Keyword: privacy

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  • ‘Minority Report’ Artificial Intelligence machine can identify 2 BILLION people in seconds

    12/12/2017 5:28:13 AM PST · by C19fan · 18 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | December 12, 2017 | Harry Pettit
    A smart surveillance system that can identify criminals among a database of 2 billion faces within seconds has been revealed in China. The system connects to millions of CCTV cameras and uses artificial intelligence to pick out targets. Known as 'Dragonfly Eye', it has already been used in Shanghai to track down hundreds of wanted criminals, reports suggest.
  • Yes, the Government Has to Get a Warrant for Digital ‘Papers’

    12/07/2017 3:42:01 PM PST · by Kaslin · 11 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | December 7, 2017 | Seton Motley
    The Fourth Amendment of our sensational Constitution reads as follows:“The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects,[a] against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.”What this means is: Government can’t invade your property or grab your stuff - without first securing a warrant.  And they have to have a darn good and specific reason to ask for said warrant.In this the Digital...
  • Can anybody here verify this whether we are being surveillance through our cellphone batteries?

    Is the government keeping tabs on us through our cellphone batteries?
  • Supreme Court to hear blockbuster cellphone privacy case

    11/29/2017 12:07:41 PM PST · by Coronal · 31 replies
    Washington Examiner ^ | November 29, 2017 | Ryan Lovelace
    The Supreme Court on Wednesday morning will hear arguments in a major privacy controversy about police tracking people through their cellphones that may bring about permanent changes to how the courts interpret the Constitution’s Fourth Amendment. At issue in Carpenter v. United States is the constitutionality of police's warrantless search and seizure of a cellphone user’s records to uncover that person’s location and movements. The government obtained location data in 2011 on Timothy Carpenter, a suspected criminal in Detroit, without getting a warrant. Carpenter appealed to the 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, which ruled that the government did not need...
  • PRIVACY ALERT: HP Quietly Installs System-Slowing Spyware On Its PCs Without Consent

    11/29/2017 10:00:41 AM PST · by blam · 40 replies
    SHTF Plan ^ | 11-29-2017
    On the heels of Lenovo’s massive $3.5 million fine for preinstalling adware on laptops without users‘ consent, Hewlett-Packard is jumping in with both feet when it comes to installing spyware on its PCs without the consumer’s permission. According to numerous reports gathered by Computer World, the brand is deploying a telemetry client (a system data that is uploaded by the Connected User Experience and Telemetry component), on customer computers without asking permission. The software, which was first identified on November 15 of this year, is called “HP Touchpoint Analytics Service” and appears to replace the self-managed HP Touchpoint Manager solution....
  • Justices to weigh cell phone privacy in landmark case

    11/26/2017 6:36:09 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 21 replies
    The Hill ^ | 11-23-17 | Wheeler
    “The privacy of emails, photos stored in the cloud, even heart rate history from a smartwatch could be at stake, according to civil libertarians, as the Supreme Court takes up a potential blockbuster case after Thanksgiving. When they return to the bench after the holiday, the justices will weigh whether the history of cell phone locations stored by a phone service provider is searchable without a warrant. The case, Carpenter v. U.S., centers on Timothy Carpenter, who argues the government violated his Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable search and seizure when it obtained his cell phone location records from MetroPCS...
  • Texas Ranger serves Apple with a search warrant for iPhone in Texas shooting

    11/20/2017 2:55:01 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 57 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | Posted on November 19, 2017 2:34 pm | By Steven Winkelman
    Apple has officially been served with a warrant in the case of the Texas shooting perpetrator Devin Patrick Kelley and his iPhone. The case hearkens back to the San Bernardino tragedy of 2015, and the ensuing legal dispute with repercussions that are still being felt today.As per court records obtained by the San Antonio Express-News, Texas Ranger Kevin Wright has produced search warrants for photos, messages, documents, and other data that might be stored on Kelley’s iPhone and his iCloud account. Access to this information, authorities say, could help shed light on the worst mass shooting in the state’s...
  • Is that service dog a fake? Under federal law, you can’t even ask

