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Keyword: theframers

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  • College Board Erases the Founding Fathers

    08/16/2014 10:13:32 AM PDT · by Steelfish · 80 replies
    American Thinker ^ | August16, 2014 | Patrick Jakeway
    August 16, 2014 College Board Erases the Founding Fathers. By Patrick Jakeway The classic novel Brave New World describes a future in which people have lost all of their liberty and in which they have become drugged robots obedient to a central authority. It also details how this control was first established. First, the rulers had to erase all history and all the people’s memory of a time before their bondage. Today, the history of George Washington's leadership has been erased in the new Advanced Placement (AP) U.S. History test/curriculum, taking effect in the fall of 2014. The College Board,...
  • April 30th, The Lost Holiday

    04/27/2014 8:17:33 AM PDT · by No One Special · 33 replies
    The American Thinker ^ | April 27, 2014 | Craig Seibert
    A little-remembered anniversary occurs this April 30 -- the 225th Anniversary of the U.S. Constitution being put into operation. Many might remember that April 30, 1789 was the day that George Washington took the oath of office and gave his inaugural address. But lest we forget, this very act also marked the launching of the American Constitutional System. Those living at the time knew what a landmark day it was and the details surrounding the events of the day show this depth of understanding. Through the process of time, neglect and the active rewriting of American history, these details have...
  • The Real Origin of the Tea Party Movement

    08/08/2012 10:46:51 AM PDT · by Da Bilge Troll · 7 replies
    Tenth Amendment Center ^ | August 6th, 2012 | KrisAnne Hall
    I recently read with joy a conservative blogger’s attempt to connect the TEA party movement to its historic roots; a topic I have been meaning to write about for months now. The blogger rightly said that the “the historical precedent for the TPM wasn’t the Tea Party event in Boston Harbor on December 16, 1773.” I actually uttered an “Amen, brother!” He went on to describe the Continental Association established on October 20, 1774 by the First Continental Congress in response to the Intolerable Acts. That’s when I realized that I have waited long enough to write this article. The...
  • Chronicling the Course of Human Events

    07/05/2012 6:57:12 AM PDT · by jfd1776 · 7 replies
    Illinois Review ^ | July 5, 2012 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    In June, 1776, with Richard Henry Lee’s proposal for independence from Great Britain awaiting a vote in the Continental Congress, a committee of five – Benjamin Franklin, John Adams, Robert R. Livingston, Roger Sherman, and Thomas Jefferson – selected one from among their number to be the key author of a formal Declaration of Independence. While the entire Continental Congress contributed to it, through their helpful editing, the principal author has long been known to be Thomas Jefferson, and he was rightly so proud of it that he wanted his authorship of this document to be on his tombstone rather...
  • If the Times Covered the American Revolution (Must Read)

    07/06/2006 10:55:34 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies · 797+ views
    The American Prowler ^ | 7/7/2006 | Andrew Cline
    If the Times Covered the American Revolution (We'd still be paying exorbitant taxes on breakfast tea.)If the New York Times had been around to report on the American Revolution, its coverage might have looked something like this... * Dec. 16, 1773: Sons of Liberty to raid East India Company ships BOSTON -- Members of the undergound organization called the Sons of Liberty are plotting to raid three East India Company ships tonight and dump the cargo -- thousands of pounds worth of Darjeeling tea -- into Boston Harbor, the Times has learned. Contacted at his headquarters, Gov. Thomas Hutchinson said,...
  • The FReeper Foxhole Enjoys a Lazy Sunday - January 30th, 2005

    01/29/2005 9:46:14 PM PST · by snippy_about_it · 82 replies · 1,299+ views
    Lord, Keep our Troops forever in Your care Give them victory over the enemy... Grant them a safe and swift return... Bless those who mourn the lost. . FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer for all those serving their country at this time. ...................................................................................... ........................................... U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues Where Duty, Honor and Countryare acknowledged, affirmed and commemorated. Our Mission: The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans. In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should feel...
  • New RevWar TV series on AMC: "Turn," about Gen. Washington's Long Island spy network.

