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Keyword: liturgy

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  • Three Ways to Teach Children About the Eucharist

    05/20/2015 4:29:34 AM PDT · by NYer · 1 replies
    Catholic Exchange ^ | April 22, 2015 | JEANNIE EWING
    I was sixteen years old when the concept of the Transubstantiation became clearer to me.  Until that time, I attended Mass with my parents half-heartedly and out of obligation.  It wasn’t until I left my Catholic elementary school only to enter the cesspool of public high school, riddled with all varieties of unbelievers and even some colorful Satanists, that I began to question what I believed and why in terms of religion.My parents reluctantly permitted me to attend a megachurch youth group with my closest friends from school, as long as I agreed to continue attending Mass on the weekends...
  • The Reception of Holy Communion in the United States (Catholic Caucus)

    05/20/2015 4:14:17 AM PDT · by NYer · 8 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | May 20, 2015 | CHRISTIAN BROWNE
    This year marks the 50th anniversary of the close of the Second Vatican Council. Pope Francis has decided to mark the occasion with the “Year of Mercy.” Despite much happy-talk and positive papal press, it is a time of foreboding in the Church. The anxiety over the coming Synod on the Family is substantial and growing, with the German bishops’ recent moves to formally ignore the Church’s teachings on sexual morality and the family. Their corruption, and the decayed state of the Church in Europe, is a source of much distress.The social and political situation in the United States is...
  • A Reflection on the “Prayer of the Faithful” at Mass and Why The Intentions Are Often Disappointing

    05/18/2015 7:06:42 AM PDT · by Salvation · 17 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 05-17-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    A Reflection on the “Prayer of the Faithful” at Mass and Why The Intentions Are So Often Disappointing By: Msgr. Charles PopeOne of the parts of the Ordinary Form of the Mass that was “restored” from antiquity is the “Prayer of the Faithful.” However, there is (in this author’s mind) a certain disappointing quality to the intentions as they are used today. They are either overly particular and ideological or, at the other end of the spectrum, perfunctory and flat. Peter Kwasniewski, writing at New Liturgical Movement, summarizes the problem very well: It is surely no exaggeration to say that throughout the world the...
  • Catholic Word of the Day: LITURGICAL KISS, 05-05-15

    05/05/2015 9:33:55 AM PDT · by Salvation · 1 replies
    CCDictionary ^ | 05-05-15 | Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary
    Featured Term selected at random:LITURGICAL KISS Touching with the lips as a mark of reverence during ceremonies of public worship. The frequency of this gesture has been reduced since the Second Vatican Council, but it is still prescribed. The priest must kiss the altar as he begins and concludes the Mass, and he is to kiss the lectionary after reading the Gospel. All items in this dictionary are from Fr. John Hardon's Modern Catholic Dictionary, © Eternal Life. Used with permission.
  • The Heavenly Elements of the Liturgy

    11/10/2014 7:20:24 AM PST · by Salvation · 86 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 11-09-14 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    The Heavenly Elements of the LiturgyBy: Msgr. Charles PopeIn November, Catholics are encouraged to meditate on the “Last Things.” As you know, I write quite often on Hell. But I have written on Heaven, too. In this post I propose simply to set forth how much of our liturgy is a kind of dress rehearsal for Heaven.Indeed, Catholics are often unaware just how biblical the Sacred Liturgy is. The design of our traditional churches; the use of candles, incense, and golden vessels; the postures of standing and kneeling; the altar; the singing of hymns; priests wearing albs and so forth are...
  • Lost Liturgies File and an Invitation: Solemn Sunday Vespers

