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Keyword: militaryhistory

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  • USS Lexington: Lost WW2 aircraft carrier found after 76 years

    03/06/2018 6:11:05 AM PST · by George - the Other · 58 replies
    BBC News ^ | March 6, 2018 | BBC News
    The wreck of a US aircraft carrier that was sunk during World War Two has been found off the coast of Australia. The USS Lexington was found 3km (2 miles) underwater in the Coral Sea, about 800km off Australia's east coast. The ship was lost in the Battle of the Coral Sea, fought with Japan from 4-8 May 1942. More than 200 crew members died in the fighting. The US Navy confirmed the ship had been discovered by a search team led by Microsoft co-founder Paul Allen.
  • Aircraft Carrier USS Lexington, Sunk During WWII, Found In Coral Sea

    03/06/2018 8:28:24 AM PST · by C19fan · 50 replies
    Internatonal Business Times ^ | March 6, 2018 | Suman Varandani
    The wreckage of a United States aircraft carrier, named USS Lexington that was sunk by the Japanese during World War II, was found on the floor of the Coral Sea more than 500 miles off the eastern coast of Australia. The carrier was discovered by a team of explorers led by billionaire Paul Allen, the U.S. Navy confirmed Monday. The ship, which was part of the Battle of the Coral Sea from May 4-8, 1942, was found in a remarkably well-preserved condition. Microsoft co-founder Allen released a statement Monday along with photos and a video of the carrier. ​
  • On this day in 1945, one of the most reproduced and parodied photos in history was taken

    02/23/2018 5:42:39 PM PST · by Saint X · 40 replies
    U.S. Naval Institute ^ | February 23, 2018 | U.S. Naval institute
    Photographer Joe Rosenthal admitted that when he took a shot of five Marines and one Navy corpsman raising the U.S. flag on Iwo Jima’s Mt. Suribachi on Feb. 23, 1945, he had no idea that he had captured something extraordinary. He was setting up for a different shot when he spotted the group of men planting the flag and quickly took a snap without even looking through the viewfinder. The chance photo would become iconic overnight and go on to win the Pulitzer Prize.
  • This Day in History: George Washington’s much-needed victory at Trenton

    12/26/2017 8:20:07 PM PST · by iowamark · 12 replies ^ | 12/26/17
    On this day in 1776, General George Washington wins the Battle of Trenton. 1776 had been a difficult year! The victory provided a much-needed morale boost. As discussed in yesterday’s post, the first weeks in December found Washington and British General William Howe on opposite sides of the Delaware River. As the weather deteriorated, Howe had decided to go into winter quarters. Washington, instead, decided to make a difficult crossing across the Delaware. His plan was to arrive at Trenton at 5 a.m., well before sunrise, so he could launch a surprise attack. Instead, Washington’s men arrived at Trenton at...
  • Worst Battle Ever For US Troops? Marine Corp. Trapped? God Bless Those Who Fought At Chosin.

    12/23/2017 8:12:31 PM PST · by Djl3668 · 34 replies
    PBS ^ | 2016 | PBS
    “The Battle of Chosin INSURMOUNTABLE ODDS. UNFORGIVING CONDITIONS. UNYIELDING COURAGE. Film Description On Thanksgiving Day 1950, American-led United Nations troops were on the march in North Korea. U.S. Marine and Air Force pilots distributed holiday meals, even to those on the front lines. Hopes were high that everyone would be home by Christmas. But soon after that peaceful celebration, American military leaders, including General Douglas MacArthur, were caught off guard by the entrance of the People's Republic of China, led by Mao Zedong, into the five-month-old Korean War. Twelve thousand men of the First Marine Division, along with a few...
  • The 15 men who earned the Medal of Honor during the Pearl Harbor attacks

    12/07/2017 5:24:53 PM PST · by fugazi · 23 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Dec. 7, 2017 | Chris Carter
    On Sunday, Dec. 7, 1941, Vice Adm. Chuichi Nagumo’s 1st Air Fleet begins their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor. Two waves of aircraft strike the U.S. Pacific Fleet at anchor, as well as bases across Hawaii. Five of the eight battleships, three destroyers, and seven other ships are either sunk or severely damaged. By day’s end, 2,718 American sailors, 582 soldiers (including Army Air Forces personnel), 178 Marines, and 103 civilians are dead, dying or wounded. In a day full of countless acts of American bravery and sacrifice, 15 men and officers of the U.S. Navy earned the Medal of...
  • Today in US military history: special ops raids in World War II and Vietnam

    11/21/2017 6:48:25 AM PST · by fugazi · 2 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Nov. 21, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1817: The First Seminole War begins when Gen. (and future president) Andrew Jackson leads forces into Spanish-held Florida to reclaim escaped slaves from Seminole tribal areas. 1943: USS Nautilus (SS-168) surfaces and disembarks Capt. James L. Jones and his Marine Amphibious Reconnaissance Company off the beaches of Abemama Atoll in the Gilbert Islands. The raiders board rubber rafts and paddle ashore under cover of darkness, spending the next several days wiping out the defenders and capturing the islands along with fire support from the sub. The Marine Corps' modern-day Force Reconnaissance companies trace their roots to Jones' team. 1947: Grumman's...
  • Today in U.S. military history: the Tuskegee Airmen, and a Civil War naval commando raid

