Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

8 Great Christian Songs
Ignitum Today ^ | 18 August 2013 | Matthew Olson

Posted on 08/19/2013 10:32:53 AM PDT by matthewrobertolson

Here are 8 great Christian songs. (The links lead to the corresponding audio via YouTube.)

Read "8 Great Christian Songs"

(Excerpt) Read more at ignitumtoday.com ...


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholicism; christian; christianity; hymn; hymnology; liturgy; music; pimpmyblog

1 posted on 08/19/2013 10:32:53 AM PDT by matthewrobertolson
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

They’re not called “hymns” anymore?


2 posted on 08/19/2013 10:37:34 AM PDT by fwdude ( You cannot compromise with that which you must defeat.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: fwdude

Hymns are passe, unfortunately. And if you aren’t Catholic you probably won’t recognize most of the list.


3 posted on 08/19/2013 10:40:33 AM PDT by Colonel_Flagg (Army dad. And damned proud.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I6-DFz6s4Eo


4 posted on 08/19/2013 11:08:54 AM PDT by varmintman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson
(Excerpt) Read more at ignitumtoday.com ...

Or you could just post links to the videos here, instead of sending traffic to your blog.

5 posted on 08/19/2013 11:15:15 AM PDT by humblegunner
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

A powerful old hymn that few Roman Catholics will have ever heard and most certainly not in church!

``A Mighty Fortress is Our God’’
by Dr. Martin Luther, 1483-1546
Version of Frederick H. Hedge
Text From:
THE METHODIST HYMNAL
(Nashville, TN: The Methodist Book Concern, 1939), Hymn 67.

1. A mighty fortress is our God,
A bulwark never failing;
Our helper He, amid the flood
Of mortal ills prevailing;
For still our ancient foe
Doth seek to work us woe;
His craft and power are great,
And, armed with cruel hate,
On Earth is not his equal.

2. Did we in our own strength confide,
Our striving would be losing;
Were not the right Man on our side,
The Man of God’s own choosing;
Dost ask who that may be?
Christ Jesus, it is He;
Lord Sabaoth, His name,
From age to age the same,
And He must win the battle.

3. And though this world, with devils filled,
Should threaten to undo us,
We will not fear, for God hath willed
His truth to triumph through us;
The Prince of Darkness grim —
We tremble not for him;
His rage we can endure,
For lo, his doom is sure,
On little word shall fell him.

4. That word above all earthly powers,
No thanks to them, abideth.
The Spirit and the gifts are ours
Though Him who with us sideth;
Let goods and kindred go,
This mortal life also;
The body they may kill;
God’s truth abideth still,
His kingdom us forever.


6 posted on 08/19/2013 11:18:18 AM PDT by A Formerly Proud Canadian (I once was lost but now I'm found; blind but now I see.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: A Formerly Proud Canadian

A good one here too http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMVkKA6xFe0


7 posted on 08/19/2013 11:21:11 AM PDT by csmusaret (Will remove Obama-Biden bumperstickers for $10)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: A Formerly Proud Canadian

A good one here too http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YMVkKA6xFe0


8 posted on 08/19/2013 11:21:25 AM PDT by csmusaret (Will remove Obama-Biden bumperstickers for $10)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

These “hymns” sound flat compared to Pentecostal southern gospel singing. To liven up things a bit, here’s one by the Speer Family: “I never shall forget the day.”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ek5s8VcpT1E

You don’t want to miss Sue Dodge, the big gal in the white dress, singing her part about half way through the video!


9 posted on 08/19/2013 1:41:10 PM PDT by sasportas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson; AnAmericanMother

Nothing tops Ave Maria

This is Schubert, I would rather hear Gounod any day.

http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=AkdTJT7C1868Wb7uBi4tHwibvZx4?p=vocal+ave+maria&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8&fr=yfp-t-622


10 posted on 08/19/2013 2:56:59 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson; AnAmericanMother
How about seven of those hymns being Catholic in origin?

8 Great Christian Songs

August 18, 2013 AD | Matthew Olson

Here are 8 great Christian songs. (The links lead to the corresponding audio via YouTube.)

