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Jeep Wrangler Problem
Today | Me

Posted on 10/16/2013 9:22:15 PM PDT by Anti-Christ is Hillary

Ok I know we don't have a lot of car questions here but my husband can't figure it out and there is not a lot that he can't figure out. I have a 2000 Jeep Wrangler Sport. For the last few weeks it has been dieing its like it just turns off. I'll be traveling down the street or on the freeway and everything is fine and all of the sudden it just dies. He thought that it was the fuel pump and changed that and now he is thinking that it is something in the electrical system. Does anyone have any ideas? He put a code reader on it and got no codes back.

Thanks for any help.

Nikki


TOPICS: Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: carproblems
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1 posted on 10/16/2013 9:22:15 PM PDT by Anti-Christ is Hillary
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

O2 sensor...


2 posted on 10/16/2013 9:24:37 PM PDT by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously-you won't live through it anyway-Enjoy Yourself ala Louis Prima)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

I had a Chevy Truck do the same thing, turned out it was the “HEI Module” that some moron replaced before I owned it and they used grease gun grease below it when they should have used special di-electric grease.

My brother fixed for me and spent 2 hours explaining why it broke which is why I remember this thing..


3 posted on 10/16/2013 9:25:45 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary
its not the o2 sensor

if its fuel delivery, and you have replaced the fuel pump, replace the fuel pump relay - inexpensive part and a diy job

4 posted on 10/16/2013 9:26:56 PM PDT by sloop (don't touch my junk)
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To: Vendome

He mentioned that earlier tonight.


5 posted on 10/16/2013 9:27:12 PM PDT by Anti-Christ is Hillary
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Fuel injected? Main computer for the vehicle.


6 posted on 10/16/2013 9:27:18 PM PDT by Jet Jaguar
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Did he change the fuel filter too?


7 posted on 10/16/2013 9:27:33 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: sloop

He replaced the relay yesterday and it still died today at a stop light but it generally starts right back up.


8 posted on 10/16/2013 9:29:08 PM PDT by Anti-Christ is Hillary
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

My 1991 Wrangler had a similar problem. Turned out to be a bad crank shaft position sensor. Both the camshaft position sensor (stator) and the CSPS must send the computer compatible signals or else the plugs won’t fire.

Either that or your positive battery cable is bad!


9 posted on 10/16/2013 9:30:35 PM PDT by cartoonistx
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Had this problem with a 2006 Grand Cherokee at 65,000 miles. It threw no codes. Dealer cleaned the fuel system and replaced the fuel injectors. Problem has not repeated. It is a 5.7 liter Hemi. Hope this helps.


10 posted on 10/16/2013 9:31:04 PM PDT by Gabrial (The nightmare will continue as long as the nightmare is in the Whitehouse.)
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To: Gabrial

Dealer also replaced the fuel filter.


11 posted on 10/16/2013 9:33:18 PM PDT by Gabrial (The nightmare will continue as long as the nightmare is in the Whitehouse.)
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To: Jet Jaguar

Its an automatic so I would say yes. (LOL I know that I just sounded like a stupid girl) He plugged the code reader into the car under the steering wheel and it showed nothing.


12 posted on 10/16/2013 9:33:19 PM PDT by Anti-Christ is Hillary
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To: smokingfrog

Yes it was on the bottom of the fuel pump


13 posted on 10/16/2013 9:34:39 PM PDT by Anti-Christ is Hillary
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

I would check the gas cap on the vehicle.I have driven a vehicle that did the same thing and I was advised to insure that the gas cap is tight,especially with a fuel injected vehicle.

Doing the above is the best place to start.Otherwise it could be an electrical issue and those are hard to detect and expensive to repair.


14 posted on 10/16/2013 9:39:21 PM PDT by puppypusher (The World is going to the dogs.)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Crank sensor if there are no codes. Common problem on Chrysler products of that vintage.


15 posted on 10/16/2013 9:40:06 PM PDT by cableguymn (The founding fathers would be shooting by now..)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

I don’t know if it has one but check the crank position switch. If it does have one, replace the little ba$&2rd and be done with it.


16 posted on 10/16/2013 9:41:24 PM PDT by Randy Larsen (Aim small, Miss small.)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

It may be the computer that controls the fuel injection.


17 posted on 10/16/2013 9:41:27 PM PDT by Jet Jaguar
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Mass Air Flow Valve. It fails after 80-100K miles. The O2 sensor would give you incomplete combustion. The MAF would kill the car dead in an intersection.

It’s basically a sensor in a tube on top of your engine. It can be expensive, at least it was on my german car. Likely cheaper for an American truck.

Get it fixed or you’ll die in traffic. It’ll cut off anywhere- 4 way stops, train tracks, highways- it is random.