    10/27/2017 8:56:29 AM PDT · by fugazi · 5 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 27, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1864: In a daring nighttime commando raid, Lt. William B. Cushing, piloting a torpedo-armed steam launch, slips past a Confederate schooner guarding the ironclad CSS Albemarle. Cushing detonates the spar torpedo, blowing a massive hole in the warship, which had been dominating the Roanoke River. Although several of his crew are drowned and captured, Cushing and another sailor escape, leaving behind a destroyed ironclad. 1942: After several days of intense fighting, a shattered Japanese military abandons their offensive on Guadalcanal's Henderson Field. The Japanese will evacuate the island in February, and the Americans will turn Guadalcanal into a major base...
  • Oct. 26 in U.S. military history

    10/26/2017 7:25:42 AM PDT · by fugazi · 1 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 26, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1909: U.S. Army Lt. (future brig. gen.) Frederick Erastus Humphreys​ becomes the first Army aviator to solo in a heavier-than-air craft – the Wright Flyer​ – following three hours of instruction by Wilbur Wright​. 1922: Off Cape Henry, Va., Lt. Commander Godfrey Chevalier becomes the first aviator to land on a moving ship when his Aeromarine 39B biplane touches down on the deck of USS Langley. 1942: Japanese carrier-based aircraft sink the carrier USS Hornet, leaving only one operational American carrier in the Pacific. The Battle of Santa Cruz is a pyrrhic victory for the Japanese, however, as their carrier...
  • Today in U.S. military history: John Basilone, Billy Mitchell, and invasion of Grenada

    10/25/2017 7:37:23 AM PDT · by fugazi · 10 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 25, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1812: The frigate USS United States under the command of Capt. (future commodore) Stephen Decatur – hero of Tripoli and said to be the U.S. Navy’s own Lord Nelson​ – captures the Royal Navy frigate HMS Macedonian under the command of Capt. John Carden in a brisk fight several hundred miles off the Azores. 1925: The court martial of Col. William "Billy" Mitchell, America's chief aviation officer during World War I and considered to be the "Father of the U.S. Air Force", begins in Washington, D.C.. The outspoken Mitchell is charged with multiple counts of insubordination due to his criticism...
  • Today in US military history: McCampbell's MoH, a Korean furball, & beginning of US aid to S Vietnam

    10/24/2017 8:05:07 AM PDT · by fugazi
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 24, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1742: After poor leadership and disease claim all but 600 of the 3,500-man 61st Regiment of Foot, the American expeditionary force is disbanded and returns to the colonies. "Gooch's Regiment", named after regimental commander - also the Governor of Virginia - Lt. Col. William Gooch, had been part of the ill-fated British expedition to capture the Spanish colony of Cartagena (present-day Colombia). 1944: On day two of the Battle of Leyte Gulf - the largest naval engagement of World War II - U.S. aircraft attack the Japanese fleet, sinking the battleship Musashi and damaging four others. A single Japanese dive...
  • Today in US military history: Beirut barracks bombing, and the Gettysburg of the West

    10/23/2017 9:47:22 AM PDT · by fugazi · 6 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 23, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1864: In Westport, Mo. (present-day Kansas City), Maj. Gen. Samuel R. Curtis' 22,000-man Army of the Border defeats a heavily outnumbered Confederate force commanded by Maj. Gen. Sterling Price in the largest battle fought west of the Mississippi River. The Union brings an end to Price's Missouri Expedition with his defeat in the "Gettysburg of the West," and Price retreats into Kansas. After the Battle of Westport, the border state of Missouri will remain under Union control for the rest of the Civil War. 1942: On Guadalcanal, Imperial Japanese soldiers and tanks attempt to cross the Matanikau River, and are...
  • Today in US military history: Keeble's MoH, 1st Korean War airborne op, and MacArthur returns

    10/20/2017 12:52:05 PM PDT · by fugazi · 5 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | 20 Oct. 2017 | Chris Carter
    1922: Lt. Harold R. Harris (Army Air Service) performs the world's first emergency parachute jump when the wings of his Loening PW-2A come apart during a simulated dogfight 2,500 feet over McCook Field. Harris bails out of his cockpit and after free-falling 2,000 feet, he lands safely in a garden in Dayton, Ohio. 1926: After a brutal murder of a post office truck driver, President Calvin Coolidge orders the Marine Corps to protect the mail delivery. 2,500 Marines of the 4th Marine Regiment, commanded by two-time Medal of Honor recipient Brig. Gen. Smedley D. Butler, serve as the "Western Mail...
  • Today in US military history: a WWII drone strike, Pyongyang captured, and Cornwallis surrenders

