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Keyword: agriculture

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 16 APRIL 17, 2015

    04/17/2015 1:08:22 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 91 replies
    freerepublic | April 17, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Green Jackfruit: is ‘Pulled Pork for Vegetarians’ the Next Big Food Craze?

    04/13/2015 9:43:31 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 29 replies
    Late last year, after 18 years of litigation, a senior government official in Kerala, south-west India was given a prison sentence after being convicted of theft. The object he stole was government property, and it was so large he had to have it cut up to get it home. A piece of art, perhaps? A precious metal? Actually, it was a 40-year-old jackfruit tree, and, once you’ve tasted its fruit, you begin to understand why he did it. To say the jackfruit is big is an understatement. It is the largest tree-borne fruit on the planet – it isn’t unusual...
  • Agriculture poses immense threat to environment, German study says

    04/12/2015 12:37:01 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 22 replies
    EurActiv ^ | 04/10/2015 – 08:12 | Nicole Sagener
    Conventional agriculture is causing enormous environmental damage in Germany, warns a study by the country’s Federal Environment Agency, saying a transition to organic farming and stricter regulation is urgently needed. EurActiv Germany reports. Spanning over 50% of the country, agriculture takes up by far the biggest amount of land in the country, and is one of its most important economic sectors. But intensive farming still harms the environment to an alarming extent, according to a study conducted by the Federal Environment Agency (UBA). The use of pesticides and fertilizers, as well as intensive animal husbandry, have a negative impact on...
  • High-tech vertical farming facility taking shape in north Pasadena (Texas)

    04/11/2015 7:29:53 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    The Pasadena Citizen ^ | April 10, 2015 | Kristi Nix
    Pasadena city officials recently signed a letter of intent to develop a vertical farming facility and education center in north Pasadena through an agreement with Indoor Harvest Corp., a Houston-based company that designs and sells hydroponic systems and specializes in high-tech urban farming techniques. “We were looking for low-impact development projects for north Pasadena and came up with the idea of vertical farming, which seemed to be a perfect fit for that area,” Pasadena Publications Manager Wayne Holt said. “We also hope to eventually add a farmer’s market and educational programs in partnership with Pasadena ISD. This type of project...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD APRIL 10, 2015

    04/10/2015 8:14:14 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 120 replies
    freerepublic | April 10, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Lab-Grown Burgers Become So Cheap, They Might be in Supermarkets Soon

    04/10/2015 7:44:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 48 replies
    Sputnik International ^ | April 7, 2015
    Scientists in the Netherlands are one step closer to producing a viable lab-grown alternative to the conventional beef burger patty. Last year, Professor Mark Post and his team of scientists at the Maastricht University in the Netherlands produced the first prototype of a lab-grown burger. Benefits of this new burger production method include a decrease in animal slaughter, savings in land, water, and energy use required for livestock, and a reduction in greenhouse gases. The project has faced several hurdles, though, not the least of which was the enormous price tag of 250,000 Euros, or $273,000. That was roughly how...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, APRIL 3, 2015

    04/03/2015 1:24:44 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 134 replies
    freerepublic | 4/3/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Tree Grown From 2,000-Year-Old Seed Has Reproduced

    03/29/2015 5:41:32 PM PDT · by EBH · 44 replies
    Smithsonianmag.com ^ | 3/26/2015 | Laura Clark
    et out the cigars—Methuselah, a Judean date palm tree that was grown from a 2,000 year old seed, has become a papa plant. Elaine Solowey, of the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies at Kibbutz Ketura in Israel, recently broke the good news to National Geographic: “He is over three meters [ten feet] tall, he's got a few offshoots, he has flowers, and his pollen is good," she says. "We pollinated a female with his pollen, a wild [modern] female, and yeah, he can make dates." Methuselah sprouted back in 2005, when agriculture expert Solowey germinated his antique seed. It had...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 13 MARCH 27, 2015

    03/27/2015 1:25:20 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 188 replies
    freerepublic | 12/27/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Prehistoric stone tools bear 500,000-year-old animal residue

    03/21/2015 6:02:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | March 19, 2015 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    Tel Aviv University discovers first direct evidence early flint tools were used to butcher animal carcasses. Some 2.5 million years ago, early humans survived on a paltry diet of plants. As the human brain expanded, however, it required more substantial nourishment - namely fat and meat - to sustain it. This drove prehistoric man, who lacked the requisite claws and sharp teeth of carnivores, to develop the skills and tools necessary to hunt animals and butcher fat and meat from large carcasses. Among elephant remains some 500,000 years old at a Lower Paleolithic site in Revadim, Israel, Prof. Ran Barkai...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 12, MARCH 20, 2015

