and Sa'adon, found archaeological evidence that the Byzantines in the Negev did not raise their pigeons for food, but to fertilize the dry loess soil and making it more suitable for intensive agriculture. Loess is made up of fragment of geological detritus, formed by the accumulation of wind-blown dust. But despite its lowly origins, loess tends to develop into very rich soils. Under appropriate climatic conditions, it forms some of the most agriculturally productive terrain in the world. "The pigeon droppings are rich in phosphorus, potassium and nitrogen, which are...
  • Entomologist Confirms First Saharan Farming 10,000 Years Ago

    03/22/2018 4:05:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | St Patrick's Day, Saturday, March 17, 2018 | editors
    The team has been investigating findings from an ancient rock shelter at a site named Takarkori in south-western Libya. It is desert now, but earlier in the Holocene age [our present age], some 10,000 years ago, it was part of the "green Sahara" and wild cereals grew there. More than 200,000 seeds - in small circular concentrations - were discovered at Takarkori, which showed that hunter-gatherers developed an early form of agriculture by harvesting and storing crops. But an alternative possibility was that ants, which are capable of moving seeds, had been responsible for the concentrations...The site has yielded other...
  • Tree rings tell tale of drought in Mongolia over the last 2,000 years

    03/19/2018 9:41:20 PM PDT · by George - the Other · 15 replies
    Science News ^ | March 19, 2018 | DAN GARISTO
    "It was suspected that a harsh drought from about 2000 to 2010 that killed tens of thousands of livestock was unprecedented in the region’s history and primarily the result of human-caused climate change. But the tree ring data show that the dry spell, while rare in its severity, was not outside the realm of natural climate variability, researchers report online March 14 in Science Advances."
  • The 900 Billion dollar fungus

    03/14/2018 7:58:50 PM PDT · by Fungi · 47 replies
    Blog.oup ^ | February, 2018 | Nicholas Money
    I never post, but this is noteworthy. Brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is responsible for five percent of our gross domestic product. From bread to beer and beyond, this fungus has an incredible impact on our lives. Fungi are important!
  • Wild horses are EXTINCT: Domesticated breeds are now the only ones to survive on the planet, [tr]

    02/23/2018 5:44:36 AM PST · by C19fan · 39 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | February 23, 2018 | Joe Pinkstone
    The last 'wild' horses is the world are not truly wild, according to a shock DNA study. Przewalski's horses, a breed thought to be the last 'wild' species, are the descendants of escaped once-domesticated animals. The research turns the mysterious origin of domesticated horses 'upside down', experts claim.
  • Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'

    01/18/2018 2:45:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday, January 18, 2018 | Maev Kennedy
    More than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago... Archaeologists from three different countries involved in an ongoing excavation have found evidence of a complex of drainage tunnels -- constructed 1,000 years before the famous indoor plumbing of the Minoan palace of Knossos on Crete -- and traces...
  • Brewing Stone Age beer

    08/05/2012 7:33:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 51 replies
    sciencenordic.com ^ | 7-20-2012 | Asle Rønning
    Beer enthusiasts are using a barn in Norway’s Akershus County to brew a special ale which has scientific pretensions and roots back to the dawn of human culture. The beer is made from einkorn wheat, a single-grain species that has followed humankind since we first started tilling the soil, but which has been neglected for the last 2,500 years. “This is fun − really thrilling. It’s hard to say whether this has ever been tried before in Norway,” says Jørn Kragtorp. He started brewing as a hobby four years ago. He represents the fourth generation on the family farm of...
  • Scientists have isolated the very first rust pathogen gene that wheat plants detect...

    12/21/2017 3:31:44 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 10 replies
    Mr Jiapeng Chen, a PhD candidate from the University of Sydney who initiated the work by sequencing and analysing the genome of a virulent rust isolate, said this was the first important step in addressing the diagnostic challenges posed by ever-changing fungi, which result in new rust pathogen strains. Professor Park explained: "It's like an ongoing arms race - we've got to keep one step ahead of this changing pathogen. "The last major epidemic of wheat stem rust in Australia alone, in 1973, caused $AU300 million in damage - imagine what that would be today." Co-corresponding author, Dr Peter Dodds...
  • Ancient barley took high road to China

    11/26/2017 3:45:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Wednesday, November 22, 2017 | Washington University in St. Louis
    First domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent of the Middle East, wheat and barley took vastly different routes to China, with barley switching from a winter to both a winter and summer crop during a thousand-year detour along the southern Tibetan Plateau, suggests new research... "Wheat was introduced to central China in the second or third millennium B.C., but barley did not arrive there until the first millennium B.C.," Liu said. "While previous research suggests wheat cultivation moved east along the northern edge of the Tibetan Plateau, our study calls attention to the possibility of a southern route...
  • Was Johnny Appleseed for real?

    11/26/2017 8:46:53 AM PST · by Kaslin · 29 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 26, 2017
    AN APPLE A DAY may or may not keep the doctor away, but it's a sentiment shared by just about everyone our Mo Rocca has been visiting: At the Johnny Appleseed Festival in Fort Wayne, Ind., there's no such thing as a bad apple. There you can indulge in apple dumplings -- a skinless apple wrapped in dough, and deep-fried. Rocca asked, "How healthy is this? "Very healthy -- it's an apple!" he was told Or partake of apple petals ("Better than apple dumplings!" enthused cutthroat vendor Logan Forbing), and sample some apple sausages. Fort Wayne is where John Chapman...
  • Shuwaymis (oldest leashed dog carvings) (Seems to be origin of large number of new articles)

    11/19/2017 6:19:12 AM PST · by mairdie · 26 replies
    Shuwaymis is an area about 370 km southwest of the city of Ha’il, near the town of al-Ha’it, in southern Ha’il province. The petroglyphs were known by local Bedouin for centuries, but only drawn to the attention of authorities by a local school headmaster, Mamdouh al Rasheedi, in 2001. Professor Saad Abdul Aziz al-Rashid, calls Shuwaymis “a unique and very important find.” The setting differs significantly from Jubbah in being surrounded by striking lava flows that impede travel, especially by camels and horses. Wadis are therefore important avenues for herders, and it is in these valleys that Neolithic and later...