The second thing I would look at is a slow drain if your alternator is failing and can’t keep the car spark plugs sparking. Not probable, but you haven’t told me your life story, so it’s the second option. That’s it. Good luck.


18 posted on 10/16/2013 9:45:04 PM PDT by JFoobar
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Could it be the gas you buy? We have a Murphy station that opened here a few years ago.* Cheapest gas in town. My car died twice, oddly enough heading to their pumps. Car was fairly new and so was the gas station. After only filling up twice there, I went across the street to the old reliable Shell station and only bought my gas there. Never had another problem since.

Do some research and find out which wire bundles do what (fuel injection, ignition, etc ). Start engine and let it warm up. Move bundles slightly at various places while it’s running. Stay clear of hot spots, fans, and coil wires.

Run through any high puddles lately? Are squirrels in the area?

* Was always told that it’s always the best gas at a new station. The pumps are newly calibrated and water build up has been purged and isn’t in the tanks. Not in this case.


19 posted on 10/16/2013 9:46:12 PM PDT by Hillarys Gate Cult (Liberals make unrealistic demands on reality and reality doesn't oblige them.)
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To: JFoobar
is it the maf sensor?

wonder if cleaning it would help. crc makes a maf sensor cleaner that is supposed to be safe.

20 posted on 10/16/2013 9:48:43 PM PDT by sloop (don't touch my junk)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary; cartoonistx
cartoonistx wrote:

My 1991 Wrangler had a similar problem. Turned out to be a bad crank shaft position sensor. Both the camshaft position sensor (stator) and the CSPS must send the computer compatible signals or else the plugs won't fire.

My Jeep Grand Cherokee had the same problem. Finally mechanic identied a bad crank shaft position sensor. Quick and cheap repair once problem is identified. Tell your mechanic to look at that first.

21 posted on 10/16/2013 9:49:12 PM PDT by Covenantor ("Men are ruled...by liars who refuse them news, and by fools who cannot govern." Chesterton)
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To: cableguymn

I had the same problem on my 1999 VW Jetta. Cost me $600 to replace an $85 sensor,most of it diagnostics.


22 posted on 10/16/2013 9:49:36 PM PDT by Randy Larsen (Aim small, Miss small.)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

There’s a screen on the fuel pump, but there is probably an in- line fuel filter too. My old PU had one on the truck frame underneath the drivers side.


23 posted on 10/16/2013 9:51:06 PM PDT by smokingfrog ( sleep with one eye open (<o> ---)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Many times the engine management computer box will go out. I had one that did that and when it cooled down it would start again. I took the engine management box apart and found that the very high power voltage regulator that takes 12V down to 5V had very wide pins that went through large holes in the circuit board. The temperature cycling from the high current caused the solder to get brittle and crack around the voltage regulator pins (the big part, probably with a heat sink radiator and three big fat electrical pins). When it got hot the expansion would cause an open circuit at the solder cracks, but when it cooled it would shrink and make contact again. You can see the crack easily with a magnifying glass if this is the problem. I had cracks all the way around 2 of the 3 pins. I wicked the solder off with the copper braid solder wick. Then I bent the pins over so they touched te copper pads around the thru-hole in the circuit board, but not shorting to another trace. Then I re-soldered. The problem never came back. Your problem could be different, but my problem was on a Porsche and I got many calls from the repair shop to help fix the same problem on other cars including a race car that had the problem in the 12 Hours of Sebring Race. It also had the same problem. I have also heard of this in other models of cars too. A simple fix if it is the problem instead of a $1500 replacement of an engine management ECU.

Often the engine management ECU os under the passenger floor board, but you would need to check for your vehicle.


24 posted on 10/16/2013 9:51:42 PM PDT by MtnClimber (Up is down, wrong is right, 0bama care is cheap.)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

The crank sensor is a popular choice.


25 posted on 10/16/2013 9:52:07 PM PDT by VeniVidiVici (Play the 'Knockout Game' with someone owning a 9mm and you get what you deserve)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary
Do you have a data link port for attaching a diagnostics tool somewhere along the left side of your dash, sort of like this? THERE IS A UNIVERSAL DATA PORT ON ALL CARS 1996 AND NEWER. Perhaps take it to an Autozone or try to find someone who can attach a diagnostics reader to the data port to get error codes to pinpoint the problem.

Or, here: Jeep Wrangler suddenly dies (forum)

Have you checked your gas cap? You could be loosing pressure in your fuel system due to faulty gas cap.

If the death is immediate without any sputtering I am thinking it's an electrical short of vacuum hose leak, leaning towards short. Does the problem happen only after reaching max engine temp? That could be a clue.