    03/20/2015 12:49:03 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 233 replies
    freerepublic | 3/20/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Discoveries Challenge Beliefs on Humans’ Arrival in the Americas

    03/28/2014 9:09:21 AM PDT · by Theoria · 68 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 27 Mar 2014 | SIMON ROMERO
    Niede Guidon still remembers her astonishment when she glimpsed the paintings. Preserved amid the bromeliad-encrusted plateaus that tower over the thorn forests of northeast Brazil, the ancient rock art depicts fierce battles among tribesmen, orgiastic scenes of prehistoric revelry and hunters pursuing their game, spears in hand. “These were stunning compositions, people and animals together, not just figures alone,” said Dr. Guidon, 81, remembering what first lured her and other archaeologists in the 1970s to this remote site where jaguars still prowl. Hidden in the rock shelters where prehistoric humans once lived, the paintings number in the thousands. Some are...
  • A Carpet of Stone Tools in the Sahara

    03/14/2015 4:01:07 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | March 11, 2015 | editors
    A new intensive survey of the Messak Settafet escarpment, a massive outcrop of sandstone in the middle of the Saharan desert, has shown that stone tools occur "ubiquitously" across the entire landscape: averaging 75 artefacts per square metre, or 75 million per square kilometre. Researchers say the vast 'carpet' of stone-age tools -- extracted from and discarded onto the escarpment over hundreds of thousands of years -- is the earliest known example of an entire landscape being modified by hominins: the group of creatures that include us and our ancestral species. The Messak Settafet runs a total length of 350...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 11, MARCH 13, 2015

    03/13/2015 12:27:32 PM PDT · by greeneyes · 126 replies
    freerepublic | 3/13/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Paying fealty to farmers: When Ted Cruz is the only person talking sense, something is wrong

    03/12/2015 2:10:41 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 9 replies
    The Economist ^ | March 14, 2015 | The Editors
    A FEW years ago, while reporting on the madness that is European farm subsidies, this columnist came up with a “Richard Scarry” rule of politics. Most politicians hate to confront any profession or industry that routinely appears in children’s books (such as those penned by the late Mr Scarry). This gives outsize power to such folk as farmers, fishermen, doctors, firemen or—to cite a fine work in the Scarry canon—to firms that build Cars and Trucks and Things That Go. The rule is seldom good news for taxpayers, and there is a logic to that too: picture books rarely show...
  • Ancient Africans used 'no fly zones' to bring herds south

    03/12/2015 7:02:39 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Washington University ^ | March 9, 2015 | Gerry Everding
    Once green, the Sahara expanded 5,500 years ago, leading ancient herders to follow the rain and grasslands south to eastern Africa. But about 2,000 years ago, their southward migration stalled out, stopped in its tracks, archaeologists presumed, by tsetse-infested bush and disease. As the theory goes, the tiny tsetse fly altered the course of history, stopping the spread of domesticated animal herding with a bite that carries sleeping sickness and nagana, diseases often fatal for the herder and the herded. Now, isotopic research on animal remains from a nearly 2,000-year-old settlement near Gogo Falls in the present-day bushy woodlands of...
  • Researchers: We know secret of Joseph's biblical pest control

    04/21/2008 3:57:10 PM PDT · by Between the Lines · 17 replies · 124+ views
    Haaretz ^ | 4/21/08 | Ran Shapira
    The remains of a burnt beetle found in a grain of wheat about 3,500 years old provided a group of researchers from Bar-Ilan University with a key to a question the Bible left without a definite answer: How did Joseph the Dreamer, who became the viceroy to the king of Egypt, succeed in preserving the grain during the seven lean years and prevent Egypt's population from starving? According to the description in the book of Genesis, during the seven years of plenty in Egypt, Joseph had all the wheat collected in silos. "And he gathered up all the food of...
  • Bill Nye now agrees with Ted Cruz that GMOs are good things

    03/09/2015 5:08:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    The Houston Examiner ^ | March 9, 2015 | Mark Whittington
    Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas told the Iowa Ag Conference that it was time to “push back” on “anti-science zealotry” concerning GMOs or genetically modified organisms, according to a Saturday story in the Washington Times. GMOs are crops that have been modified to have desirable traits, such as resistance to pests or to contain certain helpful vitamins and nutrients that they otherwise would not have. Oddly enough, Bill Nye, the former “science guy” and former GMO opponent has come around to Cruz’s point of view. Nye, who is not a scientist but played one once on Children’s television, has joined in...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 10 MARCH 6, 2015

