Keyword: animalhusbandry

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  • Water's role in the rise and fall of the Roman Empire

    12/13/2014 6:19:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Science Daily ^ | December 11, 2014 | European Geosciences Union
    Smart agricultural practices and an extensive grain-trade network enabled the Romans to thrive in the water-limited environment of the Mediterranean, a new study shows. But the stable food supply brought about by these measures promoted population growth and urbanisation, pushing the Empire closer to the limits of its food resources... Brian Dermody, an environmental scientist from Utrecht University, teamed up with hydrologists from the Netherlands and classicists at Stanford University in the US. The researchers wanted to know how the way Romans managed water for agriculture and traded crops contributed to the longevity of their civilisation. They were also curious...
  • Ancient Europeans remained intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agriculture

    11/02/2014 8:20:13 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    University College Dublin ^ | 22 October 2014 | UCD University Relations
    By analysing DNA extracted from the petrous bones of skulls of ancient Europeans, scientists have identified that these peoples remained intolerant to lactose (natural sugar in the milk of mammals) for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultural practices and 4,000 years after the onset of cheese-making among Central European Neolithic farmers. The findings published in the scientific journal Nature Communications (21 Oct) also suggest that major technological transitions in Central Europe between the Neolithic, Bronze Age and Iron Age were also associated with major changes in the genetics of these populations. For the study, the international team of scientists examined...
  • Obamas Have Date Night for 22nd Anniversary

    10/04/2014 8:12:50 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 46 replies
    ABC News ^ | October 4, 2014
    President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama observed their 22nd wedding anniversary a day late with a celebratory dinner Saturday night in the city's Georgetown neighborhood. For their anniversary dinner they picked Bourbon Steak at the Four Seasons Hotel, about a six-minute drive from the White House. Before their date, the president spent four hours playing golf at Andrews Air Force Base.
  • Jurassic Farm: Can we bring prehistoric bovines back from extinction?

    09/10/2014 1:40:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    modernfarmer.com ^ | September 10, 2014 | By Kristan Lawson
    The 21st-century back-to-the-farm movement stems from our yearning to escape the artificiality of modern urban life. Yet the domesticated plants and animals now found in most gardens and farms are themselves artificial, the results of extensive human meddling, cross-breeding and genetic manipulation. Mankind began engineering what we now call “farm animals,” including cattle, all the way back in the Neolithic period, between 10,000 and 5,000 B.C. Try as you might, you won’t find an untamed Jersey cow that originated naturally in the wild, because no such thing exists — just like there’s no such thing as a wild labradoodle. Cattle...
  • New research reveals how wild rabbits were genetically transformed into tame rabbits

    08/30/2014 2:32:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | August 28, 2014 | Uppsala University
    The genetic changes that transformed wild animals into domesticated forms have long been a mystery. An international team of scientists has now made a breakthrough by showing that many genes controlling the development of the brain and the nervous system were particularly important for rabbit domestication... The domestication of animals and plants, a prerequisite for the development of agriculture, is one of the most important technological revolutions during human history. Domestication of animals started as early as 9,000 to 15,000 years ago and initially involved dogs, cattle, sheep, goats and pigs. The rabbit was domesticated much later, about 1,400 years...
  • Bill Clinton has father-son bonding time with pregnant Chelsea's husband Marc as they walk their dog

    08/06/2014 6:22:01 PM PDT · by maggief · 57 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | August 6, 2014 | LOUISE BOYLE
    Bill Clinton has father-son bonding time with pregnant Chelsea's husband Marc as they walk their dogs in New York City The former President and his investment banker son-in-law walked their dogs in Madison Square Park together on a Sunday The pair blended in with the weekend crowd despite being trailed by Clinton's Secret Service detail Marc Mezvinsky and wife Chelsea are expecting their first baby in the fall The couple celebrated their fourth wedding anniversary on July 31
  • Analysis confirms dairy farming in prehistoric Finland

    08/02/2014 9:04:13 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Wednesday, July 30, 2014 | University of Bristol
    By comparing the residues found in the walls of cooking pots from two separate eras and cultures, dating to circa 3900 BC to 3300 BC and circa 2500 BC, the more recent pottery fragments showed evidence of milk fats. This coincided with the transition from a culture of hunting and fishing – relying mainly on marine foods – to the arrival of ‘Corded Ware’ settlements which we now know saw the introduction of animal domestication. Lead author Dr Lucy Cramp, from the Department of Archaeology and Anthropology at Bristol University, said: “This is remarkable evidence which proves that four and...
  • Mitochondrial DNA of first Near Eastern farmers is sequenced for the first time