REMEMBER THE GOLDEN RULE OF TROUBLESHOOTING:

"ALWAYS START WITH THE LEAST EXPENSIVE PROBLEM AREA AND WORK YOUR WAY UP FROM THERE"

26 posted on 10/16/2013 9:55:09 PM PDT by Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America (If Americans were as concerned for their country as Egyptians are, Obama would be ousted!)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary
How's the oil pressure? You may be about to blow the engine.
27 posted on 10/16/2013 9:56:05 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: cableguymn

I also agree with cableguy, based on what I’ve read that ‘crank sensor’ is common problem with wrangers.


28 posted on 10/16/2013 9:56:18 PM PDT by Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America (If Americans were as concerned for their country as Egyptians are, Obama would be ousted!)
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To: Randy Larsen

Yup, but on the jeep is a 30-50 dollar sensor held on by 2 10mm head bolts. very easy to replace.

when ever one came in the shop doing what they describe with out codes we always put a crank sensor in first. 99% of the time it’d fix it and the sensor was cheaper than the diagnostics.


29 posted on 10/16/2013 9:58:30 PM PDT by cableguymn (The founding fathers would be shooting by now..)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary
The note with a replacement fuel pump says When Replacing The Pump Only Both Strainers Are Required.

Does your Jeep have an evaporative control system that captures the tank vapors, condenses them, and returns them to the tank? Sometimes a bit of crud can plug those lines, or a small check valve in the system can fail, giving the symptoms you describe. A vacuum lock in that system can cause the pump relay to kick. After a minute or two the pressures equalize and everything is hunky-dory until the next time. Don't forget to check the fuel cap.

30 posted on 10/16/2013 9:58:49 PM PDT by kitchen (Make plans and prepare. You'll never have trouble if you're ready for it. - TR)
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To: Obama_Is_Sabotaging_America

they pulled the codes - none were present


31 posted on 10/16/2013 10:00:32 PM PDT by sloop (don't touch my junk)
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To: Jet Jaguar

My 2002 Dodge RAMwagon started having problems with the engine suddenly quitting while driving down the highway or street, and then it would sometimes start up again as if nothing had ever happened. Turned out to be the failure of the master computer. Chrysler-Dodge had no replacements available for a month. The tsunami in Japan had wiped out the manufacturer of the component. afte renting a car for nearly a month, the dealer finally admitted they didn’t know when of if a replacement would be available.

I finally bought a remanufactured part from a company in Florida and had the dealer install it. A year later and the dealers tell me they now have the part in stock again.

Because the master computer wasw responsible for the O2 sensor and many other sensors, its intermittant failures misled the dealer mechanics for awhile.


32 posted on 10/16/2013 10:02:08 PM PDT by WhiskeyX ( provides a system for registering complaints about unfair broadcasters and the ability to request a)
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To: cableguymn

Sounds like good advice.


33 posted on 10/16/2013 10:02:49 PM PDT by MtnClimber (Up is down, wrong is right, 0bama care is cheap.)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Ditto on the crankshaft position sensor others have mentioned. There is also an outside chance that a timing belt pulley has chewed up its bearings and put the engine slightly out of time...but that should have given a code...but devastating enough to merit checking. The fuel system is probably fine...problems with fuel delivery should manifest themselves during hard driving, like accelerating uphill....rail pressure is actually highest at idle.

There are also a host of things dealing with the throttle position sensor and iac solenoid that would be suspect....but these should have given a code.


34 posted on 10/16/2013 10:05:48 PM PDT by lacrew (Mr. Soetoro, we regret to inform you that your race card is over the credit limit.)
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To: WhiskeyX

I had a Ford, fuel injected, that had a similar problem. After many dolllars and time, it was the Main computer that controlled the fuel injection.

I hope that is not the solution.


35 posted on 10/16/2013 10:06:33 PM PDT by Jet Jaguar
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To: Hillarys Gate Cult; Anti-Christ is Hillary
Hillarys Gate Cult said: "Move bundles slightly at various places while it’s running. Stay clear of hot spots, fans, and coil wires."

Good advice. I use a wooden broom handle to avoid shocks or burns.

One time I tapped an unknown sensor at the top of the engine and the engine immediately died. I took the car in to a mechanic and told him, "change that thing. It's defective."

I also have had crankcase sensors fail on two different vehicles. The engine would die while the car was moving. After a few minutes, the car would start right up. Very inconvenient.

36 posted on 10/16/2013 10:20:03 PM PDT by William Tell
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To: Jet Jaguar

This is like the problem I described earlier. If the engine management computer is losing power by losing the voltage regulator then it cannot store a fault code.


37 posted on 10/16/2013 10:20:12 PM PDT by MtnClimber (Up is down, wrong is right, 0bama care is cheap.)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Crank Positioning Sensor is likely bad. I had a Dodge van that finally left me sitting. Take it to an Autozone parts store and they may be able to use their diagnositc reader and see if it’s having a fail code.


