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Keyword: computer

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  • Artificial Intelligence Machine Gets Testy With Its Programmer

    06/29/2015 10:36:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    WSJ ^ | 1:56 pm ET Jun 26, 2015 | By Amir Mizroch
    Researchers have shown that machines are inching closer to self-learning, and perhaps even copping a little attitude. Over at Google, a computer program using a database of movie scripts was asked again and again by researchers to define morality. It struggles to do so, and in a conversation recorded by its human engineers, becomes exasperated and ends the conversation by lashing out at its human inquisitor. Here’s part of the exchange, as related in a paper presented this week: Human: Tell me the definition of morality. Machine: I don’t have ethics. Human: Look, I need help; I need to know...
  • Fed personnel agency admits history of security problems

    06/16/2015 9:52:46 AM PDT · by Enterprise · 2 replies
    juno-news.com ^ | 6/16/2015 | KEN DILANIAN
    An Office of Personnel Management investigative official said Tuesday the agency entrusted with millions of personnel records has a history of failing to meet basic computer network security requirements.Michael Esser, assistant inspector general for audit, said in testimony prepared for delivery that for years many of the people running the agency's information technology had no IT background.
  • Google Wants to Turn Your Clothes Into a Computer

    05/30/2015 6:15:31 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 11 replies
    NY Times ^ | 05/29/15 | Conor Dougherty
    On Friday, the second day of its annual developer conference, Google I/O, one of the search giant’s semi-secretive research divisions announced a project that aims to make conductive fabrics that can be weaved into everyday clothes. The effort, called Project Jacquard, is named for the French inventor of the Jacquard Loom, which revolutionized textile manufacturing and helped pave the way for modern computing. Much like the screens on mobile phones, these fabrics could register the user’s touch and transmit information elsewhere, like to a smartphone or tablet computer. They are made from conductive yarns that come in a rainbow of...
  • Police explode briefcase left for literary agent

    08/11/2011 3:07:03 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies
    Mercury news ^ | 8/11/11 | AP
    BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — A writer desperate to get a movie script read suffered the ultimate rejection Thursday when police blew up a briefcase he said contained the screenplay after an agent refused to read it, police said. The bizarre story was set in Beverly Hills, where a man visited the office of a literary agent and left behind a briefcase that he said contained a computer, police Sgt. Brad Cornelius said. The man left instructions for it to be delivered to someone at the business, who told another person in the office, "This guy's been kind of pestering me...
  • New maze-like beamsplitter is world's smallest

    05/25/2015 4:57:28 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 50 replies
    Physics World ^ | 05/25/2015 | Ker Than
    An ultracompact beamsplitter – the smallest one in the world – has been designed and fabricated by researchers in the US. Using a newly developed algorithm, the team built the smallest integrated polarization beamsplitter to date, which could allow computers and mobile devices of the future to function millions of times faster than current machines.
  • Critical vulnerability in NetUSB driver exposes millions of routers to hacking

    05/20/2015 9:48:26 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 13 replies
    ITworld.com ^ | May 19, 2015 | Lucian Constantin
    Millions of routers and other embedded devices are affected by a serious vulnerability that could allow hackers to compromise them. The vulnerability is located in a service called NetUSB, which lets devices connected over USB to a computer be shared with other machines on a local network or the Internet via IP (Internet Protocol). The shared devices can be printers, webcams, thumb drives, external hard disks and more. NetUSB is implemented in Linux-based embedded systems, such as routers, as a kernel driver. The driver is developed by Taiwan-based KCodes Technology. Once enabled, it opens a server that listens on TCP...
  • 10 Keyboard Hacks That Will Change Your Life

    05/20/2015 10:54:01 AM PDT · by lulu16 · 38 replies
    Refinery 29 ^ | 5/20/15 | Christina Bonnington
    Turns out, there are a few savvy (and super-easy) keyboard tricks that can do just that. Your desktop, browser, Gmail, and even Facebook all have simple keyboard-based shortcuts you can press to more quickly accomplish things you do all the time — things like creating a new tab in Chrome or favoriting a tweet. We’ve rounded up 10 super-handy keyboard hacks that will help you zip through your daily grind, so you can spend more time on things that matter — or at least save your index finger from repetitive stress syndrome. And, we've organized them from the most basic...
  • Funds sought for tiny £6 computer

    05/12/2015 4:13:25 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | 11 May 2015 | BBC
    A Californian start-up is seeking funding to make a computer that will cost $9 (£6) in its most basic form. Next Thing wants $50,000 to finish development of the credit-card sized Chip computer. The first versions will have a 1Ghz processor, 512MB of Ram and 4GB of onboard storage. The gadget, due to go on general release in early 2016, could become yet another rival to the popular Raspberry Pi barebones computer.
  • The number glitch that can lead to catastrophe

