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'Please spare my little girl': How Mexico's fearless female mayor sacrificed herself...
The Daily Mail ^ | 11/26/2012 | Sam Webb

Posted on 11/27/2012 3:04:15 PM PST by Beave Meister

The woman mayor who was kidnapped and murdered by a Mexican drug gang pleaded with her attackers for her young daughter’s life, it emerged today.

Maria Santos Gorrostieta, who had already survived two assassination attempts, was driving the child to school at around 8.30am when she was ambushed by a car in the city of Morelia.

The 36-year-old was hauled from her vehicle and physically assaulted as horrified witnesses watched, according to newspaper El Universal. They described how she begged for her child to be left alone and then appeared to get into her abductors’ car willingly.

The little girl was left wailing as her mother was driven away on Monday November 12.

(Excerpt) Read more at dailymail.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: borders; cartels; corruption; crime; dirtbags; drugcartel; drugs; drugwar; drugwars; gorrostieta; kidnapped; mexicanborder; mexico; mexicomayor; murder; scum; warondrugs; wod; wodlist; wosd
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An incredibly brave woman who should be considered a hero both in Mexico and the U.S. It's time to use our drones on the drug cartels!
1 posted on 11/27/2012 3:04:25 PM PST by Beave Meister
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To: Beave Meister

Hey, Time Magazine, here’s a real “Woman of the Year” candidate: Maria Santos Gorrostieta.


2 posted on 11/27/2012 3:07:16 PM PST by adorno (Y)
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To: Beave Meister

This story is horrible. She’s another Time person of the year candidate. Screw Fluck.


3 posted on 11/27/2012 3:07:46 PM PST by Thebaddog (Obama won, we lost)
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To: Beave Meister

Another reason we need a real border

Voldemortos can come and go as he pleases


4 posted on 11/27/2012 3:08:17 PM PST by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: adorno

Here here.


5 posted on 11/27/2012 3:08:57 PM PST by Beave Meister (Die Hard Cubs Fan.....if it takes forever.)
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To: adorno

Here here.


6 posted on 11/27/2012 3:09:13 PM PST by Beave Meister (Die Hard Cubs Fan.....if it takes forever.)
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To: Beave Meister

Bravery of ONE Mexican woman mayor >> all of our Congress


7 posted on 11/27/2012 3:11:31 PM PST by gaijin
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To: Beave Meister

We have far more national security interest in Mexico than over there in Afghanistan.
Right now our troops must make sure not to damage the opium poppy crop. We need to hit this.

Average Mexicans are terrified of the cartel wars. If we did with the slightest PR effort, we should be able do it without making them freak out that we are taking over. It could easily be cast as a rescue mission for them and as security for both of us.


8 posted on 11/27/2012 3:12:17 PM PST by DesertRhino (I was standing with a rifle, waiting for soviet paratroopers, but communists just ran for office.)
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To: Thebaddog

Is it any wonder that nobody reads Time magazine anymore?


9 posted on 11/27/2012 3:20:00 PM PST by seanmerc
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To: Beave Meister
From the article:

But after decades of using force to combat the gangs, it is U.S. lawmakers who are the criminals' biggest problem.

Legalisation of marijuana, as recently voted for by Colorado and Washington states, may wipe billions of dollars from the cartels’ annual profits.

And it has left politicians in Mexico with a tough question: How can they continue to justify spending money – and lives – fighting drug distribution to America when it will be legal in some states from next month?

Mexico presidential advisor Luis Videgaray said in a radio interview last week: 'Obviously, we can’t handle a product that is illegal in Mexico, trying to stop its transfer to the United States, when in the United States, at least in part of the United States, it now has a different status.'

10 posted on 11/27/2012 3:25:20 PM PST by Procyon (Decentralize, degovernmentalize, deregulate, demonopolize, decredentialize, disentitle.)
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To: adorno

btt


11 posted on 11/27/2012 3:27:39 PM PST by KSCITYBOY
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To: Procyon

I hate to say it, but maybe it is time to legalize drugs. Let the idiots abuse themselves. Too many innocent people are dying in the drug cartel violence.


