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WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 37 SEPTEMBER 14, 2012
Free Republic | Sept. 14, 2012 | greeneyes

Posted on 09/14/2012 11:18:57 AM PDT by greeneyes

The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you.

This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread ... there is no telling where it will go and that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!

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TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: agriculture; food; gardening; hobbies
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Greetings from Missouri. We have a very crisp cool day today. Perfect to get some heavy work done outside. Burn order was lifted for the county, since we have had sufficient rain to make everything green again.

I have a few good tomatoes, all are green, so hope to have at least one batch before frost. Lemons are starting to turn from green to yellow.

Have a great weekend. God Bless.

1 posted on 09/14/2012 11:19:06 AM PDT by greeneyes
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To: greeneyes; Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; ...

Pinging the List.


2 posted on 09/14/2012 11:25:31 AM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Thanks for the ping...

Question of the day... Cause I just don’t know

Bermuda Grass will not stay away tilling just makes it thicker and it seems even more robust after a till.

Other than pulling it which is futile at best.
What are my options?
My elderly neighbor said spray it with a herbicide but I do not want to hurt the soil... He said it will not but I want a second opinion.
Thoughts anyone?


3 posted on 09/14/2012 11:36:54 AM PDT by Rightly Biased (How do you say Arkanicide in Kenyan?)
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To: greeneyes

Woohoo! It’s been in the 80s the last two days and raining! Of course, now that the tomatoes finally have ripe ones on the vines, it’s too soggy to harvest them.

Had a toad in the garden this week. He and the lizards are welcome to feast all they want. Something has been digging holes.

I read somewhere that Dollar General has seed packages for 90% off.


4 posted on 09/14/2012 11:37:06 AM PDT by bgill
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To: greeneyes

Good afternoon. I’m clinging close to home to da;y managing my Mom’s business. Because I have POA to pay her bills and her mailing address was switched to here, etc., her health plan switched her to another group. I can’t get anyone in 2 offices to talk to me about it. Grrrrr.


5 posted on 09/14/2012 11:42:03 AM PDT by afraidfortherepublic (Joe Biden is reported to be seeking asylum in a foreign country so he does not have to debate Ryan.)
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To: Rightly Biased

Nothing kills Bermuda. When the world ends, the only thing left will be Bermuda grass and fire ants. The roots are too deep. If you’re trying to put in a garden on top of where Bermuda is, just prepare yourself for a lifetime of headaches. You just have to live with it. Good luck.


6 posted on 09/14/2012 11:42:51 AM PDT by bgill
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To: bgill

Well isn’t that encouraging....

I have heard if you want a good stand of bermuda put in a calichi driveway or plant a garden...

I have had pretty good luck with it until this year and the durn bermuda will just not stay away... Its overwhelming this year.


7 posted on 09/14/2012 11:48:06 AM PDT by Rightly Biased (How do you say Arkanicide in Kenyan?)
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To: greeneyes

82 degrees in Torrance, CA.
No answer to the Bermuda grass question.

Random other question. Do some cactuses grow really slowly? Last year I threw dragon fruit seeds in a pot and 8 sprouted. They are now about 1.5 inches tall. That’s it. Eventually, a dragon fruit tree should be perhaps 5 feet tall. At this rate of growth, I’ll be passing on this plant in my will before it ever grows up and has fruit.


8 posted on 09/14/2012 11:50:22 AM PDT by married21 (As for me and my house, we will serve the Lord.)
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To: Rightly Biased

I don’t know anything about Bermuda Grass, except that it can be invasive. Maybe one of our more expert gardeners can chime in, if they post to the thread.


9 posted on 09/14/2012 11:57:15 AM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: bgill

I love dollar general. I’ll have to check it out and see if we have the same deal. Almost everything should be pretty good for next year, except maybe corn.


10 posted on 09/14/2012 11:59:17 AM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Does anyone know if the date on seed packs at the store really matter. I have seen some with an end of year date 12/12 will they still be good next year.


11 posted on 09/14/2012 11:59:20 AM PDT by Ratman83
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To: afraidfortherepublic

My sympathies to you. I had POA for my Dad, and he lived with me for the last 5 years of his life. It was a Bittersweet time.

Just be thankful your Mom has you to help her. You are about to get a real education on health care for the elderly in this country - even before Obama Care.


12 posted on 09/14/2012 12:04:01 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Rightly Biased

In my experience, the only non-herbicidal way to get rid of Bermuda grass is to physically remove the plants themselves.