    03/13/2015 8:56:27 AM PDT · by Salvation · 6 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 03-12-15 | Msge. Charles Pope
    Lost Liturgies File and an Invitation: Solemn Sunday Vespers By: Msgr. Charles Pope One of the fixtures of larger parish churches prior to the last century was the singing of Vespers (evening prayer) on Sunday afternoons. Prior to the 1950s, Masses were not permitted to be celebrated after 12:00 noon and thus the concept of a Sunday (or Saturday) evening Mass was unknown. Some very beautiful music, indeed some of the greatest music of the Church, was composed for Sunday Vespers. Best known is the 1610 Vespers of Claudio Monteverdi (Vespro della Beata Vergine). Monteverdi (a Catholic priest and composer) also composed the...
  • Towards A God Centered Liturgy

    02/28/2015 2:07:31 PM PST · by walkinginthedesert · 4 replies
    Ad Orientem and why we should go back to it  Ad Orientem is a liturgical orientation done by the priest since the Early Christian Church. It has held a historical and traditional way in which priests would celebrate Mass in the Roman Rite. This liturgical position and action are still celebrated in the Tridentine Latin Mass (Extraordinary Form), as well as in the Dominican and Norbertine Rites, as well as several others. It has however sadly lost practice and has been abandoned in most of the Novus Ordo (Ordinary Form)This article will help explain the historical, and theological significance, its...
  • "Let my prayer arise..." (Ecumenical - Lent)

    02/25/2015 12:09:17 PM PST · by NRx · 4 replies
    Optina Monastery ^ | 25 Feb 2015 | Optina Monastery
    Scenes from the Liturgy of the Pre-Sanctified Gifts on the First Wednesday of Great Lent at the Optina Monastery. (Church Slavonic)
  • The Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete (First Day of Lent)

    02/23/2015 10:33:39 AM PST · by NRx · 3 replies
    YouTube ^ | 7th Century | St. Andrew of Crete
    Today is the first day of Lent for Orthodox Christians. During Clean Week there are many special services of which one of the most important is The Great Canon of St. Andrew of Crete, also known as The Great Canon of Repentance. It is a penitential hymn, the longest ever composed, that is chanted in monasteries on Clean Monday. Because of its great length it is usually broken up in parishes and chanted over the first four days of Lent as part of Great Compline. The linked video is from one of those services. This particular rendition is entirely in...
  • Remember That Thou Art Dust (Ash Wednesday)

    02/17/2015 8:54:33 PM PST · by Salvation · 19 replies
    CatholicExchange.com ^ | 02-17-15 | David Mills
    Remember That Thou Art Dust David Mills Ash Wednesday is the holy day on which you are asked to face the facts about yourself. Letting someone smear ashes on your forehead while telling you that you are dirt is a statement that you have seen and accepted the facts about yourself, and know they’re not in your favor. And, though this isn’t as obvious, it is also a declaration of the good news.The Church doesn’t give official explanations of what her rites mean, but here’s what I think what is being said through the imposition of ashes. Even if this...
  • How to Save the World, God’s Way – A Reflection on a Liturgical Teaching of Pope Benedict

    02/03/2015 7:39:26 AM PST · by Salvation · 10 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 02-02-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    How to Save the World, God’s Way – A Reflection on a Liturgical Teaching of Pope Benedict By: Msgr. Charles Pope Whenever I write on liturgy, I usually get a lot of comments. Many people obviously care deeply about it.Yet I also get comments that decry my “preoccupation” with liturgy, saying that it is of minor importance compared to the issues of poverty, abortion, etc. Some on the left will say, “Who cares if the Pope washes certain feet or doesn’t wear a fanon! Get out there and take care of the poor and show compassion. Frankly, your elaborate and expensive liturgies are...
  • >A Portrait of Powerful Preaching – A Homily for the 4th Sunday of the Year

    02/01/2015 4:34:56 AM PST · by Salvation · 9 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 01-31-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    A Portrait of Powerful Preaching – A Homily for the 4th Sunday of the Year By: Msgr. Charles Pope There are four aspects of powerful preaching displayed by Jesus in this passage. Jesus is not just a powerful preacher Himself, but also models what it means to be a powerful and effective preacher.In using the word “preacher” here we ought to be careful not to reduce preaching merely to what takes place in a church. For surely the clergy have churches in which to preach. But all Catholic parents ought also to learn from Jesus here, for they have...
  • A Look at the “Actual Mass” of Vatican II: the 1965 Missal