12 posted on 11/27/2012 3:31:04 PM PST by MNDude
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To: Beave Meister

She stood up to the drug world, but the drug world will hijack this thread.


13 posted on 11/27/2012 3:44:54 PM PST by ansel12 (The only Senate seat GOP pick up was the Palin endorsed Deb Fischer's successful run in Nebraska)
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To: MNDude

That’s the only way out, I think.

Have the big pharmaceutical companies produce legal drugs, and minimize the risk of them being instantly or strongly addictive.

It won’t stop the cartels from producing the instant and strongly addictive drugs, like crack or meth, but hopefully it will cut their income severely that Mexico can win its drug war.


14 posted on 11/27/2012 3:44:54 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Beave Meister

Meanwhile our administration and our politicians want amnesty for the illegals and want our country to look like Mexico.

They care only for their own power and jobs.

F’em.


15 posted on 11/27/2012 3:49:10 PM PST by ladyjane (For the first time in my life I am not proud of my country.)
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To: Jonty30

NO...it will NOT end with legalization...certain segments will still be UNDERGROUND...and there will be OTHER drugs...the only way to control this is to shoot within 1 MONTH of capture and CONVICTION drug pushers. Otherwise, we will have THIS (war) in OUR streets (more than it already is.)


16 posted on 11/27/2012 3:52:30 PM PST by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: goodnesswins

Let me say this, I honestly don’t like drugs and have no understanding as to why people would volunteer to become drug dependent.

Having said that, many people who are in prison are there over a minor drug conviction, a couple of ounces of pot.

If regulation worked for booze, because there are no massive battles with rum runners anymore, the principle should work for drugs as well. Allow the pharmaceuticals to produce safe drugs that people can consume safely and minimal addictiveness and end the war on drugs.

It’s either that or we will end with a police state.


17 posted on 11/27/2012 3:59:37 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Beave Meister; All

Legalization is not the answer.

This is a good post regarding that from StevenCrowder:

www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-gop/2963222/posts


18 posted on 11/27/2012 4:06:17 PM PST by PieterCasparzen (We have to fix things ourselves.)
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FReepathon Day 58.

19 posted on 11/27/2012 4:07:22 PM PST by RedMDer (Please support Toys for Tots this CHRISTmas season.)
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To: MNDude
Thought along those lines myself over the years. We are not solving anything.

It will never be so as it would put: Judges, lawyers, policemen/women out of work and POLITICIANs out less of their "income", and of course the insurance companies would have to lower our homeowners premiums.

So it is not likely to be legalized. Status Quo equals population control.

20 posted on 11/27/2012 4:08:33 PM PST by annieokie
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To: MNDude

naw, time to use the only solution ever found to work ~ start executing the users


21 posted on 11/27/2012 4:15:17 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: Jonty30

I don’t think you know much about the PHARMA industry, do you. Or the abuse of pharma drugs?


22 posted on 11/27/2012 4:20:27 PM PST by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: goodnesswins

And I agree with you that there will always be a market for highly dangerous and instantly addictive drugs. You can’t stop stupid.

Im more concerned with the 85%, or whatever, users could be steered away from crack or meth, if they had a safe supply from some authorized dealer.

The illegal dealers will always be problematic, no matter what they do. However, we can reduce then to a more manageable number, they would be easier to contain.


23 posted on 11/27/2012 4:20:42 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Jonty30
a drug addict's needs are insatiable.....give them some, they want more....its the nature of the beast.....

and most people IMO are in jail not because they have a little weed...they're there because of the lying, cheating, stealing, prostituting and striping they do to afford their drugs....

its a difficult problem and you can believe that its never going to just go away because again, IMO, too many Americans are making big bucks from the trade and looking "away"....

what if people suddenly became ethical and moral?...what if people turned to God?...all problems solved.

