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Keyword: agriculture

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  • The Latest: Trump says he will end 'war on American farmer'

    08/27/2016 5:55:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 63 replies
    Lancaster Farming ^ | August 27, 2016 | The Associated Press
    WASHINGTON (AP) The Latest on the 2016 presidential campaign (all times EDT): 4:20 p.m. Donald Trump is telling Iowans that one of his campaign goals is to "make America grow again." Speaking at a rally Saturday in Des Moines, Iowa, Trump touted his plans to boost economic growth and help American farmers, including his proposal to lower the tax rate on family farms to 15 percent....
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD AUGUST 26, 2016

    08/26/2016 3:57:46 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 54 replies
    freerepublic | aug 26. 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Feds Spend $1 Million for Refugees to Become Farmers

    08/26/2016 2:38:03 AM PDT · by knarf · 26 replies
    The Washington Free Beacon ^ | August 25, 2016 | Elizabeth Harrington
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is spending nearly $1 million to teach refugees how to farm. New grants announced last week include two projects in Idaho and Kansas to cultivate the next generation of farmers by helping refugees get land leases to start their own farms.
  • LEED for vertical farms? Defining high-tech sustainable food

    08/20/2016 3:03:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    Business Green ^ | August 19, 2016 | Lauren Hepler
    The Association for Vertical Farming aims to create the first sustainability standard for towering indoor food systems From shipping containers-turned-micro farms to fruit-picking robots, the wide world of agriculture techis attracting attention and investor dollars as increasingly urgent concerns about food scarcity come into focus. Amid a wave of in-field technology, food data analytics and experimental urban agriculture, the particularly futuristic field of vertical farming is attracting entrants including industrial incumbents such as Fujitsu and upstarts such as AeroFarms, City Farm and Green Sense. As ag tech blooms, attracting a total $4.6 billion in investment during 2015, the nonprofit Association...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD AUGUST 19, 2016

    08/19/2016 3:34:11 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 44 replies
    freerepublic | Aug 19, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Feds Holding Summits for Lesbian Farmers

    08/16/2016 12:37:08 PM PDT · by PROCON · 109 replies
    freebeacon.com ^ | Aug. 16, 2016 | Elizabeth Harrington
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is holding summits to promote the role of lesbian farmers as a part of its Rural Pride campaign. The agency is working with singer and LGBT activist Cyndi Lauper for a day of conversation about the struggles of gay and transgender individuals in rural America. The agency says its wants to change the perception of what it means to be a farmer in America away from the white, rich male. The latest summit, first reported by the College Fix, will be held on August 18 at Drake University in Iowa. The Office of the Assistant...
  • Minnesota farmers turn to bankruptcy as low prices continue

    08/15/2016 10:55:44 AM PDT · by Lorianne · 22 replies
    Mainichi, The ^ | 14 August 2016
    Minnesota's crop, livestock and dairy farmers are suffering with continuing rock bottom prices for their commodities, driving some into bankruptcy. John Quaal, 71, operates a dairy farm near Fergus Falls and tells Minnesota Public Radio News (http://bit.ly/2b5RcoD ) that it's nearly impossible to break even producing milk. "For almost two years now we've been going backwards," said Quaal. "You've got to learn to deal with it I guess. It's just the way it is." Quaal said his farm has lost as much as $40,000 in a single month and figures the family operation lost a total of $300,000 last year....
  • Recent high school grads represent the future of southeast Ohio farming

    08/14/2016 1:58:28 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 7 replies
    The Athens Messenger ^ | July 17, 2016 | Larry Di Giovanni
    Maryrose Littler, who is committed to organic farming and permaculture, picks fresh onions from her grandmother Barbara Keyes’ raised vegetable beds near McArthur.        Two Class of 2016 graduates — organic farmer-in-the making Maryrose Littler, and Kayla Cline, raised on an historic farm in Albany — represent the future of farming in southeastern Ohio. Littler recently graduated from Athens High School and Cline from Alexander High School. Littler enjoys living an organic lifestyle on her parents’ five-acre homestead near Morrison-Gordon Elementary School, where she helps raise honeybees, homegrown vegetables, chickens and beef. She...
  • Twin Falls Police Report Reveals Shocking Details of Latest Refugee Sex Assault