    01/29/2015 7:46:27 AM PST · by Salvation · 47 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 01-28-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    A Look at the “Actual Mass” of Vatican II: the 1965 Missal By: Msgr. Charles PopeA couple of weeks ago I wrote a cautionary article aimed at my traditionally-minded brethren saying, among other things, that we ought to be careful in identifying the Ordinary Form of the Mass (1970 Missal and beyond) as the “Mass of Vatican II.”  I will not reproduce that whole article here. I will only recall three points:1. The Mass was already undergoing significant changes, beginning in the 1940s and picking up speed through the 1950s. More changes were planned by the Vatican before the Second Vatican...
  • What May Christians Safely Disbelieve?

    01/17/2015 5:23:38 PM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 52 replies
    Ethics Forum ^ | January 10, 2015 | Alice C. Linsley
    My Roman Catholic friend, Michael Liccione, has written on his Facebook page that "the main disagreement among American Catholics is not about whether we should believe 'all that the Holy Catholic Church believes, professes, and teaches,' but which teachings we may safely disbelieve." I responded, "Aggiornamento has that effect on us! There is an interesting parallel between the Roman Catholic Church in the USA and the Anglicans in the USA in that liturgical reform suggested to many that the historic Catholic faith had changed. The Vatican II liturgical changes and the Episcopal Church's 1979 prayer book changed words and forms....
  • Time for a Truly Catholic Renovation

    01/08/2015 2:20:39 PM PST · by NYer · 39 replies
    Crisis Magazinei ^ | January 8, 2015 | Anthony ESOLEN
    O magnum mysterium,et admirabile sacramentum,ut animalia viderent Dominum natum,iacentem in praesepio:Beata Virgo, cuius viscerameruerunt portare Dominum Christum.What a great mystery,what a wonderful sign,that animals should see the Lord, new-born,lying in a manger!Blessed is the Virgin, whose wombwas privileged to carry Christ the Lord.      ∌  From the Roman Breviary, the Matins of ChristmasWe’re in Rome, in the year 1572. The great Pope Pius V has passed to glory. Just one year before, the naval forces of the Holy League had crushed the superior fleets of the ever-marauding Turks at Lepanto, giving maritime Europe a chance to breathe free...
  • Strange Moments In Liturgical History – How a Paragon of Liturgical Tradition May Have Caused....

    12/17/2014 9:34:51 AM PST · by Salvation · 6 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 12-16-14 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    Strange Moments In Liturgical History – How a Paragon of Liturgical Tradition May Have Caused Unintended Effects By: Msgr. Charles PopeIn the modern struggles and disagreements over the Liturgy, there tends to be a list of friends and opponents depending on one’s stance. For those of us with a more traditional leaning, Pope St. Pius X looms large as a friend and an image of tradition. He is usually seen as a defender of the tradition and a great proponent of what is called today the Extraordinary Form or Traditional Latin Mass (TLM)—so much so that the Society of...
  • Don’t Forget to Worship God! A Call to Better Liturgy from an Unlikely Source

    12/16/2014 6:54:56 AM PST · by Salvation · 34 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 12-15-14 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    Don’t Forget to Worship God! A Call to Better Liturgy from an Unlikely Source By: Msgr. Charles Pope We have discussed before many of the trends of modern liturgy and how the focus has shifted from God to the “assembly.” Too much of modern liturgy today is anthropocentric (focused on man).Back in the 1990’s, Thomas Day observed in the book Why Catholics Can’t Sing, that liturgy today often comes down  to “the aware, gathered community, celebrating itself.” Many modern songs go on at great length about how we are the gathered, we are the flock, we have been sung throughout all of...
  • Hearts Aloft! A Reflection on our Mystical Transport to Heaven in Every Mass

    11/28/2014 7:11:33 AM PST · by Salvation · 25 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 11-27-14 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    Hearts Aloft! A Reflection on our Mystical Transport to Heaven in Every Mass By: Msgr. Charles PopeBefore November ends and our consideration of the four last things (death, judgment, Heaven, and Hell) gives way to Advent preparations for the great Second Coming that ushers in those things definitively,  let us turn our attention to a short, often-overlooked summons to Heaven that takes place in every Mass. It takes place in a short dialogue just after the prayer over the gifts and before the singing of the Sanctus. It is called the “preface dialogue” and it is really quite remarkable...
  • Nebraska Diocese Will Move to Ad Orientem Liturgy During Advent

    11/20/2014 2:10:49 PM PST · by marshmallow · 10 replies
    Bishop James Conley of Lincoln, Nebraska, has announced that Mass will be celebrated ad orientem in the diocsean cathedral during Advent, to remind the faithful of the symbolism of facing East. Explaining the move, Bishop Conley writes: But the symbolism of facing together, and awaiting Christ, is rich, time-honored and important. Especially during Advent, as we await the coming of the Lord, facing the east together—even symbolically facing Christ together at the altar and on the crucifix—is a powerful witness to Christ’s imminent return.
  • 1,500-year-old 'magical' papyrus is first to refer to Last Supper

    09/02/2014 10:11:49 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 72 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 2 September 2014 | Sarah Griffiths for
    It has laid largely unstudied in a university library for more than 100 years. But now a 1,500-year-old papyrus has been identified as one of the world’s earliest surviving Christian charms. The ‘remarkable’ document contains some of the earliest documented references to The Last Supper and sheds new light on early Christian practices, experts say.
  • Liturgical Vestments [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

    08/07/2014 7:33:13 PM PDT · by Salvation · 7 replies
    CatholicExchange.com ^ | August 7, 2014 | Fr. William Saunders
    Liturgical Vestments Fr. William Saunders The liturgical vestments worn at Mass have evolved over time. Nevertheless, since the earliest days of the Church, liturgical vestments have been worn by priests for the celebration of the Mass. Even though priests of the Old Testament wore vestments in their liturgical rites, the “Christian” vestments are not really adaptations of them.Rather, the vestments of the Christians developed from the dress of the Graeco-Roman world, including the religious culture.Nevertheless, the Old Testament idea of wearing a special kind of clothing in the performance of liturgical rites did influence the Church. St. Jerome asserted, “The...
  • An Open Letter to the Archdiocese of New York About Holy Innocents

    06/13/2014 5:38:55 AM PDT · by statestreet · 1 replies
    Catholic History Nerd ^ | May 21, 2014 | Sarah
    Greetings in Christ! Like you, I am a transplant to the NYC area with Midwestern roots. It was an honor to attend the young adult Mass you celebrated at St. Patrick's Cathedral last December. Your joyful witness to our Catholic faith is such an inspiration. It's come to my attention that the Archdiocese of New York is considering closing several churches. It's always a shame to see a parish go, but I get it. Neighborhood demographics change, and we're no longer in an era where multiple ethnic parishes need to co-exist within blocks of each other. Urban dioceses now find...
  • Explaining the Heresy of Catholicism (John MacArthur)

    05/26/2014 4:13:56 PM PDT · by Dr. Thorne · 232 replies
    Grace To You ^ | Pastor John MacArthur
    Praying to Mary, celebrating the Mass, venerating the Pope—you won’t find those doctrines in the Bible. And yet more than one billion Roman Catholics throughout the world follow such practices in line with the official teaching of the Roman Catholic Church. With that many Catholics around the globe, it’s likely you know some of them as relatives, friends, neighbors, or co-workers. Find out what they don’t know—the origin and error of Catholic doctrine—so you can help the Catholics you know out of the darkness and into the light.
  • Give Me the Pomp and Ceremony... (Ecumenical)

    05/02/2014 1:49:13 PM PDT · by Pyro7480 · 39 replies
    Standing on My Head blog ^ | 05/02/2014 | Fr. Dwight Longenecker
    The other day I took a funeral for Arthur– one of our WWII vets. He was a sweet, faithful and good Catholic gentleman and a decorated WWII pilot. At the graveside a couple of Marines were present in their dress uniforms for the flag ceremony. They stood tall with shoes shined and hat brims low. After the Catholic ceremony one soldier stood at attention while the other bugled “Taps”. Then he stepped forward, smart and correct. They took the flag and folded it into the famous triangle and handed it to the widow with the set formula of words. It...
  • Occultism Under a Catholic Name

    02/26/2014 12:33:09 PM PST · by BlatherNaut · 11 replies
    The Eponymous Flower ^ | 2/26/14 | The Eponymous Flower
    Minneapolis] Being a radical in touch with indigenous traditions is a kind of garden industry involving lots of consumer items, sage, special mystical rocks, weird confab liturgies, guest appearances at schools and other perks. Whether these practices are legitimately Indian, or have more pecuniary or nefarious purposes is at question. Supposedly, the personages involved in this type of activity is surrounded by a panoply of myths and various objects imbued with alleged magical properties. They provide an aura of authenticity for entrepreneurs, various groups of victims, particularly native Americans, who often hide their demands for special treatment, entitlements and subsidy...
  • The Divine Office: Christ is our head, and the wise man keeps his eyes upon him

    02/24/2014 6:14:43 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/24/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    A sermon on Ecclesiastes by St Gregory of Nyssa We shall be blessed with clear vision if we keep our eyes fixed on Christ, for he, as Paul teaches, is our head, and there is in him no shadow of evil. Saint Paul himself and all who have reached the same heights of sanctity had their eyes fixed on Christ, and so have all who live and move and have their being in him. As no darkness can be seen by anyone surrounded by light, so no trivialities can capture the attention of anyone who has his eyes on Christ....
  • The Divine Office: The Wisdom of God has mixed wine for us and set up a feast

    02/19/2014 6:07:00 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/19/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    The commentary on Proverbs by Procopius of Gaza Wisdom has built herself a house. God the Father’s Power, himself a person, has fashioned as his dwelling-place the whole world, in which he lives by his activity; and has fashioned man also, who was created to resemble God’s own image and likeness and has a nature which is partly seen and partly hidden from our eyes. And she has set up seven pillars. To man, who was made in the image of Christ when the rest of creation was completed, Wisdom gave the seven gifts of the Spirit to enable him...
  • The Divine Office: On the search for wisdom

    02/17/2014 8:36:25 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    the Examiner ^ | 2/17/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From a sermon by Saint Bernard, abbot Let us work for the food which does not perish – our salvation. Let us work in the vineyard of the Lord to earn our daily wage in the wisdom which says: Those who work in me will not sin. Christ tells us: The field is the world. Let us work in it and dig up wisdom, its hidden treasure, a treasure we all look for and want to obtain. If you are looking for it, really look. Be converted and come. Converted from what? From your own wilfulness. “But,” you may say,...
  • The Divine Office: The pre-eminence of love

    02/15/2014 8:22:30 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/15/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From a sermon by Blessed Isaac of Stella, abbot Why, my brethren, are we so little concerned with finding opportunities to advance each other’s salvation, responding to greater need with greater help and bearing each other’s burdens? This is what St Paul advised: Bear one another’s burdens and so fulfil the law of Christ – or, again, forbearing each other in love. For that is most definitely the law of Christ. When I notice something wrong in my brother that cannot be corrected – either because it is inevitable or because it comes from some weakness of his in body...
  • The Divine Office: St. Cyril

    02/14/2014 6:26:23 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/14/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From an Old Slavonic Life of Constantine Constantine, already burdened by many hardships, became ill. At one point during his extended illness, he experienced a vision of God and began to sing this verse: “My spirit rejoiced and my heart exulted because they told me we shall go into the house of the Lord.” Afterward he remained dressed in the vestments that were to be venerated later, and rejoiced for an entire day, saying: “From now on, I am not the servant of the emperor or of any man on earth, but of almighty God alone. Before, I was dead,...
  • The Divine Office: Let Christ take shape within you

    02/13/2014 5:41:02 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 2 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/13/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    St Augustine's Exposition on Galatians St Paul says, Be like me – who, though I was born a Jew, have learnt through spiritual insight to look down on things of the body – as I have become like you – that is, I am a man. Next he very properly reminds them of his love for them, so that they should not think that he is their enemy. My brethren, hear me: you have never done me harm – implying, ‘do not therefore think that I mean to do you any harm’. My children, he adds – so that they...
  • The Divine Office: Abraham's Sacrifice

    02/11/2014 5:48:33 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 3 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/11/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    Origen's homilies on Genesis Abraham took the wood for the burnt offering, loaded it on Isaac, and carried in his own hands the fire and the knife. Then the two of them set out together. Isaac himself carries the wood for his own holocaust: this is a figure of Christ. For Christ carried the burden of the cross himself, and yet to carry the wood for the holocaust is really the duty of the priest. So Christ is then both victim and priest. This is the meaning of the expression: they set out together. For when Abraham, who was to...
  • The Divine Office: Saint Scholastica

    02/10/2014 7:58:05 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 4 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/10/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From the books of Dialogues by Saint Gregory the Great, pope Scholastica, the sister of Saint Benedict, had been consecrated to God from her earliest years. She was accustomed to visiting her brother once a year. He would come down to meet her at a place on the monastery property, not far outside the gate. One day she came as usual and her saintly brother went with some of his disciples; they spent the whole day praising God and talking of sacred things. As night fell they had supper together. Their spiritual conversation went on and the hour grew late....
  • The Divine Office: Without the Creator the creature would disappear.

    02/08/2014 9:20:24 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/8/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    Vatican II, 'Gaudium et Spes' Just as it proceeds from man, so human activity is ordered toward man. For when a man works, he not only alters things and society, he develops himself as well. He learns much, he cultivates his resources, he goes outside himself and beyond himself. Rightly understood, this kind of growth is of greater value than any external riches which can be obtained. A man is more precious for what he is than for what he has. Similarly, all that men do to obtain greater justice, wider brotherhood, a more humane disposition of social relationships has...
  • The Divine Office: You shall be my witnesses

    From an account of the martyrdom of Saint Paul Miki and his companions, by a contemporary writer The crosses were set in place. Father Pasio and Father Rodriguez took turns encouraging the victims. Their steadfast behaviour was wonderful to see. The Father Bursar stood motionless, his eyes turned heavenward. Brother Martin gave thanks to God’s goodness by singing psalms. Again and again he repeated: “Into your hands, Lord, I entrust my life.” Brother Francis Branco also thanked God in a loud voice. Brother Gonsalvo in a very loud voice kept saying the Our Father and Hail Mary. Our brother, Paul...
  • The Divine Office: The gift of God, the source of all goodness

    From a homily on Saint Agatha by Saint Methodius of Sicily, bishop My fellow Christians, our annual celebration of a martyr’s feast has brought us together. She achieved renown in the early Church for her noble victory; she is well known now as well, for she continues to triumph through her divine miracles, which occur daily and continue to bring glory to her name. She is indeed a virgin, for she was born of the divine Word, God’s only Son, who also experienced death for our sake. John, a master of God’s word, speaks of this: He gave the power...
  • The Divine Office: In Christ are the first-fruits of the Resurrection

    02/04/2014 6:19:09 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/4/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From the treatise Against Heresies by Saint Irenaeus, bishop The Word of God became man, the Son of God became the Son of Man, in order to unite man with himself and make him, by adoption, a son of God. Only by being united to one who is himself immune could we be preserved from corruption and death, and how else could this union have been achieved if he had not first become what we are? How else could what is corruptible and mortal in us have been swallowed up in his incorruptibility and immortality, to enable us to receive...
  • The Divine Office: The hearts and minds of all believers were one

    02/03/2014 7:54:02 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 7 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/3/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From a treatise on the psalms by Saint Hilary of Poitiers Behold, how good and pleasant it is for brothers to dwell in unity! It is good and pleasant for brothers to dwell in unity, because when they do so their association creates the assembly of the Church. The term “brothers” describes the bond of affection arising from their singleness of purpose. We read that when the apostles first preached, the chief instruction they gave lay in this saying: The hearts and minds of all believers were one. So it is fitting for the people of God to be brothers...
  • The Divine Office: The mystery of death

    02/01/2014 10:47:47 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 10 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 2/1/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From the pastoral constitution on the Church in the modern world of the Second Vatican Council In the face of death the enigma of human existence reaches its climax. Man is not only the victim of pain and the progressive deterioration of his body; he is also, and more deeply, tormented by the fear of final extinction. But the instinctive judgement of his heart is right when he shrinks from, and rejects, the idea of a total collapse and definitive end of his own person. He carries within him the seed of eternity, which cannot be reduced to matter alone,...
  • The Divine Office: Love the Lord and walk in his ways

    01/30/2014 7:06:04 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 1/30/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From a sermon by John the Serene, bishop The Lord is my light and my salvation; whom shall I fear? How great was that servant who knew how he was given light, whence it came, and what sort of man he was when he was favoured by that light. The light he saw was not that which fades at dusk, but the light which no eye has seen. Souls brightened by this light do not fall into sin or stumble on vice. Our Lord said: Walk while you have the light in you. What other light did he mean but...
  • The Divine Office: Where sin abounded grace has overflowed

    01/29/2014 8:45:07 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner
    The Examiner ^ | 1/29/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From a sermon on the Song of Songs by Saint Bernard, abbot Where can the weak find a place of firm security and peace, except in the wounds of the Saviour? Indeed, the more secure is my place there, the more he can do to help me. The world rages, the flesh is heavy, and the devil lays his snares, but I do not fall, for my feet are planted on firm rock. I may have sinned gravely. My conscience would be distressed, but it would not be in turmoil, for I would recall the wounds of the Lord: he...
  • The Divine Office: The Cross exemplifies every virtue

    01/28/2014 7:56:33 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 1/28/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From a conference by Saint Thomas Aquinas, priest Why did the Son of God have to suffer for us? There was a great need, and it can be considered in a twofold way: in the first place, as a remedy for sin, and secondly, as an example of how to act. It is a remedy, for, in the face of all the evils which we incur on account of our sins, we have found relief through the passion of Christ. Yet, it is no less an example, for the passion of Christ completely suffices to fashion our lives. Whoever wishes...
  • The Divine Office: The holiness of married life and family life

    01/27/2014 9:08:51 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner
    The Examiner ^ | 1/27/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    Vatican II, "Gaudium et spes" A man and a woman, who by the marriage covenant of conjugal love ‘are no longer two, but one flesh’, render mutual help and service to each other through an intimate union of their persons and of their actions. Through this union they experience the meaning of their oneness and attain to it with growing perfection day by day. As a mutual gift of two persons, this intimate union, as well as the good of the children, imposes total fidelity on the spouses and argues for an unbreakable oneness between them.
  • The Divine Office: Devotion must be practised in different ways

    01/24/2014 8:25:37 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 1 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 1/24/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From The Introduction to the Devout Life by Saint Francis de Sales, bishop When God the Creator made all things, he commanded the plants to bring forth fruit each according to its own kind; he has likewise commanded Christians, who are the living plants of his Church, to bring forth the fruits of devotion, each one in accord with his character, his station and his calling. I say that devotion must be practised in different ways by the nobleman and by the working man, by the servant and by the prince, by the widow, by the unmarried girl and by...
  • The Divine Office: Christ lives for ever to make intercession for us

    01/23/2014 10:34:26 AM PST · by Catholic Examiner · 3 replies
    The Examiner ^ | 1/23/14 | Joseph Speranzella
    From a letter by Fulgentius of Ruspe, bishop Notice, at the conclusion of our prayer we never say, “through the Holy Spirit,” but rather, “through Jesus Christ, your Son, our Lord.” Through the mystery of the Incarnation, Jesus Christ became man, the mediator of God and man. He is a priest for ever according to the order of Melchisedech. By shedding his own blood he entered once and for all into the Holy Places. He did not enter a place made by human hands, a mere type of the true one; but, he entered heaven itself, where he is at...
  • Symbolism and the Language of the Liturgy

    01/15/2014 9:58:03 AM PST · by NYer · 7 replies
    Crisis Magazine ^ | January 15, 2014 | Fr. Dwight Longenecker
    In his conversations with the journalist Bill Moyers, the mythologist Joseph Campbell commented on the power of lived symbolism in communal life. When the judge comes out in a black robe, sits behind a high desk and calls the court to order with a gavel he is no longer an ordinary man. He is the law incarnate. He is justice. He is the authority.A uniform and dress code are not merely utilitarian. The policeman, the soldier, the nurse, and even the waiter, the school child, or utility man wear the uniform for more than its function. The uniform temporarily...
  • [CATHOLIC CAUCUS] The Mass in Slow Motion – The Altar is Reverenced

    08/20/2010 5:57:35 PM PDT · by markomalley · 1 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 4/23/2009 | Msgr Charles Pope
                            As the Entrance procession draws to its close something rather unusual happens! Upon entering the sanctuary, (the part of the Church where the Altar and Tabernacle are located) the priest and deacon enter the sanctuary and kiss the altar as a sign of reverence and veneration. Many of us who go to Mass all the time may hardly notice this gesture. But to someone observing Mass for the first time this gesture may seem quite unusual and raise questions. Why kiss an altar? Where did this gesture come from and what does it mean? The significance of this kiss...
  • No One Goes Away From Jesus Unchanged. Reflection on the fruitfulness of Sacraments and Liturgy

    02/26/2013 3:29:14 PM PST · by NYer · 4 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | February 25, 2013 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    There is a very clear and consistent principle in the New Testament which stated simply is “No one goes away from Jesus Christ unchanged.” That is to say, no one encounters him and leaves that encounter in the same condition that they began it. The blind man came away seeing, the deaf man came away hearing, the lame left walking, lepers went away cleansed, the poor had the good news proclaimed to them, those without a shepherd gained a Shepherd, those without a teacher, were taught, the sick got well, and the dead were raised to life.Sadly too there were...
  • The Key to True Fasting

    02/22/2012 7:40:57 PM PST · by Salvation · 20 replies · 1+ views
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | February 22, 2012 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    The Key to True FastingBy: Msgr. Charles Pope Required fasting is almost non-existent in the Catholic Church today. Even the two days where fasting is required for those over 18 and under 60, it is really a mitigated fast of two small “snack-like” meals and one regular sized meal (no snacks in between now!). Not really a fast at all. A truer fast (going without food for the whole day) is practiced by some today as a personal discipline and it is laudable if a person is able.Yet, even the mitigated fast is “hard” for many as are most...
  • The Power of the Mass: The Greatest Prayer, The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass [Cath/Ortho Caucus]

    12/08/2013 7:31:52 AM PST · by Salvation · 13 replies
    Our Lady's Warriors ^ | not given | various
    The Power of the MassThe Greatest PrayerThe Holy Sacrifice of the Mass Compilation The Tremendous Blessings and Benefits of the Mass as Told by Popes and Saints Pope Paul VI "The Mass is the most perfect form of prayer!" Pope Benedict XV "The Holy Mass would be of greater profit if people had it offered in their lifetime, rather than having it celebrated for the relief of their souls after death." St. Thomas Aquinas,Doctor of the Church "The celebration of Holy Mass is as valuable as the death of Jesus on the cross." St. Gregory,Doctor of the Church "The...