24 posted on 11/27/2012 4:22:59 PM PST by cherry
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To: Jonty30

I really do not think there are people in jail for 2 oz possession of mj....also, you need to think about how mj has changed over the years....sure, regulating it would make it “safer”....except for those mixing up more POWERFUL concoctions which is what would happen. The police around here are NOT happy with the legalization of mj...they see it as a gateway drug....start in gradeschool and go from there...legalizing won’t stop stupid, either.


25 posted on 11/27/2012 4:23:56 PM PST by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: goodnesswins

How much of your national debt can be attributed, in some way, to the war on drugs. It’s not working and people are killing themselves to use their drugs of choice.

No, killing people on sight for toking will not work either.


26 posted on 11/27/2012 4:24:35 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: seanmerc

“Is it any wonder that nobody reads Time magazine anymore?”

I’m guessing there are enough doctor, lawyer, etc. offices to subscribe to bunches of magazines that the anti-American yellow journal CEOs don’t care.

With HusseinCare and more welfare office visitors, there will be even more sold.


27 posted on 11/27/2012 4:38:00 PM PST by treetopsandroofs (Had FDR been GOP, there would have been no World Wars, just "The Great War" and "Roosevelt's Wars".)
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To: goodnesswins
What's that line? Written in stone by God himself?

Something about not doing something?

It's scary how sometimes you can forget the very words themselves isn't it?

28 posted on 11/27/2012 4:41:14 PM PST by rawcatslyentist ("Behold, I am against you, O arrogant one," Jeremiah 50:31)
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To: Beave Meister

My such a bave woman.

May God comfort and protect her family.

May she rest in peace.

May her assasins face God’s judgement soon. No one buys their way out of that.


29 posted on 11/27/2012 4:50:14 PM PST by Texas Fossil
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To: Jonty30

“Have the big pharmaceutical companies produce legal drugs, and minimize the risk of them being instantly or strongly addictive.”

That’s a tricky proposition. For most drugs, the “high” produced, and the addictiveness of the drug are directly linked. I don’t think this is a chemical issue so much as it is a psychological issue, since you see the same phenomenon when the exact same drugs are delivered by methods of varying effectiveness. For example, snorting cocaine is less addictive than smoking cocaine, not because of any chemical difference in the drug, but just because smoking it delivers the drug more effectively to the brain, producing a more immediate and powerful high.

The consumers want the “high”, but if the “high” itself is addictive, regardless of what chemical produces it, then you won’t be able to design a drug that produces a “high” that isn’t addictive. You can produce a drug that is addictive but doesn’t produce much of a high, such as tobacco, or methadone, but it doesn’t work the other way around.


30 posted on 11/27/2012 4:55:07 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: ansel12

I imagine organized criminals were most affected by the repeal of prohibition. If we had not done so then, nearly 100 years later, the nation would be divided by alcohol cartels as violent as we see in Mexico today. Now, 40 years after Nixon launched the war on drugs, the new cartels are not on the losing side and the violence is spreading across the border. This isn’t an issue of morality. Certainly the Prohibitionists held the moral high ground. But at what cost to society?


31 posted on 11/27/2012 4:55:10 PM PST by Procyon (Decentralize, degovernmentalize, deregulate, demonopolize, decredentialize, disentitle.)
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To: Beave Meister

Every now and then a saint walks among us.

I hope the Church considers her for sainthood


32 posted on 11/27/2012 4:57:32 PM PST by Scotswife
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To: cherry

“and most people IMO are in jail not because they have a little weed...they’re there because of the lying, cheating, stealing, prostituting and striping they do to afford their drugs....”

Well, then the only people being punished by the drug possession laws are the otherwise law-abiding users. The rest of them would be in jail for those other crimes anyway, whether the drugs were legalized or not.

Drugs laws are really just one step above thoughtcrime. We’re not really punishing people for being destructive to society, just punishing them because we think they are doing something that will lead them to be destructive to society. Instead, we should just punish the people that actually are destructive, regardless of what we think caused them to do what they did. Let the sociologists worry about that stuff, not our legislators.