    06/07/2014 8:25:06 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Universitat de Barcelona ^ | Friday, June 6, 2014 | unattributed
    The mitochondrial DNA of the first Near Eastern farmers has been sequenced for the first time... experts analysed samples from three sites located in the birthplace of Neolithic agricultural practices: the Middle Euphrates basin and the oasis of Damascus, located in today’s Syria and date at about 8,000 BC... The study is focused on the analysis of mitochondrial DNA —a type of non-Mendelian maternally inherited DNA— from the first Neolithic farmers, by means of samples obtained by the UAB research group which were first processed by the UB research group... The genetic composition of first Neolithic populations was one of...
  • UK's Oldest town revealed: Amesbury dates back more than TEN millenia

    05/07/2014 6:42:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Express (UK) ^ | Thursday, May 1, 2014 | Emily Fox
    Carbon dating from an archaeological dig by the university shows that the parish of Amesbury has been continually occupied for every millennia since 8,820BC. The origins of Amesbury have been discovered as a result of carbon dating bones of aurochs - twice the size of bulls, wild boar and red deer - following a dig at Vespasian's Camp, Blick Mead, a mile-and-a-half from Stonehenge. It dates the activities of the people who were responsible for building the first monuments at Stonehenge, made of massive pine posts, and show their communities continuing to work and live in the area for a...
  • Why Do Dogs Bark? It's Still Mostly a Mystery.

    04/24/2014 4:35:17 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 98 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 4-24-14 | Ross Pomeroy
    Whether a woof, ruff, yip, or yap, dogs bark dozens, if not hundreds, of times each day. Imagine if every pet canine in the U.S. -- all 83.3 million of them -- congregated. The chorus would be a postal worker's nightmare. Dogs sound off in almost any situation. Maybe the doorbell rang, or a stranger approached, or a bird fluttered nearby. Even with little to no obvious stimulation, dogs can bark incessantly. Behaviorist and biologist Raymond Coppinger once observed a dog that barked for seven hours straight, even though no other canines were within miles. Because dogs bark repetitively and...
  • More questions than answers as mystery of domestication deepens

    04/23/2014 11:25:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Washington University in St Louis ^ | Monday, April 21, 2014 | Diana Lutz
    ...why did people domesticate a mere dozen or so of the roughly 200,000 species of wild flowering plants? And why only about five of the 148 species of large wild mammalian herbivores or omnivores? And while we’re at it, why haven’t more species of either plants or animals been domesticated in modern times? ... [Fiona Marshall:] “We used to think cats and dogs were real outliers in the animal domestication process because they were attracted to human settlements for food and in some sense domesticated themselves. But new research is showing that other domesticated animals may be more like cats...
  • Basque Country horses

    03/08/2006 11:24:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies · 421+ views
    Basque Research ^ | March 7, 2006 | Elhuyar Fundazioa
    417 animals were analysed in all: 147 pottokas, 163 Basque mountain ponies, 62 Jacas Navarras and 45 of the Burguete horse breed. Two of these breeds are heavy or given over to meat production (Jaca Navarra and Burguete); on the other hand, the other two are considered to be lightweight breeds... one can observe a gradient between the autochthonous breeds: the pottoka has had the least external influence and the Burguete breed the most... The results show that the four native breeds are related to each other; above all there are geographical relations: the pottoka with the Basque mountain pony...
  • Birthplace of the domesticated chili pepper identified in Mexico

    04/18/2014 9:49:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-18-2014 | by Pat Bailey AND Journal reference: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
    Central-east Mexico gave birth to the domesticated chili pepper—now the world's most widely grown spice crop—reports an international team of researchers, led by a plant scientist at the University of California, Davis. Results from the four-pronged investigation—based on linguistic and ecological evidence as well as the more traditional archaeological and genetic data—suggest a regional, rather than a geographically specific, birthplace for the domesticated chili pepper. That region, extending from southern Puebla and northern Oaxaca to southeastern Veracruz, is further south than was previously thought, the researchers found. The region also is different from areas of origin that have been suggested...
  • "Our first child is arriving later this year" Chelsea Clinton and Marc Mezvinsky