Dig/turn it and remove as much soil from the roots as practical, then dispose of the plants.

Then, periodically dig up the remnant roots that resprout; the more of the root you can get each time the less remains to resprout.

Eventually, the remaining roots will die because they never can replenish their stored nutrients as you keep pulling the “green sprouts” at every opportunity.

It’s tedious.


13 posted on 09/14/2012 12:06:36 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: greeneyes
Thank you for the ping. This side of MO got rain again off and on all day yesterday and last night. Everything is soggy, but that sure is no complaint.

I am making grape and plum jelly today until I get all the juice done. My tomatoes have finally stopped producing by the bushel basket, so have a very manageable amount to eat at my pleasure. There is almost as much green grass now as there is dead grass in the yard. Right now it is 63 degrees and feels awesome.

14 posted on 09/14/2012 12:06:43 PM PDT by Just mythoughts (Please help Todd Akin defeat Claire and the GOP-e send money!!!!!)
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To: Ratman83

I used to have a list of seeds and their viability. IIRC most of them are good for 3 or 4 years and some longer. Especially if vacuum packed and stored in the refrigerator.

However, corn was listed as only a 2 year viability, but even corn should be ok for next year. I usually do get seeds at end of year sales, and plant them in grow pots indoors the next spring to make seedlings for transplant.


15 posted on 09/14/2012 12:09:29 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Just mythoughts
We just got some rain this morning. Hope we have a sunny day tomorrow. I want to get some gardening chores done, and start planting the winter garden.
16 posted on 09/14/2012 12:14:10 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Just mythoughts

Frugal tip - make plum and grape butter from the leftover pulp.


17 posted on 09/14/2012 12:18:48 PM PDT by bgill
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To: greeneyes

I’ve got horseradish to harvest, but aside from that I’ve given up for this year. I’ll clean up and burn after we get a good hard freeze. Try again next year.


18 posted on 09/14/2012 12:19:44 PM PDT by Augie
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To: greeneyes; Ratman83

Here’s a list of seed viability. Most will last several years.

http://www.growingyourownveg.com/vegetableseedviability.php


19 posted on 09/14/2012 12:24:03 PM PDT by bgill
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To: greeneyes

Central Texas finally got some rain during the past 24 hours. I recorded just under 3” and several reports to the north were 6” - 8”. Temps will stay in the 60s today.

Several boat docks were demolished on the smaller feeder streams into Lake Travis. Areas around Johnson City got close to 7” and all that feeds into the lake.


20 posted on 09/14/2012 12:25:43 PM PDT by Arrowhead1952 ("It's better to vote for a Republican you don't know than wind up with a dim you don't like".)
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To: Rightly Biased; bgill

Controlling bermuda grass is fairly simple, though neither cheap nor 100% effective.

1) hire a backhoe & dump truck
2) set up a 25 foot perimeter around the area to be controlled
3) remove all the soil inside the perimeter to a dpeth of 10’, and truck it to the nearest toxic waste site
4) install 6” concrete walls from the bottom of the hole to 3’ above the soil line, with anchor bolts to fasten the dome in step 6
5) clean and sterilize the truck thoroughly, and use it to fill the hole with sterile garden soil over a 16” layer of clean, washed sharp 1”-minus gravel (for drainage)
6) install a greenhouse dome over the site to keep out future contamination of bermuda seeds or roots
7) keep a flamethrower handy, to use at the first sign of a new infestation starting.

I know this is only a temporary solution, but should be good for 2-3 years of bermuda-free gardening. Good luck!


21 posted on 09/14/2012 12:35:07 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: bgill
Frugal tip - make plum and grape butter from the leftover pulp.

My grapes were a month early, I picked and strained the juice and fed the pulp to the hungry thirsty birds. I did not know when I returned it to the garden to 'mulch' my broccoli that it would draw the birds. One trip out to the garden and the ground was literally covered with all kinds of birds. I figure I got a bit of fresh fertilizer from them that got baked as fast as they dropped it. So we both were rewarded. I have wild grape vines that were initially looking really well early this year that I like to mix with my tame grapes to make jelly, but they did not survive the heat and drought.

I had so little pulp left from the plums maybe 2 cups that I put it in the compost.

I will keep your recommendation in mind for next year. It has been so hot I have yet to make my strawberry jam and jelly. The juice and mashed berries are waiting for me in the freezer.

