HOME/ABOUT  Prayer  SCOTUS  ProLife  BangList  Aliens  StatesRights  ConventionOfStates  WOT  HomosexualAgenda  GlobalWarming  Corruption  Taxes  Congress  Fraud  MediaBias  GovtAbuse  Tyranny  Obama  ObamaCare  Elections  Polls  Debates  Trump  Carson  Cruz  Bush  OPSEC  Benghazi  InfoSec  BigBrother  IRS  Scandals  TalkRadio  TeaParty  FreeperBookClub  HTMLSandbox  FReeperEd  FReepathon  CopyrightList  Copyright/DMCA Notice 

Please keep those donations coming in, folks. Our 1st quarter FReepathon is off to a great start and we have a chance of getting 'er done early! Thank you all very much!!

Or by mail to: Free Republic, LLC - PO Box 9771 - Fresno, CA 93794
Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $42,555
48%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 48% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Keyword: agriculture

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • 200,000 fish bones suggest ancient Scandinavian people were more complex than thought

    02/08/2016 10:58:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | February 8, 2016 | Elsevier
    200,000 fish bones discovered in and around a pit in Sweden suggest that the people living in the area more than 9000 years ago were more settled and cultured than we previously thought. Research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science suggests people were storing large amounts of fermented food much earlier than experts thought. The new paper reveals the earliest evidence of fermentation in Scandinavia, from the Early Mesolithic time period, about 9,200 years ago. The author of the study, from Lund University in Sweden, say the findings suggest that people who survived by foraging for food were actually...
  • DNA evidence uncovers major upheaval in Europe near end of last Ice Age

    02/08/2016 11:24:59 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | February 4, 2016 | Current Biology, Cell Press
    DNA evidence lifted from the ancient bones and teeth of people who lived in Europe from the Late Pleistocene to the early Holocene -- spanning almost 30,000 years of European prehistory -- has offered some surprises, according to researchers who report their findings in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on Feb. 4, 2016. Perhaps most notably, the evidence shows a major shift in the population around 14,500 years ago, during a period of severe climatic instability... The researchers pieced this missing history together by reconstructing the mitochondrial genomes of 35 hunter-gatherer individuals who lived in Italy, Germany, Belgium, France,...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD FEBRUARY 5, 2016

    02/05/2016 2:49:23 PM PST · by greeneyes · 30 replies
    freerepublic | Feb. 5, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • THE WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JANUARY 29, 2016

    01/29/2016 2:04:21 PM PST · by greeneyes · 64 replies
    freerepublic | Jan. 29, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • The world's first robot-run farm will harvest 30,000 heads of lettuce daily

    01/27/2016 7:04:30 PM PST · by PittsburghAfterDark · 51 replies
    Tech Insider ^ | January 27, 2016 | Leanna Garfield
    The Japanese lettuce production company Spread believes the farmers of the future will be robots. So much so that Spread is creating the world's first farm manned entirely by robots. Instead of relying on human farmers, the indoor Vegetable Factory will employ robots that can harvest 30,000 heads of lettuce every day. Don't expect a bunch of humanoid robots to roam the halls, however; the robots look more like conveyor belts with arms. They'll plant seeds, water plants, and trim lettuce heads after harvest in the Kyoto, Japan farm. "The use of machines and technology has been improving agriculture in...
  • Virginia House Votes Unanimously to Legalize Hemp Farming, Nullifying Federal Law

    01/26/2016 1:54:33 PM PST · by djf · 36 replies
    The Activist Post ^ | 1/26/2016 | Michael Boldin
    Today, the Virginia House of Delegates passed a bill to authorize the farming, and production of industrial hemp in the state for commercial purposes, setting the foundation to nullify in practice the unconstitutional federal prohibition on the same. The vote was 98-0. Introduced by Del. Brenda Pogge (R-Norge), House Bill 699 (HB699) would amend current state law on hemp by removing a provision that authorized the licensing of hemp farming only upon approval of the federal government.
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JANUARY 22, 2016