    04/17/2014 2:21:31 PM PDT · by Biggirl · 77 replies
    DailyMail.co.uk ^ | April 17, 2014 | Tamara Abraham,Sadie Whitelocks
    Chelsea Clinton has announced that she her husband, Marc Mezvinsky are expecting their first child. The Former First Daughter, 34, revealed the happy news this afternoon at a Clinton Foundation event. She told the assembled guests: 'Marc and I are very excited that we have our first child arriving later this year.'
  • Three-toed horses reveal the secret of the Tibetan Plateau uplift

    04/29/2012 3:17:02 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Tuesday, April 24, 2012 | Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology
    The Tibetan Plateau has gradually risen since the Indian plate collided with the Eurasian plate at about 55 Ma. Regardless of the debates over the rising process and elevation of the plateau, there is no doubt that the Himalayas have appeared as a mountain range since the Miocene, with the appearance of vegetation vertical zones following thereafter. Open grasslands per se have no direct relationship to elevation, because they can have different elevations in different regions of the world, having a distribution near the sea level to the extreme high plateaus. On the other hand, the southern margin of the...
  • 'Speed Gene' in Modern Racehorses Originated from British Mare 300 Years Ago, Scientists Claim

    01/28/2012 7:50:57 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | January 24, 2012 | NovaUCD
    Scientists have traced the origin of the 'speed gene' in Thoroughbred racehorses back to a single British mare that lived in the United Kingdom around 300 years ago, according to findings published today in the scientific journal Nature Communications. The origin of the 'speed gene' (C type myostatin gene variant) was revealed by analysing DNA from hundreds of horses, including DNA extracted from the skeletal remains of 12 celebrated Thoroughbred stallions born between 1764 and 1930. "Changes in racing since the foundation of the Thoroughbred have shaped the distribution of 'speed gene' types over time and in different racing regions,"...
  • Pompeii's Mystery Horse Is a Donkey

    11/03/2010 8:28:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 1+ views
    Softpedia ^ | Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010 | Smaranda Biliuti
    Back in 2004, when academics unearthed skeletons found at a house in the ancient Roman town that was covered in ashes in 79 AD, they thought it belonged to an extinct breed of horse... What happened really was that there seems to have been a mix-up in the lab, which led to horse DNA being combined with donkey DNA, creating an artificial hybrid that actually never existed. Six years ago, the skeletons of equids having belonged to a rich Roman household in Pompeii were analyzed. There were found in the stables of a probably wealthy politician, and all five of...
  • How 6,000 Years Of Agriculture Transformed Athletic Humans Into Couch Potatoes

    04/12/2014 12:05:54 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    BioNews ^ | April 9, 2014 | Charles Moore
    Researchers at Cambridge University, U.K. finds that after agriculture’s emergence in Central Europe starting around 5300 BC, bones of those living in the Danube River valley became progressively less strong, pointing to a regressive decline in human mobility and loading... Research by Alison Macintosh, a PhD candidate in Cambridge University’s Department of Archaeology and Anthropology, finds functional adaptation in postcranial skeletal morphology in response to prolonged cultural and behavioural change across ~6150 years of agriculture in Central Europe (~5300 cal BC to 850 AD)... Dr. Ron Pinhasi of the University College in Dublin, Ireland, notes that colonization of Europe by...
  • Noah's Ark Flood Spurred European Farming

    11/18/2007 8:58:45 AM PST · by anymouse · 63 replies · 152+ views
    Reuters) ^ | Nov 17, 2007 | Maggie Fox and Catherine Evans
    An ancient flood some say could be the origin of the story of Noah's Ark may have helped the spread of agriculture in Europe 8,300 years ago by scattering the continent's earliest farmers, researchers said on Sunday. Using radiocarbon dating and archaeological evidence, a British team showed the collapse of the North American ice sheet, which raised global sea levels by as much as 1.4 meters, displaced tens of thousands of people in southeastern Europe who carried farming skills to their new homes. The researchers said in the journal Quaternary Science Reviews their study provides direct evidence linking the flood...
  • Holy Land Farming Began 5,000 Years Earlier Than Thought