    11/01/2017 3:03:57 PM PDT · by familyop · 50 replies
    Kansas City Star ^ | NOVEMBER 01, 2017 | MARK DAVIS
    Neither the vest from the accredited training program nor the certificate are required under the ADA. The ADA says anyone can train their dog, or miniature horse, to perform a task that mitigates or helps them with their disability. Professional training is not required. ADA also specifically prohibits cities, merchants and others from requiring proof that a dog is a service dog. It allows, in fact, only two questions. Is the dog a service animal required because of a disability? What work or task has the dog been trained to perform? Service dog owners may not be asked about the...
  • Why Google is reading your Docs

    11/01/2017 8:53:29 AM PDT · by Behind Liberal Lines · 20 replies
    © Telegraph Media Group Limited 2017 ^ | 11/01/17 | James Titcomb
    Several users of Google's online word processing service, Google Docs, were surprised on Tuesday when their documents were blocked for violating its policies. While Google quickly restored them, blaming a botched update that mistakenly locked users out of the documents, the episode revealed what many people did not realise - Google is monitoring the ostensibly private files stored in Docs. Google Drive's terms of service prohibit spam, violent or hate speech, pornography, the spread of confidential information and so on. They apply only to files that are shared, so those kept to yourself are presumably exempt. A Google spokesman said...
  • Warning over iPhone apps that can silently turn on cameras at any time

    10/26/2017 10:52:19 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 19 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 10/26/17 | James Titcomb
    Apple has been urged to change the way in which iPhone apps are granted access to the phone's camera after a security researcher demonstrated how apps can secretly record photos and videos without the user knowing. Felix Krause, an Austrian developer who works for Google, built an app that was able to take pictures of its user every second and upload them, without notifying the user. He called it a "privacy loophole that can be abused by iOS apps". When an app wants to access the camera, for example to scan a credit card or take a profile picture during...
  • Looking for Privacy in All the Wrong Places

    10/25/2017 7:37:33 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 2 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | October 25, 2017 | Bob Barr
    Like the rising of the sun or the changing of the tides, another opportunity for the GOP to right the wrongs of the post-9/11 security state is here again. In less than three months, Section 702 of the 2008 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Amendments Act, which authorizes the National Security Agency’s controversial (and in many instances, unconstitutional) spy programs, is set to expire. The lingering question, however, is whether the GOP is finally ready to close the book on what has been one of the biggest abuses of government power in American history.It is well-known that the GOP has had numerous...
  • New iPhone Facial Recognition

    09/12/2017 11:39:40 PM PDT · by Reno89519 · 47 replies
    Self ^ | September 13, 2017 | Reno89519
    The new Apple iPhone X replaces the fingerprint scanner with facial recognition to unlock the phone. If you recall, some courts ruled that forcing you to give up your fingerprint to access your iPhone content was okay and did not require a search warrant. How will they rule about facial recognition and will they even have to?
  • For secretive surveillance court, rare scrutiny in wake of NSA leaks

    06/23/2013 1:59:33 PM PDT · by dirtboy · 12 replies
    Wash ComPost ^ | June 22, 2013 | Peter Wallsten, Carol D. Leonnig and Alice Crites
    Wedged into a secure, windowless basement room deep below the Capitol Visitors Center, U.S. District Court Judge John Bates appeared before dozens of senators earlier this month for a highly unusual, top-secret briefing. The lawmakers pressed Bates, according to people familiar with the session, to discuss the inner workings of the United States’ clandestine terrorism surveillance tribunal, which Bates oversaw from 2006 until earlier this year. FISA court papers show NSA warrantless surveillance rules Classified documents spell out procedures for targeting foreigners and minimizing the collection of data from U.S. persons. Bates had rarely spoken of his sensitive work. He...
  • Did Another Intelligence Director Lie to Wyden About Surveillance?