    08/13/2016 1:11:09 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 62 replies
    Big Government (Breitbart) ^ | August 11, 2016 | Lee Stranahan
    TWIN FALLS, IDAHO The victims mother heard her 33-year-old daughter screaming and crying as the mentally disabled daughter ran home Saturday afternoon after allegedly being trapped and sexually assaulted by refugee Mohammed Hussein Eldai. Thats just one of the heartbreaking details in a police report obtained exclusively by Breitbart News that sheds new light on this latest alleged refugee sex attack to hit this small southern Idaho city. Just as many Americans have begun to learn about the shocking early June attack on a five-year-old girl by three Muslim refugee boys who orally and anally penetrated the girl before...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD AUGUST 12, 2016

    08/12/2016 4:04:37 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 74 replies
    freerepublic | Aug. 12, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • This Canadian Startup Wants to Be the Plant Whisperer of Indoor Farming

    08/12/2016 3:05:59 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    Modern Farmer ^ | August 5, 2016 | Andrew Amelinckx
    Two guys from Canada have come up with a new way for everyone from small indoor growers to large-scale vertical farmers to easily automate their operations. Their system's called Motorleaf and it collects data about your plants and then instructs your existing grow equipment to adjust to the crops needs. Think of it as the Nest for your indoor farm. In the summer of 2015, Ramen Dutta began tinkering around with a way to more easily care for his small indoor hobby farm. Although he had a degree in agricultural engineering, he had been working in IT and created an...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD AUGUST 5, 2016

    08/05/2016 6:12:26 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 76 replies
    freerepublic | Aug. 5, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Indoor farming gives former New Jersey arena new lease on life

    08/03/2016 7:39:42 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 19 replies
    Reuters ^ | June 28, 2016 | Gina Cherelus
    In an old warehouse in Newark, New Jersey, that once housed the state's biggest indoor paint ball arena, leafy green plants such as kale, arugula and watercress sprout from tall metal towers under bright lights. A local company named AeroFarms has built what it says is the world's largest indoor vertical farm, without the use of soil or sunlight. Its ambitious goal is to grow high-yielding crops via economical methods to provide locally sourced food to the community, protect the environment and ultimately even combat hunger worldwide. "We use about 95 percent less water to grow the plants, about 50...
  • Where Ag Fosters Self-Reliance from the Ground Up (K-12)

    08/01/2016 10:38:48 AM PDT · by CharlesOConnell · 2 replies
    Freep | 08-01-2016 | Charles O'Connell
    The diary of a Yankee farmer who stopped writing after 20 years in about 1795, was analyzed for equivalence to professions, in the range of tasks he accomplished.It was found that in that 20 year period, he practiced 200 separate crafts, from wheelrighting to coopering, probably a fair amount of small-scale blacksmithy.Where do you find this today? When something breaks down on the farm, the first stop isn't the NAPA, it's your own machine shop.A clue is that the county west of Sacramento which has UC Davis close by, Yolo County, has the highest proportion, percentage of county land in...
  • Venezuelas socialist government adopts forced labor law

    07/29/2016 6:28:09 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 33 replies
    Hot Air ^ | July 29, 2016 | John Sexton
    Venezuelas President Nicolas Maduro has a plan to guarantee food supply, social justice, and democracy. As with most of Maduros plans, it will accomplish none of those things. Vice News reports: A new decree establishing that any employee in Venezuela can be effectively made to work in the countrys fields as a way to fight the current food crisis is unlawful and effectively amounts to forced labor, Amnesty International said in a statement released on Thursday. President Nicols Maduro signed a decree at the end of last week that gives powers to the labor ministry to order all workers from...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JULY 29, 2016

    07/29/2016 2:22:50 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 94 replies
    freerepublic | July 29, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Regulators move to limit wildlife deaths from misuse of deadly fly killer

    07/25/2016 6:15:31 PM PDT · by bkopto · 22 replies
    Science ^ | Feb 18, 2016 | Nala Rogers
    The fly bait companies opposed that solution, however, and instead reached a compromise with EPA in April 2015. By early 2017, the agreement calls for the companies to stop distributing methomyl fly baits to general retailers such as hardware stores, and to stop making small containers. Farm supply stores will still be able to sell larger 4.5- and 18-kilogram containers, which will come with new warning labels and explanatory pamphlets. The companies and EPA plan to monitor reports of misuse through 2020, and further restrict use to licensed applicators if incidents arent significantly reduced. The maker of one of the...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JULY 22, 2016

    07/22/2016 9:11:22 AM PDT · by greeneyes · 56 replies
    freerepublic | July 22, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • One Of Hillarys Top VP Picks Also Destroyed Emails, Used A Secret Account