    03/23/2014 2:43:39 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 43 replies
    AMC ^ | March 23, 2014 | Anon
    It looks really, really good from the previews/website. I don't want to go beyond crazy here, but it seems to have a slant that Freepers would like. We can only hope...From their website:"Based on Alexander Rose’s book Washington’s Spies, AMC’s TURN tells the untold story of America’s first spy ring. A historical thriller set during the Revolutionary War, TURN centers on Abe Woodhull (Jamie Bell), a farmer living in British-occupied Long Island who bands together with his childhood friends to form the Culper Ring -- an unlikely team of secret agents who not only went on to help George Washington...
  • Book(s) about George Washington

    03/08/2014 8:51:35 AM PST · by roofgoat · 29 replies
    Looking to buy a book or books that accurately and honestly cover the life of George Washington. Something I can find on Amazon. Any comments why you liked the book would be appreciated. Thanks
  • George W’s Spooks: Inside the Culper Ring. [NR Interview]

    08/10/2013 10:45:23 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 13 replies
    National Review ^ | June 19, 2013 | Alexander Rose
    ALEXANDER ROSE: Thankfully, this isn’t a chicken-and-egg question, so the answer is a simple one: Washington’s spies, otherwise known as the Culper Ring. There were five primary members. First in seniority was Benjamin Tallmadge, a dragoons officer who acted as the Ring’s manager in American-held Connecticut and made sure their intelligence was passed on to Washington back at headquarters. The agent who sailed back and forth across Long Island Sound (I prefer the more colorful contemporary description of it, “the Devil’s Belt”), tussling with freebooters and dodging patrol-boats, was Caleb Brewster, a former whaleboatman who really, really liked fighting. Brewster’s...
  • ‘Turn,’ AMC’s New Series About America’s First Spy Ring, Is A Visually Arresting Historical Epic

    04/06/2014 9:42:14 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 79 replies
    The new AMC series Turn, which premieres April 6, is bewildering at first. We’re dropped smack in the middle of British-occupied New York. The year is 1776, and Abraham Woodhull (Jamie Bell) is scraping by as a cabbage farmer and sometime innkeeper in Setauket, Long Island. He’s husband to Mary (Meegan Warner), and father to a young child. His father, Richard (Kevin McNally), is a local magistrate loyal to George III. Then the scene shifts. We’re now in New Jersey. A stunning overhead shot reveals a sprawling field of bluecoat rebel bodies lying next to a pool dyed red with...
  • The American Flag Daily: Alexander Hamilton

    01/11/2014 1:11:13 PM PST · by Master Zinja · 31 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | January 11, 2014 | FlagBearer
    Today is the traditional birthdate of Alexander Hamilton, one of the Founding Fathers of the United States, who signed the Constitution, authored many of the Federalist Papers in support of the Constitution's passage, was Secretary of the Treasury under George Washington, and whose portrait is currently on the U.S. $10 bill. He died in 1804 following a duel with Aaron Burr. "The fabric of American Empire ought to rest on the solid basis of THE CONSENT OF THE PEOPLE. The streams of National power ought to flow immediately from that pure original fountain of all legitimate authority." -Hamilton, Federalist No....
  • The surprising ages of the Founding Fathers on July 4, 1776

    08/13/2013 3:43:07 PM PDT · by NYer · 99 replies
    kottke.org ^ | August 13, 2013 | Todd Andrlik
    For the Journal of the American Revolution, Todd Andrlik compiled a list of the ages of the key participants in the Revolutionary War as of July 4, 1776. Many of them were surprisingly young: Marquis de Lafayette, 18 James Monroe, 18 Gilbert Stuart, 20 Aaron Burr, 20 Alexander Hamilton, 21 Betsy Ross, 24 James Madison, 25 This is kind of blowing my mind...because of the compression of history, I'd always assumed all these people were around the same age. But in thinking about it, all startups need young people...Hamilton, Lafayette, and Burr were perhaps the Gates, Jobs, and Zuckerberg of...
  • 12 Little-Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence (Part 2)

    07/02/2013 3:58:07 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 15 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 2, 2013 | Chuck Norris
    Last week, I highlighted four little-known facts about the Declaration of Independence. Here are a few more facts to add to those oddities: There are at least 26 surviving paper copies of the Declaration of Independence of the hundreds made in July 1776 for circulation among the Colonies. After Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence, the Committee of Five, which was appointed to write it, was also responsible with overseeing its reproduction for proclamation to those living in the Colonies. The reproduction was done at the shop of Philadelphia printer John Dunlap. "On July 5, Dunlap's copies were dispatched across...
  • 12 Little-Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence (Part 3)

    07/09/2013 3:32:00 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 7 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 9, 2013 | Chuck Norris
    Over the past two weeks, I've highlighted eight little-known facts about the Declaration of Independence. (If you missed the first two parts of this series, you can find them at http://www.creators.com/opinion/chuck-norris.html.) Here are the last four facts in my series: 9) One of the 26 known July 1776 copies of the Declaration of Independence was found behind an old painting purchased at a flea market for $4. In 1991, one of 24 known copies at the time of the declaration -- and one of only three known to be privately owned -- was auctioned for $2.42 million. What's even more...
  • Who coined the name: 'United States of America'? Mystery might have intriguing answer.