    04/06/2014 8:00:14 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    LiveScience ^ | March 19, 2013 | Douglas Main
    For thousands of years, different groups of people have lived in the Negev desert, building stone walls and cities that survive to this day. But how did they make their living? The current thinking is that these desert denizens didn't practice agriculture before approximately the first century, surviving instead by raising animals, said Hendrik Bruins, a landscape archaeologist at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. But new research suggests people in this area, the Negev highlands, practiced agriculture as long ago as 5000 B.C., Bruins told LiveScience. If true, the finding could change historians' views of the area's inhabitants, who lived...
  • Study Detects Recent Instance of Human Evolution

    12/10/2006 2:44:11 PM PST · by Alter Kaker · 178 replies · 2,651+ views
    New York Times ^ | 10 December 2006 | Nicholas Wade
    A surprisingly recent instance of human evolution has been detected among the peoples of East Africa. It is the ability to digest milk in adulthood, conferred by genetic changes that occurred as recently as 3,000 years ago, a team of geneticists has found. The finding is a striking example of a cultural practice — the raising of dairy cattle — feeding back into the human genome. It also seems to be one of the first instances of convergent human evolution to be documented at the genetic level. Convergent evolution refers to two or more populations acquiring the same trait independently....
  • Clay pot fragments reveal early start to cheese-making, a marker for civilization

    01/12/2013 5:52:13 AM PST · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 1-10-2013 | John Sullivan
    (Phys.org)—As a young archaeologist, Peter Bogucki based his groundbreaking theory on the development of Western civilization on the most ancient of human technology, pottery. But it took some of the most modern developments in biochemistry—and 30 years —finally to confirm he was right. While working as director of studies at one of Princeton University's residential colleges in the 1980s, Bogucki theorized that the development of cheese-making in Europe—a critical indicator of an agricultural revolution—occurred thousands of years earlier than scientists generally believed. His insight, based on a study of perforated potsherds that Bogucki helped recover from dig sites in Poland,...
  • Art of cheese-making is 7,500 years old

    12/13/2012 11:49:12 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Nature ^ | 12-12-2012 | Nidhi Subbaraman
    Traces of dairy fat in ancient ceramic fragments suggest that people have been making cheese in Europe for up to 7,500 years. In the tough days before refrigerators, early dairy farmers probably devised cheese-making as a way to preserve, and get the best use out of, milk from the cattle that they had begun to herd. Peter Bogucki, an archaeologist at Princeton University in New Jersey, was in the 1980s among the first to suspect that cheese-making might have been afoot in Europe as early as 5,500 bc. He noticed that archaeologists working at ancient cattle-rearing sites in what is...
  • Ancient nomads spread earliest domestic grains along Silk Road, study finds

    04/05/2014 8:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | April 1, 2014 | Gerry Everding
    Charred grains of barley, millet and wheat deposited nearly 5,000 years ago at campsites in the high plains of Kazakhstan show that nomadic sheepherders played a surprisingly important role in the early spread of domesticated crops throughout a mountainous east-west corridor along the historic Silk Road... "Ancient wheat and broomcorn millet, recovered in nomadic campsites in Kazakhstan, show that prehistoric herders in Central Eurasia had incorporated both regional crops into their economy and rituals nearly 5,000 years ago, pushing back the chronology of interaction along the territory of the 'Silk Road' more than 2,000 years," Frachetti said... ...several strains of...
  • Seven centuries of ploughing in Ede: Dutch Celtic fields used continuously for centuries

    03/21/2014 5:48:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    University of Groningen ^ | March 14, 2014 | Stijn Arnoldussen
    Archaeological excavations have finally answered the question regarding the age and development of the mysterious prehistoric fields enclosed by earthen ridges known as ‘Celtic fields’. Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), a technique that dates the last exposure to light or heat sources of quartz minerals, archaeologist Stijn Arnoldussen from the University of Groningen managed to determine that these banks around the later prehistoric field plots were constructed more than 3100 years ago and remained in use for hundreds of years thereafter... The Celtic field complex targeted by the Groningen Institute of Archaeology at Lunteren measured at least 210 hectares in...
  • The mysterious coywolf, a mixture of western coyote and eastern wolf

