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Keyword: militaryhistory

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  • Today in U.S. military history: Leroy Petry's Medal of Honor, and the 1st flight of the Black Widow

    05/26/2017 6:35:39 AM PDT · by fugazi · 5 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 26, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1917: U.S. Army Gen. John Joseph “Black Jack” Pershing is named commander-in-chief of the American Expeditionary Force, which is destined for European combat the following year. 1942: The Northrop P-61 “Black Widow” night fighter makes its first flight. The twin-boom P-61 is the first aircraft to carry radar and the U.S. military’s first night fighter. The warplane saw service in both the Atlantic and Pacific Theaters, and is widely believed to be credited with the last “kill” of an enemy aircraft in World War II, when a Japanese “Tojo” fighter pilot flies into the water while attempting to evade a...
  • Today in U.S. military history: Harry Welch breaks the sound barrier, and Kennedy's man on the moon

    05/25/2017 7:04:40 AM PDT · by fugazi · 5 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 25, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1942: Having broken the Japanese naval code, the Navy secretly prepares for the expected Japanese invasion of Midway. Two companies of Marine Raiders land on the island to reinforce the garrison and submarines take up their patrol positions. 1945: As the Joint Chiefs of Staff meet in Washington and approve plans for the invasion of Japan (set for November 1), 464 B-29 "Superfortress" heavy bombers target Tokyo, burning 16 square miles of the city. 1953: The North American F-100 "Super Sabre" makes its first flight, with test pilot George Welch pushing the jet to Mach 1.03. The sleek new warplane...
  • Today in U.S. military history: NYC fire fighters occupy Alexandria, and the first submarine rescue

    05/24/2017 7:19:11 AM PDT · by fugazi · 3 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 24, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1818: Gen. (future U.S. pres.) Andrew Jackson and his expeditionary army march into Spanish-controlled Florida, easily capturing the Gulf-coastal town of Pensacola. Col. José Masot, the Spanish governor, retreats to nearby Fort San Carlos de Barrancas (originally built by the British as “the Royal Navy Redoubt”) where he briefly puts up a token resistance – to save face – before hoisting the white flag there, too. 1861: Less than 24 hours after Virginia secedes from the Union, a regiment of Zouave infantry consisting of volunteer fire fighters from New York City land at Alexandria and occupy the town. The regiment’s...
  • Today in U.S. military history: U.S. breakout at Anzio, and the "self-cleaning" M-16

    05/23/2017 9:13:55 AM PDT · by fugazi · 17 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 23, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1862: Confederate forces under the command of Maj. Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson strike, outmaneuver, and – with textbook coordination of infantry, cavalry, and artillery – decisively defeat Union Army forces under Col. John R. Kenly at Front Royal, Virginia. 1943: The most decorated battleship in the U.S. Navy, USS New Jersey (BB-62), is commissioned at Philadelphia. “The Big J” earned 19 battle stars and numerous other commendations during her 48 years of service, which covered actions in the Pacific Theater of World War II, Korea, Vietnam, Lebanon, and the Persian Gulf. 1944: In Italy, VI Corps at the Anzio...
  • Today in U.S. military history: Lewis and Clark sets out, and a nuclear sub sinks

    05/22/2017 10:23:41 AM PDT · by fugazi · 17 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 22, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1804: The "Corps of Discovery," a group of about four dozen Army volunteers led by Capt. Meriwether Lewis and 2nd Lt. William Clark, departs St. Charles Missouri on the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Altogether, the company will travel some 8,000 miles as they map and explore the recently acquired Louisiana Purchase and find a route to the Pacific Ocean for President Thomas Jefferson. 1912: The aviation arm of the U.S. Marine Corps is born with the arrival of 1st Lt. Alfred A. Cunningham at the Naval Aviation Camp, Annapolis, Maryland. There, Cunningham will begin his flight training, and with less...
  • Today in Medal of Honor history: Capt. Kern W. Dunagan

    05/13/2017 7:55:34 AM PDT · by fugazi · 4 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | 13 May 2017 | Chris Carter
    Today in Medal of Honor history (1969): U.S. Army Capt. Kern Dunagan leads an attack to relieve Fire Support Base Professional in Quang Tin Province. Despite taking a serious bullet wound to the face, a broken ankle, and gunshots breaking both of his arms during the intense two-day battle against the North Vietnamese Army, Dunagan refuses medical evacuation and returns to the battlefield to search for soldiers and carries a wounded comrade to the fire base. Click the link above to read Dunagan's Medal of Honor citation
  • Today in U.S. military history: the Mayaguez incident, and the Civil War's "Bloody Angle"

