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Keyword: militaryhistory

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  • How the U.S. Assassinated the Japanese Admiral Who Planned Pearl Harbor

    04/17/2017 7:37:05 AM PDT · by SpeedyInTexas · 137 replies
    The National Interest ^ | 04/16/2017 | Michael Peck
    Some sixty-eight years before U.S. special forces killed Osama bin Laden, America conducted an assassination of another kind. This time, the target wasn’t a terrorist. It was the Japanese admiral who planned the Pearl Harbor operation. But the motive was the same: payback for a sneak attack on the United States.
  • When U.S. Airstrikes Could Have Destroyed a Terrorist Regime,

    04/15/2017 5:13:09 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 20 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | April 15, 2017 | Humberto Fontova
    “Where are the planes?!” kept crackling over U.S. Navy radios exactly 56 years ago this week. The U.S. Naval armada (22 ships including the Carrier Essex loaded with deadly Skyhawk jets.) was sitting 16 miles off the southern Cuban coast near an inlet known as Bahia de Cochinos (Bay of Pigs). The question — bellowed between blasts from a Soviet artillery and tank barrage landing around him — came from commander, Jose San Roman.“Send planes or we can’t last!” San Roman kept pleading to the very fleet that escorted his men to the beachhead (and sat much closer to them...
  • On this date in 1864

    03/09/2017 5:00:51 PM PST · by Bull Snipe · 56 replies
    President Abraham Lincoln promotes Major General Ulysses S. Grant to the Rank of Lieutenant General. He is the first Army officer to hold that rank since George Washington.
  • Battle of Cowpens: January 17, 1781

    01/10/2017 3:37:44 PM PST · by imardmd1 · 30 replies
    fold3|||HQ bkig ^ | January 1, 2017 | Trevor
    THE BATTLE OF COWPENS In the early morning of January 17, 1781, in South Carolina, American troops under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan defeated a force under British Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton in one of the more decisive victories for the Americans in the south during the Revolutionary War (snip) The British infantry had been stunned by the fire from the American’s first two lines and now faced the third line, predominately composed of experienced Continental troops overseen by Lieutenant Colonel John Howard. Meanwhile, Tarleton sent his reserve infantry and additional dragoons to try to outflank their opponents on the Americans’...
  • NEW BLOG: Top ten Battles in history (EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY)

    11/01/2016 7:22:18 AM PDT · by mainestategop · 34 replies
    mainestategop ^ | Kyle Weissman
    MAINESTATEGOP AND THE NEW ENGLAND ALLIANCE FOR LIBERTY AND FREE MARKETS PRESENTS A NEW BLOG  EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY BY KYLE WEISSMAN  We've had many history articles on our blog, The story of The Battle Of Lepanto being our best one, we've had many requests for more history related articles. So, we're presenting a new blog, EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY by our very own Kyle Weissman.  Kyle Weissman is one of our original founders of the New England Alliance For Liberty and Free Markets, He has been very very active in the free state movement in New Hampshire and...
  • The Inchon landing, 66 years ago next month, was brilliant. But what made it necessary?

    08/20/2016 9:57:10 PM PDT · by Mr. Mojo · 51 replies
    The American Spectator ^ | August 19, 2016 | Robert Zapesochny
    When back in June 2015 Donald Trump announced he was running for president, he said during his speech, “I will find the General Patton or I will find General MacArthur. I will find the right guy. I will find the guy that’s going to take that military and make it really work.” Since then, Trump has frequently mentioned Douglas MacArthur in his speeches. It is worth discussing his importance in American history, especially as we are approaching the 66th anniversary of Battle of Inchon. While MacArthur’s greatest achievement was the creation of modern Japan, the Inchon landing on September 15,...
  • Gettysburg 20th Maine bayonet charge at Little Round Top

    07/02/2016 9:23:58 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 30 replies
    civilwar.org ^ | JAMES R. BRANN
    Late in the afternoon of July 2, 1863, on a boulder-strewn hillside in southern Pennsylvania, Union Colonel Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain dashed headlong into history, leading his 20th Maine Regiment in perhaps the most famous counterattack of the Civil War.
  • The US Navy's Five Aircraft Carrier Museum Ships