38 posted on 10/16/2013 10:35:03 PM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Crank Positioning Sensor is likely bad. I had a Dodge van that finally left me sitting. Take it to an Autozone parts store and they may be able to use their diagnositc reader and see if it’s having a fail code.


39 posted on 10/16/2013 10:35:03 PM PDT by cva66snipe (Two Choices left for U.S. One Nation Under GOD or One Nation Under Judgment? Which one say ye?)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Back in the 70’s we had an Escapade Motor home. We would be driving and it would just quit. Found it was the Module. Same thing happened with a Chevy Malibu we had. It was the Module.


40 posted on 10/16/2013 10:52:43 PM PDT by Spunky
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Change the fuel filter


41 posted on 10/16/2013 11:11:16 PM PDT by hattend (Firearms and ammunition...the only growing industries under the Obama regime.)
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To: sloop

Is there a fuel filter? Either inline within the hose or screwed into the carb body. Today’s fuel isn’t always so clean.


42 posted on 10/16/2013 11:40:13 PM PDT by ridesthemiles
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To: sloop

Quite possibly a fuel filter. If at any time someone inadvertently used a poor grade of fuel (dirty or containing water) it may have partially plugged up the fuel filter.

I had a similar problem with an older vehicle that I had bought as a converted camper. There was some rust in the tank and fuel line which would allow the engine to run for awhile and then completely die until the rust fell away from the filter element.

Replacing the fuel filter complete fixed the problem and I was able to drive that vehicle from Chicago to northern Minnesota where I spent the summer as a horsemanship instructor at a summer camp.

If the problem is the fuel filter and there is dirt, rust or some other sediment in the tank, It may be necessary to replace the fuel filter a second time after some more debris moves from the fuel tank and/or fuel line into the new filter.

My converted camper was a former school bus on an International Metro body which had over 300,000 miles on it which I bough very cheaply after it had an engine valve job.

After it stalled and I removed the fuel filter I was able to see the filter almost completely filler with a rust like sediment which occurred because the truck had been sitting unused for a long time.

The rust was caused by water in the gas separating from the gas and sitting in the bottom of the fuel tank. Running the engine caused the rust to be sucked up into the filter while not running the engine allowed the rust to fall away from blocking the filter.


43 posted on 10/17/2013 12:16:34 AM PDT by dglang
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To: dglang

On further thought, I also had a much newer Ford Crown Vic which also exhibited the same problem in which it suddenly died while I was driving on I4 in Florida.

Again it was the fuel filter but this time I had to have the car towed to a local shop and spend a lot of time waiting for someone to get a new fuel pump and replace it.

The Ford did have fuel injection while the much older converted Metro did not. In both cases it was the fuel filter which was at fault.


44 posted on 10/17/2013 12:26:32 AM PDT by dglang
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

It was the “TPS” (throttle position sensor) on my 1998 4.0 liter straight six Cherokee. Fairly cheap and easy to access on top near throttle body. It is a “potentiometer” and after 100K miles or so gets worn spots on it that throw “static” to the engine/injector computer causing rough/jerky/stalling. Like a dirty volume knob on an old AM radio. Good luck!

http://youtu.be/gC7lVSnkyCI

and

http://youtu.be/IbB6V3K03G0


45 posted on 10/17/2013 12:38:36 AM PDT by Drago
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

One very remote possibility is the switch which cuts off the electric fuel pump in the event of an accident. That is not likely your problem but is not impossible.


46 posted on 10/17/2013 12:41:22 AM PDT by Rockpile
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

Is there still power to the console/dash when the engine loses power?

Is there auxiliary power?

Can you start the engine immediately after it loses power?

Does it run rough prior to stalling?

Does it stall at low speeds?

Does it stall cold or only after the engine warms up?


47 posted on 10/17/2013 1:05:53 AM PDT by Gene Eric (Don't be a statist!)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

I had this problem with my 1970 Dodge. I asked at the local parts house what it might be and they said, “check for a burned spot in the wiring harness at the base of the steering column.” BINGO! I insulated that and it worked until I got rid of the car. So, look for an intermittent in a cable someplace. (Wear points are near any sharp edge.)

Try a Jeep forum or two.


48 posted on 10/17/2013 2:01:05 AM PDT by Gen.Blather
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary
After you fix this problem, sell it! Wrangler transmission-failures are legendary.
49 posted on 10/17/2013 2:15:00 AM PDT by Does so (Soon, we'll be looking like Detroit.)
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To: Anti-Christ is Hillary

It’s most likely either a bad coil pack on the 4.0l 6 or the Cam position sensor. The Cam sensor is more common, but when I had that problem it stopped and never started again. When I had the coil pack problem it behaved like you are describing. I have a 2001 Cherokee with the 4.0l 6, same engine as the Wrangler.


50 posted on 10/17/2013 2:17:42 AM PDT by Woodman
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