    07/20/2016 2:58:05 PM PDT · by MaxistheBest · 17 replies
    The Daily Caller ^ | 07/20/2016 | MICHAEL BASTASCH
    One of the top candidates being considered for former Secretary of State Hillary Clintons Running mate in 2016 has had some email problems of his own. Tom Vilsack, the former governor of Iowa and President Barack Obamas current secretary of agriculture, was caught up in a 2004 scandal that resulted in emails being inadvertently destroyed. Vilsack partially blamed himself for destroying emails regarding the Iowa Department of Economic Development Foundation. The Des Moines Register had requested the emails. Vilsacks response to the controversy, rather ironically, mirrored Clintons response to her own email scandal: he basically said he was old and...
  • Orchid or demon: Flower of a new species of orchid looks like a devil's head

    07/17/2016 6:26:09 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 26 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 7/16/2016 | Pensoft Publishers
    A lone and unique population of about 30 reddish to dark violet-maroon orchids grows on the small patch of land between the borders of two Colombian departments. However, its extremely small habitat is far from the only striking thing about the new species. A closer look at its flowers' heart reveals what appears to be a devil's head. Named after its demonic patterns, the new orchid species, Telipogon diabolicus, is described in the open access journal PhytoKeys. Discovered by Dr Marta Kolanowska and Prof Dariusz Szlachetko, both affiliated with University of Gdansk, Poland, together with Dr Ramiro Medina Trejo, Colombia,...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JULY 15, 2016

    07/15/2016 3:20:00 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 180 replies
    freerepublic | July 15, 2016 | greeneyes
    Posted on ‎7‎/‎8‎/‎2016‎ ‎3‎:‎32‎:‎57‎ ‎PM by greeneyes The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to...
  • Does farming have multiple roots? DNA reveals several communities began growing crops 10,000 years a

    07/14/2016 7:53:51 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 6 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | Sarah Griffiths
    Now experts believe several genetically distinct Stone Age hunter-gatherer communities living in the region began to grow crops and keep animals 10,000 years ago, before subsequent generations went on to sow the seeds of farming far and wide. It had been widely assumed that these first farmers were from a single, genetically homogeneous population, said study author Dr Garrett Hellenthal of University College London (UCL). However, we've found that there were deep genetic differences in these early farming populations, indicating very distinct ancestries. A team of researchers examined ancient DNA from four skeletons representing some of the world's first farmers...
  • Jurassic Farm: Can we bring prehistoric bovines back from extinction?

    09/10/2014 1:40:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    modernfarmer.com ^ | September 10, 2014 | By Kristan Lawson
    The 21st-century back-to-the-farm movement stems from our yearning to escape the artificiality of modern urban life. Yet the domesticated plants and animals now found in most gardens and farms are themselves artificial, the results of extensive human meddling, cross-breeding and genetic manipulation. Mankind began engineering what we now call farm animals, including cattle, all the way back in the Neolithic period, between 10,000 and 5,000 B.C. Try as you might, you wont find an untamed Jersey cow that originated naturally in the wild, because no such thing exists just like theres no such thing as a wild labradoodle. Cattle...
  • Archaeologists say Stonehenge was "London of the Mesolithic" in Amesbury investigation

    05/10/2014 2:20:13 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | May 6, 2014 | Ben Miller
    Giant bull, wild boar and red deer bones left at a settlement a mile from Stonehenge prove that Amesbury is the oldest settlement in Britain and has been continually occupied since 8820 BC, according to archaeologists who say the giant monuments were built by indigenous hunters and homemakers rather than Neolithic new builders. Carbon dating of aurochs a breed twice the size of bulls predates the settlers responsible for the massive pine posts at Stonehenge, suggesting that people had first lived in Wiltshire around 3,000 years before the site was created in 3000 BC. Experts had previously thought...
  • Ancient giant cattle genome first

    02/20/2010 5:30:54 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 28 replies · 878+ views
    bbc ^ | 17 February 2010 | Steven McKenzie
    Scientists have analysed the DNA of ancient giant European wild cattle that died out almost 400 years ago. They have determined the first mitochondrial genome sequence from aurochs (Bos primigenius) from bone found in a cave in England. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is passed down from a mother to her offspring....... One of the researchers involved, Dr Ceiridwen Edwards, has previously investigated the remains of a polar bear found in the Scottish Highlands.... The species became extinct when a female animal died in a forest in Poland in 1627. Roman general and dictator Julius Caesar was said to have been impressed...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JULY 8, 2016