    03/09/2014 2:01:08 PM PDT · by DBCJR · 158 replies
    The coywolf, a mixture of western coyote and eastern wolf, is a remarkable new hybrid carnivore that is taking over territories once roamed by wolves and slipping unnoticed into our cities. Its appearance is very recent — within the last 90 years — in evolutionary terms, a blip in time. Beginning in Canada but by no means ending there, the story of how it came to be is an extraordinary tale of how quickly adaptation and evolution can occur, especially when humans interfere. Tag along as scientists study this new top predator, tracking it from the wilderness of Ontario’s Algonquin...
  • Ancient mummies found buried with world's oldest cheese

    03/01/2014 3:15:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 29 replies
    L. A. Times ^ | 2-28-2014 | Jean Harris
    For some cheese lovers, the older and stinkier the cheese, the better. Well, what about a cheese that's been aging for 3,600 years? Yellow lumps, believed to be the world's oldest cheese, were found on mummies buried in the Taklamakan Desert in northwestern China. The cheese, which was found during archaeological excavations that took place between 2002 and 2004, dates to as early as 1615 BC. The cheese was found on the necks and chests of the mummies. The multiple layers of cowhide the mummies were buried in, and the dry, salty desert helped preserve the cheese....
  • The Latest Challenge to the Bible's Accuracy: Abraham's Anachronistic Camels?

    02/16/2014 3:48:28 PM PST · by daniel1212 · 33 replies
    christianitytoday.com ^ | February 14, 2014 | Gordon Govier
    Two researchers at Tel Aviv University (TAU) studied the bones of camels found in an area of ancient copper mines in the Aravah Valley, south of the Dead Sea. Using radiocarbon dating and other techniques, they determined that camels were first used in the mining operations near the end of the 10th century BC. They state that this is the first evidence of domesticated camels in ancient Israel. This would be almost 1,000 years later than the time of the patriarchs, when camels first appear in the Bible. Their study was quickly used to claim that the Bible was written...
  • Earliest Evidence of Dairy Farming Found

    01/28/2003 3:08:12 PM PST · by Junior · 17 replies · 291+ views
    AP - Science ^ | 2003-01-27
    WASHINGTON - Dairy farming became widespread in Britain as early as the new stone age — around 4,000 B.C. — a team of researchers at England's University of Bristol reports.Mark Copley, an archaeological chemist, said evidence of milk fats was found on broken pieces of pottery at several ancient sites in southern England.Using new methods of analysis, scientists have learned to differentiate between ancient residue from milk fat and other fats and oils in recent years, Copley and his team report in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science.Their findings provide evidence of "the earliest farming communities in Britain, though...
  • VIKING REVISIONISM

    12/21/2007 7:39:54 AM PST · by finnsheep · 36 replies · 238+ views
    http://www.interweave.com/spin/spinoff_magazine/default.asp | winter 07 issue | Judith MacKenzie McCuin
    Gutefar - The Bronze Age Sheep of Gotland This article claims sheep of the British Isles descended from sheep from Gotland, an Island in the Baltic "...arriving in Britain between 2,000 and 3,000 years ago, doubtless traveling along with the same Viking raiders that brought sheep originally to Gotland." She also claims Vikings are the ANCESTORS of the Visigoths. Only problems is that the Visigoths preceded the Vikings by about 400 years. The Visigoths sacked Rome in 451 AD and the first recorded Viking raid on the British Isles happened around 800 AD with the raid on the monastery at...
  • Prehistoric Britons' Taste For Milk

    01/27/2003 4:06:39 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 245+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-27-2003
    Monday, 27 January, 2003, 22:36 GMTPrehistoric Britons' taste for milk The oldest direct evidence for the existence of dairy farming has been discovered in the UK. It is based on a chemical analysis of milk fat deposits left on pottery fragments found to be 6,500 years old. It is clear that by the time farming reached Britain, milk was already an important commodity Although the practice of milking animals for food was undoubtedly developed elsewhere and then introduced into Britain, this is the earliest time for which researchers have been able to show definitively that it was going on. According...
  • Camel bones suggest error in Bible, archaeologists say

