Free Republic 3rd Qtr 2020 Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $2,820
3%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 3% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: agriculture

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Olives First Domesticated 7,000 Years Ago in Israel, Study Says

    07/01/2020 10:23:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Haaretz ^ | March 11, 2020 | Ariel David
    Villagers in what is today Israel were the first to cultivate olive trees, an international study that pooled data from countries surrounding the Mediterranean Sea has concluded. This start of olive domestication apparently began in the Galilee around 7,000 to 6,500 years ago, the team estimates. Olives and especially olive oil were staples of ancient economies around the Mediterranean Basin: The oil was used for cooking, lighting as well as medicinal and ritual purposes. But so far there has been little agreement among researchers as to where and when people first domesticated the plant. Dating estimates have ranged from more...
  • First evidence that ancient humans ate snakes and lizards is unearthed in Israel

    06/28/2020 12:17:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Live Science ^ | June 25, 2020 | Mindy Weisberger
    Human communities in the Levant at this time were known as Natufian. They were primarily hunters and foragers and are considered the first non-nomadic society; the semi-sedentary habits of Natufian culture were likely a precursor to humans settling down and becoming farmers. At the el-Wad Terrace settlement, the site was densely layered with animal remains, of which "a high percentage" belonged to lizards and snakes, the researchers reported in a new study, published online June 10 in the journal Scientific Reports. The quantity of squamate bones at the site was astonishing; that alone hinted at human consumption as a possible...
  • weekly Garden Thread - June 27 - July 3, 2020

    06/27/2020 6:25:41 AM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 87 replies
    June 27, 2020 | Diana in Wisconsin/Greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. If you have specific question about a plant/problem you are having, please remember to state the Growing Zone where you are located. This thread is non-political respite. No matter what, you won’t be flamed, and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the...
  • Nextrush Unplugged: Weekend Edition DC 19 Freedom In Idaho?...John Roberts Runs The Country?

    06/20/2020 8:00:51 PM PDT · by Nextrush · 7 replies
    Nextrush Free ^ | 6/20/2020 | Nextrush/Self
    Before the music lets talk about plans for next week in Idaho with legislators seeking to end martial law and the emergency rule of Republican Governor Brad Little. They intend to attempt a meeting on Tuesday morning at 9 am in Boise at the State Capitol...... And Dame Vera Lynn passed away this week at the age of 103. She is remembered for her wartime singing but of course that song "We'll Meet Again" was the closing of "Dr. Strangelove's" working the government officials to dictate our lives.... I guess this is a good lead into John Bolton and his...
  • Give Up Your Farm

    06/07/2020 9:49:10 AM PDT · by The Louiswu · 92 replies
    Me | 6/7/2020 | Me
    I’m wondering, since this BLM movement seems to have gained the upper hand in the US, before extra-governmental groups begin going to rural areas and demanding White owners give up their farms and. Businesses. It happened in South Africa, I believe it’s just a matter of time.
  • Maya monuments and maize in the Americas [LIDAR discovery of Aguada Fenix]

    06/04/2020 8:51:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Cosmos ^ | Wednesday, June 3, 2020 | Nick Carne
    In Mexico, LiDAR (light detection and ranging) equipment uncovered what researchers say is the largest and oldest known Maya monument, while in neighbouring Belize, isotopic analysis of human remains provided the earliest timeline for the adoption of maize as a staple crop. The discovery at Tabasco near the border with Guatemala suggests the Maya civilisation developed more rapidly than previously thought and hints at less social inequality than in later periods, according to the international research team led by Takeshi Inomata and Daniela Triadan from the University of Arizona US. Known as Aguada Fénix, the monument lurked beneath the surface...
  • News Summary-Intelligence Report Monday 6/1/2020