    10/19/2017 3:10:31 PM PDT · by fugazi · 19 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 19, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1781: British Gen. Charles Cornwallis formally surrenders 7,087 officers and men, 900 seamen, 144 cannons, 15 galleys, a frigate, and 30 transport ships to an American and French force at Yorktown, Va., effectively ending the American Revolution. 1944: Two Interstate TDR assault drones are launched against Japanese gun emplacements on Ballale Island - one drone missing its target and another delivering two of its four 100-lb. bombs on the target. The TDR was a two-engine, unmanned airplane remotely controlled by a Grumman TBF "Avenger" via a television camera feed. 1950: Troopers with the 5th Cavalry Regiment enter Pyongyang, capturing the...
  • Today in US military history: "The Bone," 29th Rangers, and the Burning of Falmouth

    10/18/2017 1:13:56 PM PDT · by fugazi · 3 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 18, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1775: A small British fleet commanded by Capt. Henry Mowat bombards the town of Falmouth, Mass. (modern-day Portland, Maine), setting most of the coastal settlement on fire with incendiary cannonballs. Mowat then sends a landing party ashore to destroy any buildings that were still standing, and the "Burning of Falmouth" will provide the inspiration for the Continental Congress to establish the Continental Navy. 1917: A convoy bearing the newly created 42d "Rainbow" Infantry Division sails from Hoboken, N.J. for France. The unit consists of federalized National Guard soldiers from 26 states and the District of Colombia, and its chief-of-staff is...
  • Today in US military history: USS Independence, John Brown, and Indian Joe's Medal of Honor

    10/16/2017 8:25:19 AM PDT · by fugazi · 1 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 16, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1821: The schooner USS Enterprise (the third of 12 so-named Continental and U.S. Naval vessels) intercepts a flotilla of four ships led by the infamous Capt. Charles Gibbs as the pirates attack American and British-flagged ships in Cuban waters. Although outnumbered, Lt. Cmdr. John Kearney and his crew quickly defeat the pirate force, and Gibbs escapes into the jungles of Cuba as three of his ships are burned. Gibbs will eventually be caught and is one of the last people executed for piracy in the United States. 1859: A small party of abolitionists, led by John Brown, occupies the military...
  • Today in US military history: CAPT Arlo L. Olson's Medal of Honor

    10/13/2017 7:32:51 AM PDT · by fugazi · 11 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 13, 2017 | Chris Carter
    The President of the United States of America, in the name of Congress, takes pride in presenting the Medal of Honor (Posthumously) to Captain (Infantry) Arlo L. Olson (ASN: 0-386969), United States Army, for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving with 15th Infantry Regiment, 3d Infantry Division, in action at the Volturno River, Italy. On 13 October 1943, when the drive across the Volturno River began, Captain Olson and his company spearheaded the advance of the regiment through 30 miles of mountainous enemy territory in 13...
  • Today in U.S. military history: Chuck Yeager, Hacksaw Ridge, and USS Cole

    10/12/2017 8:26:09 AM PDT · by fugazi · 7 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 12, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1862: Confederate cavalry commander Gen. James Ewell Brown “J.E.B.” Stuart completes his “second ride” around Union Gen. George B. McClellan’s Army of the Potomac. 1870: Five years after surrendering his Army of Northern Virginia to Gen. Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox, Gen. Robert E. Lee passes away after suffering a stroke. The revered general served his country 44 years, fighting alongside Grant in the Mexican-American War, and against him in the Civil War. 1944: U.S. Army Air Force 1st Lt. Charles E. "Chuck" Yeager and his 357th Fighter Group surprise a flight of 22 Messerschmitt Bf-109 fighters near Hanover, Germany....
  • Today in US military history: Guadalcanal, Apollo 7, and Chesty Puller passes

    10/11/2017 4:34:38 PM PDT · by fugazi · 11 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 11, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1939: A letter written by Hungarian-born physicist Leo Szilard, and signed by Albert Einstein, reaches President Franklin D. Roosevelt, warning that the Germans could develop an atomic weapon and that the United States should begin their own nuclear research. Roosevelt quickly authorizes a committee on uranium, setting in motion what will eventually become the Manhattan Project. 1942: U.S. Naval forces under the command of Rear Admiral Norman Scott intercept a Japanese fleet, commanded by Rear Adm. Aritomo GotĹŤ, attempting to reinforce troops on Guadalcanal in the Battle of Cape Esperance. Fighting begins shortly before midnight off the northwest coast of...
  • Today in US military history

    10/10/2017 8:02:03 AM PDT · by fugazi · 4 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Oct. 10, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1845: Secretary of the Navy George Bancroft founds the Naval School in Annapolis, Md. - later renamed the U.S. Naval Academy. The nation's second-oldest service academy (the U.S. Military Academy was established by Thomas Jefferson in 1802) is built on the grounds of Fort Severn, which traces its roots to the American Revolution. 1944: Although assigned as a gunnery instructor and advised not to actively seek out combat, Maj. Richard I. Bong, America's all-time leading ace, volunteers for several missions between Oct. 10 and Nov. 11, shooting down eight Japanese warplanes from his P-38 "Lightning" fighter. For his actions during...