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Keyword: superconductor

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  • High-temperature superconductor spills secret: A new phase of matter

    03/25/2011 3:27:53 PM PDT · by decimon · 23 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | March 24, 2011 | Unknown
    (PhysOrg.com) -- Scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) and the University of California at Berkeley have joined with researchers at Stanford University and the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory to mount a three-pronged attack on one of the most obstinate puzzles in materials sciences: what is the pseudogap?A collaboration organized by Zhi-Xun Shen, a member of the Stanford Institute for Materials and Energy Science (SIMES) at SLAC and a professor of physics at Stanford University, used three complementary experimental approaches to investigate a single material, the high-temperature superconductor Pb-Bi2201 (lead bismuth strontium lanthanum copper-oxide)....
  • One-atom-thick materials promise a 'new industrial revolution'

    07/24/2005 10:53:00 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 20 replies · 1,584+ views
    Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a new class of materials which have previously only existed in science fiction films and books. A team of British and Russian scientists led by Professor Geim have discovered a whole family of previously unknown materials, which are one atom thick and exhibit properties which scientists had never thought possible. Not only are they ultra-thin, but depending on circumstances they can also be ultra-strong, highly-insulating or highly-conductive, offering a wide range of unique properties for space-age engineers and designers to choose from. Professor Andre Geim said: "This discovery opens up practically infinite...
  • Scientists have discovered a new state of matter, called 'Jahn-Teller metals'

    07/25/2015 6:00:39 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 26 replies
    Science Alert ^ | May 12, 2015 | Bec Crew
    And it could be the key to understanding one of the biggest mysteries in physics today - high-temperature superconductors.An international team of scientists has announced the discovery of a new state of matter in a material that appears to be an insulator, superconductor, metal and magnet all rolled into one, saying that it could lead to the development of more effective high-temperature superconductors. Why is this so exciting? Well, if these properties are confirmed, this new state of matter will allow scientists to better understand why some materials have the potential to achieve superconductivity at a relativity high critical temperature...
  • Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current

    07/24/2015 10:52:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 24, 2015 | by Carla Reiter & Provided by: Argonne National Laboratory
    Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this...
  • Understanding How Graphene can become Superconducting

    03/21/2014 6:56:04 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 11 replies
    Overclockersclub ^ | March 21, 2014 09:50AM | Guest_Jim_*
    The atom-thick sheet of carbon, graphene already has a number of amazing properties to it, including strength and electrical conductivity. As impressive its conductivity is though, superconductivity is still greater and has been observed with graphene, but not explained. Researchers at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have now found how graphene and calcium become a superconductor.Called calcium intercalated graphite, or CaC6 is produced by interweaving calcium and graphite, which is a means of isolating sheets of graphene. About ten years ago it was discovered that this material could become superconducting, but neither the exact means nor...
  • This Strange Metal Might Be the Newest State of Matter

    05/14/2015 10:48:49 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 38 replies
    Popular Mechanics ^ | 12 may 2015 | John Wenz
    Researchers at Japan's Tohoku University are making a bold claim: an entirely new state of matter. The team, led by Kosmas Prassides, says they've created what's called a Jahn-Teller metal by inserting rubidium, a strange alkali metal element, into buckyballs, a pure carbon structure which has a spherical shape from a series of interlocking polygons (think of the Epcot Center, but in microscopic size.) Advertisement - Continue Reading Below Buckyballs, which are somewhat related to other supermaterials like graphene and carbon nanotubes, are already known for their superconductive capabilities. Here, while combining buckyballs and rubidium, the researchers created a...
  • Ultrathin Copper-Oxide Layers Behave Like Quantum Spin Liquid

    06/10/2011 8:04:58 AM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies
    Brookhaven National Laboratory ^ | June 10, 2011 | Unknown
    Surprising discovery may offer clues to emergence of high-temperature superconductivityUPTON, NY — Magnetic studies of ultrathin slabs of copper-oxide materials reveal that at very low temperatures, the thinnest, isolated layers lose their long-range magnetic order and instead behave like a “quantum spin liquid” — a state of matter where the orientations of electron spins fluctuate wildly. This unexpected discovery by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory and collaborators at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland may offer support for the idea that this novel condensed state of matter is a precursor to the emergence of...
  • The 2011 Cold Fusion/Lattice-Assisted Nuclear Reactions Colloquium at MIT — Part 2