    02/05/2014 5:24:50 PM PST · by workerbee · 84 replies
    Fox ^ | 1/5/14
    Archaeologists from Israel’s top university have used radiocarbon dating to pinpoint the arrival of domestic camels in the Middle East -- and they say the science directly contradicts the Bible’s version of events. Camels are mentioned as pack animals in the biblical stories of Abraham, Joseph and Jacob, Old Testament stories that historians peg to between 2000 and 1500 BC. But Erez Ben-Yosef and Lidar Sapir-Hen of Tel Aviv University's Department of Archaeology and Near Eastern Cultures say camels weren’t domesticated in Israel until centuries later, more like 900 BC. “In addition to challenging the Bible's historicity, this anachronism is...
  • Dogs are NOT descended from modern wolves but split from common ancestor 34,000 years ago

    01/16/2014 9:01:52 PM PST · by Fractal Trader · 77 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 16 January 2014 | SARAH GRIFFITHS
    Dogs and wolves evolved from a common ancestor between 11,000 and 34,000 years ago, according to new research. U.S. scientists said that part of the genetic overlap observed between some modern dogs and wolves is the result of interbreeding after dog domestication and not a direct line of descent from one group of wolves. They believe their research reflects a more complicated history than the popular story that early farmers adopted a few docile, friendly wolves that later became our modern canine companions. Dogs and wolves evolved from a common ancestor between 11,000 and 34,000 years ago but modern canines...
  • War Elephant Myths Debunked by DNA

    01/20/2014 6:06:44 PM PST · by lbryce · 43 replies
    The Institute for Genomic Biology ^ | January 20, 2014 | Staff
    On a whim, I recently posted the image below of the frog riding the beetle irreverently entitling it as Hannibal Crossing the Carpathians. Hannibal Crosses The CarpathiansWhile it was obviously posted in jest, several comments appeared in scholarly discussion of the use of elephants in war, having come across this article thought it might be of interest.Please take note any establishment, organization involved in science will inevitably be a left-wing liberal tool, certainly so, a group with the tagline, where science meets society. War Elephant Myths Debunked by DNAThe Institute for Genomic BiologyWhere Science Meets Society Through DNA analysis, Illinois...
  • The Education of Barack Obama: The Devil’s in the Details.

    01/18/2014 8:53:42 AM PST · by NOBO2012 · 4 replies
    Michelle Obama's Mirror ^ | 1-18-2014 | MOTUS
    The country’s former newspaper of record, the New York Times, saw a big blip in their circulation yesterday when it ran with an above the fold story about Lady M’s half-century mark: On Saturday night, Mrs. Obama will celebrate her 50th birthday (which falls on Friday) with dancing and sweets throughout the state floor of the White House, drawing the nation’s attention away from her husband, at least for an evening. Guests will sip fine American wines, consume delicate macarons and be entertained — the expectation is by Beyoncé. It was a wonderful, humanizing piece: She has perfected a mean...
  • Hunter-gatherer diet caused tooth decay

    01/12/2014 3:03:25 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | Tuesday, January 7, 2014 | Natural History Museum
    ...The results published in PNAS (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences) also suggest tooth decay was more prevalent in earlier societies than previously estimated. The results also suggest that the hunter-gatherer society studied may have developed a more sedentary lifestyle than previously thought, relying on nut harvesting. Dental disease was thought to have originated with the introduction of farming and changes in food processing around 10,000 years ago. A greater reliance on cultivated plant foods, rich in fermentable carbohydrates, resulted in rotting teeth.High level of decayNow, the analysis of 52 adult dentitions from hunter-gatherer skeletons found in a cave...
  • Diets of the middle and lower class in Pompeii revealed

    01/05/2014 7:13:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 1-2-2014 | Dawn Fuller
    University of Cincinnati archaeologists are turning up discoveries in the famed Roman city of Pompeii that are wiping out the historic perceptions of how the Romans dined, with the rich enjoying delicacies such as flamingos and the poor scrounging for soup or gruel. Steven Ellis, a University of Cincinnati associate professor of classics, will present these discoveries on Jan. 4, at the joint annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America (AIA) and American Philological Association (APA) in Chicago. UC teams of archaeologists have spent more than a decade at two city blocks within a non-elite district in the Roman...
  • Cats ‘domesticated in China over 5,000 years ago to prey on rodents’