    03/06/2015 12:47:33 PM PST · by greeneyes · 100 replies
    freerepublic | 3/6/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Determining recipes for some of the world's oldest preserved beers

    03/04/2015 10:20:58 AM PST · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 03-04-2015 | Provided by American Chemical Society
    Some breweries have taken to resurrecting the flavors of ages past. Adventurous beer makers are extrapolating recipes from clues that archeologists have uncovered from old and even ancient brews found at historical sites. Now scientists have analyzed some of the oldest preserved beer samples from an 1840s' shipwreck to try to provide insight into how they were made. They report their findings in ACS' Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. Brian Gibson and colleagues explain that in 2010, divers discovered an old schooner at the bottom of the Baltic Sea near Finland. Archeological evidence suggested the ship went down about...
  • How hunting with wolves helped humans outsmart the Neanderthals

    02/28/2015 7:20:56 PM PST · by E. Pluribus Unum · 80 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 02/28/2015
    Dogs are humanity’s oldest friends, renowned for their loyalty and abilities to guard, hunt and chase. But modern humans may owe even more to them than we previously realised. We may have to thank them for helping us eradicate our caveman rivals, the Neanderthals.
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 9 FEBRUARY 27, 2015

    02/27/2015 12:35:01 PM PST · by greeneyes · 96 replies
    freerepublic | 2/27/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Britain Imported Wheat 2,000 Years Before Growing It

    02/26/2015 6:45:03 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 18 replies
    scientificamerican.com ^ | Cynthia Graber
    Early farming began in the Near East about 10,500 years ago. Farming first reached the Balkans in Europe some 8 to 9,000 years ago, and then crept westward. Locals in Britain, separated from the mainland by the relatively newly formed English Channel, did not start farming until about 6,000 years ago. But an analysis of sediment from a submerged British archaeological site called Bouldner Cliff found something unexpected. “Amongst our Bouldner Cliff samples we found ancient DNA evidence of wheat at the site, which was not seen in mainland Britain for another 2,000 years.” Robin Allaby of the University of...
  • Forget Pizza Delivery: How Drones in Construction and Agriculture Help Save Time and Money

    02/24/2015 1:49:12 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 6 replies
    Autodesk ^ | February 12, 2015 | Jeff Walsh
    When people discuss business uses for drones, they tend to jump to the novelty end of the consumer market—from the drone hobbyist with a GoPro camera to a complete overhaul of delivery services. “In the press, you always hear that Amazon will deliver a book, or pizzas will come to your house,” says Amar Hanspal, senior vice president at Autodesk, during a recent discussion on drones at Gigaom Structure Connect. “That is a cute thing to talk about, but the real action is in B2B industrial applications. That is where we’re watching the democratization of a broad use of drones...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD, VOLUME 8 FEBRUARY 20, 2015

    02/20/2015 12:51:08 PM PST · by greeneyes · 190 replies
    freerepublic | 2/20/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • Letter from Ireland: Mystery of the Fulacht Fiadh

    02/19/2015 2:24:40 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2012 | Erin Mullally
    On a typically misty morning in the west of Ireland, just outside the medieval town of Athenry, County Galway, archaeologist Declan Moore... is taking me to visit an unexcavated fulacht fiadh (pronounced FULL-ahk FEE-add), or fulachtaí fia in plural, the most common type of prehistoric archaeological site in Ireland. Better known as a "burnt mound" in the neighboring United Kingdom, where they are also found, there are nearly 6,000 recorded fulacht fiadh sites dotted around Ireland alone... When we arrive at the site, Moore shows me the basic features of a fulacht fiadh -- a horseshoe-shaped mound of soil and...
  • Ancient artefacts at Tullaghoge [Ireland, 5000 BC]

    02/19/2015 1:31:39 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Belfast Telegraph ^ | February 15, 2015 | unattributed
    An archaeological bid to discover more about the hilltop where Ulster chieftains were crowned 700 years ago has uncovered artefacts dating back more than 7,000 years. Tullaghoge Fort in rural Co Tyrone was the place leaders of the dominant O'Neill clan came to be crowned from around the 14th Century to just before the arrival of the planters at the start of the 17th Century. Targeted excavation work around the picturesque tree encircled earthen mound ahead of the planned development of new visitor facilities hoped to find and preserve buried artefacts from that period -- but it ended up unearthing...
  • Pictures from an intervention: Venezuela Government takes over Hato El Charcote