    07/05/2013 8:48:20 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 25 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | 07/05/2013 | By Byron DeLear
    Historians have long tried to pinpoint exactly when the name 'United States of America' was first used and by whom. A new find suggests the man might have been George Washington himself. As if George Washington hasn’t been credited enough with laying the foundation stones of the American republic, a new discovery might put one more feather in his cap. Our leading Founding Father could have been author of the country's name. The identity of who coined the name “United States of America” has eluded historians for years. Online sources vary greatly, erroneously crediting Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton,...
  • George Washington: The Crossing

    07/05/2013 3:32:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies
    American Spectator ^ | 7.4.13 | Jeffrey Lord
    Jack Levin’s Fourth of July reminder of the courage that created America. It was December, 1776. George Washington’s army, encamped on the banks of the frozen Delaware River, was struggling and near death. As Jack E. Levin recounts in his New York Times bestseller, the famous story of George Washington: The Crossing (with a preface by his son Mark Levin) is riveting. A timely reminder on this Fourth of July 2013 — 237 years later — of the sheer, raw courage it took to bring the United States of America to life as more than the ringing words written on...
  • Faces of the American Revolution [Photos of Soldiers of Amer Revolution]

    07/04/2013 7:14:45 PM PDT · by BunnySlippers · 71 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 07/04/13
    These stunning images are early photographs of some of the men who bravely fought for their country in the Revolutionary War some 237 years ago. Images of Americans who fought in the Revolution are exceptionally rare because few of the Patriots of 1775-1783 lived until the dawn of practical photography in the early 1840s. These early photographs – known as daguerreotypes – are exceptionally rare camera-original, fully-identified photographs of veterans of the War for Independence – the war that established the United States.
  • Who coined 'United States of America'? Mystery might have intriguing answer

    07/04/2013 4:41:48 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 12 replies
    As if George Washington hasn’t been credited enough with laying the foundation stones of the American republic, a new discovery might put one more feather in his cap. Our leading Founding Father could have been author of the country's name. The identity of who coined the name “United States of America” has eluded historians for years. Online sources vary greatly, erroneously crediting Thomas Paine, Benjamin Franklin, Alexander Hamilton, and others.
  • IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776

    07/04/2013 7:28:37 AM PDT · by RaceBannon · 60 replies
    The declaration of Independence ^ | July 4, 1776 | Good men
    IN CONGRESS, July 4, 1776. The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America, When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature's God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation. We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that...
  • 12 Little-Known Facts About the Declaration of Independence (Part 1)

    06/25/2013 3:50:40 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 16 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | June 25, 2013 | Chuck Norris
    Being about a week away from Independence Day, I was doing a little reflecting upon the history surrounding the Declaration of Independence. And I thought it would be of equal interest to many of my readers to look at some often-overlooked aspects of the declaration's production and legacy. Several historical websites hold some fascinating facts about this national treasure -- including the National Archives and Records Administration's site, at http://www.archives.gov. In addition, on History's website, the article "9 Things You May Not Know About the Declaration of Independence," by Elizabeth Harrison, has some intriguing notes. Let me elaborate on some...
  • Archaeologist to Discuss Life on Thomas Jefferson's Monticello Plantation

    02/06/2009 9:38:35 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 694+ views
    Smith College, Office of College Relations ^ | Monday, February 2, 2009 | Kristen Cole, Media Relations Director
    Later this month, an archaeologist at Thomas Jefferson's historic home of Monticello in Charlottesville, Va., will speak at Smith College about the use of the late president's plantation by the estate's residents, both free and enslaved. Sara Bon-Harper, archeological research manager, will lecture at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 24, in McConnell Hall, Room 103, about "Defined Spaces: Landscape on the Monticello Plantation." The event is sponsored by the Program in Archaeology and the Lecture Committee and is free and open to the public. Bon-Harper's work at Monticello focuses on an archaeological survey of the original 5,000-acre plantation and the excavation...
  • Today in History,March 23rd 1775,Patrick Henry proclaims "Give me liberty or give me death"