    09/27/2011 11:42:18 PM PDT · by Kevmo · 11 replies
    INFINITE ENERGY • ISSUE 99 • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011 ^ | ISSUE 99 • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011 | INFINITE ENERGY •/ Jet Energy Staff
    The 2011 Cold Fusion/Lattice-Assisted Nuclear Reactions Colloquium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology — Part 2 (Report prepared by staff of JET Energy, Inc.) INFINITE ENERGY • ISSUE 99 • SEPTEMBER/OCTOBER 2011 The 2011 Lattice-Assisted Nuclear Reactions/Cold Fusion Colloquium at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Cambridge, Massachusetts) was held on Saturday, June 11 and Sunday, June 12, 2011. The meeting focused on the science and technology of cold fusion (CF) and lattice-assisted nuclear reactions (LANR). In 1989, the initial failures of cold fusion resulted from bad experiments, bad paradigm, materials issues, poor loadings and a poor appreciation of the...
  • MIT and Cold Fusion: A Special Report

    09/10/2011 8:55:10 AM PDT · by Kevmo · 25 replies
    Infinite Energy Magazine, Issue 24 ^ | 2003 | Eugene F. Mallove, Sc.D.
    MIT and Cold Fusion: A Special Report Compiled and written by Eugene F. Mallove, Sc.D. MIT Class of 1969, S.B. Aero/Astro Eng., 1970 S.M. Aero/Astro Eng. Editor-in-Chief, Infinite Energy Magazine President, New Energy Foundation, Inc. Introduction When on March 23, 1989 Drs. Martin Fleischmann and Stanley Pons announced that they had measured nuclear-scale excess energy from a palladium-heavy water electrochemical cell, and that they had also detected some preliminary evidence of nuclear signatures from their exotic energy-producing reactions, the world was in awe. Their famous afternoon press conference at the University of Utah, coming less than twelve hours before the...
  • US spooks buy a superconducting supercomputer ( Research Project)

    12/05/2014 11:28:38 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 11 replies
    fudzilla.com ^ | Thursday, 04 December 2014 10:45 | Nick Farrell
    Password guessing The U.S. intelligence community has launched a multi-year research project to develop a superconducting computer, awarding its first contracts to three major technology companies.IBM, Raytheon BBN and Northrop Grumman won the contracts, the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity said Wednesday, without disclosing financial details.If it works, the Cryogenic Computer Complexity (C3) program could lead to a new generation of superconducting supercomputers."The energy demands of today's high-performance computers have become a critical challenge for the Intelligence Community that the C3 program aims to address," IARPA said in a statement. Such computers use massive amounts of energy.Competition from Europe, Japan...
  • Got mass? Scientists observe electrons become both heavy and speedy

    06/20/2012 10:08:53 AM PDT · by Kevmo · 39 replies
    Phys Org ^ | June 13, 2012 | Phys Org
    Got mass? Scientists observe electrons become both heavy and speedy Electrons moving in certain solids can behave as if they are a thousand times more massive than free electrons, but at the same time act as superconductors. A new study led by Princeton scientists shows that this happens because of a process known as quantum entanglement that determines the mass of electrons moving in a crystal. The discovery can help improve understanding of how certain materials become superconducting, which may have applications in areas such as power network efficiency and computing speed. Credit: the Yazdani Group A Princeton University-led team...
  • New Superconductor Wires Could Give Renewable Energy More Charge

    This could change everything you know about electrical power or computers.
  • Japanese doctor turns hot toddy into superconductor catalyst

    01/13/2011 6:54:11 AM PST · by dangerdoc · 33 replies
    Engadget ^ | 1/13/11 | Christopher Trout
    It's rare that hot booze does anything more than get you drunk, and possibly make you sick, but according to Dr. Yoshihiko Takano, the drink you're sucking on could facilitate the levitation of a train. After a party for a colleague, the Japanese scientist found that FeTe0.8S0.2 (composed of iron, tellurium, and tellurium sulfide), when soaked in warm booze overnight, shows signs of increased superconductivity -- another in a long line of liquor-enhanced discoveries that could have far reaching effects on everything from consumer electronics to public transportation. Dr. Takano decided to test the material (known to become a superconductor...
  • Hot booze turns material into a superconductor

