Keyword: iyadagghali

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  • Mayhem in Mali: Implications of the Military Coup in Bamako

    03/24/2012 1:20:28 AM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 7 replies · 5+ views
    Jamestown Foundation ^ | 3/23/2012 | Andrew McGregor
    Executive Summary:On March 21, 2012, a group of Army mutineers appeared on Mali's national television station to declare that they had ended President Amadou Toumani Toure's regime and put in place the “National Committee for the Return of Democracy and the Restoration of State” (CNRDR). In the days following the coup, the leader of the CNRDR – Captain Amadou Sanago, a virtually unknown junior officer, has shown an inability to command discipline from his troops – who have looted the capital. The disappearance of President Toure and the factional infighting of the Army have made the country defenseless against AQIM’s...
  • Foreign Policy: The Mess In Mali (Surprise! Obama's magical Libyan tour results in more Sharia)

    04/11/2012 6:58:21 PM PDT · by Duke of Qin · 5 replies
    NPR ^ | 04/10/2012 | Gregory Mann
    But though the MNLA has a secular nationalist bent, the rebellion in the north is helping Islamist extremists expand their foothold in the country. The MNLA has been in a loose partnership with Ansar Dine, an Islamist group led by Iyad ag Ghali, a Tuareg who led a major rebellion in the 1990s. Ag Ghali's career is a testament to the tangled web of alliances in the region: His most recent gig was in Libya, where, according to reports, Libya's transitional government encouraged him to lead a large-scale defection of Tuareg fighters from Muammar al-Qadaffi's security forces. Ag Ghali obliged,...
  • Intervening in Mali: West African Nations Plan Offensive against Islamists and Tuareg Rebels

    As Tuareg rebels battle radical Islamists with heavy weapons for control of the northern Mali city of Gao, Mali and the other 15 nations of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) are planning a military offensive designed to drive both groups out of northern Mali in an effort to re-impose order in the region and prevent the six-month old conflict from destabilizing the entire region. So far, however, operational planning has not been detailed enough to gain the approval of the UN Security Council for authorization of a Chapter Seven military intervention, leaving ECOWAS and the African Union...