    07/08/2016 1:32:57 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 97 replies
    freerepublic | July 8, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Earliest Roman Restaurant Found in France: Night Life Featured Heavy Drinking

    07/03/2016 8:14:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Haaretz ^ | February 23, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    An ancient tavern believed to be more then 2,100 years old has been found in the town of Lattes, southern France, making it the oldest Roman restaurant found in the Mediterranean. They also found evidence that while Romanization changed the locals' dining habits, it didn't do much for the cuisine. Evidently some things never change, though. The excavators in the town of Lattes found indoor gristmills and ovens for baking pita, each about one meter across. This oven, called a tabouna or taboon, is still used throughout the Middle East and Israel. In another room, across the courtyard from the...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JULY 1, 2016

    07/01/2016 2:29:24 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 88 replies
    freerepublic | July 1, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • The worlds oldest paycheck was cashed in beer

    06/29/2016 7:23:28 PM PDT · by ameribbean expat · 30 replies
    On one tablet excavated from the area we can see a human head eating from a bowl, meaning ration, and a conical vessel, meaning beer. Scattered around are scratches recording the amount of beer for a particular worker. Its the worlds oldest known payslip.
  • Ancient Canaanites Imported Animals from Egypt

    06/25/2016 5:03:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 21, 2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    The ancient Canaanites living in Gath some 5,000 years ago weren't sacrificing their own livestock to appease the gods. They were importing animals from ancient Egypt, archaeologists have now proven. A donkey, as well as some sheep and goats whose remains were found in Early Bronze Age layers at Gath dating to 4900 years ago turn out to have been born and bred in the Nile valley.The discovery at the archaeological site of Tell el-Safi shows that animals were part of the extensive trading relations between the Old Kingdom of Egypt and Early Bronze Age Canaan (circa 2900-2500 BCE).... Until...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JUNE 24, 2016

    06/24/2016 2:33:36 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 86 replies
    greeneyes | June 24, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Farming Invented Twice In Middle East, Genomes Study Reveals

    06/22/2016 11:55:17 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Nature ^ | June 20, 2016 | Ewen Callaway
    Study of 44 ancient Middle Eastern genomes supports idea of independent farming revolutions in the Fertile Crescent. Two Middle Eastern populations independently developed farming and then spread the technology to Europe, Africa and Asia, according to the genomes of 44 people who lived thousands of years ago in present-day Armenia, Turkey, Israel, Jordan and Iran. ...the research supports archaeological evidence about the multiple origins of farming, and represents the first detailed look at the ancestry of the individuals behind one of the most important periods in human history the Neolithic revolution. Some 11,000 years ago, humans living in the...
  • Clemson's first harvest of ancient Southern wheat exceeds expectations

    06/20/2016 10:37:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    phys.org ^ | 06-20-2016 | by Jim Melvin & Provided by: Clemson University
    Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Credit: Scott Miller / Clemson University ================================================================================================= The first step of an ongoing-process designed to bring a valuable heirloom wheat back from the brink of extinction has been completed with flying colors. Last month, Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Purple Straw is the only heirloom wheat to have been cultivated continually in the South from...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JUNE 17, 2016

    06/17/2016 4:11:41 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 85 replies
    freerepublic | June 17, 2017 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Oldest noodles unearthed in China

    10/12/2005 1:36:46 PM PDT · by bigmac0707 · 78 replies · 1,386+ views
    BBC News ^ | 9/12/05 | BBC News
    Oldest noodles unearthed in China Late Neolithic noodles: They may settle the origin debate The 50cm-long, yellow strands were found in a pot that had probably been buried during a catastrophic flood. Radiocarbon dating of the material taken from the Lajia archaeological site on the Yellow River indicates the food was about 4,000 years old. Scientists tell the journal Nature that the noodles were made using grains from millet grass - unlike modern noodles, which are made with wheat flour. The discovery goes a long way to settling the old argument over who first created the string-like food. Professor Houyuan...
  • 'Farming in India began much earlier'

    12/05/2006 10:59:05 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 403+ views
    Hindustan Times ^ | December 3, 2006 | HT Correspondent
    Professor VD Mishra said that new researches have revealed that agricultural practices in India started in Mesolithic period (6-7,000 BC), much before the Neolithic period (4000 BC) as is generally believed. This discovery has proved that agriculture in India started simultaneously with other parts of the world. He said that Sativa rice, discovered from excavations at Chopni in Belan valley, has proved that India did not lag behind in agriculture... Joshi said that encroachments around historical monuments should be stopped because it harms our heritage. Citing an example, he said that Gwalior Fort could not be declared World Heritage due...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD JUNE 10, 2016