1. Hail, Holy Queen. This is, by far, my favorite hymn. Hearing it during the closing procession at the evening Mass on the Solemnity of the Assumption this past week was one of the highlights of that day. And I’m not the only one that shares such a high enthusiasm for it – after all, who could forget the famous Sister Act version?

2. Panis Angelicus. It was written by St. Thomas Aquinas as part of Sacris Solemniis, and it is one of my all-time favorite songs – out of every genre. If it were up to me, singing it would be mandatory around the Eucharist at every Mass. The polished version from Luciano Pavarotti is the best.

3. Turn Around. I’m not a big Matt Maher fan, which is probably due to my unsatisfying Protestant upbringing and, stemming from that, my general distaste for anything affiliated with the charismatic movement. Despite this, the song contains a good message on God’s grace, and I can be occasionally caught humming it.

4. Dies Irae. Considering its prominence in the traditional Requiem Mass, this chant about Judgment Day is hardly uplifting, but it maintains a sense of the sacred that I find lacking in most other songs.

5. The Litany of the Saints. I never hesitate to give credit to this prayer when discussing my conversion to Catholicism. This particular rendition from the 2005 papal conclave always fills me with awe.

6. Te Deum. It has traditionally been ascribed to St. Ambrose and St. Augustine (two of my favorite saints!), and it is simply great. I was first introduced to it by an Anglican, surprisingly enough. The lyrics are not especially profound, but they provide a captivating reflection on the grandness of God.

7. Miserere. This Latin classic is based on Psalm 51 (Greek: 50), which enshrines contrition.

8. The Paraklesis. It consists of a series of odes to Mary, the Theotokos (Mother of God). This version from the Greek Orthodox is beautiful. (An English translation is available in the video’s description.)

 


11 posted on 08/19/2013 3:00:35 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: A Formerly Proud Canadian

Actually, I have sung this song in church. I am a Catholic and we do sing it although not often. I was aware also that it was by Luther.
In earlier times, it would have been considered a “Protestant” hymn and not used in a Catholic Church. Happily such is no longer true.


12 posted on 08/19/2013 3:27:55 PM PDT by Gumdrop
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: sasportas
flat? more solemn, certainly.

There's a place for Southern Gospel (I have sung Sacred Harp for years). Just not at Mass.

Our choir sang at an ecumenical prayer service once, at the local Greek Orthodox cathedral. The "Greek Pope" (the Patriarch of Constantinople) was there, with a number of Greek priests in attendance. So was a classic Pentecostal choir . . . to say that the visitors were completely nonplussed and confused by their performance is an understatement. It was completely outside their experience.

Our choirmaster, on the other hand, was careful to select works that would be on some level familiar to our visitors. Wound up singing Gregorian chant paired with Palestrina and Victoria motets derived from those chants. They loved it - one of our priests said that the Patriarch had tears in his eyes.

My point is that there is a universal Christian idiom in music. We share it with the Orthodox (Russian and Greek) as well as most Protestants. Southern Gospel is an outlier (so are Sacred Harp, West Gallery music, "cowboy church" and Christian Rock). They are local, not universal. NOT that there's anything wrong with that.

You want something lively, I recommend the English Renaissance, they do lively and reverent simultaneously:

O sing joyfully

or this . . .

Rejoice in the Lord alway

13 posted on 08/19/2013 3:33:40 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: fwdude
I disagree with the use of "songs" here.

A hymn is a particular type of vocal music, not part of the ordinary or propers for the day. But none of these appear to be those (except possible the "Dies Irae"). So I would still call them hymns (especially the ones that are part of the Office, which is where hymns started. E.g. "Salve Regina" or "Hail Holy Queen".)

Salve Regina by the great master, Palestrina. Since this is a polyphonic setting, it's technically a "motet".

14 posted on 08/19/2013 3:45:27 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
There are about a million "Ave Maria"s . . .

My favorites, in more or less chronological order:

Ockeghem

Josquin

Parsons

Arcadelt

Victoria

Palestrina (one of many)

Biebl

. . . but you can truly say, "We got a million of 'em." Any composer worth his salt has tried his hand at this.