    05/12/2017 7:48:50 AM PDT · by fugazi · 4 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | 12 May 2017 | Chris Carter
    1780: Gen. Benjamin Lincoln, commanding American forces at Charleston, S.C., surrenders to Gen. Sir Henry Clinton after a six-week siege. Although the fall of Charleston and capture of thousands of Continental Army soldiers is the largest setback of the war for the Americans, British operations in the Southern colonies will quickly prove to be the undoing of the king’s men in North America. 1864: Gen. Ulysses S. Grant orders his forces to assault the Confederate salient known as the “Mule Shoe” during the Battle of Spotsylvania Court House. 15,000 Union soldiers break through, but Gen. Robert E. Lee quickly plugs...
  • Today in U.S. military history: J.E.B. Stuart and the 7th Infantry Division invades Alaska

    05/11/2017 7:48:30 AM PDT · by fugazi · 31 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 11, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1846: Three days after Gen. Zachary Taylor’s forces defeat the Mexican Army in the Battle of Palo Alto, Pres. James K. Polk tells Congress: “Mexico has passed the boundary of the United States, has invaded our territory and shed American blood upon American soil.” The Mexican-American War – already underway – is formally declared within two days. 1863: During the Battle of Yellow Tavern, Condederate Maj. Gen. J.E.B. Stuart is shot by a dismounted Union cavalry trooper north of Richmond, Va. “The greatest cavalry officer ever foaled in America” is mortally wounded and will die the next day. 1943: 3,000...
  • Today in U.S. military history: V-E Day and the birth of Naval aviation

    05/08/2017 7:13:53 AM PDT · by fugazi · 8 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 8, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1846: In the first major battle of the Mexican War, U.S. Army forces under the command of Gen. (and future president) Zachary Taylor decisively defeat Mexican forces under Gen. Mariano Arista in the Battle of Palo Alto (Texas). The Mexicans will retreat to a seemingly more defensible position at Resaca de la Palma the following day, but Taylor will pursue and beat them badly there too. 1864: Union Army forces under the command of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant and Confederate forces under Gen. Robert E. Lee clash in the Battle of Spotsylvania Courthouse. The outcome at Spotsylvania Courthouse will...
  • Today in U.S. military history: Lincoln leads combat in Virginia and the first black combat pilot

    05/05/2017 8:57:52 AM PDT · by fugazi · 6 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 5, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1862: Disappointed in the lack of progress of Maj. Gen. George B. McClellan’s Peninsula Campaign, President Abraham Lincoln departs for Hampton Roads, Va. on the Treasury Department revenue cutter Miami to personally oversee operations. Over five days, the president – a former militia rifle company commander – directs the bombardment of Confederate positions and lands to conduct reconnaissance of the area with Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton and Secretary of the Treasury Salmon P. Chase. 1864: The bloody albeit inconclusive Battle of the Wilderness (Virginia) opens between Union Army forces under the command of Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant...
  • May 4 in U.S. military history: Grant begins the bloody Overland Campaign and the Kent State riots

    05/04/2017 7:55:11 AM PDT · by fugazi · 4 replies
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 4, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1864: Lt. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant, general-in-chief of all Union forces, moves the Army of the Potomac out of their winter encampments and 100,000 Union soldiers cross the Rapidan River in Virginia to begin the campaign that would set the stage for the defeat of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Army of Northern Virginia. Union losses in the Overland Campaign – the bloodiest in American history – are heavy, but Grant’s troops are replaceable. Lee’s are not. 1916: To avoid a diplomatic break with the United States, Germany announces it will abandon its policy of unrestricted submarine warfare. Instead of indiscriminately...
  • Today in U.S. military history: MacArthur hearings begin and the first transcontinental flight

    05/03/2017 11:56:57 AM PDT · by fugazi
    Unto the Breach ^ | May 3, 2017 | Chris Carter
    1898: Following the Battle of Manila Bay, Marines from the cruisers USS Baltimore (C-3) and USS Raleigh (C-8) raise the Stars and Stripes for the first time in the Philippines over Cavite, the historical capital. 1923: 26 hours and 50 minutes after taking off in New York, Army Air Corps First Lieutenants Oakley Kelly and John Macready touch down at Rockwell Field, San Diego, becoming the first aviators to fly non-stop across the United States. The specially modified Fokker T-2 passenger plane averaged a blistering 92 mph. 1942: The first air-naval battle in history takes place between American and Japanese...
  • How the U.S. Assassinated the Japanese Admiral Who Planned Pearl Harbor

    04/17/2017 7:37:05 AM PDT · by SpeedyInTexas · 137 replies
    The National Interest ^ | 04/16/2017 | Michael Peck
    Some sixty-eight years before U.S. special forces killed Osama bin Laden, America conducted an assassination of another kind. This time, the target wasn’t a terrorist. It was the Japanese admiral who planned the Pearl Harbor operation. But the motive was the same: payback for a sneak attack on the United States.
  • When U.S. Airstrikes Could Have Destroyed a Terrorist Regime,

    04/15/2017 5:13:09 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 20 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | April 15, 2017 | Humberto Fontova
    “Where are the planes?!” kept crackling over U.S. Navy radios exactly 56 years ago this week. The U.S. Naval armada (22 ships including the Carrier Essex loaded with deadly Skyhawk jets.) was sitting 16 miles off the southern Cuban coast near an inlet known as Bahia de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs). The question — bellowed between blasts from a Soviet artillery and tank barrage landing around him — came from commander, Jose San Roman.“Send planes or we can’t last!” San Roman kept pleading to the very fleet that escorted his men to the beachhead (and sat much closer to them...
  • On this date in 1864

    03/09/2017 5:00:51 PM PST · by Bull Snipe · 56 replies
    President Abraham Lincoln promotes Major General Ulysses S. Grant to the Rank of Lieutenant General. He is the first Army officer to hold that rank since George Washington.
  • Battle of Cowpens: January 17, 1781

    01/10/2017 3:37:44 PM PST · by imardmd1 · 30 replies
    fold3|||HQ bkig ^ | January 1, 2017 | Trevor
    THE BATTLE OF COWPENS In the early morning of January 17, 1781, in South Carolina, American troops under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan defeated a force under British Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton in one of the more decisive victories for the Americans in the south during the Revolutionary War (snip) The British infantry had been stunned by the fire from the American’s first two lines and now faced the third line, predominately composed of experienced Continental troops overseen by Lieutenant Colonel John Howard. Meanwhile, Tarleton sent his reserve infantry and additional dragoons to try to outflank their opponents on the Americans’...
  • NEW BLOG: Top ten Battles in history (EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY)

    11/01/2016 7:22:18 AM PDT · by mainestategop · 34 replies
    mainestategop ^ | Kyle Weissman
    MAINESTATEGOP AND THE NEW ENGLAND ALLIANCE FOR LIBERTY AND FREE MARKETS PRESENTS A NEW BLOG  EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY BY KYLE WEISSMAN  We've had many history articles on our blog, The story of The Battle Of Lepanto being our best one, we've had many requests for more history related articles. So, we're presenting a new blog, EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY by our very own Kyle Weissman.  Kyle Weissman is one of our original founders of the New England Alliance For Liberty and Free Markets, He has been very very active in the free state movement in New Hampshire and...
  • The Inchon landing, 66 years ago next month, was brilliant. But what made it necessary?

    08/20/2016 9:57:10 PM PDT · by Mr. Mojo · 51 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | August 19, 2016 | Robert Zapesochny
    When back in June 2015 Donald Trump announced he was running for president, he said during his speech, “I will find the General Patton or I will find General MacArthur. I will find the right guy. I will find the guy that’s going to take that military and make it really work.” Since then, Trump has frequently mentioned Douglas MacArthur in his speeches. It is worth discussing his importance in American history, especially as we are approaching the 66th anniversary of Battle of Inchon. While MacArthur’s greatest achievement was the creation of modern Japan, the Inchon landing on September 15,...
  • Gettysburg 20th Maine bayonet charge at Little Round Top

    07/02/2016 9:23:58 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 30 replies
    civilwar.org ^ | JAMES R. BRANN
    Late in the afternoon of July 2, 1863, on a boulder-strewn hillside in southern Pennsylvania, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain dashed headlong into history, leading his 20th Maine Regiment in perhaps the most famous counterattack of the Civil War.
  • The US Navy's Five Aircraft Carrier Museum Ships

    07/12/2013 7:42:25 AM PDT · by Jeff Head · 98 replies
    JEFFHEAD.COM ^ | July 12, 2013 | Jeff Head
    US NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER MUSEUMS (Click map for a high resolution image) Currently (July 2013) there are five US Navy Aircraft Carrier museums. Four are of Essex class carriers commissioned during World War II which underwent the SBC-125 refit in the 1950s to modernize them. All were commissioned in 1943 & served into modern times. The last, the USS Lexington, was decommissioned in 1991 after 48 years service. The other is the USS Midway, namesake of a larger class carrier built at the end of the war. She underwent two major refits, in the 1950s & in 1970 greatly enlarging...