    06/10/2016 4:16:42 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 200 replies
    freerepublic | June 10, 2016 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you wont be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isnt asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • SEE IT: Japanese high school students hatch a baby chick without a shell

    06/08/2016 1:21:51 PM PDT · by EinNYC · 22 replies
    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS ^ | June 8, 2016 | MOLLY CRANE-NEWMAN
    What an eggsperiment! A group of high school students in Japan have made an incredible discovery - they've figured out how to hatch a perfectly healthy chick from an egg without the shell. The discovery is so significant, the students' findings have been published in a scientific journal. The experiment - which was filmed and then shared on YouTube - consists of a few very simple steps and takes less than one month. By day three - the little chick's heart had formed, and by day five, the outline of its body could be seen. In just three weeks, a...
  • Researchers develop method to produce sweeter, well-growing tomatoes

    06/07/2016 11:47:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    6-7-2016 | Provided by: Tohoku University Japan
    The researchers think it is likely that most flowering plants, or angiosperms, contain similar sucrose-susceptible genes, making their sweetening technology widely applicable. Credit: Cienpies Design ================================================================================================= Previous research has shown that the sugar sucrose plays a role in controlling key fruit genes involved in sugar metabolism. Efforts to control these genes succeeded in increasing the sugar content in fruit but also resulted in stunted growth. Researchers from Tohoku University in Japan used a bioinformatics search tool to find nucleotide sequences in the tomato genome similar to a known tobacco gene sequence that can be repressed by sucrose. When a special...
  • Have humans made dogs STUPID? Pets are 'lazy thinkers' compared to wild wolves and [tr]

    09/16/2015 5:24:45 AM PDT · by C19fan · 74 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 16, 2015 | Richard Gray
    They may be man's best friend, but dogs have little to thank humans for it seems. Research suggests the domesticated pets can't solve problems as well as their wild cousins because living with us has made them 'incapable of thinking for themselves.' In tests, experts presented a 'puzzle box' containing food to a group of dogs, and a group of wolves and while the wolves were capable of breaking inside, the dogs looked to humans for help.
  • Canine Copycats Can Mirror Other Dogs' Emotions (Dogs Read Feelings)

    12/23/2015 11:27:24 AM PST · by goldstategop · 17 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12/23/2015 | Helen Briggs
    Dogs can copy each other's expressions in a split-second just like people, showing signs of basic empathy, according to Italian researchers. Mimicking each other's facial expressions is a human habit, which helps people to get along. Dogs do the same to bond with other dogs, scientists report in the journal, Royal Society Open Science. They think dogs may be showing a basic built-in form of empathy, enabling them to pick up on emotions. And the phenomenon may have emerged in our canine companions during the process of domestication, say scientists from the Natural History Museum, University of Pisa.
  • Dogs Mimic Each Other’s Expressions, Too

    12/27/2015 12:35:34 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 13 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | 12-22-15 | Rachel Nuwer
    This week, millions of people around the world will no doubt experience rapid mimicry-an involuntary, split-second mirroring of another person's facial expressions-as they exchange smiles over gifts, good meals and holiday traditions. This phenomenon, observed in humans and many other primates, is considered a basic building block of our ability to feel empathy. "When your companion or friend smiles, you don't know why exactly, but you immediately react with the same smile to him or her," says Elisabetta Palagi, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Pisa in Italy. "It’s an extremely important phenomenon, because through this mimicry you can...
  • Dogs can read human emotions, study finds (only other species shown to be capable of this)

    01/13/2016 5:26:46 PM PST · by presidio9 · 135 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 13 Jan 2016 | Sophie Jamieson
    Dogs really are man's best friend, it seems, as researchers have shown they can recognise emotions in humans by combining information from different senses. They are the only creatures outside of humans who have been observed to have that ability. -SNIP- "Our study shows that dogs have the ability to integrate two different sources of sensory information into a coherent perception of emotion in both humans and dogs. "To do so requires a system of internal categorisation of emotional states. This cognitive ability has until now only been evidenced in primates and the capacity to do this across species only...
  • 'Golden jackals' of East Africa are actually 'golden wolves'