    01/11/2011 6:07:37 AM PST · by epithermal · 24 replies
    Physorg ^ | January 11, 2011 | Lin Edwards
    (PhysOrg.com) -- A Japanese scientist who "likes alcohol very much" has discovered that soaking samples of material in hot party drinks for 24 hours turns them into superconductors at ambient temperature. The scientist, Dr. Yoshihiko Takano of the National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS) in Tsukuba, Japan, made the discovery after a party, soaking samples of a potential superconductor in hot alcoholic drinks before testing them next day for superconductivity. The commercial alcoholic beverages, especially wine, were much more effective than either water or pure alcohol.
  • Physicists explain why superconductors fail to produce super currents

    06/27/2010 10:53:03 AM PDT · by decimon · 19 replies
    University of Florida ^ | June 27, 2010 | Unknown
    GAINESVILLE, Fla. --- When high-temperature superconductors were first announced in the late 1980s, it was thought that they would lead to ultra-efficient magnetic trains and other paradigm-shifting technologies. That didn't happen. Now, a University of Florida scientist is among a team of physicists to help explain why. In a paper set to appear Sunday in the online edition of Nature Physics, Peter Hirschfeld, a UF professor of physics, and five other researchers for the first time describe precisely how the atomic-level structural elements of high-temperature ceramic superconductors serve to impede electrical current. Their explanation for how "grain boundaries" separating rows...
  • Hydrocarbon turns superconductor

    03/04/2010 6:44:19 PM PST · by neverdem · 15 replies · 659+ views
    Chemistry World ^ | 03 March 2010 | Jon Cartwright
    Researchers in Japan have created the first superconducting material based on a molecule of carbon and hydrogen atoms. Although the superconducting transition occurs at a chilly 18K, the simplicity of the molecule, which consists of just five benzene rings, suggests that it will open the door to other molecules that have higher transition temperatures.Superconductivity occurs when a material is cooled below a certain transition temperature (Tc) so that its electrical resistance disappears. The first superconductors were pure metals and had Tc  values close to absolute zero, but over the past 25 years scientists have begun to discover various 'high-Tc' materials, including...
  • Some parts at 20 degrees Kelvin and Other at Room Temperature and the Whole Wire still Superconducts

    11/27/2009 2:45:38 PM PST · by decimon · 28 replies · 949+ views
    Next Big Future ^ | November 26, 2009 | Brian Wang
    > For this to work, the wire's surface must be extremely clean, allowing electrons to move freely and spread along the wire to create a uniform temperature. A material with a critical temperature of -193 °C could superconduct at room temperature, provided some sections were kept to -253 °C, they found. In principle, the colder these refrigeration points are, the fewer you need, Dubi says. >
  • Towards a New Test of General Relativity? (Generating Gravity in the Lab)

    07/23/2009 3:26:56 PM PDT · by anymouse · 27 replies · 1,026+ views
    European Space Agency ^ | 23 March 2006
    Scientists funded by the European Space Agency believe they may have measured the gravitational equivalent of a magnetic field for the first time in a laboratory. Under certain special conditions the effect is much larger than expected from general relativity and could help physicists to make a significant step towards the long-sought-after quantum theory of gravity. Just as a moving electrical charge creates a magnetic field, so a moving mass generates a gravitomagnetic field. According to Einstein's Theory of General Relativity, the effect is virtually negligible. However, Martin Tajmar, ARC Seibersdorf Research GmbH, Austria, and colleagues believe they have measured...
  • New Type of Superconductivity Spotted

    03/19/2009 9:41:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 12 replies · 986+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 13 March 2009 | Adrian Cho
    Enlarge ImageStrange swirls. The vortices in the type-2 superconductor niobium diselenide form an orderly pattern (bottom); those in the "type-1.5" superconductor magnesium diboride form a disorderly pattern filled with stripes and voids. Credit: V. V. Moshchalkov and M. Menghini/K. U. Leuven Superconductors, materials that carry electricity without resistance, can be divided into two broad groups depending on how they react to a magnetic field--or so physicists thought. New experiments show that one well-studied superconductor actually belongs to both groups at the same time. "If the experiment is true, this would add a whole new class of superconductors," says Egor...
  • Scientists make ultrathin superconducting films (Reuters)

    10/09/2008 5:24:04 AM PDT · by shove_it · 19 replies · 594+ views
    CHICAGO (Reuters) - U.S. researchers have developed ultrathin films that when sandwiched together form a superconductor, an advance that could lead to a new class of fast, power-saving electronics. The films can be used at relatively high temperatures for superconductors, making them easier to handle and produce, they said on Wednesday. "What we have done is we have put together two materials, neither of which is a superconductor, and we found their interface -- where they touch -- is superconducting," said physicist Ivan Bozovic of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, in a telephone interview. "This superconducting layer...