15 posted on 08/19/2013 4:13:42 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: A Formerly Proud Canadian

Hey, we periodically sneak Luther in. We’ve been known to sing “Ein feste Burg” and “Von Himmel Hoch”. . . after all, both are paraphrases from Scripture.


16 posted on 08/19/2013 4:18:41 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: fwdude
They’re not called “hymns” anymore?

THANK YOU!!

17 posted on 08/19/2013 5:28:17 PM PDT by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
There are about a million "Ave Maria"s . . .

AT LEAST a million.

From what I read many of the 17th-19th century composers were Catholic and they ALL did an "Ave Maria."

Can there be too many songs for the Mother of God?
I don't think so.

18 posted on 08/19/2013 5:31:16 PM PDT by cloudmountain
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

You linked to a beautiful version of César Franck’s 1872 composition, “Panis Angelicus.”


19 posted on 08/19/2013 6:57:09 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: cloudmountain
It goes all the way back to the 12th c. and Leonin and Perotin.

And that doesn't count all the settings of the Magnificat, the Four Marian Antiphons, and Masses based on all of them.

Can't be enough of them for the Blessed Virgin. Fortunately in Eternity we will have plenty of time to run them ALL.

20 posted on 08/19/2013 7:11:11 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: csmusaret
I like the original Swedish version of "How Great Thou Art," written in 1885 by Carl Gustav Boberg:

O Store Gud (Oh Mighty God)

21 posted on 08/19/2013 7:11:45 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: csmusaret
I like the original Swedish version of "How Great Thou Art," written in 1885 by Carl Gustav Boberg:

O Store Gud (Oh Mighty God)

22 posted on 08/19/2013 7:11:51 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson
I haven't found very many hymns and gospel songs on Youtube that I like, but here are a few:
23 posted on 08/19/2013 7:35:01 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

Some personal favorites:

Sicut Cervus - Palestrina
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Nsw1kdLqfec

Tu Es Petrus - Palestrina
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0mSLVoOKzBM

Maria Magdalene - Andrea Gabrieli (hard to find because of everything else that comes up in a ‘Maria Magdalene’ search)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HlTtU6k9jCY

Exultate Justi in Domino - Viadana
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6ok8evP2S70

Biebl’s Ave Maria
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rby62ZghBWg

Thanks for this thread!


24 posted on 08/20/2013 7:48:03 AM PDT by firerosemom (Jesus, son of God, son of Mary, have mercy on me, a sinner.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

Beautiful! Thanks for posting those!


25 posted on 08/20/2013 8:06:42 AM PDT by firerosemom (Jesus, son of God, son of Mary, have mercy on me, a sinner.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: firerosemom
I see we got several of the same faves! (love that Biebl)

Our choir sings the Viadana "Exultate Justi" and the Palestrina "Sicut Cervus". The middle section of the Viadana is a real tongue twister - first 'in psalterio decem chordarum' and then 'in vociferatione' . . .

Another great one is the Palestrina Magnificat Primi Toni (Liber Primus). We sang this for Archbishop Donoghue's vigil/vespers the night before his funeral.

26 posted on 08/20/2013 5:25:04 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill
. . . and now for something completely different . . .

"Cowper" (168) and "Delight" (216)

This (Sacred Harp or Original Sacred Harp/OSH) is the source of gospel music. It derives from the New England Singing School, transmitted down the Southern mountains. That in its turn derived from the West Gallery choir music of rural England, that grew out of the old Tate & Brady psalmody.

Great film about the tradition is "Awake My Soul" - here's the trailer. Best line: "They asked, 'do you want to sound like a bunch of uneducated Southerners?' We all said . . . 'Yeah!'"

It's pretty raw in performance, but it is actually very sophisticated music. The classic signature "fuging tune" (when you hear the parts in imitation of each other a few measures or beats apart) originates even further back - in early Renaissance polyphony. Everything new is old.

