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Keyword: microbiome

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  • Male Circumcision Offers HIV Protection By Dramatically Altering Microbiome

    04/17/2013 1:43:14 AM PDT · by SoFloFreeper · 10 replies
    rttnews.com ^ | 4/16/13
    Over the last few years there have been a number of studies suggesting that male circumcision may protect against HIV infection. Several possible reasons have been offered by experts as to why circumcision offers protection against HIV infection. Now here's one more reason... A study led by Lance Price of the Translational Genomics Research Institute suggests that a significant shift in the bacterial community or microbiome of the penis as a result of circumcision could explain HIV protection. The researchers found that in men who were circumcised, the total bacterial load under the foreskin was 33.3 percent less than those...
  • Microbiome: Cultural differences

    12/08/2012 4:52:31 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Nature ^ | December 5, 2012 | Virginia Hughes
    Studies of gut bacteria are beginning to untangle how diet affects health in old age — but determining cause and effect is tricky. Almost everything about eating gets more difficult with age. Elderly people typically cannot taste or smell as well as they used to, decreasing the appeal of some foods. Dental issues or a dry mouth can impede chewing; loss of muscle tone in the pharynx can make swallowing difficult; constipation and the side effects of medication can make digestion uncomfortable; and decreased mobility makes a chore of grocery shopping or cooking complex meals. Little wonder that older people...
  • Gut bacteria gene complement dwarfs human genome

    03/04/2010 12:16:08 AM PST · by neverdem · 15 replies · 594+ views
    Nature News ^ | 3 March 2010 | Andrew Bennett Hellman
    Sequencing project finds that Europeans share a surprising number of bacteria. Researchers have unveiled a catalogue of genes from microbes found in the human gut. The information could reveal how 'friendly' gut bacteria interact with the body to influence nutrition and disease. "This is the most powerful microscope that's been used so far to describe microbial communities," says George Weinstock, a geneticist at Washington University in St. Louis who was not involved in the study. The human body contains about ten times as many microbes as human cells, and most of them live in the gut. The new study, published...