    06/07/2017 1:03:22 PM PDT · by deplorableindc · 9 replies
    Privacy advocates and journalists want to know what Sen. Ron Wyden is up to -- and whether the Oregon Democrat elicited another lie about surveillance from a director of national intelligence during Wednesday's Senate intelligence committee hearing. Wyden asked one of the final questions at the hearing that dealt with the investigation into Russia's role in the 2016 election and with Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, which expires later this year if Congress does not act. Wyden, a forceful privacy advocate, asked Director of National Intelligence Dan Coats, with whom he had sparred earlier, a simple standalone...
  • Insurer’s mailing to customers made HIV status visible through envelope window

    08/25/2017 8:21:14 AM PDT · by Silentgypsy · 30 replies
    Statnews.com ^ | 08/24/2017 | Erin Mershon
    Thousands of people with HIV received mailed letters from Aetna last month that may have disclosed their HIV status on the envelope. The letters, which Aetna said were sent to approximately 12,000 people, were meant to relay a change in pharmacy benefits. Text visible through a small window on the envelopes listed the patients’ names and suggested a change in how they would fill the prescription for their treatment for the virus. “People have been devastated. We’ve had a number of people tell us they had chosen not to disclose their HIV status to family members — but this is...
  • India's top court rules privacy a fundamental right in blow to 'Aadhaar' (National) ID card plan

    08/24/2017 7:32:12 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 6 replies
    france24.com ^ | 8/24/17 | Reuters
    A nine-member bench of India's Supreme Court announced the ruling in a big setback for the Narendra Modi-led government, which argued that privacy was not a fundamental right protected by the constitution.(Emphasis mine) The ruling comes against the backdrop of a large multi-party case against the mandatory use of national identity cards, known as Aadhaar, as an infringement of privacy. There have also been concerns over breaches of data. Critics say the ID cards link enough data to create a comprehensive profile of a person's spending habits, their friends and acquaintances, the property they own and a trove of other...
  • How Google Is Secretly Recording YOU Through Your Mobile, Monitoring Millions Of Conversations

    08/22/2017 9:39:19 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 43 replies
    The Sun ^ | 08/22/17 | Margi Murphy
    DID you know that Google has been recording you without your knowledge? The technology giant has effectively turned millions of its users' smartphones into listening devices that can capture intimate conversations - even when they aren't in the room. If you own an Android phone, it's likely that you've used Google's Assistant, which is similar to Apple's Siri. Google says it only turns on and begins recording when you utter the words "OK Google". But a Sun investigation has found that the virtual assistant is a little hard of hearing. In some cases, just saying "OK" in conversation prompted it...
  • Why Your Face Will Soon Be The Key To All Your Devices

    08/21/2017 4:59:13 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 18 replies
    WSJ ^ | 08/20/17 | Christopher Mims
    It was a memorable moment in Pixar’s 2004 classic “The Incredibles,” one that seemed wildly futuristic at the time: Mr. Incredible picks up a wafer-thin tablet computer, and it scans his face to verify his identity before divulging his secret mission. Thirteen years later, many slim phones and tablets unlock with the press of a thumb—and just this sort of mobile facial scanning is on the way. Forget fiddling with passwords or even fingerprints; forget multiple layers of sign-in; forget credit cards and, eventually, even physical keys to our homes and cars. A handful of laptops and mobile devices can...
  • Roomba's Next Big Step Is Selling Maps of Your Home to the Highest Bidder

    07/26/2017 10:02:49 AM PDT · by C19fan · 4 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | July 24, 2017 | Rhett Jones
    The Roomba is generally regarded as a cute little robot friend that no one but dogs would consider to be a potential menace. But for the last couple of years, the robovacs have been quietly mapping homes to maximize efficiency. Now, the device’s makers plan to sell that data to smart home device manufacturers, turning the friendly robot into a creeping, creepy little spy.
  • Question for IT guys, should you turn off images before reading PMs on a political forum?

    07/09/2017 10:48:35 AM PDT · by BestPresidentEver · 9 replies
    Should people turn off images before viewing Personal Messages on political forums? I’ve been reading about how CNN got the real name of the reddit forum user who they think created the wrestling video they felt so threatened by. It seems it involves sending emails with images or web links in them. When either the image is viewed with the rest of the message or when the link is clicked on the sender learns the IP address of the recipient. So if forum software allows images to be sent in PMs then one can include a transparent 1 pixel by...