    01/22/2016 1:55:21 PM PST · by greeneyes · 54 replies
    freerepublic | January 22, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JANUARY 15, 2016

    01/15/2016 12:55:47 PM PST · by greeneyes · 69 replies
    freerepublic | January 15, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • A Mysterious Mammoth Carcass Could Change Human History

    01/14/2016 8:42:33 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 99 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 01/14/2016 | Maddie Stone
    The carcass was remarkably well preserved, but something was clearly wrong. A rounded hole through the interior jugal. Deep incisions along the ribs. Dents in the left scapula. A broken mandible. This 45,000 year-old mammoth's life ended violently at the hands of hunters. That wouldn't be surprising-it's well known that Pleistocene humans were expert mammoth killers=but for the location. It was excavated from a permafrost embankment at Yenisei bay, a remote spot in central Siberia where a massive river empties into the Arctic Ocean. That makes this brutalized mammoth the oldest evidence for human expansion into the high Arctic by...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JANUARY 8, 2016

    01/08/2016 1:36:46 PM PST · by greeneyes · 69 replies
    freerepublic | January 8, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • What Cuba Can Teach Us About Food and Climate Change

    01/04/2016 7:07:30 AM PST · by C19fan · 13 replies
    Slate ^ | January 4, 2015 | Raj Patel
    The Studebakers plying up and down Havana’s boardwalk aren’t the best advertisement for dynamism and innovation. But if you want to see what tomorrow’s fossil-fuel-free, climate-change-resilient, high-tech farming looks like, there are few places on earth like the Republic of Cuba. Under the Warsaw Pact, Cuba sent rum and sugar to the red side of the Iron Curtain. In exchange, it received food, oil, machinery, and as many petrochemicals as it could shake a stick at. From the Missile Crisis to the twilight of the Soviet Union, Cuba was one of the largest importers of agricultural chemicals in Latin America....
  • Save the Environment…from Deadly Lettuce

    12/16/2015 6:39:11 AM PST · by Sean_Anthony · 5 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 12/16/15 | Judi McLeod
    The enviro police could be coming soon to a house near you, if only because they’ve zapped everything else considered a danger to the environment ISIS will not be amused. First, President Barack Obama and Pope Francis have given the inherent danger of their terrorism the heave-ho by declaring that global warming/climate change is a bigger threat to 21st century humanity—and now global warming doctrine dares to suggest that bacon is better for the environment than run-of-the-mill lettuce. All pork products, including bacon, are anathema to any self-respecting Islamic terrorist. So anathematic In fact, that some brave souls who dare...
  • Tree Grown From Ancient Seed Found in Jewish Fortress

    06/13/2008 10:01:24 AM PDT · by mware · 25 replies · 56+ views
    Fox News ^ | Friday, June 13, 2008 | By Clara Moskowitz
    Scientists have grown a tree from what may be the oldest seed ever germinated. The new sapling was sprouted from a 2,000-year-old date palm excavated in Masada, the site of a cliff-side fortress in Israel where ancient Jews are said to have killed themselves to avoid capture by Roman invaders. Dubbed the "Methuselah Tree" after the oldest person in the Bible, the new plant has been growing steadily, and after 26 months, the tree was nearly four feet (1.2 meters) tall.
  • Ancient Seeds Yield Once Extinct Squash

    01/01/2016 8:36:56 AM PST · by Popman · 131 replies
    Wimp ^ | NOV 24, 2015 | Jake Brannon:
    Students from Winnipeg, Canada recently discovered a stash of 800-year-old seeds while on an archaeological dig. The mysterious seeds, once planted, grew into a rare species of squash that has been extinct for hundreds of years. While we don't know if the seeds themselves were safe to eat, the squash that they harvested was absolutely delicious. Check out the images below to see the rare gourd for yourself and learn more about this discovery.
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JANUARY 1, 2016