    01/09/2005 5:18:21 PM PST · by Kitten Festival · 13 replies · 1,286+ views
    The Devil's Excrement (Venezuela) ^ | Jan. 9, 2005 | Miguel Octavio
    The Government of Cojedes state took over as proimised the British owned cattle ranch Hato El Charcote. The Goveror stil claims they are respecing private property, but "it is not absolute" whatever that means. You can read more about it here, here and here. The people at the bottom are not part of the intervention, they are the invaders of the ranch, who are protesting because the Government apparently is not going to give them the intervened land, but it will be handed over to 28 cooperatives of farmers.
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 7 FEB. 13, 2015

    02/13/2015 1:01:56 PM PST · by greeneyes · 90 replies
    freerepublic | Feb. 13., 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. Planting, Harvest to Table(recipes)preserving, good living - there is no...
  • ...Why was the wine of the Negev so renowned in the Byzantine Empire...

    02/13/2015 12:07:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Israel Antiquities Authority ^ | February 2015 | unattributed
    For the first time, grape seeds from the Byzantine era have been found. These grapes were used to produce "the Wine of the Negev" -- one of the finest and most renowned wines in the whole of the Byzantine Empire. The charred seeds, over 1,500 years-old, were found at the Halutza excavation site in the Negev during a joint dig by the University of Haifa and the Israel Antiquities Authority. "The vines growing in the Negev today are European varieties, whereas the Negev vine was lost to the world. Our next job is to recreate the ancient wine, and perhaps...
  • Berkeley Offers Lecture on "Queer Agriculture"

    02/10/2015 1:16:04 PM PST · by rightistight · 28 replies
    Pundit Press ^ | 2/10/15 | Aurelius
    The University of California, Berkeley is offering a lecture today on "queer agriculture." Presented by Bailey Kier from the University of Maryland, the talk is officially titled, "Queering Agriculture: Food Security in the Nation's Capital and the Crises of Reproductive American Familism." The description of the talk asks, "Why queer agriculture," then answers, "This talk highlights vital ways queering and trans-ing ideas and practices of agriculture are necessary for more sustainable, sovereign, and equitable food systems for the creatures and systems involved in systemic reproductions that feed humans and other creatures. "Since agriculture is literally the backbone of economics, politics,...
  • Ancient Romans ate meals most Americans would recognize.

    02/10/2015 1:07:35 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 35 replies
    Inside Science ^ | February 3, 2015 | Joel N. Shurkin
    Let's pretend it is 56 B.C. and you have been fortunate enough to be invited to a party at the home of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a great social coup. Piso, after all, was Julius Caesar's father-in-law and a consul of Rome. What's for dinner? You need to prepare for pig. Archaeologists studying the eating habits of ancient Etruscans and Romans have found that pork was the staple of Italian cuisine before and during the Roman Empire. Both the poor and the rich ate pig as the meat of choice, although the rich, like Piso, got better cuts, ate meat...
  • Barley and wheat residues in Neolithic cemeteries of Central Sudan and Nubia

    02/10/2015 12:15:00 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | February 9, 2015 | PLOS ONE
    A research team successfully identified ancient barley and wheat residues in grave goods and on teeth from two Neolithic cemeteries in Central Sudan and Nubia, showing that humans in Africa were already exploited domestic cereals 7,000 years ago and thus five hundred years earlier than previously known. Dr. Welmoed Out from Kiel University said, “With our results we can verify that people along the Nile did not only exploit gathered wild plants and animals but had crops of barley and wheat.” These types of crops were first cultivated in the Middle East about 10,500 years ago and spread out from...
  • Obama pressed to ban bee-killing pesticide before it's too late

    02/07/2015 9:10:38 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 57 replies
    The Washington Examiner ^ | February 5, 2015 | Paul Bedard
    Several top environmental groups have joined with the honey bee industry to urgently demand that President Obama ban a pesticide many blame for the downfall of the world’s No. 1 food pollinator before it is too late.Fearing that Obama’s Environmental Protection Agency is delaying action, the groups took the unusual step to press Obama directly in a letter that said inaction could jeopardize food supplies.“We hope that you will prioritize action on this issue of vital importance to our food system, economy and environment and make saving bees a key piece of your legacy as president,” said the letter provided...
  • When did dogs become man's best friend?