    05/06/2015 7:28:17 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    BBC ^ | Chris Baraniuk
    Such glitches emerge with surprising frequency. It’s suspected that the reason why Nasa lost contact with the Deep Impact space probe in 2013 was an integer limit being reached. And just last week it was reported that Boeing 787 aircraft may suffer from a similar issue. The control unit managing the delivery of power to the plane’s engines will automatically enter a failsafe mode – and shut down the engines – if it has been left on for over 248 days. Hypothetically, the engines could suddenly halt even in mid-flight. The Federal Aviation Administration’s directive on the matter states that...
  • Why Coding Is Your Child’s Key to Unlocking the Future

    04/29/2015 7:26:19 AM PDT · by Borges · 43 replies
    WSJ ^ | 4/29/2015 | CHRISTOPHER MIMS
    Racing across the U.S. in your taco truck, you must fight off animals mutated by fallout from a nuclear war, and you must also turn them into delicious filling for the tacos you sell inside fortified towns. Your mission: Make it to the Canadian city of Winnipeg. You are “Gunman Taco Truck.” “It’s pretty much only a game that a kid would come up with,” says Brenda Romero, a videogame designer for more than 30 years and the mother of Donovan Romero-Brathwaite, the 10-year-old inventor of the game. And yet GTT already has been licensed by a videogame publisher for...
  • Beyond the lithium ion—a significant step toward a better performing battery

    04/17/2015 2:27:18 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-17-2015 | Provided by University of Illinois at Chicago
    The race is on around the world as scientists strive to develop a new generation of batteries that can perform beyond the limits of the current lithium-ion based battery. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have taken a significant step toward the development of a battery that could outperform the lithium-ion technology used in electric cars such as the Chevy Volt. They have shown they can replace the lithium ions, each of which carries a single positive charge, with magnesium ions, which have a plus-two charge, in battery-like chemical reactions, using an electrode with a structure like those...
  • Engineer improves rechargeable batteries with MoS2 nano 'sandwich'

    04/17/2015 2:21:31 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-17-2015 | Provided by Kansas State University
    Molybdenum disulfide sheets -- which are "sandwiches" of one molybdenum atom between two sulfur atoms -- may improve rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, according to the latest research from Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering. Credit: Kansas State University The key to better cellphones and other rechargeable electronics may be in tiny "sandwiches" made of nanosheets, according to mechanical engineering research from Kansas State University. Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering, and his research team are improving rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The team has focused on the lithium cycling of molybdenum disulfide, or MoS2, sheets, which Singh...
  • Tech Ping: Bought the Computer, Trying to Do Wireless File Transfer HELP!!

    04/14/2015 4:57:49 PM PDT · by Chickensoup · 87 replies
    04.14.15 | chickensoup
    Tech Ping: Bought the Computer, Trying to Do Wireless File Transfer HELP!! Is there any help out there for Win7 among the Freepers? Wanted to file transfer from the old WIN 7 machine to the new WIN7 machine and the new computer wont recognize the old computer and vice versa. Both computers I think have the same name, could that be a problem. The old computer has a home group and the new computer keeps trying to make its own home group, the hussy! The last legs are rapidly approaching for old computer Last conversation was this: Question about Laptop...
  • 8th Grader Faces Felony Charges for Changing Teacher’s Computer Background

    04/13/2015 1:19:58 PM PDT · by yuffy · 39 replies
    Time.com ^ | April 10, 2015 | Laura Stampler
    Pranksters be warned Eight-grader Domanik Green was arrested on felony charges in Holiday, Fla. Wednesday after breaking into his teacher’s computer to change the background picture to two men kissing. Green, 14, who was released the day of his arrest, said that he broke into the computer of teacher he didn’t like after realizing that faculty members’ passwords were simply their last names, the Tampa Bay Times reports. Green, who previously faced a three-day suspension for a similar prank, said that many students got in trouble for breaking into teachers’ computers.
  • Are smartphones making our children mentally ill?

    03/22/2015 7:01:34 AM PDT · by CharlesOConnell · 58 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | 7:00AM GMT 21 Mar 2015 | By Peter Stanford
    Are smartphones making our children mentally ill?Leading child psychotherapist Julie Lynn Evans believes easy and constant access to the internet is harming youngsterstelegraph.co.uk/news/health/children/11486167/Are-smartphones-making-our-children-mentally-ill.html
  • Chromium Hack : special 13 character can crash Chrome Browser Tab on a Mac PC

    03/21/2015 7:36:39 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 30 replies
    TechWorm ^ | on March 21, 2015 | Vijay
    No browsers are safe as proved yesterday at Pwn2Own, but crashing one of them with just one line of special code is slightly different. A developer has discovered a hack in Google Chrome which can crash the Chrome tab on a Mac PC. The code is a 13 character special string which appears to be written in Assyrian script *break* Matt C has reported the bug to Google, who have marked the report as duplicate. This means that Google are aware of the problem and are reportedly working on it.
  • Cambridge Consultants reveal world’s first all-digital radio transmitter