    01/01/2016 1:18:03 PM PST · by greeneyes · 39 replies
    freerepublic | Jan 1, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD DECEMBER 25, 2015

    12/25/2015 9:48:59 AM PST · by greeneyes · 99 replies
    freerepublic | 12/25/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD DECEMBER 18, 2015

    12/18/2015 11:36:05 AM PST · by greeneyes · 46 replies
    freerepublic | December 18, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • How a Ship Full of Fish Helped Recreate an Ancient Fish Sauce

    03/06/2012 10:18:22 AM PST · by Renfield · 20 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 3-1-2012 | Peter Smith
    If youre like me, the last post on the convoluted origins of our favorite fermented condimentketchupprobably left you wondering: What is the difference between Roman garum than modern Thai fish sauce? What little I know comes from an experiment performed by Sally Grainger, author of Cooking Apicus, recounted in the book Cured, Fermented and Smoked Foods. Grainger is a British chef and an experimental archeologist. She looked at studies on fish sauce amphorae (ceramic vessels) from archeological sites in Spain and North Africa. One of her more fascinating sources comes from a 2,000-year-old shipwreck discovered off the coast of Grado,...
  • Roman Shipwreck Discovered Near Aeolian Islands

    07/02/2010 5:59:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | July 2010 | unattributed
    The wreck of a Roman ship from the first century AD which is still whole and has over 500 wide-mouthed amphorae onboard has been discovered to the south of the island of Panarea... [announced] by the Regional Councillor for Cultural Heritage, Gaetano Armao, and by the Superintendent, Sebastiano Tusa. ''From the first surveys,'' said Tusa, ''we can establish that it is a merchant shipping measuring around 25 metres, in perfect condition, which transported fruit and vegetables from Sicily to the markets in the north. The style of the amphorae is in fact typical of the 'workshops' of the island and...
  • Fish Sauce Used to Date Pompeii Eruption [ garum / liquamen]

    09/30/2008 4:30:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies · 6,769+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Monday, September 29, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Remains of rotten fish entrails have helped establish the precise dating of Pompeii's destruction, according to Italian researchers who have analyzed the town's last batch of garum, a pungent, fish-based seasoning. Frozen in time by the catastrophic eruption that covered Pompeii and nearby towns nearly 2,000 years ago with nine to 20 feet of hot ash and pumice, the desiccated remains were found at the bottom of seven jars. The find revealed that the last Pompeian garum was made entirely with bogues (known as boops boops), a Mediterranean fish species that abounded in the area in the summer months of...
  • Waiter, There's a Fish in My Wine!

    01/31/2005 1:44:55 PM PST · by Junior · 46 replies · 923+ views
    Oddly Enough, Reuters ^ | Mon Jan 31,10:36 AM ET
    BEIJING (Reuters) - The French used grapes, Russians fermented potatoes, Koreans put ginseng in their drink and Mexicans distilled cactus plants to make fiery tequila. Now China is introducing fish wine. Sun Keman, an entrepreneur in the northeastern port city of Dalian, has formed the Dalian Fisherman's Song Maritime Biological Brewery, with a plan to use his background in the fishing industry to make fish into wine. "Different from China's thousands of years of brewing, the brewery will clean, boil, and ferment fish for making wine," the official Xinhua news agency reported. The company already had orders from Japan, Russia...
  • Sunken haul of Roman fish sauce found off Italy

    12/12/2015 4:36:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    The Local (Italy) ^ | Decenber 11, 2015 | unattributed
    In spite of the mystery that usually surrounds ancient shipwrecks, it is almost certain that the ship was sailing a route between Italy, Spain and Portugal in order to transport a precious cargo of Roman garum. The clue lies in the shape of the clay jars, as the sauce itself has all since seeped into the sea. "After we filmed the wreck and analyzed an amphora [clay jar] and some fragments that a robotic craft brought back to the surface, we realized the ship was carrying a huge quantity of fish sauce when it sank," said Trigona. "The amphora are...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD DECEMBER 11, 2015