    02/07/2015 12:25:26 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 32 replies
    CBS News ^ | February 6, 2015, 6:30 PM | By/Michael Casey//
    Using sophisticated 3D imaging to analyze several fossil skulls, a study in this week's Nature Scientific Reports found dogs emerged much more recently than previously thought. Other studies in recent years had suggested dogs evolved as early as 30,000 years ago, a period known as the late Paleolithic, when humans were hunter-gatherers. Abby Grace Drake, a biologist at Skidmore College and one of the co-authors of the latest study, said there is an abundance of evidence -- including the skulls as well as genetic and cultural evidence -- to show dogs arrived instead in the more recent period known as...
  • Malocclusion and dental crowding arose 12,000 years ago with earliest farmers

    02/07/2015 10:06:25 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | February 4, 2015 | University College Dublin
    Hunter-gatherers had almost no malocclusion and dental crowding, and the condition first became common among the world's earliest farmers some 12,000 years ago in Southwest Asia... By analysing the lower jaws and teeth crown dimensions of 292 archaeological skeletons from the Levant, Anatolia and Europe, from between 28,000-6,000 years ago, an international team of scientists have discovered a clear separation between European hunter-gatherers, Near Eastern/Anatolian semi-sedentary hunter-gatherers and transitional farmers, and European farmers, based on the form and structure of their jawbones... In the case of hunter-gatherers, the scientists from University College Dublin, Israel Antiquity Authority, and the State University...
  • Dinner At Piso's: Ancient Romans ate meals most Americans would recognize

    02/07/2015 9:01:27 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Inside Science ^ | Tuesday, February 3, 2015 | Joel N. Shurkin, Contributor
    Let's pretend it is 56 B.C. and you have been fortunate enough to be invited to a party at the home of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a great social coup. Piso, after all, was Julius Caesar's father-in-law and a consul of Rome... You need to prepare for pig. Archaeologists studying the eating habits of ancient Etruscans and Romans have found that pork was the staple of Italian cuisine before and during the Roman Empire. Both the poor and the rich ate pig as the meat of choice, although the rich, like Piso, got better cuts, ate meat more often and...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 6 FERUARY 6, 2015

    02/06/2015 12:32:13 PM PST · by greeneyes · 93 replies
    freerepublic | 2/06/2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. There is no telling where it will go and... that...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 5 JAN 30, 2015

    01/30/2015 12:38:35 PM PST · by greeneyes · 132 replies
    freerepublic | Jan 30, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. There is no telling where it will go and... that...
  • Scientists Take Big Step Toward Peanut Allergy Cure

    01/29/2015 10:20:18 AM PST · by Red Badger · 55 replies
    www.newser.com ^ | Posted Jan 28, 2015 1:08 PM CST | By Matt Cantor, Newser Staff
    (Newser) – As many as three million Americans may be allergic to peanuts, the Huffington Post has reported, with one study suggesting that the number of kids with the allergy doubled between 1997 and 2002. But those who are affected may have a reason to smile: A new study could point the way to a cure for the condition, the Australian Associated Press reports via the Guardian. For a year and a half, 30 kids with the allergy were given peanut protein plus a probiotic every day; another 30 received a placebo, researchers at the Murdoch Childrens Research Institute report....
  • California’s Scrambled Eggs

    01/28/2015 7:24:39 PM PST · by ObamahatesPACoal · 65 replies
    California has a way of living up to the worst regulatory expectations, as grocery shoppers across the country are discovering. The state’s latest animal-rights march is levying a punishing new food tax on the nation’s poor. Egg prices are soaring in California, where the USDA says the average price for a dozen jumbo eggs is $3.16, up from $1.18 a dozen a year ago, and in some parts of the state it’s more than $5. (SNIP) The state legislature realized this would put home-state farmers at a disadvantage, so in 2010 it compounded the problem by requiring that eggs imported...
  • Chemists find a way to unboil eggs

    01/26/2015 2:39:12 PM PST · by Red Badger · 46 replies
    phys.org ^ | 01/26/2015 | Janet Wilson
    UC Irvine and Australian chemists have figured out how to unboil egg whites – an innovation that could dramatically reduce costs for cancer treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry, according to findings published today in the journal ChemBioChem. "Yes, we have invented a way to unboil a hen egg," said Gregory Weiss, UCI professor of chemistry and molecular biology & biochemistry. "In our paper, we describe a device for pulling apart tangled proteins and allowing them to refold. We start with egg whites boiled for 20 minutes at 90 degrees Celsius and return...
  • Cats Are Finally Getting Geneticists' Attention