33 posted on 11/27/2012 5:01:31 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: goodnesswins

“NO...it will NOT end with legalization...certain segments will still be UNDERGROUND...and there will be OTHER drugs...”

That’s really an argument for, not against legalization. We didn’t have any “drug culture” or “underground” trying to find new novelty drugs to skirt drug laws until we started classifying and scheduling all the prohibited substances that the government couldn’t trust adult citizens with. As long as we have a list of prohibited substances, there will be an underground drug culture, and a constant stream of new drugs with unknown properties. The only way to get rid of those things is to get rid of the list that created them.

Really, your comment reads like you won’t be satisfied until there is no drug use in society. That’s an impossible scenario that will never happen in the real world, and conservatives don’t deal in utopian fantasies. People are always going to abuse drugs, and government will never be able to put a stop to it, even if we executed all the drug pushers AND the drug users. You might as well try to outlaw sex and see how that goes.


34 posted on 11/27/2012 5:17:10 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: Boogieman

I agree with you that it is tricky. However, as it is, by having turned the production of drugs completely over to the cartels, there is no incentive for them to moderate their product so it is not as addictive. Who, except somebody completely lost to drugs would smoke paint thinner and turpentine, amongst the key ingredients for meth? The cartels are completely happy to turn out instant addictives like crank or crocodile.Crocodile, by the way is so damaging that users can literally watch their arm rot to bone, but users literally cannot stop.

If we did legalize, and regulate drugs, most users would also moderate their use because they would buy it from legal sellers. A few won’t, but the few are lost no matter what we do. We could handle the few hardcore drug users easier, if we weren’t so diffused trying to stop all drugs.


35 posted on 11/27/2012 5:23:35 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: muawiyah

I don’t know, maybe you’re just trolling, but what’s your definition of “work”? I ask because, it seems to me, even if executing all the drug users managed to stamp out a drug problem, you’d just have an increase in other social problems as a result. People use drugs to escape from reality, and if they are afraid to use drugs because of the executions, they’ll escape from reality through other means. So, you’d just see more alcoholism, more prostitution, gambling, sexual abuse, domestic violence, etc.

Thinking that you can just “win” some war on drugs and declare a victory is looking at things very myopically. It’s like the psychologists who suppress the symptoms of psychological problem with drugs, and then declare the patient cured. If you don’t address the underlying issues that caused the symptoms, then those issues are probably just going to manifest in other ways.


36 posted on 11/27/2012 5:26:07 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: All

What right does the US Congress have to make drugs illegal, short of a Constitutional Amendment? /rhetorical


37 posted on 11/27/2012 5:30:24 PM PST by PghBaldy (Pete Hoekstra RE: Petraeus scandal - "There's more here than meets the eye.")
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To: Jonty30

Alright, I think I see what you are saying now. Not that they would produce some “safe”, non-addicting drugs, just that we could put some limits on the purity and the strength, to moderate the addictiveness and bad side effects.

We’d still always have a few people that would try to cook up stronger drugs, but we still have people that cook up moonshine so they can get something stronger than the 80 or 100 proof stuff that the state regulates. They’re a minority and they don’t cause a lot of problems. Most people would probably be happy with the 5% THC weed cigarettes or the “Meth Lite” they could buy at the 7-11.


38 posted on 11/27/2012 5:32:03 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: PghBaldy

When is the last time the US Congress worried about whether it had a right to do something or not? /rhetorical


39 posted on 11/27/2012 5:33:33 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: Boogieman

That wouldn’t work anyway. All that would happen is, by increasing the risk, is raise the price of the product to account for the increased risk.

It would just increase the incentive for the cartels to research ways to increase the addictiveness of the crap that’s out there now.

If anybody thinks drugs like crank, crocodile, meth, and crack are the worst it can get, I’ve got news for you...


40 posted on 11/27/2012 5:34:04 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Boogieman

Exactly. Most people will satisfy themselves with products with relatively low highs and low rates of addiction.