    12/16/2013 6:13:56 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 35 replies
    “Our data suggest that cats were attracted to ancient farming villages by small animals, such as rodents that were living on the grain that the farmers grew, ate and stored. “Results of this study show that the village of Quanhucun was a source of food for the cats 5,300 years ago, and the relationship between humans and cats was commensal, or advantageous for the cats. “Even if these cats were not yet domesticated, our evidence confirms that they lived in close proximity to farmers, and that the relationship had mutual benefits.” Cats have lived alongside humans for a very long...
  • 700,000-Year-Old Horse Found in Yukon Permafrost Yields Oldest DNA Ever Decoded

    11/23/2013 12:58:13 PM PST · by Dysart · 37 replies
    Western Digs ^ | 11-22-13 | Blake de Pastino
    The frozen remains of a horse more than half a million years old have reluctantly given up their genetic secrets, providing scientists with the oldest DNA ever sequenced. The horse was discovered in 2003 in the ancient permafrost of Canada’s west-central Yukon Territory, not far from the Alaskan border.And although the animal was dated to between 560,000 and 780,000 years old, an international team of researchers was able to use a new combination of techniques to decipher its genetic code. Among the team’s findings is that the genus Equus — which includes all horses, donkeys, and zebras — dates back...
  • Study Reveals More Clues to Origins of Domesticated Dog

    11/17/2013 4:22:00 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, November 14, 2013 | Science
    ...based on a recently completed study, Olaf Thalmann of the University of Turku, Finland, and colleagues are suggesting that Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers in Europe as much as 32,000 years ago may have played a significant role in the process. To come to this conclusion, Thalmann and his team compared mitochondrial DNA from a broad range of modern-day dog and wolf breeds to mitochondrial DNA from canine fossils dated to 19,000-32,000 years ago, as well as fossils from modern canines. Their analysis showed that modern dogs’ genetic sequences most closely matched those of either ancient European canines, including wolves, or modern European...
  • Genetic study proves Israel's wild boars originated in Europe

    11/10/2013 7:44:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Nov 04, 2013 | Tel Aviv University
    Wild boars look more or less the same in Israel as they do anywhere else: stalky and hairy with big heads, long snouts, and beady eyes. So scientists had no reason to suspect Israeli wild boars were any different than their brothers and sisters roaming the Middle East, from Egypt to Iran... unlike the Near Eastern wild boars in surrounding countries, Israel's wild boars originated in Europe. After a genetic and archaeological analysis, the researchers suggest the wild boars living in Israel are descendants of domesticated pigs brought to Israel starting almost 3,000 years ago by the Philistines and other...
  • How 17th Century Fraud Gave Rise To Bright Orange Cheese

    11/09/2013 4:31:29 AM PST · by NYer · 54 replies
    npr ^ | November 7, 2012 | Allison Aubrey
    Shelburne Farms' clothbound cheddar has a bright yellow color because it's made from the milk of cows that graze on grasses high in beta-carotene. The news from Kraft last week that the company is ditching two artificial dyes in some versions of its macaroni and cheese products left me with a question.Why did we start coloring cheeses orange to begin with? Turns out there's a curious history here.In theory, cheese should be whitish — similar to the color of milk, right?Well, not really. Centuries ago in England, lots of cheeses had a natural yellowish-orange pigment. The cheese came from the...
  • Elephants Understand Human Gestures

    10/14/2013 8:38:08 AM PDT · by null and void · 88 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | October 10, 2013 | University of St Andrews
    Elephants understand humans in a way most other animals don’t, according to the latest research from the University of St Andrews. The new study, published October 10, 2013 by Current Biology, found that elephants are the only wild animals to understand human pointing without any training to do so. The researchers, Anna Smet and Professor Richard Byrne from the University’s School of Psychology and Neuroscience, set out to test whether African elephants could learn to follow pointing — and were surprised to find them responding successfully from the first trial. They said, “In our study we found that African elephants spontaneously...
  • Archaeologists make startling discovery at ancient Sussita: A beer bottlecap

    09/28/2013 7:15:24 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Haaretz ^ | September 24, 2013 | Ran Shapira
    An unexpected discovery awaited a team of Israeli archaeologists in a drainage canal dating from roughly 2,000 years ago: an aluminum bottlecap. From a beer bottle. No, the good people of ancient Sussita weren't producing aluminum metal. The meaning of the startling discovery is that millennia after its construction, the drainage canal was still working, centuries after the city's final destruction by earthquake. Made of aluminum and feather-light, the bottle-cap floated on rainwater that washed into the canal, says Dr. Michael Eisenberg, head of an Israeli archaeological team digging the site. This canal, or less romantically -- a sewer, passed...
  • No seafood for early Easter Islanders -- they ate rats