22 posted on 09/14/2012 12:35:31 PM PDT by Just mythoughts (Please help Todd Akin defeat Claire and the GOP-e send money!!!!!)
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To: greeneyes

I’ve started making a list of foodstuffs for a kitchen scrap garden. Like don’t throw away those old onions and potatoes, but plant them. We probably know much of this but there were a couple I didn’t know about. Yes, yes, hybrid and storage and all that other stuff has to be considered but there’s nothing to lose. It’s too much to type out all the details but here’s a list of the veggies that you can replant into your garden:

Grape seeds, coffee beans, citrus seeds, sweet potato, white potato, avocado, onions, garlic, carrots, ginger, beets, rutabaga, turnip, pineapple, lettuce, sprouts, lemon grass, celery and cabbage, peppers.


23 posted on 09/14/2012 12:36:33 PM PDT by bgill
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To: greeneyes

Thanks I wanted to take advantage of the end of season sales.


24 posted on 09/14/2012 12:40:16 PM PDT by Ratman83
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To: bgill

Thank you.


25 posted on 09/14/2012 12:41:19 PM PDT by Ratman83
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To: ApplegateRanch

Finally a serious solution...but I doubt it works

So what yall are telling me is to give up on my garden and take up something else?


26 posted on 09/14/2012 12:50:35 PM PDT by Rightly Biased (How do you say Arkanicide in Kenyan?)
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To: Arrowhead1952

I sat up here yesterday in Keller watching the large patches of yellow and dark green on the radar heading my way, then poof. As soon as it got to me it disappeared and the sun came out. Finally got some drizzle and cooler temps today.
Hope it will be enough to revive my gardens. If not I am ready to yank everything out and start getting ready for the winter garden.


27 posted on 09/14/2012 12:51:23 PM PDT by heylady (“Sometimes I wish I could be a Democrat and then I remember I have a soul.”( Deb))
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To: ApplegateRanch

Yeah, temporary at best. ;)


28 posted on 09/14/2012 12:52:55 PM PDT by bgill
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To: ApplegateRanch

Will kudzu crowd-out bermuda?


29 posted on 09/14/2012 1:13:54 PM PDT by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: ApplegateRanch

You’re solution to Bermuda is simple brilliant!!

Seriously, all I know to do is till and keep on tilling. It’ll get better eventually.


30 posted on 09/14/2012 1:36:01 PM PDT by Country Cousin
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To: Country Cousin

Oh my. “Your” not “You’re.” My grammatically correct cousin is going to get me now!!


31 posted on 09/14/2012 1:38:05 PM PDT by Country Cousin
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To: DuncanWaring

THATS the answer KUDZU...

THANKS


32 posted on 09/14/2012 1:56:28 PM PDT by Rightly Biased (How do you say Arkanicide in Kenyan?)
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To: greeneyes

Just getting hit with late-blight on the tomatoes this year. We normally would have a frost soon so it isn’t that big a deal. Luckily we harvested potatoes before it hit.

The tomatoes, red or green, get little brown spots and just rot ina day or so. Some look like they were hit with a butane flame, brownish spot with blisters around the edges.

So far the peppers don’t have it. Our first tomatoes came along in late July so we have lots of spaghetti sauce in the freezer.


33 posted on 09/14/2012 2:48:57 PM PDT by finnsheep
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To: Rightly Biased
Never give up; just learn to live with the problem, while doing all you can to mitigate it.

Our own problem is akin: field bindweed. Till it; pull it as soon as you see sprouts; spray it in the off-season, then do it again next year. Just stay on top of it as it reappears; you'll never truly 'get rid of it', but it will become much more manageable with time.

If it is really a major problem, then use containers or raised beds.

It's not as bad as it could be...


34 posted on 09/14/2012 4:01:52 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: greeneyes

Got good control of powdery mildew this year, so had quite a few acorn squash and lemon cucumbers. (love those things!!)

Unfortunately, lost many tomatoes to Late blight. It totally took me by surprise, it was almost overnight it started killing plants, and the worse thing is, it infects the fruit as well, you can’t even pick them green and let them ripen, they’re already infected. Late blight is what caused the Irish potato famine.

Surprisingly, it didn’t affect my potatoes at all, and I got about 30 pounds of various types, reds, russets, fingerlings.

My New Zealand spinach is still going very strong. Good in salads.

Peas are done. The stragglers on the vines are hardening for next years seeds, same with the blue lake pole beans, I’m gonna end up with probably a pound of dried beans for seed next year.

I am always most successful if I use seeds from plants that have done well here in the past.