By introducing legal competition, it would likely lower the cost of drugs, reducing the incentive to rob and pillage, because the drugs that are costing $500 on the street could be had for $20 or so at a liquor outlet, or 7/11.


41 posted on 11/27/2012 5:40:27 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: rawcatslyentist

Which one? “Thou shalt not MURDER?”


42 posted on 11/27/2012 5:43:18 PM PST by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: Boogieman

NO, I’m a realist...there will be USERS....but, our culture has degraded to such an extent that we almost CELEBRATE them these days. Oh, and by the way, Pharma drugs have underground markets, also.


43 posted on 11/27/2012 5:46:54 PM PST by goodnesswins (R.I.P. Doherty, Smith, Stevens, Woods.)
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To: Procyon

Of course, Mexico legalized ALL drugs several years ago, but it hasn’t stopped the criminal murderous methods of those involved in its trade.

FWIW, the drug cartels announced several years ago that they were next targeting the pharmaceutical industry in the US.

After Prohibition, the gangs in the US didn’t lose power, they simply reinforced their marketing and criminal control of their enterprises.


44 posted on 11/27/2012 5:47:05 PM PST by Cvengr (Adversity in life and death is inevitable. Thru faith in Christ, stress is optional.)
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To: Cvengr

The market for illegal drugs is the United States. We need to reduce the profit margin here before anything can really be done.


45 posted on 11/27/2012 5:52:16 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: Beave Meister

brave but incredibly stupid. you can be brave and still have some security. you can’t count on the kindness of murderous drug mobsters.


46 posted on 11/27/2012 5:55:42 PM PST by Secret Agent Man (I can neither confirm or deny that; even if I could, I couldn't - it's classified.)
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To: goodnesswins

Well, as long as there are drug consumers, there will be producers and distributors. It’s simple economics; supply and demand. The supply does not produce the demand, but rather the demand fuels production of the supply. Eliminating the supply of the drug simply increases the value, making it more profitable to find a new way to meet demand.

Now, if we decrease the number of consumers, that is probably about the best we can hope to achieve. You’re right that our culture celebrates them, but that is a battle that needs to be fought in the cultural arena. Enforcing drug laws more harshly just ends up glorifying the outlaws as some kind of modern day Robin Hoods standing up against “the Man”, because a large segment of the public can sympathize with the few that get caught in the net and punished.

Reagan had a much better idea, to appeal directly to the public and try to convince them, as thinking adults, to choose not to do drugs. There’s no reason we can’t tell people not to do drugs and still legalize them to castrate the criminals and cartels. We do the exact same thing with our PR campaigns against legal tobacco and alcohol, and they have been proven to be fairly effective.

As for the prescription drugs, of course there is a black market, but that exists for the same reason that there is a black market on other drugs: excessive government regulation. There is never any other reason for a black market on anything.


47 posted on 11/27/2012 6:09:51 PM PST by Boogieman
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To: Beave Meister

It’s time to legalize th crap and put the cartels out of business entirely.


48 posted on 11/27/2012 6:13:43 PM PST by Lurker (Violence is rarely the answer. But when it is it is the only answer.)
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To: Jonty30

“If regulation worked for booze, because there are no massive battles with rum runners anymore, the principle should work for drugs as well. Allow the pharmaceuticals to produce safe drugs that people can consume safely and minimal addictiveness and end the war on drugs.

It’s either that or we will end with a police state.”

A police state is just what they are working towards, the agenda behind the curtain, the source of endless cash for the corrupt.


49 posted on 11/27/2012 6:34:42 PM PST by GladesGuru (In a society predicated upon freedom, it is necessary to examine principles."...the public interest)
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To: GladesGuru

And the war on drugs is feeling a police state.

Prior to the war on drugs, police could fairly be considered neighbors who kept the law and peace.

Now, they are nameless and faceless drones who shoot dogs to intimidate people into compliance.


50 posted on 11/27/2012 7:03:28 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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