    07/12/2013 7:42:25 AM PDT · by Jeff Head · 98 replies
    JEFFHEAD.COM ^ | July 12, 2013 | Jeff Head
    US NAVY AIRCRAFT CARRIER MUSEUMS (Click map for a high resolution image) Currently (July 2013) there are five US Navy Aircraft Carrier museums. Four are of Essex class carriers commissioned during World War II which underwent the SBC-125 refit in the 1950s to modernize them. All were commissioned in 1943 & served into modern times. The last, the USS Lexington, was decommissioned in 1991 after 48 years service. The other is the USS Midway, namesake of a larger class carrier built at the end of the war. She underwent two major refits, in the 1950s & in 1970 greatly enlarging...
  • ACTUAL COLOR FILM OF PEARL HARBOR ATTACK

    05/28/2016 1:07:36 PM PDT · by knarf · 45 replies
    FB ^ | Conservative Post
    Long forgotten, private color film of the actual attack on Pearl Harbor
  • How was Gun Control Imposed Upon an Unwilling World?

    02/20/2016 1:37:51 AM PST · by marktwain · 16 replies
    Ammoland ^ | 18 February, 2016 | Dean Weingarten
    Disarmists use the bandwagon fallacy, (argumentum ad populum) to promote citizen disarmament. In essence, the non-argument makes the claim; everyone else disarms their population - so we should do the same.  This is a logical fallacy. (snip) .. it is clear that from 1500 on, the major developments in gun technology came from Europe.Europeans underwent the black death shortly before the introduction of the gun.  The loss of up to a third of the population made the remainder much more valuable. The development of the gun, the Reformation, the Renaissance, much wider availability of literacy and printed material, all...
  • Historical PHOTO: US Soldiers Pose with the Bodies of Moro (Muslim) Insurgents, Philippines; c. 1906

    02/19/2016 10:13:09 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 44 replies
    Rare Historical Photos ^ | January 29, 2016 | RHP
    US Soldiers Pose with the Bodies of Moro (Muslim) Insurgents, Philippines; circa 1906 On March 7, 1906, US troops under the command of Major General Leonard Wood massacred as many as 1,000 Filipino Muslims, known as Moros, who were taking refuge at Bud Dajo, a volcanic crater on the island of Jolo in the southern Philippines. The First Battle of Bud Dajo, also known as the Bud Dajo Massacre, was a counter insurgency action fought by the United States Army against Moros in March 1906, during the Moro Rebellion phase of the Philippine - American War. After the United States...
  • The truth about how our founding fathers fought Islamic extremists - A President's Day Message

    02/15/2016 1:18:37 PM PST · by SandRat · 13 replies
    Move America Forawrd
    Today we celebrate President's Day, a day in which Americans are expected to look back and honor our founding fathers and their contributions to our Nation's proud history. The words and writings of our founding fathers offer us wisdom and insight that stretches across the ages. The ideas about freedom and liberty that they wrote about and fought for are still serving America today. The system of government that they envisioned and set up for us continues to persevere, has brought great prosperity to the people residing in the United States. Through the centuries, millions of brave troops have risked...
  • Group protests Civil War Museum exhibit (because of guns)

    02/14/2016 11:57:23 AM PST · by Red in Blue PA · 64 replies
    HARRISBURG - Dozens of protesters took a stand against the National Civil War Museum Wednesday, saying that an exhibit currently on display and sponsored by the NRA sends the wrong message to young people. “This public institution is highlighting guns when we in fact are trying to get them off the streets and limit their use,” Homer Floyd, a demonstrator, said. Much of the anger is directed at the display of a pistol used by William Quantrill, a Confederate fighter who captured runaway slaves in Kansas and Missouri. In one such raid during the Civil War, Quantrill and his group...
  • George Washington reenactors make Christmas crossing of the Delaware River