    12/11/2015 1:50:07 PM PST · by greeneyes · 35 replies
    freerepublic | Dec 11, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Near unanimous UN support for Israel 'an important achievement'

    12/10/2015 4:06:12 AM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 5 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 10/12/15 | Raphael Poch
    In a rare turn of events, Israel received almost unanimous support at the United Nations last week for its proposal to further the dissemination of agricultural and farming technology to developing African nations. Despite of the humanitarian nature of the proposal, it was met with vehement opposition from representatives of Arab nations, including some that will be helped by the proposal. Regardless of the aid the proposal would provide to African countries who are suffering from drought and malnutrition, Arab nations, some of whom sit on the United Nations human rights council, did not vote in favor of the proposal...
  • The Cold Snap That Civilised The World

    02/23/2002 2:33:42 PM PST · by blam · 91 replies · 2,860+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 2-22-2002 | David Derbyshire
    The cold snap that civilised the world By David Derbyshire, Science Correspondent (Filed: 22/02/2002) A SUDDEN drop in temperatures 5,000 years ago ushered in the modern climate and may have encouraged the development of complex civilisations around the world. Researchers studying ancient fish bones off the coast of Peru say the temperature fall heralded El Nino, the periodical warming of the Pacific which brings unusual weather patterns every two to seven years. The rapidly changing weather, which followed several thousand years of post-Ice Age stability, triggered a new temple building culture in South America. Elsewhere, it may have forced Stone ...
  • New way to make yeast hybrids may inspire new brews, biofuels

    12/04/2015 1:18:16 PM PST · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    phys.org ^ | December 4, 2015 | by Terry Devitt & Provided by: University of Wisconsin-Madison
    Orange-colored galls, such as these pictured in 2010, from the beech tree forests of Patagonia have been found to harbor the yeast that makes lager beer possible. Five hundred years ago, in the age of sail and when the trans-Atlantic trade was just beginning, the yeast somehow made its way from Patagonia to the caves and monastery cellars of Bavaria where the first lager beers were fermented. University of Wisconsin-Madison Genetics Professor Chris Todd Hittinger and colleagues have discovered a quick and efficient way to fuse different strains of yeast to make hybrids similar to the lager beer hybrid, an...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD DECEMBER 4, 2015

    12/04/2015 3:42:18 PM PST · by greeneyes · 63 replies
    freerepublic | Dec. 4, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Israel Aims to Recreate Wine That Jesus and King David Drank

    11/30/2015 6:28:11 PM PST · by SJackson · 41 replies
    NY Times ^ | NOV. 29, 2015 | JODI RUDOREN
    HEFER VALLEY, Israel — The new crisp, acidic and mineral white from a high-end Israeli winery was aged for eight months — or, depending on how you look at it, at least 1,800 years. The wine, called marawi and released last month by Recanati Winery, is the first commercially produced by Israel’s growing modern industry from indigenous grapes. It grew out of a groundbreaking project at Ariel University in the occupied West Bank that aims to use DNA testing to identify — and recreate — ancient wines drunk by the likes of King David and Jesus Christ. Eliyashiv Drori, the...
  • 'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold

    11/29/2015 7:27:04 PM PST · by TigerLikesRooster · 48 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | November 28, 2015
    'Truly amazing' scientific discovery on adaptation of Yakutian horses to cold By The Siberian Times reporter 28 November 2015 Fast track evolution as great Siberian symbol is surprisingly unmasked as an immigrant breed. Researchers say these horses, which seem so well attuned to the harsh cold with thick, dense winter coats, their armour against temperatures of minus 70C (minus 94F), are incomers that only arrived in these parts within the last 800 years.Picture:Maria Vasilyeva The resilient Yakutian horses are one of the great native sights of the Sakha Republic - or Yakutia. In their way as much a part of...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD NOVEMBER 27, 2015