35 posted on 09/14/2012 4:09:58 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: Rightly Biased

We have a noxious pest called Quake Grass or Joint Grass very similar to Bermuda Grass and after five years of digging and re-digging we went with the Round-up and in two years it was gone!!!


36 posted on 09/14/2012 5:44:00 PM PDT by tubebender (Evening news is where they begin with "Good Evening," and then proceed to tell you why it isn't.)
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To: greeneyes
hey greeneyes. We got a few things growing for fall, collards, of course, butternut, cushaw squashes, and my fav, 3 seddlings of ghost peppers from oshkalaboomboom, thanks again. The peppers are about ready to be put into 4"pots.

On another topic, we have had swarms of humming birds at the feeders. Has anyone else had lots of hummers?

37 posted on 09/14/2012 6:17:40 PM PDT by rightly_dividing (We are Dan Cathy, Ted Cruz, and Scott Walker, and Paul Ryan, we are walking tall this year.)
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To: Augie

Yeh, I am pretty much done too. However, I will still do the winter garden. Turns out winter garden planted in 2011 was the most productive for 2012. LOL.


38 posted on 09/14/2012 8:38:41 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: rightly_dividing

We are in upstate NY - no hummingbirds this year. BUT - we have had tons and tons of weird varieties of mushrooms and toadstools. Growing in the weirdest places too.

I’ve never seen anything like it here.


39 posted on 09/14/2012 8:39:00 PM PDT by Ladysforest
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To: bgill

Thanks for the link.


40 posted on 09/14/2012 8:39:29 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Arrowhead1952

So glad to hear that Texas has finally had some rainfall.


41 posted on 09/14/2012 8:40:24 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: rightly_dividing

I meant to mention - I HATE collards! LOL - a carry-over from my childhood in VA.


42 posted on 09/14/2012 8:40:51 PM PDT by Ladysforest
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To: bgill

Thats a good list. I have trouble using up garlic, so I plant quite a bit of that after I have it on hand for a while. Most everything else we use so quickly I don’t have to mess with planting.

An occasional potato and the garlic is about it.


43 posted on 09/14/2012 8:43:49 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: finnsheep

Good thing it didn’t hit soomer - sounds like you got some good results this year.


44 posted on 09/14/2012 8:45:18 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: djf

Is it possible to treat the soil to prevent late blight next year - or is it not a problem that gets carried over?


45 posted on 09/14/2012 8:47:29 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Well, for one, most fungi thrive in an acidic environment - the soil in the PNW is quite acid due to the pine trees. So I need to lime it good, better yet, I have about 50 lbs of wood ash from burning up tons (literally) of limbs last spring, I’ll use some of that.

And I have a couple pounds of potassium bicarbonate which is an excellent fungicide, I just didn’t catch it in time.

But no matter what, it would be complete foolishness for me to plant tomatoes next spring in the same place, so I’ll have to move them elsewhere!


46 posted on 09/14/2012 9:00:12 PM PDT by djf (Political Science: Conservatives = govern-ment. Liberals = givin-me-it.)
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To: djf

Well, yeh I always rotate my crops, but I wasn’t sure if you could plant anything there once you had late blight. Thanks for the additional info.


47 posted on 09/14/2012 9:03:56 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes; All

Are there those on this thread that save seeds from their own veggies, and If so can you please share tips on what to do to save them?


48 posted on 09/14/2012 10:22:37 PM PDT by Bellflower (The LORD is Holy, separated from all sin, perfect, righteous, high and lifted up.)
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To: greeneyes

I just sampled some vegetable beef soup made from veggies from my first garden. It was so good!


49 posted on 09/14/2012 10:24:32 PM PDT by Bellflower (The LORD is Holy, separated from all sin, perfect, righteous, high and lifted up.)
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To: Bellflower

Yes, quite a few do. A week or so ago we had a discussion about saving Tomato seeds, which can be kind of a pain.

Red Devil_232 has a simpler way by using oxiclean.

Most of my seeds like cantaloupe, watermelon, etc. I just scrape out the seeds and wash them off in a strainer, then when clean drain on paper towels. Then I put them on a dixie paper plate and label it.

Cover the plate with a plate that has a number of holes in it. Secure it with a clothes pin or paper clips, and put it on top of the refrigerator to dry.

Then I put them in an envelope or empty medicine bottle. Label and date the contents, and pitch them all in a coffee can with lid and place in the Refrigerator till spring.

For Corn, I just strip the husks and leave them attached at the bottom, remove the silks, and use the husks to hang them up and let them dry.


50 posted on 09/14/2012 11:23:17 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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