    03/23/2013 2:21:02 PM PDT · by mdittmar · 19 replies
    various | 3/23/13 | Patrick Henry
    "Give me liberty,or give me death!" Patrick Henry delivering his great speech on the rights of the colonies,before the Virginia Assembly,convened at Richmond,March 23rd 1775, concluding with the above sentiment,which became the war cry of the revolution. LIBERTY OR DEATH March 23, 1775 NO man thinks more highly than I do of the patriotism, as well as abilities, of the very worthy gentlemen who have just addressed the House. But different men often see the same subject in different lights; and, therefore, I hope that it will not be thought disrespectful to those gentlemen, if entertaining, as I do, opinions of...
  • What Would John Adams Drink?

    03/01/2013 8:32:32 AM PST · by Sir Napsalot · 19 replies
    Slate ^ | 9-30-2009 | Brian Palmer|
    ..... A thirsty American colonist had limited beverage options. For everyone but the lucky few who lived near a natural spring or fast-running stream, water was often contaminated, sometimes deadly, and always unpalatable. Milk in those days was seen merely as a precursor to cream, cheese, and butter. Alcohol wasn't an indulgence; it was what we drank. It was hygienic: Even at relatively low concentrations, alcohol kills most pathogens. And, according to the prevailing view at the time, it fortified the body against illness and the backbreaking labor of subduing a wild country. But the colonists had trouble procuring alcohol....
  • GEORGE WASHINGTON, KEEPER OF THE PEACE

    02/22/2013 6:46:34 PM PST · by jfd1776 · 11 replies
    Illinois Review ^ | February 22, 2013 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    A year into his second term, President George Washington celebrated his 63rd birthday on February 22, 1794, and received one of the best birthday presents any head of state ever received. The new minister from France, Jean Antoine Joseph Baron Fauchet presented his credentials as the new ambassador from France, replacing the troublesome Edmund-Charles Genet at last. Citizen Genet was many things. A child prodigy, fluent in six languages by age twelve, he was born at Versailles in 1763, the only son of a French civil servant. Genet served as court translator in his youth and was then sent to...
  • Poor Richard's Almanack complete, unedited, originally sourced

    02/02/2013 8:04:49 AM PST · by ProgressingAmerica · 7 replies
    Searching Google Books for Poor Richard's has become somewhat of an exercise in frustration for me. Typically, what you will find are compilations. Authors who have looked at Franklins' works and decided what should be considered "greatest hits" quotations. Consider me uninterested. So I finally got my hands on a copy from the library which contained the original constructs of Poor Richards' as Franklin wrote them, that way I would know what to search for. Below, you will see where to find all of them online, in their original context. 1733, 1734, 1735, 1736, 1737 ,1738, 17391740 ,1741, 1742, 1743,...
  • The “Best Earthly Inheritance” Our Founders Bequeathed

    07/04/2012 1:52:00 PM PDT · by Twotone · 1 replies
    Oregon Catalyst ^ | July 4, 2012 | Kathryn Hickok
    Every July much is said by eloquent historians, civic and religious leaders, and—thanks to blogs and social media—Americans everywhere, about the Declaration of Independence, the meaning of the American Experiment, and the price of freedom. Independence Day is a moment to be grateful for the blessings of liberty and to remember the gifts many sacrificed so much to leave us. But this year we also mark the 180th anniversary of the death in 1832 of the last surviving signer of the Declaration. Charles Carroll’s life spanned nearly a century. By the fiftieth anniversary of July 4, 1776, Carroll had outlived...
  • The Wisdom of Washington

    07/01/2012 7:33:34 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 23 replies
    NY Post ^ | June 30, 2012 | Maureen Callahan
    His annotated Constitution was worth $9.8 million at auction — but was priceless to a nation When George Washington’s personal, annotated copy of the Constitution sold last week for $9.8 million at auction in New York, it didn’t just set a record. It allowed us to see, for the first time, how cautiously our first president assumed the office, his eyes not toward history but the future. “This shows that he let the presidency define him, rather than for him to define the presidency,” says Edward Lengel, military historian and author of two books on Washington. “He was a man...
  • Reagan Remembers Dr. Joseph Warren, hero at Bunker Hill (June 17,1775)