    11/27/2015 2:03:54 PM PST · by greeneyes · 49 replies
    freerepublic | Novemeber 27, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Endangering Our Citrus Industry

    11/22/2015 7:53:41 AM PST · by Kaslin · 8 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | November 22, 2015 | Paul Driessen
    Florida's citrus harvest has plummeted 60 percent from ten years ago, because of citrus greening disease, a bacterial infection that causes trees to produce stunted fruit and eventually die. The disease has also been found in one Los Angeles area orchard, potentially putting California's citrusgroves at risk. Billions of dollars and thousands of jobs are at stake. Introduced and spread by the flying aphid-like Asian citrus psyllid, citrus greening is also called HLB, from the Mandarin word for "yellow dragon disease." It can quickly infest entire orchards, and thus far there is no cure. Infected trees must simply be destroyed....
  • U.S. Cattle Futures Slide Limit-Down, Sending Hog Prices Sharply Lower

    11/21/2015 11:40:43 AM PST · by jjotto · 32 replies
    NASDAQ ^ | November 16, 2015 | Kelsey Gee
    [Excerpt and link] ...Live-cattle futures for December fell 3 cents, or 2.3%, to $1.27675 a pound, after declining 3.1% over the past week on the Chicago Mercantile Exchange. Cattle futures for February were also limit-down, dropping 2.3% to $1.2965 a pound. Feeder-cattle futures for November fell 2.775 cents to $1.7230 a pound. Other feeder-cattle futures were limit-down... ...December lean hogs fell 3 cents, or 5.5%, to 51.80 cents a pound, a fresh six-year low...
  • Evidence Found for Canals That Watered Ancient Peru

    01/03/2006 3:43:00 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 23 replies · 823+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 3, 2006 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Photograph courtesy of Tom D. DillehayRUNNING WATER The sites of ancient irrigation canals. People in Peru's Zaa Valley dug the canals as early as 6,700 years ago to divert river water to their crops. In the Andean foothills of Peru, not far from the Pacific coast, archaeologists have found what they say is evidence for the earliest known irrigated agriculture in the Americas. An analysis of four derelict canals, filled with silt and buried deep under sediments, showed that they were used to water cultivated fields 5,400 years ago, in one case possibly as early as 6,700 years ago,...
  • Ancient Canals Reveal Underpinnings of Early Andean Civilization

    05/12/2007 6:38:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 444+ views
    Newswise ^ | Tuesday, November 29, 2005 | Vanderbilt University
    The discovery by Vanderbilt University anthropologist Tom Dillehay and his colleagues, Herbert Eling, Instituto Naciona de Anthropolotica e Historia in Coahulila, Mexico, and Jack Rossen, Ithaca College, was reported in the Nov. 22 issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The anthropologists discovered the canals in Peru's upper middle Zana Valley, approximately 60 kilometers east of the Pacific coast. Preliminary results indicate one of the canals is over 6,700 years old, while another has been confirmed to be over 5,400 years old. They are the oldest such canals yet discovered in South America... Dillehay and his team...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD NOVEMBER 20, 2015

    11/20/2015 1:41:41 PM PST · by greeneyes · 76 replies
    freerepublic | November 20, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won't be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn't asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • What's Actually in the Trans Pacific Partnership?

    11/20/2015 8:09:10 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 6 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 11/20/2015 | By Howard Richman, Raymond Richman and Jesse Richman
    On November 5, the White House released the text of the 5,544 page Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) that President Obama had just finished negotiating under the FastTrack authority that Congress gave him. That trade pact can no longer be amended. The up-or-down votes in the House and Senate will take place as early as January 2016. So what’s in the TPP? Here’s a quick summary: A legislative body superior to CongressA vehicle to pass Obama’s climate change treatyIncreased legal immigrationReduced patent protection for U.S. pharmaceuticalsQuotas on U.S. agricultural exportsIncreased currency manipulationReduced U.S. power That’s the summary. Here are the details....
  • 'Fourth strand' of European ancestry originated with hunter-gatherers isolated by Ice Age