    12/26/2015 1:55:17 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 20 replies
    Fox News ^ | 12-25-15
    WASHINGTON CROSSING, Pa. - George Washington and his troops have made their annual Christmas Day trip across the Delaware River. The re-enactors crossed the river between Pennsylvania and New Jersey on a 65-degree day Friday, considerably warmer than the actual crossing which took place on an ice-choked river during a snowstorm. The annual Christmas tradition drew families and fans of history to both sides of the Delaware River for the 63rd annual re-enactment. Boats ferried 2,400 soldiers, 200 horses and 18 cannons across the river during the original crossing.Washington's troops marched 8 miles downriver before battling Hessian mercenaries in the...
  • It’s True! A toilet was used as an aerial bomb during the Vietnam War

    11/03/2015 11:03:14 PM PST · by Impala64ssa · 18 replies
    As American involvement in the Vietnam War began, the A-1 Skyraider was still the medium attack aircraft in many carrier air wings, although it was planned to be replaced by the A-6A Intruder as part of the general switch to jet aircraft. Skyraiders from Constellation andTiconderoga participated in the first U.S. Navy strikes against North Vietnam on 5 August 1964 as part of Operation Pierce Arrow in response to the Gulf of Tonkin Incident, striking against fuel depots at Vinh, with one Skyraider from Ticonderoga damaged by anti-aircraft fire, and a second from Constellation shot down, killing its pilot. In...
  • WW II fighter ace Fritz Payne dies; shot down 6 warplanes during Guadalcanal

    08/19/2015 7:20:54 PM PDT · by Impala64ssa · 7 replies
    Fox News ^ | 8/18/15 | AP
    <p>Frederick R. "Fritz" Payne, a World War II fighter ace who left his mark on aviation and wartime history by shooting down six Japanese warplanes during the Battle of Guadalcanal, a bloody, months-long confrontation that helped change the course of the war, has died at age 104.</p>
  • Confederate Warship, Weapons Recovered from Georgia River

    08/18/2015 12:08:52 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 31 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 8/18/15 | Elizabeth Goldbaum
    The armored husk of a Confederate warship is being raised out of the depths of a Georgia river, 150 years after the ship's crew deliberately sunk it. Government officials are pulling approximately 250,000 lbs. (113,000 kilograms) of the warship CSS Georgia's armored siding — the ship's skeleton — from the Savannah River. Crews are raising the Civil War-era ship's remains in 10,000-lb. (4,500 kg) chunks that measure about 4 feet tall by 24 feet wide (1.2 by 7.3 meters). The siding is the last major ship part remaining in the water; Navy divers began retrieving the ship's unexploded shells, cannons...
  • How Did Armies Keep Archers Supplied With Arrows While Fighting?

    07/30/2015 11:19:03 AM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 84 replies
    Slate ^ | July 27, 2015 | By Stephen Tempest
    During the Hundred Years' War, England had a centralized, state-controlled organization for manufacturing arrows in bulk. These were then issued as required to the soldiers on campaign. In June 1413, for example, Henry V appointed Nicholas Mynot to be “keeper of the king's arrows,” based in the Tower of London. Mynot was responsible for making arrows, but the royal fletchers alone could not supply the total need, so additional orders were placed with outside suppliers. In August 1413, for example, London-based fletcher Stephen Seler was paid for 12,000 arrows. We have some total figures available. In 1418, Henry V's government...
  • First Naval Battle of the American Revolutionary War…

    07/04/2015 2:05:26 PM PDT · by artichokegrower · 14 replies
    Maritmetv.com ^ | July 4, 2015
    Before July 4th, 1776, let’s remember Captain Jeremiah O’Brien (1744–1818) commanded the sloop Unity when on June 12, 1775 she captured the British armed schooner HMS Margaretta in the Battle of Machias, the first naval battle of the American Revolutionary War. Under the command of Jeremiah O’Brien, thirty-one townsmen sailed aboard Unity armed with guns, swords, axes, and pitch forks and captured Margaretta in an hour-long battle. This battle is often considered the first time British colors were struck to those of the United States, even though the Continental Navy did not exist at the time. The United States Merchant...
  • Spanish Armada artefacts retrieved from the ocean [Co. Sligo, Ireland]

    06/17/2015 9:53:38 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    UTV Ireland ^ | June 17, 2015 | Marese O’Sullivan
    credit: Heather Humphries (Twitter feed)