    06/01/2020 8:29:31 PM PDT · by Nextrush · 7 replies
    Nextrush Free ^ | 6/01/2020 | Nextrush/Self
    China makes a move to end imports of American agricultural products but first..... Speaking in a video posted Sunday Libertarian activist and People's Rights leader Ammon Bundy spoke about the present situtation across the United States noting among other things: "There's middle ground that's right...the police haven't been right they're not right, rioters are not right, they're in the wrong...... The owner of a Louisville, Kentucky business shot dead when Louisville Police and National Guard forces opened fire early this morning. They claimed they were fired upon. David McAtee's sister said: "My brother did nothing wrong. He was an innocent...
  • Corn prices keep slumping, and farmers keep planting more

    05/27/2020 7:53:27 AM PDT · by fluorescence · 10 replies
    StarTribune ^ | May 22, 2020 | Adam Belz
    Corn farmers are throwing another government-backed Hail Mary this year, planting more of the crop than in 2019 even though prices are near the bottom of a six-year slump. “They call it plant and pray,” said Al Kluis, a commodities broker in Wayzata. “What you want is a disaster in some other part of the Corn Belt or some other country.” Favorable weather in April helped most Minnesota farmers get corn in the ground faster than last year, when a wet spring kept them out of some fields until June and some cornfields were never planted. But despite all those...
  • Weekly Garden Thread - May 23-29, 2020

    05/23/2020 7:34:43 AM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 123 replies
    May 23, 2020 | Diana in Wisconsin/Greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. If you have specific question about a plant/problem you are having, please remember to state the Growing Zone where you are located. This thread is non-political respite. No matter what, you won’t be flamed, and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the...
  • Brewing beer may be an older craft than we realized in some places

    05/21/2020 7:06:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | May 7, 2020 | Maria Temming
    Microscopic signatures of malting could help reveal which prehistoric people had a taste for beer. Ancient beer is difficult to trace, because many of beer’s chemical ingredients, like alcohol, don’t preserve well (SN: 9/28/04). But a new analysis of modern and ancient malted grain indicates that malting’s effects on grain cell structure can last millennia. This microscopic evidence could help fill in the archaeological record of beer consumption, providing insight into the social, ritual and dietary roles this drink played in prehistoric cultures, researchers report online May 7 in PLOS ONE. Malting, the first step in brewing beer, erodes cell...
  • Gardening Essentials - Peat Moss

    05/21/2020 11:51:33 AM PDT · by orsonwb · 20 replies
    The How Do Gardener ^ | May 8, 2020 | The How Do Gardener
    Peat Moss. Learn what it is, why it is used in gardening, and if it is sustainable...WATCH THE VIDEO
  • Long Frozen DNA Shows How Humans Made Horses Faster - and

    04/28/2017 4:23:08 PM PDT · by SteveH · 58 replies
    The WaPo ^ | April 27 2017 | Ben Guarino
    At some point in the past two millennia — peanuts on an evolutionary time scale — humans transformed their horses into equine speed demons. Selective breeding had a price, though, beyond $30,000 vials of pedigreed racehorse sperm. Unhelpful mutations plagued the animals. The current population of domesticated horses is about 55 million, but at some point in their history, their genetic diversity crashed. The Y chromosomes of all the world's stallions are now quite similar, suggesting that only a relatively few males were the ancestors of today's horses. Humans have not always bred so selectively, according to a study published...
  • How did the plague reshape Bronze Age Europe?

    05/20/2020 9:37:06 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | December 3, 2019 | Anthony King
    ...Prof. Haak will also try to detect more plague DNA in hundreds of skeletons from the late Neolithic and early Bronze Age. So far, DNA evidence from a dozen skeletons points to little variability between the strains of Yersinia pestis in such remains, suggesting that the pestilence spread rapidly across the continent. The speed may owe to another human advance at this time -- the domestication of wild horses, which may literally have carried the disease into Europe. "We see the change from wild local horses to domesticated horses, which happened rapidly at the beginning of the Bronze Age," said...
  • New technique delivers complete DNA sequences of chromosomes inherited from mother and father