27 posted on 08/20/2013 5:37:21 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
That's very interesting--and, indeed, completely different from what I'm used to. The melody for Cowper (There Is a Fountain) that I am familiar with can be heard here, although it has been set to several tunes.
28 posted on 08/20/2013 5:53:08 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
My favorite version of "Sanctus," from Charles Gounod's St. Cecilia Mass (1854) is by the choir and orchestra of the Bupyeong Methodist Church in Inchon, South Korea. It is sung in Korean. Listen to it here.
29 posted on 08/20/2013 6:03:42 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Salvation; Fiji Hill; sasportas; cloudmountain
One more, which has been running through my head all day -- it is wonderful to hear, and simply glorious to sing, the way the parts chase each other around the melody.

Cantate Domino (Hans Leo Hassler)

Cantate Domino canticum novum, cantate Domino omnis terra.
Sing unto the Lord a new song, sing unto the Lord all the earth.

Cantate Domino, et benedicite nomini ejus.
Sing unto the Lord, and bless his name.

Annuntiate de die in diem salutare ejus.
Proclaim from day to day his salvation.

Annuntiate inter gentes gloriam ejus, in omnibus populis mirabilia ejus.
Proclaim among the nation his glory,among all peoples his wonders.

30 posted on 08/23/2013 12:47:08 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

That’s a beautiful tune.


31 posted on 08/23/2013 12:56:28 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
Another one I like is Laudate Dominum (Praise the Lord) by Wolfgang A. Mozart (1780), which is based on Psalm 116 in the Vulgate Bible. It was performed at my father's memorial service.
32 posted on 08/23/2013 1:06:33 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill
Excellent - we sang that at our long-time deacon's First Mass after his ordination to the priesthood.

You need a REALLY good soprano - fortunately we have one (wish we had more - I'm just a workhorse alto).

33 posted on 08/23/2013 4:57:04 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill
Mr Hassler should be better known - his stuff is splendid.

Our choir also sings his Dixit Maria, suitable for the Annunciation, Advent or Christmas. "Then said Mary to the angel (in some versions, "Gabriel"): Behold the handmaid of the Lord; let it be done to me according to thy word."

The fun thing about following the score is that you can see the imitation happening across the parts . . . I really like YouTube . . . sometimes.

34 posted on 08/23/2013 5:01:00 PM PDT by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: A Formerly Proud Canadian
My favorite hymn written by a Lutheran is Ave Maria.
35 posted on 08/23/2013 5:04:43 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

Miserere is almost impossibly beautiful. I have several versions of my iPod and cherish them all.


36 posted on 08/23/2013 5:07:02 PM PDT by Skooz (Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us Gabba Gabba we accept you we accept you one of us)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Lucky

I believe that Maetin Luther approved of the first half of the ‘Hail Mary’ (”Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.”)


37 posted on 08/23/2013 6:29:11 PM PDT by A Formerly Proud Canadian (I once was lost but now I'm found; blind but now I see.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

We did, indeed, have an excellent soprano to perform “Laudate Dominum” at my father’s memorial service. She was the wife of a former pastor. My father directed the choir for many years and was a talented baritone singer.


38 posted on 08/23/2013 6:41:42 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother
Another great tune from Hassler. Yes, he should be better known--I had never heard of him until I read this thread. A short biography of him can be found here.
39 posted on 08/23/2013 6:48:36 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: matthewrobertolson

I thought it was gonna be songs like Church In The Wildwood or Standing On the Promises.


40 posted on 08/23/2013 6:50:55 PM PDT by GSWarrior
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Lucky
My favorite hymn written by a Lutheran is Ave Maria.

Who would that composer be?

41 posted on 08/23/2013 6:56:01 PM PDT by Fiji Hill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: AnAmericanMother

Yes,we do share some favorites! I learned these pieces through the talents of the various choir directors our school has had through the last several years - I never knew there was such beauty out there - (and yes I agree with you on the Exultate - I feel like a trapeze artist on some of those lines too :) )


42 posted on 08/26/2013 12:39:45 PM PDT by firerosemom (Jesus, son of God, son of Mary, have mercy on me, a sinner.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Fiji Hill

The Johann Sebastian Bach version tops my hit parade.


43 posted on 09/04/2013 11:12:28 AM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson