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We don't remember the Great War fallen; yet we still mourn them
Telegraph ^ | 11-9-13 | Daniel Hannan

Posted on 11/09/2013 2:48:03 PM PST by Dysart

I find Remembrance Sunday sadder each year. It’s partly that I’m becoming sentimental – I find it increasingly difficult to recite any poetry without a catch in my voice – but it’s mainly that the fallen are now closer in age to my children than to me.

When I was a small boy, I was, as small boys are, uncomplicatedly pro-war. At around eleven or twelve, I started to read the First World War poets, but I was still mainly attracted by the heroic element in their writing: their endurance in monstrous circumstances. Later, as a teenager, I began to wrestle with the question of whether Britain ought to have become involved (probably not, I currently think, but it’s finely balanced). Now, I find the whole business almost too melancholy for words.

There was a Remembrance Service at my children’s school this morning. We sang familiar hymns and recited familiar words, and the fallen old boys were remembered by name. A small school, a long list: more than 120 fatalities. Of every nine boys who answered the call, two failed to return.

(Excerpt) Read more at blogs.telegraph.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; United Kingdom
KEYWORDS: fallen; great; mourn; thegreatwar; war; worldwarone
Remembrance Sunday, the second Sunday in November, is the day traditionally put aside to remember all those who have given their lives for the peace and freedom we enjoy today. On this day people across the UK pause to reflect on the sacrifices made by service men and women.
1 posted on 11/09/2013 2:48:03 PM PST by Dysart
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To: Dysart

Motorhead - 1916

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EqFoqtpUFY8


2 posted on 11/09/2013 2:50:41 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: Dysart
They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years contemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.
3 posted on 11/09/2013 2:51:18 PM PST by AnAmericanMother (Ecce Crucem Domini, fugite partes adversae. Vicit Leo de Tribu Iuda, Radix David, Alleluia!)
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To: dfwgator
Binyon's famous war poem referenced in the article:

For The Fallen

With proud thanksgiving, a mother for her children, England mourns for her dead across the sea. Flesh of her flesh they were, spirit of her spirit, Fallen in the cause of the free.

Solemn the drums thrill; Death august and royal Sings sorrow up into immortal spheres, There is music in the midst of desolation And a glory that shines upon our tears.

They went with songs to the battle, they were young, Straight of limb, true of eye, steady and aglow. They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted; They fell with their faces to the foe.

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old: Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn. At the going down of the sun and in the morning We will remember them.

They mingle not with their laughing comrades again; They sit no more at familiar tables of home; They have no lot in our labour of the day-time; They sleep beyond England's foam.

But where our desires are and our hopes profound, Felt as a well-spring that is hidden from sight, To the innermost heart of their own land they are known As the stars are known to the Night; As the stars that shall be bright when we are dust, Moving in marches upon the heavenly plain; As the stars that are starry in the time of our darkness, To the end, to the end, they remain.

--Laurence Binyon

4 posted on 11/09/2013 2:58:07 PM PST by Dysart (Obamacare: "We are losing money on every subscriber-- but we will make it up in volume!")
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To: Dysart

All it takes for me to tear up about The Great War is “The Green Fields of France” by the Dropkick Murphy’s.


5 posted on 11/09/2013 3:00:37 PM PST by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: Dysart
The teacher who delivered the address told us about something I had not heard of before. There are 53 villages in the United Kingdom known as the Thankful Villages: villages where there is no war memorial, because every one of the young men returned alive. When we think that there are more than 16,000 villages in the country, we glimpse the magnitude of the tragedy.

Fifty three out of sixteen thousand. And I understand that of those 53, 13 are called Double Thankful because they didn't lose anyone in World War II either.

In France there is a single village in the entire country which did not lose a son during World War I.

6 posted on 11/09/2013 3:07:18 PM PST by DoodleDawg
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To: Dysart

The great National Theater production of War Horse is currently traveling the world. No one can forget THAT war after seeing it.


7 posted on 11/09/2013 3:09:14 PM PST by miss marmelstein (Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: DoodleDawg

Yes, those stats are always sobering; boggling really; especially of the toll on French villages.


8 posted on 11/09/2013 3:16:26 PM PST by Dysart (Obamacare: "We are losing money on every subscriber-- but we will make it up in volume!")
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To: Dysart

Does this guy realize this is Veterans Day and even though it honors past and present servicemen and women, Memorial Day is set aside specifically for remembrance of the dead servicemen and women of the past.


9 posted on 11/09/2013 3:22:36 PM PST by AKinAK (Keep your powder dry pilgrim.)
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To: AKinAK

What? You might click on the link for context.


10 posted on 11/09/2013 3:28:00 PM PST by Dysart (Obamacare: "We are losing money on every subscriber-- but we will make it up in volume!")
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To: Dysart
At the conclusion of WWI on November 11, 1918 it was said that the Great War would end all wars ... at least in Europe. England, France, Germany were bled white ... a whole generation of mostly young men were decimated in the carnage of that war. Yet just a generation later (21 years) the same antagonists were at it again ... nothing was learned from WWI. Particularly the Germans.
11 posted on 11/09/2013 3:28:26 PM PST by BluH2o
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To: AKinAK

Remembrance Day (UK). Veterans Day (US). It would help you understand if you would read the article.


12 posted on 11/09/2013 3:33:20 PM PST by Afterguard (Liberals will let you do anything you want, as long as it's mandatory.)
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To: Dysart

My mother’s American family lost men in both wars.

My grandfather served in WWI in France, my father and father-in-law were WWII vets with combat purple hearts.

None of them wanted to talk about war. My faather, a young Marine who spent 45 days in combat on Okinawa before being injured, was discharged before turning 20 yrs. old, at war’s end.


13 posted on 11/09/2013 3:40:32 PM PST by truth_seeker
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To: Dysart

I wish his editor had caught this gaffe:

“It’s not simply that there are almost no First World War veterans left...”

There are no First World War veterans left, combatants or non-combatants.

The last living veteran of World War I was Florence Green, a British citizen who served in the Allied armed forces, and who died 4 February 2012, aged 110.

The last combat veteran was Claude Choules who served in the British Royal Navy (and later the Royal Australian Navy) and died 5 May 2011, aged 110.

The last veteran who served in the trenches was Harry Patch who died on 25 July 2009, aged 111.

The last Central Powers veteran, Franz Künstler of Austria-Hungary, died on 27 May 2008 at the age of 107.


14 posted on 11/09/2013 3:46:29 PM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Welfare is the new euphemism for Eugenics.)
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To: Dysart

A thousand pardons. It appears Remembrance Day is like our Veterans Day as it honors the living and dead. They have no holiday for just the dead like we do. Thanks for bringing my stupidity to light.


15 posted on 11/09/2013 4:47:59 PM PST by AKinAK (Keep your powder dry pilgrim.)
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To: miss marmelstein

Wonderful show. Also see “The Making of War Horse” on Netflicks instant view.


16 posted on 11/09/2013 5:04:07 PM PST by Mercat
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To: Dysart

I still think of a Jewish guy that I served with in Germany. He died in an auto accident in California but some of the things we talked about will remain forever.


17 posted on 11/09/2013 5:07:47 PM PST by Bogie
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To: BluH2o

Europe never fully recovered from WWI, WWII just made the wound even deeper.


18 posted on 11/09/2013 5:12:26 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: Dysart

19 posted on 11/09/2013 5:13:24 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: All

Living very close to the Canadian border, I can only receive stations from there. At least every 15 minutes, the play a tribute to the men and women from both wars, usually a letter from someone on the front. They’ve been doing this for a while now. Watching our TV and listening to the radio while in town in the good old USA, all I hear is ads for sales. Enough to make a patriot cry. Semper Fidelis


20 posted on 11/09/2013 5:19:14 PM PST by gunner03
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To: Dysart

My grandmother’s only brother died, at age 19, at the Battle of the Bulge. I find it extraordinarily humbling to read about the casualities of WWI and WWII - just the sheer numbers. It puts into perspective when we hear, for example, “100 dead in 2011” in Afghanistan. Please realize, I mean no disrespect towards or belittling of the even a single loss of an American soldier or sailor. It just reminds me how nearly impossible it is for us now, collectively, to understand the kind of sacrifice that was given by prior generations. To lose 100 men a day - or ten times that - was the norm not so long ago.


21 posted on 11/09/2013 5:23:33 PM PST by workerbee (The President of the United States is DOMESTIC ENEMY #1!)
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To: Dysart

In the US, the vets organization used to sell plastc poppies for people to wear on Veterans Day. I haven’t seen that happening for a generation now. Always thought it was a nice way to honor our veterans. Guess it’s more a custom of Canada and the Commonwealth nations.


22 posted on 11/09/2013 5:31:46 PM PST by Ciexyz
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To: Dysart

In the US, the vets organization used to sell plastc poppies for people to wear on Veterans Day. I haven’t seen that happening for a generation now. Always thought it was a nice way to honor our veterans. Guess it’s more a custom of Canada and the Commonwealth nations.


23 posted on 11/09/2013 5:31:47 PM PST by Ciexyz
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To: Ciexyz

The last time I bought such a poppy was only about 5 years ago.


24 posted on 11/09/2013 5:40:12 PM PST by Bigg Red (Let me hear what God the LORD will speak. -Ps85)
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To: gunner03

Always nice to see the English soccer players with the poppies on their uniforms.


25 posted on 11/09/2013 5:43:30 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: gunner03

A very good first world war film is “A very long engagement”
it is in french with subtitles and covers some very
disturbing aspects of leadership and cowardice and how
this affected the people at home. Filmed in a almost
Expressionist style, the views of the french countyside
are just awesome, the trench fighting is horrendous.

It is long but well worth viewing as some of the family
and loved ones of the disgraced take revenge on the
higher unfeeling command structure in a number of mcabe
incidents. The main character finally takes the identy
of another dead outcast and survives the war but suffers
greatly for all he has been through .

Basically there were various shirkers,slackers, some
men who shot off their trigger fingers or attempted
suicide but were not successful. they were all gathered
together and marched out between the lines to be decimated.
But some of them lived as outcasts.

Really great film, must see!


26 posted on 11/09/2013 5:59:45 PM PST by tet68 ( " We would not die in that man's company, that fears his fellowship to die with us...." Henry V.)
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To: BluH2o

Oh, the Germans had learned something from WWI, but not the lessons one might have hoped: they learned the importance of tanks in modern warfare, and the basis of blitzkrieg — fusing the tactical innovation that had been turning the tide in their favor before the entry of the U.S. and the first generation of British tanks into the war with the use of tanks. (Though it was really a British captain, B.H. Liddell-Hart, who learned those lessons and set them down fair and square in books, which his own country’s General Staff didn’t read while the German General Staff (and Patton) devoured them.)


27 posted on 11/09/2013 6:05:38 PM PST by The_Reader_David (And when they behead your own people in the wars which are to come, then you will know...)
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To: tet68

“A Very Long Engagement” is available on youtube for the low, low price of $1.99.


28 posted on 11/09/2013 6:14:35 PM PST by Dysart (Obamacare: "We are losing money on every subscriber-- but we will make it up in volume!")
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To: The_Reader_David
Germany ... they learned the importance of tanks in modern warfare, and the basis of blitzkrieg

What the Germans should have focused on were U-boats ...
Strategists (Monday AM QB's) have said if Nazi Germany had 40 more U-boats ready to deploy by 1940 they would have effectively cut Britain off from supplies ... food, armaments, fuel.
Once the US entered the war in December 1941 it was essentially over for Germany. The US and Canada had a stream of supplies & war equipment, production uninterrupted by bombing, moving across the Atlantic. Very little in the way of German U-boat activity to stop it ... especially the last two years of WWII.

29 posted on 11/09/2013 6:34:06 PM PST by BluH2o
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To: workerbee

I understand what you are saying about historical vs modern warfare carnage. Moreover, the casualty figures in the Civil War are ghastly and unfathomable anymore.


30 posted on 11/09/2013 6:44:36 PM PST by Dysart (Obamacare: "We are losing money on every subscriber-- but we will make it up in volume!")
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To: Mercat

I’ll look for the making of War Horse. I saw the show 3 times - and each time, the director/creators had made changes. In the original production, the entire French family were puppets, not actors! Tremendously eerie, didn’t work, and was quickly changed. The last time I saw it, with my nephew, I sat so close to the stage, I could have pulled Joey’s tail.


31 posted on 11/10/2013 5:17:52 AM PST by miss marmelstein (Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: Ciexyz

I’ve only seen red crape paper poppies here in the Northeast. I buy one every year. I prefer the British poppy - made of a kind of plastic/vinyl. Prettier design as well.


32 posted on 11/10/2013 5:19:44 AM PST by miss marmelstein (Richard Lives Yet!)
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To: tet68

I’ll try to locate it, sounds interesting. Thank you.


33 posted on 11/10/2013 8:09:17 AM PST by gunner03
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To: dfwgator

And Scots, Northern Irish (well most lol) and Welsh. Only one major UK club’s fans make a hoo-hah about the poppy, guess?. To be fair the club has supported it, its the fans who complain.


34 posted on 11/10/2013 12:03:28 PM PST by the scotsman (i)
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