    06/17/2012 6:10:01 PM PDT · by gusopol3 · 18 replies
  • The Income Tax in 1913

    01/26/2012 9:02:45 PM PST · by zeugma · 17 replies
    ZeugmaWeb.com ^ | 1/26/2012 | Zeugma
    The 1913 Income Tax In 1913 the 16th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution was ratified. It was a fairly short amendment, as such things go, weighing in at a whopping 30 words. It reads as follows: The Congress shall have power to lay and collect taxes on incomes, from whatever source derived, without apportionment among the several states, and without regard to any census of enumeration. It was a simple little thing, with rather large consequences for the republic. Prior to the income tax being instituted, the United States government managed to fund itself with various excise taxes, and...
  • DC Museum Works to Save Thomas Jefferson‘s ’Cut & Paste’ Bible

    03/12/2011 6:50:19 PM PST · by STARWISE · 40 replies
    The Blaze ^ | 3-12-11 | Meredith Jessup
    By literally cutting and pasting biblical passages demonstrating the life and lessons of Jesus Christ from several Bibles, Thomas Jefferson put together a book that he titled “The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth” during his retirement in 1820. The former president’s finished product would become known to historians as the Jefferson Bible. "The Life and Morals of Jesus of Nazareth" (CNN) Nearly 200 years later, conservationists at the National Museum of American History are working to carefully preserve the 86-page book and preparing to put it on display in November. Over time, the book’s brittle paper has become...
  • Jefferson's books found in Mo. university library

    02/22/2011 2:37:09 PM PST · by DJ MacWoW · 24 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Feb 22, 2:28 PM (ET) | HEATHER HOLLINGSWORTH
    Dozens of Thomas Jefferson's books, some including handwritten notes from the nation's third president, have been found in the rare books collection at Washington University in St. Louis. Now, historians are poring through the 69 newly discovered books and five others the school already knew about, and librarians are searching the collection for more volumes that may have belonged to the founding father. Even if no other Jefferson-owned books are found, the school's collection of 74 books is the third largest in the nation after the Library of Congress and the University of Virginia.
  • 'Analyzing the Constitution for 90 Days – The Preamble to the United States Constitution'

    02/21/2011 6:53:00 PM PST · by hillsdale1 · 11 replies
    Constituting America ^ | 2/22/11 | Dr. David Bobb
    We the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. The Preamble to the Constitution was added at the last minute by the Constitutional Convention, roundly criticized upon its announcement, and even today lacks any legal standing. So what does it mean, and why does it matter? “We the People” was a powerful and even revolutionary way to...
  • Alexander the Great(Hamilton)

    07/04/2005 7:29:25 AM PDT · by kellynla · 23 replies · 1,301+ views
    Wall Street Journal ^ | July 4, 2005 | RICHARD BROOKHISER
    When I was a boy my family had a Time-Life book on the mind which featured a chart of the presumed IQs of famous dead men. Goethe, as I recall, led the pack, at 210. But the Founding Fathers did very well: Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and George Washington all scored over 150. As the Fourth of July approaches, we'd do well to remember that the Founders were a smart lot, with few gentleman's C's among them. Yet they didn't know everything. They were strongest in law, political philosophy and history--all essential subjects for revolutionaries and statesmen. But another subject,...
  • When Ben Franklin Met the Battlefield

    10/08/2010 2:51:14 PM PDT · by Palter · 10 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 08 Oct 2010 | Brooke C. Stoddard
    Most famous today as a founding father, inventor and diplomat, Franklin also commanded troops during the French and Indian War Weapons ready, slogging into the deserted village, the men and their commander were appalled at what they saw: dead soldiers and civilians and evidence of a hasty retreat. The commander ordered quick fortifications against further attack, then burial parties. The orders came from an unlikely figure: Benjamin Franklin, 50 years old, already rich, retired from his printing business and notably famous for his inventions. He had received the Copley Medal from the Royal Society of London in 1753 for his...
  • Founding Fathers have a new fan base that is growing daily

    06/05/2010 2:13:15 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 31 replies · 1,250+ views
    The Sarasota Herald-Tribune ^ | June 5, 2010 | Krissah Thompson (The Washington Post)
    SPRINGFIELD, Mo. - Earl Taylor has spent 31 years teaching that "the Founding Fathers have answers to nearly every problem we have in America today." Only in recent months has he found so many eager students. On a recent Saturday, he held the rapt attention of 70 of them. The eight-hour seminar held at a roadside inn here was one of half a dozen "Making of America" sessions nationwide that day, all sponsored by a little-known organization based in Idaho. Two years ago, Taylor, president of the National Center for Constitutional Studies, made about 35 trips to speak to small...