    07/30/2015 10:32:37 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-30-2015 | Provided by: Cell Press
    A golden jackal (Canis anthus) from Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Based on genomic results, the researchers suggest this animal be referred to as the African golden wolf, which is distinct from the Eurasian golden jackal (Canis aureus). Credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson ======================================================================================================================= Despite their remarkably similar appearance, the "golden jackals" of East Africa and Eurasia are actually two entirely different species. The discovery, based on DNA evidence and reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 30, increases the overall biodiversity of the Canidaethe group including dogs, wolves, foxes, and jackalsfrom 35 living species to 36. "This...
  • Have humans made dogs STUPID? Pets are 'lazy thinkers' compared to wild wolves

    09/16/2015 6:45:14 PM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 63 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 16 September 2015 | RICHARD GRAY
    They may be man's best friend, but dogs have little to thank humans for it seems. Research suggests the domesticated pets can't solve problems as well as their wild cousins because living with us has made them 'incapable of thinking for themselves.' In tests, experts presented a 'puzzle box' containing food to a group of dogs, and a group of wolves and while the wolves were capable of breaking inside, the dogs looked to humans for help.
  • Living with humans has taught dogs morals, say scientists

    08/21/2008 6:11:16 AM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 63 replies · 183+ views
    The Daily Mail UK ^ | 21st August 2008 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Dogs are becoming more intelligent and are even learning morals from human contact, scientists claim. They say the fact that dogs' play rarely escalates into a fight shows the animals abide by social rules. During one study, dogs which held up a paw were rewarded with a food treat. When a lone dog was asked to raise its paw but received no treat, the researchers found it begged for up to 30 minutes. But when they tested two dogs together but rewarded only one, the dog which missed out soon stopped playing the game. Dr Friederike Range, of the University...
  • Otago Researchers Sequence Kuri Dog Genomes

    10/08/2015 1:55:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    University of Otago ^ | Thursday, October 8, 2015 | Ms Karen Greig
    The genetic heritage of New Zealand's first dog, the now extinct kuri, is being unravelled by University of Otago scientists using state-of-the-art ancient DNA analysis. University of Otago PhD student Karen Greig has sequenced the complete, or near complete, mitochondrial genomes of 14 kuri represented by bones recovered from Wairau Bar, one on New Zealand's earliest and most important archaeological sites. Kuri were smallish dogs about the size of cocker spaniels and were brought to New Zealand from East Polynesia in the colonising canoes that arrived in the early fourteenth century AD. They were the only domesticated animal to be...
  • Dogs 'Can Trace Origins To Central Asia'

    10/21/2015 2:37:41 PM PDT · by blam · 51 replies
    BBC ^ | 10-20-2015 | Paul Rincon
    By Paul Rincon 20 October 2015 Dogs may have become man's best friend in Central Asia, according to the study Today's dogs can trace their origins to Central Asia, according to one of the most comprehensive genetic surveys yet. Dogs are the most diverse animal on the planet - a legacy of thousands of years of selective breeding by humans. But they derive from wild wolves that were gradually tamed and inducted into human hunting groups - perhaps near Mongolia or Nepal. The findings come from an analysis of DNA from thousands of pooches, and are published in PNAS journal....
  • Fossils reveal felines drove 40 species of canines to extinction after arriving in North [tr]

    08/13/2015 6:14:53 AM PDT · by C19fan · 26 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | August 13, 2015 | Jack Millner
    You may think your dog has an irrational hatred of cats, but their instinct to chase felines out of their territory might be more reasonable than you think. Fossils have revealed the two species have a rocky past after the introduction of cats to the Americas had a devastating effect on the continent's species of wild dogs. In fact, it is thought that competition from cats caused up to 40 species of dog to become extinct in the region millions of years ago.
  • Reading An Ancient Bond In The Look Of Puppy Love

    03/06/2016 5:39:38 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    University of Alberta ^ | March 1, 2016 | Geoff McMaster
    The irresistible gaze of "puppy-dog eyes" has roots in thousands of years of human evolution alongside domesticated dogs, says anthropologist Robert Losey. Anyone who owns a dog is familiar with the "gaze" -- that hypnotic, imploring stare that demands reciprocation. It can seem to hold a world of mystery and longing, or just pure bafflement at what makes humans tick. It turns out that the look of mutual recognition between human and dog reflects thousands of years of evolution, a bond programmed into our very body chemistry. Last spring a research team in Japan discovered that both species release a...