    11/16/2015 1:14:08 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Monday, November 16, 2015 | University of Cambridge, Nature
    The first sequencing of ancient genomes extracted from human remains that date back to the Late Upper Palaeolithic period over 13,000 years ago has revealed a previously unknown "fourth strand" of ancient European ancestry. This new lineage stems from populations of hunter-gatherers that split from western hunter-gatherers shortly after the 'out of Africa' expansion some 45,000 years ago and went on to settle in the Caucasus region, where southern Russia meets Georgia today. Here these hunter-gatherers largely remained for millennia, becoming increasingly isolated as the Ice Age culminated in the last 'Glacial Maximum' some 25,000 years ago, which they weathered...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD NOVEMBER 13, 2015

    11/13/2015 1:55:12 PM PST · by greeneyes · 57 replies
    freerepublic | November 13, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Volcanic Soils Offer New Clues About The Emergence Of Powerful Chiefdoms In Hawaii

    06/11/2004 4:26:36 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 263+ views
    Eureka Alert/Stanford University ^ | 6-11-2004 | Mark Shwartz
    Contact: Mark Shwartz mshwartz@stanford.edu 650-723-9296 Stanford University Volcanic soils yield new clues about the emergence of powerful chiefdoms in Hawaii When the first Europeans arrived in the Hawaiian Islands in 1778, they found a thriving, complex society organized into chiefdoms whose economies were based primarily on farming. On the islands of Kauai, O'ahu and Molokai, the principal crop was taro a starchy plant grown in irrigated wetlands where the supply of water was usually abundant. But on Maui and the Big Island of Hawaii, the main staple was the sweet potato a more labor-intensive crop planted in relatively...
  • 'Ancient' boat expedition hits trouble

    09/09/2005 8:28:22 AM PDT · by CarrotAndStick · 26 replies · 1,179+ views
    The Sydney Morning Herald ^ | September 8, 2005 - 5:25PM | SMH
    A bid by an Australian archaeologist and other sailors to recreate an ancient voyage in a traditional reed boat has struck trouble in the Arabian Sea. Nautical archaeologist Dr Tom Vosmer and seven other sailors had set off from Oman for a two-week voyage in the Magan, a 12-metre-long sailing boat made of reeds, rope and wood, but capsized within hours. "Water leaked into the Magan causing it to capsize, but a support ship from the Omani royal navy accompanying the boat intervened and rescued the sailors," a source from Oman's culture and national heritage ministry which organised the trip...
  • Deep history of coconuts decoded (Colonization of the Americas?)

    06/24/2011 2:06:33 PM PDT · by decimon · 39 replies
    Washington University in St. Louis ^ | June 24, 2011 | Diana Lutz
    Written in coconut DNA are two origins of cultivation, several ancient trade routes, and the history of the colonization of the AmericasThe coconut (the fruit of the palm Cocos nucifera) is the Swiss Army knife of the plant kingdom; in one neat package it provides a high-calorie food, potable water, fiber that can be spun into rope, and a hard shell that can be turned into charcoal. Whats more, until it is needed for some other purpose it serves as a handy flotation device. No wonder people from ancient Austronesians to Captain Bligh pitched a few coconuts aboard before setting...
  • Ancient British tree undergoing 'sex-change'

    11/02/2015 11:36:43 AM PST · by Red Badger · 87 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 2, 2015 | Staff
    A British tree thought to be up to 5,000 years old has started to change sex, a "rare and unusual" phenomenon not fully understood by scientists, a botanist said Monday. The Fortingall Yew, in Perthshire, central Scotland has for hundreds of years been recorded as male, but has recently begun sprouting berries, suggesting that at least part of the tree is changing gender. "It's a rare occurence ... rare and unusual and not fully understood," said Max Coleman of Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, who spotted the berries. "It's thought that there's a shift in the balance of hormone-like compounds that...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD OCTOBER 30, 2015