    01/24/2015 3:27:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    January 15, 2015 ^ | January 15, 2015 | Carl Engelking
    Consumer doggie DNA testing is old hat at this point, having been around since 2007. But cat-lovers who wish to decipher their pet's breed are out of luck -- no such tests exist for felines. That fact reflects the state of the underlying science. Since the first full dog genome was sequenced ten years ago, geneticists have identified hundreds of genes behind canine diseases and physical traits. By comparison, just a handful of such genes have been identified in cats. But a group of geneticists is working to close this gap by sequencing 99 domestic cats. This week the researchers...
  • Deere to cut more than 900 U.S. workers as farm economy weakens

    01/23/2015 1:35:11 PM PST · by Kartographer · 7 replies
    Reuters via Yahoo Finance ^ | 1/23/15 | Tom Polansek
    Deere & Co , the world's largest maker of farm equipment, will lay off more than 900 employees at plants in Iowa and Illinois in the latest round of job cuts spurred by a decline in grain prices that is hurting demand for agricultural machinery. The layoffs, which represent about 3 percent of Deere's workforce in the United States and Canada, are set to begin early next month, the company said in a statement. The cuts at facilities that build agricultural equipment reflect Deere's attempt "to align the size of its manufacturing workforce to market demand for products," according to...
  • WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 4 JANUARY 23, 2015

    01/23/2015 12:30:55 PM PST · by greeneyes · 90 replies
    freerepublic | Jan 23, 2015 | greeneyes
    The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you. This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked. It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread. There is no telling where it will go and... that...
  • Giant, Hungry Snails Overrunning Caribbean Island of Barbados

    11/08/2006 10:07:29 AM PST · by gobucks · 57 replies · 2,215+ views
    Foxnews ^ | 8 Nov 2006 | AP`
    BRIDGETOWN, Barbados — A breed of giant, ravenous snails that first appeared in Barbados five years ago has thrived on the tropical island, destroying crops and prompting calls for the government to eliminate the slimy pests. A nocturnal "snail hunt" last weekend reported finding hundreds of thousands of giant African snails swarming the central parish of St. George, the country's agricultural heartland, where farmers had complained of damage to crops including sugar cane, bananas and papayas. "We saw snails riding on each other's backs and moving in clusters," said David Walrond, chairman of the local emergency response office, which organized...
  • Crop-chomping snails seized at Dulles

    09/11/2010 7:24:13 AM PDT · by ExGeeEye · 16 replies
    WTOP.com ^ | 9/9/10 | Staff
    ...A traveler from Ghana tried to bring 14 Giant African Land Snails into the US...one of the worst invasive species...could have been devastating to crops.
  • Tuberculosis genomes track human history

    01/21/2015 6:34:38 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Nature ^ | 19 January 2015 Corrected: 20 January 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Although M. tuberculosis probably first emerged some 40,000 years ago in Africa, the disease did not take hold until humans took to farming... A previous analysis by his team had shown that the common ancestor of all the M. bacterium strains circulating today began spreading around 10,000 years ago in the ancient Fertile Crescent, a region stretching from Mesopotamia to the Nile Delta that was a cradle of agriculture... 4,987 samples of the Beijing lineage from 99 countries... the information to date the expansion of the lineage and show how the strains are related... the Beijing lineage did indeed emerge...
  • Environmental Groups Seeking More Protection For Sage Grouse ( CO & Utah )

    01/20/2015 5:15:34 PM PST · by george76 · 9 replies
    CBS Denver ^ | January 20, 2015 | Donna Bryson
    Two environmentalist groups filed suit Tuesday seeking stronger protection for a bird found only in Colorado and Utah ... The Center for Biological Diversity and the Western Watersheds Project said in court papers that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service should go back and produce an “adequate finding” on the status of the Gunnison sage grouse ... The threatened designation could result in restrictions on oil and gas drilling, agriculture, recreational and other land uses. ... both camps will be watching litigation closely, in part to see how it might influence policy on the more common greater sage grouse. The...
  • Ireland's Dairies Date Back 6,000 Years

    01/19/2015 4:45:29 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Friday, January 16, 2015 | editors
    Ninety percent of the fats found in Neolithic cooking pots from Ireland came from dairy products, according to a new study conducted at the University of Bristol. "We know from previous research that dairying was an important part of many early farming economies, but what was a big surprise was the prevalence of dairy residues in Irish pots. It looks to have been a very important food source," said Jessica Smyth of the School of Chemistry. The remaining ten percent of the residues came from beef or mutton fat, or a mixture of milk and meat. "People can obviously cook...