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Keyword: militaryhistory

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  • The Inchon landing, 66 years ago next month, was brilliant. But what made it necessary?

    08/20/2016 9:57:10 PM PDT · by Mr. Mojo · 51 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | August 19, 2016 | Robert Zapesochny
    When back in June 2015 Donald Trump announced he was running for president, he said during his speech, “I will find the General Patton or I will find General MacArthur. I will find the right guy. I will find the guy that’s going to take that military and make it really work.” Since then, Trump has frequently mentioned Douglas MacArthur in his speeches. It is worth discussing his importance in American history, especially as we are approaching the 66th anniversary of Battle of Inchon. While MacArthur’s greatest achievement was the creation of modern Japan, the Inchon landing on September 15,...
  • Gettysburg 20th Maine bayonet charge at Little Round Top

    07/02/2016 9:23:58 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 30 replies ^ | JAMES R. BRANN
    Late in the afternoon of July 2, 1863, on a boulder-strewn hillside in southern Pennsylvania, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain dashed headlong into history, leading his 20th Maine Regiment in perhaps the most famous counterattack of the Civil War.
  • The US Navy's Five Aircraft Carrier Museum Ships

    07/12/2013 7:42:25 AM PDT · by Jeff Head · 98 replies
    JEFFHEAD.COM ^ | July 12, 2013 | Jeff Head
    US NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER MUSEUMS (Click map for a high resolution image) Currently (July 2013) there are five US Navy Aircraft Carrier museums. Four are of Essex class carriers commissioned during World War II which underwent the SBC-125 refit in the 1950s to modernize them. All were commissioned in 1943 & served into modern times. The last, the USS Lexington, was decommissioned in 1991 after 48 years service. The other is the USS Midway, namesake of a larger class carrier built at the end of the war. She underwent two major refits, in the 1950s & in 1970 greatly enlarging...

    05/28/2016 1:07:36 PM PDT · by knarf · 45 replies
    FB ^ | Conservative Post
    Long forgotten, private color film of the actual attack on Pearl Harbor
  • How was Gun Control Imposed Upon an Unwilling World?

    02/20/2016 1:37:51 AM PST · by marktwain · 16 replies
    Ammoland ^ | 18 February, 2016 | Dean Weingarten
    Disarmists use the bandwagon fallacy, (argumentum ad populum) to promote citizen disarmament. In essence, the non-argument makes the claim; everyone else disarms their population - so we should do the same.  This is a logical fallacy. (snip) .. it is clear that from 1500 on, the major developments in gun technology came from Europe.Europeans underwent the black death shortly before the introduction of the gun.  The loss of up to a third of the population made the remainder much more valuable. The development of the gun, the Reformation, the Renaissance, much wider availability of literacy and printed material, all...
  • Historical PHOTO: US Soldiers Pose with the Bodies of Moro (Muslim) Insurgents, Philippines; c. 1906

    02/19/2016 10:13:09 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 43 replies
    Rare Historical Photos ^ | January 29, 2016 | RHP
    US Soldiers Pose with the Bodies of Moro (Muslim) Insurgents, Philippines; circa 1906 On March 7, 1906, US troops under the command of Major General Leonard Wood massacred as many as 1,000 Filipino Muslims, known as Moros, who were taking refuge at Bud Dajo, a volcanic crater on the island of Jolo in the southern Philippines. The First Battle of Bud Dajo, also known as the Bud Dajo Massacre, was a counter insurgency action fought by the United States Army against Moros in March 1906, during the Moro Rebellion phase of the Philippine - American War. After the United States...
  • The truth about how our founding fathers fought Islamic extremists - A President's Day Message

    02/15/2016 1:18:37 PM PST · by SandRat · 13 replies
    Move America Forawrd
    Today we celebrate President's Day, a day in which Americans are expected to look back and honor our founding fathers and their contributions to our Nation's proud history. The words and writings of our founding fathers offer us wisdom and insight that stretches across the ages. The ideas about freedom and liberty that they wrote about and fought for are still serving America today. The system of government that they envisioned and set up for us continues to persevere, has brought great prosperity to the people residing in the United States. Through the centuries, millions of brave troops have risked...
  • Group protests Civil War Museum exhibit (because of guns)

    02/14/2016 11:57:23 AM PST · by Red in Blue PA · 64 replies
    HARRISBURG - Dozens of protesters took a stand against the National Civil War Museum Wednesday, saying that an exhibit currently on display and sponsored by the NRA sends the wrong message to young people. “This public institution is highlighting guns when we in fact are trying to get them off the streets and limit their use,” Homer Floyd, a demonstrator, said. Much of the anger is directed at the display of a pistol used by William Quantrill, a Confederate fighter who captured runaway slaves in Kansas and Missouri. In one such raid during the Civil War, Quantrill and his group...
  • George Washington reenactors make Christmas crossing of the Delaware River

    12/26/2015 1:55:17 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 20 replies
    Fox News ^ | 12-25-15
    WASHINGTON CROSSING, Pa. - George Washington and his troops have made their annual Christmas Day trip across the Delaware River. The re-enactors crossed the river between Pennsylvania and New Jersey on a 65-degree day Friday, considerably warmer than the actual crossing which took place on an ice-choked river during a snowstorm. The annual Christmas tradition drew families and fans of history to both sides of the Delaware River for the 63rd annual re-enactment. Boats ferried 2,400 soldiers, 200 horses and 18 cannons across the river during the original crossing.Washington's troops marched 8 miles downriver before battling Hessian mercenaries in the...
  • It’s True! A toilet was used as an aerial bomb during the Vietnam War

    11/03/2015 11:03:14 PM PST · by Impala64ssa · 18 replies
    As American involvement in the Vietnam War began, the A-1 Skyraider was still the medium attack aircraft in many carrier air wings, although it was planned to be replaced by the A-6A Intruder as part of the general switch to jet aircraft. Skyraiders from Constellation andTiconderoga participated in the first U.S. Navy strikes against North Vietnam on 5 August 1964 as part of Operation Pierce Arrow in response to the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, striking against fuel depots at Vinh, with one Skyraider from Ticonderoga damaged by anti-aircraft fire, and a second from Constellation shot down, killing its pilot. In...
  • WW II fighter ace Fritz Payne dies; shot down 6 warplanes during Guadalcanal

    08/19/2015 7:20:54 PM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 7 replies
    Fox News ^ | 8/18/15 | AP
    <p>Frederick R. "Fritz" Payne, a World War II fighter ace who left his mark on aviation and wartime history by shooting down six Japanese warplanes during the Battle of Guadalcanal, a bloody, months-long confrontation that helped change the course of the war, has died at age 104.</p>
  • Confederate Warship, Weapons Recovered from Georgia River

    08/18/2015 12:08:52 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 31 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 8/18/15 | Elizabeth Goldbaum
    The armored husk of a Confederate warship is being raised out of the depths of a Georgia river, 150 years after the ship's crew deliberately sunk it. Government officials are pulling approximately 250,000 lbs. (113,000 kilograms) of the warship CSS Georgia's armored siding — the ship's skeleton — from the Savannah River. Crews are raising the Civil War-era ship's remains in 10,000-lb. (4,500 kg) chunks that measure about 4 feet tall by 24 feet wide (1.2 by 7.3 meters). The siding is the last major ship part remaining in the water; Navy divers began retrieving the ship's unexploded shells, cannons...
  • How Did Armies Keep Archers Supplied With Arrows While Fighting?

    07/30/2015 11:19:03 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 84 replies
    Slate ^ | July 27, 2015 | By Stephen Tempest
    During the Hundred Years' War, England had a centralized, state-controlled organization for manufacturing arrows in bulk. These were then issued as required to the soldiers on campaign. In June 1413, for example, Henry V appointed Nicholas Mynot to be “keeper of the king's arrows,” based in the Tower of London. Mynot was responsible for making arrows, but the royal fletchers alone could not supply the total need, so additional orders were placed with outside suppliers. In August 1413, for example, London-based fletcher Stephen Seler was paid for 12,000 arrows. We have some total figures available. In 1418, Henry V's government...
  • First Naval Battle of the American Revolutionary War…

    07/04/2015 2:05:26 PM PDT · by artichokegrower · 14 replies ^ | July 4, 2015
    Before July 4th, 1776, let’s remember Captain Jeremiah O’Brien (1744–1818) commanded the sloop Unity when on June 12, 1775 she captured the British armed schooner HMS Margaretta in the Battle of Machias, the first naval battle of the American Revolutionary War. Under the command of Jeremiah O’Brien, thirty-one townsmen sailed aboard Unity armed with guns, swords, axes, and pitch forks and captured Margaretta in an hour-long battle. This battle is often considered the first time British colors were struck to those of the United States, even though the Continental Navy did not exist at the time. The United States Merchant...
  • Spanish Armada artefacts retrieved from the ocean [Co. Sligo, Ireland]

    06/17/2015 9:53:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    UTV Ireland ^ | June 17, 2015 | Marese O’Sullivan
    credit: Heather Humphries (Twitter feed)
  • VE-Day: How it unfolded, told through CBC's original reports

    05/08/2015 12:54:48 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 9 replies ^ | May 07, 2015 | CBC News
    Seventy years ago, then-British prime minister Winston Churchill declared May 8, 1945, to be "Victory in Europe Day" after a gruelling five-year war against Nazi Germany and its allies. The day before, people had already started celebrating amid news that Hitler had committed suicide in his so-called Fuehrerbunker in Berlin days prior, and Germany has surrendered unconditionally. Canada celebrated, too. It had joined the war effort early, with its first troops departing for Europe at the end of 1939. More than one million Canadians performed full-time duty during the war. They fought in the raid on Dieppe and at Juno...
  • Most Britons have no idea about Waterloo

    04/25/2015 9:39:10 AM PDT · by DeaconBenjamin · 99 replies
    The Local (France) ^ | 20 Apr 2015 08:51 GMT+02:00
    With the 200th anniversary of the famous Battle of Waterloo just two months away a survey in Britain has revealed that most ofthe public know little about it and some even think it's just an Abba song, while many thought the French actually won. A survey of Britons published in the build-up to the 200th anniversary of the Battle of Waterloo found three-quarters knew little or nothing about it -- while many thought France won. The poll of 2,070 people for the National Army Museum found 73 percent either knew nothing or next to nothing about the battle, one of...
  • St. Joan of Arc & the Truth about Snipers & Why Tyrants like Hitler Always Hate Them

    01/26/2015 1:29:37 PM PST · by poetbdk · 32 replies
    Maid of Heaven Foundation ^ | 1-26-15 | Ben D. Kennedy
    St. Joan of Arc & the Truth about Snipers & Why Tyrants like Hitler Always Hate Them In recent days I have been amazed and sickened by some of the vicious comments I have heard directed at Chris Kyle, the soldier portrayed in the new movie American Sniper, and I felt I could help people better understand the truth about snipers and why they are so feared and hated by the kind of people making the negative comments.  In St. Joan of Arc’s army soldiers that functioned as snipers were as important to her military success as they are...
  • On this day in 1968.

    01/23/2015 7:48:46 AM PST · by LouAvul · 28 replies
    North Korea seized the USS Pueblo and accused the crew of spying. The crew was released 11 months later. NK, however, kept the vessel.
  • Americans and Belgians mark 70th anniversary of Battle of the Bulge

    12/13/2014 12:15:44 PM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 22 replies ^ | Saturday 13 December 2014 11.43 EST
    Belgium’s King Philippe, right, and Queen Mathilde throw nuts to the public, during the 70th anniversary of the Battle of the Bulge, in Bastogne, Belgium, on Saturday. The tradition dates from when the Germans asked for the US surrender in Bastogne, to which General Anthony McAuliffe answered: ‘Nuts!’ Photograph: Yves Logghe/AP Braving snowy weather, Americans and Belgians gathered in the Ardennes on Saturday to mark the 70th anniversary of one of the biggest and bloodiest US battles of the second world war, the Battle of the Bulge. Jean-Claude Klepper, 62, of Virton, Belgium, said “we must never forget what...
  • Pearl Harbor Reunion, 2014

    12/07/2014 2:33:08 PM PST · by Sean_Anthony · 7 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 12/07/14 | Douglas V. Gibbs
    The Greatest Generation With each passing year, the reunion number is dwindling. The Pearl Harbor survivors are over 90 years old, and the members of that group that got together today in Hawaii numbered a little more than a dozen. Today marks the 73rd Anniversary of the attack against Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, during which 2,400 sailors, Marines, and soldiers were killed. Some have called the reunion of the USS Arizona Reunion Association the last gathering of USS Arizona survivors, but the gathering doesn’t see this meeting as the last one, just yet. The USS Arizona was a battleship that was...
  • 150 years on, Sherman's March to Sea still vivid

    12/05/2014 5:44:32 AM PST · by TurboZamboni · 354 replies
    Pioneer Press ^ | 11-15-14 | Christopher Sullivan
    MILLEDGEVILLE, Ga. (AP) — At the heart of this well-preserved antebellum city, sunbeams stream through the arched windows of a grand public meeting room that mirrors the whole Civil War — including its death throes, unfolding 150 years ago this week when Union Gen. William Tecumseh Sherman launched his scorching March to the Sea. The first major objective along Sherman's route, Milledgeville was Georgia's capital at the time, and this room was the legislative chamber. Crossing its gleaming floor, Amy Wright couldn't help recalling family stories of the hated "foragers" who swept through then. "They were just called 'Sherman's men,'"...
  • ‘Is this shade?': UK embassy ‘commemorates’ burning the White House [pic]

    08/24/2014 5:06:59 PM PDT · by SMGFan · 28 replies
    twitchy ^ | August 24, 2014
    British Embassy âś” @UKinUSA Commemorating the 200th anniversary of burning the White House. Only sparklers this time!
  • Pope Francis pays tribute to 'heavy sacrifice' of soldiers on 70th anniversary of D-Day landings

    06/06/2014 9:56:54 AM PDT · by rrstar96 · 3 replies
    Vatican Radio ^ | June 6, 2014 | Vatican Radio
    (Vatican Radio) Pope Francis says the 70th Anniversary of the D-Day landings is an opportunity for present generations to show gratitude for the “heavy sacrifice” of soldiers who landed on the beaches of Normandy to fight against “Nazi barbarism” and free occupied France during World War II. He also states that it should serve as a reminder that excluding God from the lives of people and societies can bring nothing but death and suffering and he calls on the people of Europe to find their roots and future hopes in the Gospel of Christ. The Holy Father’s words are contained...
  • 10 must see castles in Wales

    03/27/2014 4:45:12 PM PDT · by Renfield · 47 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | 3-18-2014
    Castles have played an important military, economic and social role in Great Britain and Ireland since their introduction following the Norman invasion of England in 1066. Although a small number of castles had been built in England in the 1050s, the Normans began to build motte and bailey and ringworks castles in large numbers to control their newly occupied territories in England and the Welsh Marches.1 Caernarfon Castle Caernarfon Castle (Welsh: Castell Caernarfon) is a medieval fortress in Caernarfon, Gwynedd, north-west Wales. There was a motte-and-bailey castle in the town of Caernarfon from the late 11th century until 1283 when...
  • Why Do 16th-Century Manuscripts Show Cats With Flaming Backpacks?

    03/16/2014 6:29:43 AM PDT · by Renfield · 41 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 3-10-2014 | Brad Scriber
    A series of 16th-century manuscripts that have been making waves on the Internet look like a Monty Python version of the Renaissance: They show cats outfitted with flaming backpacks, attacking castles and villages. But the illustrations are legit. They're intended to show how cats and birds could in theory be used to set fire to a besieged city, according to a University of Pennsylvania scholar. Mitch Fraas, scholar in residence at the University of Pennsylvania—the university digitized the manuscripts last year—says that the drawings are from artillery manuals and are accompanied by notes explaining how to use animals as incendiary...
  • Iwo Jima Anniversary Remembered Across The Nation

    02/23/2014 7:08:38 PM PST · by kingattax · 35 replies
    WebProNews ^ | 2-20-14 | Emily Greene
    Wednesday marked the 69th anniversary of the Battle of Iwo Jima – one of the worst battles of World War II. Across the nation many remembered this day from 69 years ago. In Newington, Connecticut, a memorial was recently built and is the only flag raising memorial built by survivors of the Battle of Iwo Jima. The flag flown at the memorial is historically correct with 48 stars. There is also sand from Iwo Jima beaches in the concrete base. The memorial also includes inscriptions of the names of 100 men from Connecticut who died during the battle. The 69th...
  • Robert E. Lee: American Patriot and Southern Hero

    01/19/2014 5:51:53 AM PST · by BigReb555 · 165 replies
    Canda Free Press ^ | January 19, 2014 | Calvin E. Johnson, Jr.
    “Here I greet you in the shadow of the statue of your Commander, General Robert E. Lee. You and he left us memories which are part of the memories bequeathed to the entire nation by all the Americans who fought in the War Between the States.”
  • Yes, the CIA Flew U-2 Spy Planes From Aircraft Carriers

    01/16/2014 8:21:12 AM PST · by Brad from Tennessee · 27 replies via Real Clear Histroy ^ | January 13, 2014 | By Steve Weintz
    On May 1, 1960, the Soviet Union shot down a CIA U-2 spy plane and captured its pilot, Francis Gary Powers. It was an international crisis for America’s intelligence agencies. A planned summit between Pres. Dwight Eisenhower and Premier Nikita Khrushchev was scuttled, much to Eisenhower’s embarrassment and to the fury of the Pakistanis, from whose territory the flight had been launched. First flown in 1957, the 63-foot-long, jet-powered U-2—capable of flying as high as 70,000 feet—is still used by the U.S. Air Force. But after the Powers incident, basing the plane in foreign countries became problematic. Their mere presence...
  • Is There Something Wrong With The Term: "War Between the States?"

    01/11/2014 11:16:07 AM PST · by Davy Buck · 332 replies
    Old Virginia Blog ^ | 01-06-2014 | Richard G. Williams, Jr.
    However if one truly wants to make such a big deal out of what we call the armed conflict which occurred in America from 1861 to 1865 , and if its historical accuracy and honesty that one truly seeks, then I think Douglas Southall Freeman is, perhaps, the truest to historical accuracy in coining the proper term . . .
  • December 16th, 1944: The Bulge

    12/16/2013 6:30:04 AM PST · by OKSooner · 98 replies
    Various sources ^ | 12-16-2013 | Vanity
    Sixty nine years ago, the largest land battle ever fought by the US Army started today. Do you know anyone who was there? Or maybe someone from your family was there and didn't come back, or came back changed in some way?
  • The Last Confederate General, General Joe Shelby

    12/02/2013 7:25:15 AM PST · by NKP_Vet · 161 replies ^ | December 12, 2006 | Christopher Eger
    Refusing to surrender he led his men on an epic 1500 mile flight through the anarchy of a lost war to continue the fight. Joseph Orville Shelby was born December 12, 1830 in Lexington, Kentucky. He was classically educated at Transylvania University before moving to Missouri. Before the civil war He was a hemp rope manufacturer and espoused the pro-slavery cause and took active part in several shady schemes to make Kansas a slave state. At the beginning of the war he accepted a commission as a Captain of Cavalry in the Missouri Confederate militia, being bloodied at the Battle...
  • The Warrior's Tale

    11/16/2013 6:13:31 AM PST · by DJ Taylor · 2 replies
    Sultan Knish ^ | November 12, 2013 | Daniel Greenfield
    The warrior's tale is a simple enough thing. Strong as steel, but fragile as chance. It is the wind in his soul and the wall we build around ourselves to tell us who we are. Before there were cities or nations, and railways and airports, computers and telephones-- the tale was told around campfires. Acted out in pantomime, dressed up in animal furs and cave paintings. But the tale was the same. The people were confronted with a threat and they called upon the best and strongest of their men to go out and fight it. These were their warriors....
  • Preservation group identifies 15 soldiers at NY Revolutionary War site

    11/14/2013 4:23:57 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 6 replies
    AP via Fox News ^ | 11/12/13 | Anon
    RICHMOND, VA. – A group working to preserve a New York military cemetery from the Revolutionary War says it has identified 15 soldiers from Virginia believed to be buried there. The Friends of the Fishkill Supply Depot has pored over old muster rolls, military correspondence, private letters, physicians’ journals and other documents to identify soldiers buried in unmarked graves on privately owned land in New York’s Hudson Valley. So far, they’ve been able to identify 84 listed in the records as having died at Fishkill. The group announced the new identifications on Monday, including the soldiers from Virginia who died...
  • Battle of Antietam Sept 17, 1862

    09/17/2013 9:40:39 AM PDT · by central_va · 46 replies ^ | 9/17/13 | This Day in History
    Beginning early on the morning of this day in 1862, Confederate and Union troops in the Civil War clash near Maryland's Antietam Creek in the bloodiest one-day battle in American history. The Battle of Antietam marked the culmination of Confederate General Robert E. Lee's first invasion of the Northern states. Guiding his Army of Northern Virginia across the Potomac River in early September 1862, the great general daringly divided his men, sending half of them, under the command of General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson, to capture the Union garrison at Harper's Ferry. President Abraham Lincoln put Major General George B. McClellan...
  • Gettysburg reenactment is a campaign in itself

    06/30/2013 2:43:24 PM PDT · by Kid Shelleen · 40 replies
    Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | 06/30/2013 | Edward Colimore
    The armies are already beginning to arrive, days ahead of the big battle. Tucked away in the rolling Adams County countryside are rows of billowy white tents. Men in blue and in gray march with shouldered muskets. Officers on horseback ride by with sabers jingling at their sides. One hundred and fifty years after the bloodiest clash ever fought on the continent, Union and Confederate forces are again gathering like storm clouds around tiny Gettysburg, this time for a bloodless re-creation of the epic battle fought there.
  • 150 years ago today -- the Gettysburg campaign begins

    06/10/2013 3:07:23 PM PDT · by lowbridge · 41 replies ^ | june 10, 2013 | Rod Gragg
    On June 10, 1863, the lead troops of General Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia left the army’s staging area near Culpeper Court House, Virginia and began a march northward. Their destination: Pennsylvania – where Lee hoped to win a major battle on Northern soil and end the Civil War with a Southern victory. Soon his army would be trailed by his main Northern adversary, the Federal Army of the Potomac. Ahead of both armies, across the Potomac River and in the heartland of southern Pennsylvania, lay the quiet crossroads town of Gettysburg, which would become the site of...
  • June 6: A walk across a beach in Normandy

    06/06/2013 10:53:26 AM PDT · by mojito · 12 replies
    American Digest ^ | 6/6/2013 | Vanderluen
    Today your job is straightforward. First you must load 40 to 50 pounds on your back. Then you need to climb down a net of rope that is banging on the steel side of a ship and jump into a steel rectangle bobbing on the surface of the ocean below you. Others are already inside the steel boat shouting and urging you to hurry up. Once in the boat you stand with dozens of others as the boat is driven towards distant beaches and cliffs through a hot hailstorm of bullets and explosions.... In front of you, over the steel...
  • Robert the Bruce Battle of Bannockburn letter discovered

    06/01/2013 9:46:34 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 69 replies
    BBC News ^ | 1st June 2013 | BBC News
    'A copy of an unknown Robert the Bruce letter from the build-up to the Battle of Bannockburn has been discovered. The letter, sent in 1310, asks English King Edward II to stop persecuting the Scots. It shows Robert asserting his God-given authority as king of the Scots and addressing Edward as his equal. The script, thought to have been transcribed from the original, was discovered by chance by a professor of Scottish history at Glasgow University. Bruce's Scottish troops defeated the English army at the Battle of Bannockburn in 1314. The new letter was found in a document which dates...
  • Photos of WWII aircraft

    12/24/2012 2:18:25 PM PST · by virgil283 · 26 replies ^ | mission4today
    ...Bastogne supply drop...B-25 v Jap ship..Weighing down wing to stop Hellcat flipping.....USN ...Prewar phosphorous bomb tests...Wildcat F4 !!!!...B-26 from 20 feet away...Dauntless 1944...Corsair rockets {note the mud]...Fleet manoevures prewar 1941...B-26's over Cherbourg...Helldivers over Hornet, 1945...P-38's over Aleutians....Helldiver Driver...{H/T aceofspades}
  • Navy's oldest commissioned warship to sail again

    08/17/2012 2:51:51 PM PDT · by ConorMacNessa · 65 replies
    AP via Tampa Bay Online ^ | Aug 17, 5:26 PM EDT | JAY LINDSAY
    BOSTON (AP) -- The U.S. Navy's oldest commissioned warship will sail under its own power for just the second time in more than a century to commemorate the battle that won it the nickname "Old Ironsides." The USS Constitution, which was first launched in 1797, will be tugged from its berth in Boston Harbor on Sunday to the main deepwater pathway into the harbor. It will then set out to open seas for a 10-minute cruise. The short trip marks the day two centuries ago when the Constitution bested the British frigate HMS Guerriere in a fierce battle during the...
  • (For Memorial Day 2012) Before and After D-Day: Rare Color Photos

    05/26/2012 12:24:29 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    LIFE ^ | Frank Scherschel
    Before and After D-Day: Rare Color Photos It’s no mystery why images of unremitting violence spring to mind when one hears the deceptively simple term, “D-Day.” We’ve all seen — in photos, movies, old news reels — what happened on the beaches of Normandy (codenamed Omaha, Utah, Juno, Gold and Sword) as the Allies unleashed an historic assault against German defenses on June 6, 1944. But in color photos taken before and after the invasion, LIFE’s Frank Scherschel captured countless other, lesser-known scenes from the run-up to the onslaught and the heady weeks after: American troops training in small English...
  • (Weird History) In 1958 America Accidentally Dropped a Nuclear Weapon on Two Little Girls’ Playhouse

    04/24/2012 10:28:08 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    IO9 ^ | Apr 24, 2012 | Cyriaque Lamar
    In 1958, America accidentally dropped a nuclear weapon on two little girls’ playhouse For certain rural residents of the Carolinas during the Cold War, apocalyptic anxiety hit disturbingly close to home. In 1958 and 1961, the American Air Force lost nuclear weapons over the skies of South and North Carolina, respectively, raining potential apocalypse on the folks below. In both incidents, complete catastrophe was avoided thanks to that ever-potent combination of foresight and unmitigated dumb luck. And in the former incident, the bomb fell square on some unsuspecting children's playhouse. The first accident occurred over Florence, South Carolina on March...
  • George Washington named Britain's greatest ever foe

    04/16/2012 10:37:35 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 22 replies
    (UK) Telegraph ^ | 4/14/12 | Jasper Copping
    The American was voted the winner in a contest run by the National Army Museum to identify the country's most outstanding military opponent. He was one of a shortlist of five leaders who topped a public poll and on Saturday was selected as the ultimate winner by an audience of around 70 guests at a special event at the museum, in Chelsea, west London. In second place was Michael Collins, the Irish leader, ahead of Napoleon Bonaparte, Erwin Rommel and Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. At the event, each contender had their case made by a historian giving a 40 minute presentation....
  • U.S. Civil War Took Bigger Toll Than Previously Estimated

    04/03/2012 11:07:36 PM PDT · by U-238 · 125 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/21/2012 | Science Daily
    The Civil War -- already considered the deadliest conflict in American history -- in fact took a toll far more severe than previously estimated. That's what a new analysis of census data by Binghamton University historian J. David Hacker reveals. Hacker says the war's dead numbered about 750,000, an estimate that's 20 percent higher than the commonly cited figure of 620,000. His findings will be published in December in the journal Civil War History. "The traditional estimate has become iconic," Hacker says. "It's been quoted for the last hundred years or more. If you go with that total for a...
  • Nov. 26 in US military history

    11/26/2011 1:55:51 PM PST · by FatMax · 1 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | Nov. 26, 2011 | Chris Carter
    1941: The Japanese First Air Fleet, commanded by Adm. Chuichi Nagumo, departs for their attack on Pearl Harbor. 1943: The British transport HMT Rohna is struck by a German radio-controlled bomb, killing over 1000 American troops. The attack became the largest loss of American lives at sea. 1950: Chinese forces launch a massive counterattack against US and South Korean forces, driving them south and putting an end to any hopes of a quick conclusion to the Korean War. Medal of Honor: In 1862, Maj. William H. Powell leads twenty men on a charge of a 500-man encampment at Sinking Creek...
  • Rome, Sweet Rome: Could a Single Marine Unit Destroy the Roman Empire?

    11/02/2011 8:30:47 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 176 replies · 1+ views
    Popular Mechanics ^ | October 31, 2011 | Alyson Sheppard
    Rome, Sweet Rome: Could a Single Marine Unit Destroy the Roman Empire? It was a hypothetical question that became a long online discussion and now a movie in development: Could a small group of heavily armed modern-day Marines take down the Roman Empire at its height? We talked about the debate with James Erwin, the man who scored a movie writing contract based on his online response, and ran the ideas by Roman history expert Adrian Goldsworthy. James Erwin was browsing on his lunch break when a thread piqued his interest. A user called The_Quiet_Earth had posed the question:...
  • WWI underground: Unearthing the hidden tunnel war (...killed an estimated 10,000 Germans.)

    06/10/2011 10:09:12 AM PDT · by decimon · 62 replies
    BBC ^ | June 10, 2011 | Peter Jackson
    Archaeologists are beginning the most detailed ever study of a Western Front battlefield, an untouched site where 28 British tunnellers lie entombed after dying during brutal underground warfare. For WWI historians, it's the "holy grail".When military historian Jeremy Banning stepped on to a patch of rough scrubland in northern France four months ago, the hairs on the back of his neck stood up. The privately-owned land in the sleepy rural village of La Boisselle had been practically untouched since fighting ceased in 1918, remaining one of the most poignant sites of the Battle of the Somme. In his hand was...
  • Victor Davis Hanson: Why Study War? Military history teaches us about honor, sacrifice, and the...

    05/29/2011 5:16:54 PM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies
    City Journal ^ | Summer 2007 | Victor Davis Hanson
    Military history teaches us about honor, sacrifice, and the inevitability of conflict. Try explaining to a college student that Tet was an American military victory. You’ll provoke not a counterargument—let alone an assent—but a blank stare: Who or what was Tet? Doing interviews about the recent hit movie 300, I encountered similar bewilderment from listeners and hosts. Not only did most of them not know who the 300 were or what Thermopylae was; they seemed clueless about the Persian Wars altogether.It’s no surprise that civilian Americans tend to lack a basic understanding of military matters. Even when I was a...
  • Old times not forgotten: Civil War at 150

    04/02/2011 7:53:41 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 210 replies
    hosted ^ | Apr 2 | CHRISTOPHER SULLIVAN
    A hush fell over the crowd filling the elegant hall in downtown Richmond, Va. The vote was about to be announced, and a young staffer of the Museum of the Confederacy balanced his laptop across his knees, poised to get out the news as soon as it was official. Who would be chosen "Person of the Year, 1861"? Five historians had made impassioned nominations, and the audience would now decide. Most anywhere else, the choice would be obvious. Who but Abraham Lincoln? But this was a vote in the capital of the rebellion that Lincoln put down, sponsored by a...