    10/30/2015 1:52:08 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 100 replies
    freerepublic | October 30, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Chickens are evolving 15 TIMES faster than expected:

    10/27/2015 7:41:08 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 121 replies
    Dailymail.co.uk ^ | 27 October 2015 | By Sarah Griffiths for MailOnline
    Scientists discover the birds have developed two mutations in just 50 years Genes of White Plymouth Rock chickens mutated twice in 50 years Scientists previously thought rate of change in mitochondrial genomes was never faster than about two per cent per million years Mutations suggest rate of evolution in the chickens is 15 times faster Study goes against theory evolution can only be seen over long periods
  • Hazelnut shells found at Skye Mesolithic site

    10/25/2015 12:19:41 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | October 22, 2015 | Steven McKenzie
    The remains of hazelnuts eaten by some of Skye's earliest inhabitants were found at a dig on the island, archaeologists have revealed. Hazelnuts were a favourite snack of Mesolithic hunter-gatherers, according to archaeologists at the University of the Highlands and Islands (UHI). The shells found at an excavation above Staffin Bay could be 8,000-years-old. UHI carried out the dig along with Staffin Community Trust, school children and volunteers. Dan Lee, lifelong learning and outreach archaeologist at UHI, said: "We have found lots of fragments of charred hazelnut shells in the lower soil samples. "They are the ideal thing to date...
  • Aboriginal Female Hunters Aided By Dingoes

    10/24/2015 6:23:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ScienceNetwork WA ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | Michelle Wheeler
    In modern society dogs are often referred to as "man's best friend" but according to an archaeological review early Aboriginal society sported a similar relationship between women and dingoes (Canis lupus dingo). The study by UWA and ANU suggests people formed close bonds with dingoes soon after the dogs' arrival on the mainland roughly 4000 years ago, with the dogs enabling women to contribute more hunted food. UWA archaeologist Jane Balme, who led the research, says it is thought the first dingoes arrived on watercraft with people from South East Asia. "What they're doing on the boat is not clear...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD OCTOBER 16, 2015

    10/16/2015 2:04:37 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 86 replies
    freerepublic | 10/16/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Tree distribution supports 'out of Taiwan' hypothesis

    10/15/2015 12:24:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Taipei Behavior, er, Dealer, er, Times! Taipei Times! ^ | Thursday, October 15, 2015 | Chen Wei-han
    An international team led by National Taiwan University forestry professor Chung Kuo-fang... analyzed the chloroplast DNA sequences of 604 paper mulberry samples collected from East Asia, Southeast Asia, and Pacific islands, and found that a specific haplotype, cp-17, which originated in Taiwan, is predominant across the region. It is assumed that paper mulberry, a common East Asian tree used for making paper, was transported across the Pacific by Austronesian people, who used the tree to make bark cloth, Chung said... Paper mulberry is a dioecious species, meaning that the male and female reproductive organs are found on separate plants. Most...
  • Reward Being Offered to Help Catch Cattle Rustlers

    10/14/2015 5:25:11 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 17 replies
    KFOR ^ | OCTOBER 14, 2015 | Reward being offered to help catch cattle rustlers POSTED 10:39 AM, OCTOBER 14, 2015, BY SARAH STEWA
    Special rangers with the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association are on the hunt for cattle rustlers up in Woods County. Authorities say theyve hit several ranches over the past several months and even got away with 41 head of steer from one operation. All of the cattle were reported missing somewhere between May and August when they were set out to pasture. Bouziden Brothers and Sons reported 41 head of yearling steers missing from their property, located in the Waynoka area of Woods County. The steers are all branded with U on their right hip. They also had purple...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD OCTOBER 9, 2015

    10/09/2015 1:47:55 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 45 replies
    freerepublic | October 9, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...