    05/19/2020 9:31:27 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    University of Adelaide ^ | May 7 2020 | Cathy Parker
    An international team of scientists led by the University of Adelaide's Davies Research Centre has shown that it is possible to disentangle the DNA sequences of the chromosomes inherited from the mother and the father, to create true diploid genomes from a single individual. In a report published in Nature Communications, and funded by the Davies Research Centre over the past 15 years, the researchers have shown that genomes of two important modern-day cattle breeds, Angus (Bos taurus taurus) and Brahman (Bos taurus indicus), can be completely decoded from a single hybrid individual carrying the genetics of both breeds, using...
  • Neanderthals Made Leather-Working Tools from Bison and Aurochs Ribs

    05/19/2020 9:42:27 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Science News ^ | May 11, 2020 | News Staff / Source
    Neanderthals selected rib bones from specific animals to make the lissoirs (French for 'smoothers'), which are bone tools that have been intentionally shaped and used on animal hides to make them softer and more water resistant, according to new research led by paleoanthropologists from the University of California, Davis. Scientists know that some Neanderthals produced bone tools. These include the discovery of five nearly identical fragments of lissoirs from two Paleolithic sites in southwest France: Pech-de-l'Azé I (Pech I) and Abri Peyrony. These specialized tools are often worn so smooth that it's impossible to tell which animal they came from...
  • Weekly Garden Thread - May 16-22, 2020

    05/16/2020 7:11:20 AM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 73 replies
    May 16, 2020 | Diana in Wisconsin/Greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. If you have specific question about a plant/problem you are having, please remember to state the Growing Zone where you are located. This thread is non-political respite. No matter what, you won’t be flamed, and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the...
  • Most Farmers in the Great Plains Don’t Grow Fruits and Vegetables. The Pandemic is Changing That.

    05/15/2020 9:27:27 AM PDT · by Ellendra · 47 replies
    Civil Eats ^ | 5-12-2020 | Daphne Miller
    On a recent Thursday, a group of farmers from Oklahoma, Kansas, and Nebraska hosted a remote agriculture happy hour. There were a few dozen attendees, and nearly everyone was wearing a cowboy hat. In total, they farm more than 30,000 acres of cropland, most of it planted in soy, corn, or cotton destined for the global commodity market. The happy hour started with presentations about integrating livestock into cropping systems, but then things took a surprising turn: farmers began to discuss how they are feeding their families and communities. “Normally, between me and the consumer there is a gigantic divide...
  • How And Why America’s Food System Is Cracking

    05/14/2020 6:36:54 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 44 replies
    The Federalist ^ | May 14, 2020 | Christopher Bedford
    Before government shut the nation down, Americans ate half their meals outside home. The farmers who served restaurants and cafeterias are dumping meat, veggies, and milk. And it's going to get worse. America’s food system is cracking.People are still eating, farmers are still farming, and grocery stores are still open, but in areas around the country, shoppers looking for meat, milk, and other products find empty shelves and limits on what they can purchase — all while farmers from coast to coast are forced to dump milk, plow up vegetables, and euthanize livestock. So what’s happening, and why?There isn’t a...
  • Federal Judge in Fresno Temporarily Blocks Trump Water Plan [California]

    05/12/2020 11:11:40 PM PDT · by kiryandil · 8 replies
    GVWire ^ | May 12, 2020 | Bill McEwen
    Federal Judge Dale A. Drozd temporarily blocked President Donald Trump’s efforts to send more water to Central Valley growers on Monday. Drozd issued a preliminary injunction in two lawsuits brought against the administration by California’s Natural Resources Agency and Environmental Protection Agency and a half-dozen environmental groups. Federal Pumping Can’t Increase During May The order bars the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation until May 31 from increasing water exports from the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta through the federal Central Valley Project. The suits argued that the exports would cause irreparable harm to species protected by state and federal law. “Today’s victory...
  • Gardening Essentials | Vermiculite

    05/12/2020 12:51:36 PM PDT · by orsonwb · 20 replies
    The How Do Gardener ^ | April 20, 2020 | The How Do Gardener
    Vermiculite. Learn what it is, why it is used in gardening, and if it is safe to use. WATCH THE VIDEO...