    09/27/2013 3:48:08 AM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    NBC News ^ | 9-26-2013 | Owen Jarus
    Chemical analyses of teeth from 41 human skeletons excavated on Easter Island revealed the inhabitants ate rats rather than seafood; Here, Moai statues at Ahu Tongariki on the south-eastern part of the island, where 26 of the skeletons were found. The inhabitants of Easter Island consumed a diet that was lacking in seafood and was, literally, quite ratty. The island, also called Rapa Nui, first settled around A.D. 1200, is famous for its more than 1,000 "walking" Moai statues, most of which originally faced inland. Located in the South Pacific, Rapa Nui is the most isolated inhabited landmass on Earth;...
  • Bill says Hillary would rather be grandmother than the president

    09/24/2013 9:43:37 AM PDT · by rightwingintelligentsia · 60 replies
    The Hill ^ | September 24, 2013 | Rebecca Shabad
    Former President Bill Clinton says his wife would rather be a grandmother than president. In an interview on “CBS This Morning” Tuesday, anchor Charlie Rose asked the 41st president which role Hillary Clinton would prefer taking on. “If you ask her, I think she’d say grandmother. But I have found it best not to discuss that issue,” he said with a laugh. The Clintons' only daughter, Chelsea, is married but does not have any children. “My goal is to live to be a grandfather. The rest of it is out of my hands,” Clinton said. With three years until the...
  • Italian archaeologists have grape expectations of their ancient wine

    08/28/2013 12:18:19 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 8-22-2013 | Tom Kington
    Archeologists in Italy have set about making red wine exactly as the ancient Romans did, to see what it tastes like. Based at the University of Catania in Sicily and supported by Italy's national research centre, a team has planted a vineyard near Catania using techniques copied from ancient texts and expects its first vintage within four years. "We are more used to archeological digs but wanted to make society more aware of our work, otherwise we risk being seen as extraterrestrials," said archaeologist Daniele Malfitana. At the group's vineyard, which should produce 70 litres at the first harvest, modern...
  • European Hunter-Gatherers Had Domesticated Pigs Earlier Than Thought

    08/28/2013 3:47:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    National Geographic ^ | August 27, 2013 | Ker Than
    Domesticated pigs were present in northern Germany around 4600 B.C., some 500 years earlier than previously thought, new fossil and DNA evidence reveals. The finding, detailed in this week's issue of the journal Nature Communications, is significant because the people living in that part of Europe at the time were Mesolithic hunter-gatherers who primarily lived off of wild game. These people, known as the Ertebølle culture, kept domesticated dogs as hunting companions, but it would be several hundreds of years before they began raising animals and crops for food. One hypothesis for how the Ertebølle came to acquire the pigs...
  • Sustainable Ancient Aquaculture

    08/15/2013 6:45:53 AM PDT · by Renfield · 11 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 7-11-2013 | Mark Spalding
    Phrases like “lessons from the past” or “learning from ancient history” are apt to make our eyes glaze over, and we flash to memories of boring history classes or droning TV documentaries. But in the case of aquaculture, a little historical knowledge can be both entertaining and enlightening. Fish farming is not new; it has been practiced for centuries in many cultures. Ancient Chinese societies fed silkworm feces and nymphs to carp raised in ponds on silkworm farms, Egyptians farmed tilapia as part of their elaborate irrigation technology, and Hawaiians were able to farm a multitude of species such as...
  • Bow and arrow forever changed ancient cultures

    08/19/2013 6:27:17 AM PDT · by Renfield · 29 replies
    Columbus Dispatch (OH) ^ | 8-4-2013 | Bradley T. Lepper
    The invention of the bow and arrow allowed users to shoot projectiles more rapidly and more accurately than with the traditional spear. A new theory argues that this innovation resulted in more than just a technological revolution. It also had profound social consequences wherever the bow was adopted. Stony Brook University biologists Paul Bingham and Joanne Souza developed the “social-coercion hypothesis” as an explanation for the rise of social complexity. They recently outlined their work in the journal Evolutionary Anthropology. According to this idea, the introduction of a more-effective weapon system gave social groups a safer, more-reliable way to coerce...