    03/13/2015 2:31:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    www.theengineer.co.uk ^ | 03-13-2015 | By Julia Pierce
    The world’s first fully digital radio transmitter has been developed by Cambridge Consultants, paving the way for 5G high-speed broadband for mobile devices. Unlike software-defined radio (SDR), the breakthrough – named Pizzicato – is not a mixture of analogue and digital components but is completely digital, which can enable new ways of using the radio spectrum intelligently. When transmitting data, only low frequency signals of 1GHz or lower propagate well over distance or through walls, so they are in great demand. Expanding to make use of frequencies of 10GHz and beyond will require techniques such as meshing and beamforming...
  • Chinese immigrant spared prison for Chicago Merc trade secrets theft

    03/09/2015 5:41:50 PM PDT · by george76 · 9 replies
    Chicago Sun Times ^ | 03/03/2015 | Kim Janssen
    A Chinese immigrant who stole trade secrets from the Chicago Merc worth an estimated $50 million was spared prison Tuesday by a federal judge who cited his otherwise “exemplary life.” Chunlai Yang, 50, of Libertyville, was instead sentenced to just four years probation for stealing software that underpinned the CME Group’s Globex trading platform. Yang, who worked as a high-ranking programmer for the Merc from 2000 until his arrest in 2011, pleaded guilty in 2012 to the theft, admitting he was trying to create a similar product in China when he illegally downloaded more than 10,000 computer source code files....
  • Intel: Moore's Law will continue through 7nm chips

    02/22/2015 4:47:42 PM PST · by ckilmer · 57 replies
    pcworld.com ^ | Feb 22, 2015 12:00 PM | Mark Hachman
    Eventually, the conventional ways of manufacturing microprocessors, graphics chips, and other silicon components will run out of steam. According to Intel researchers speaking at the ISSCC conference this week, however, we still have headroom for a few more years. Intel plans to present several papers this week at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco, one of the key academic conferences for papers on chip design. Intel senior fellow Mark Bohr will also appear on a panel Monday night to discuss the challenges of moving from today's 14nm chips to the 10nm manufacturing node and beyond.
  • The Unending High-Frequency Rip-Off

    02/17/2015 7:31:08 AM PST · by alexmark1917 · 19 replies
    This is an update to article written a few years ago. Everybody knows that retail and institutional investors are usually late to a trade. When they decide to buy, the wise guys are distributing or selling their shares to them and locking in their gains. When they sell, the wise guys are accumulating or buying their shares from them, again locking in their gains. How do the wise guys pull it off? The answer lies in the combination of reflexive human behavior and the use of high frequency, algorithmic (HFA) trading. With the advance of computer trading on a massive...
  • Computers with consciousness: Stanley Kubrick

    01/29/2015 11:00:31 AM PST · by Reverend Saltine · 21 replies
    Jon Rappoport's Blog ^ | January 29, 2015 | Jon Rappoport
    Computers have as much consciousness as cars or concrete. This will not change. They’re machines. They can be programmed to follow directions and calculate certain kinds of solutions within those directed parameters. That’s it. That’s the beginning and end of the story. Why do some technocrats believe computers will gain actual consciousness? They think a) the brain is a machine that expresses consciousness via information processing, and b) information processing is all the consciousness there is. To sum up, technocrats are high-IQ idiots. You can assemble all the information in the world and cross-reference it 100 billion different ways; you...
  • Taiwanese man dies after three-day computer gaming binge

    01/19/2015 9:22:36 AM PST · by golux · 6 replies
    UPI ^ | Jan. 19, 2015 | Amy Connolly
    KAOHSIUNG, Taiwan, Jan. 19 (UPI) -- A Taiwanese man who was on a three-day computer gaming binge died in an Internet cafe and went unnoticed for hours, the second such death in the area in less than a month. The man, identified as Hsieh, went into the Internet cafe on Jan. 6 and was found motionless on a table on Jan. 8. Investigators said the man had a heart attack. His death went unnoticed for several hours as gamers continued around him. "The CCTV footage from the Internet cafe showed that he had a small struggle before he collapsed motionless,"...
  • easiest non-cloud backup for tech novices?

    01/08/2015 3:36:14 PM PST · by TurboZamboni · 35 replies
    me | 1-8-15 | TZ
    wanted for a dying laptop.
  • If you sign out of G Mail does google still track you?

    12/25/2014 5:51:08 AM PST · by dennisw · 60 replies
    self | Dec 25 | self
    One of my New Years resolutions is to not stay signed into Google mail or Google anything// Does this help with the tracking google does? I use track me not on Firefox and Chrome. I am using Bing and Google for searches Thanks
  • Dangerous 'Misfortune Cookie' flaw discovered in 12 million home routers

    12/19/2014 9:29:02 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 23 replies
    PCWorld ^ | December 19, 2014 | By John E. Dunn
    Researchers at Check Point have discovered a serious security vulnerability affecting at least 12 million leading-brand home and SME routers that appears to have gone unnoticed for over a decade. Dubbed the ’Misfortune Cookie’ flaw, the firm plans to give a detailed account of the issue at a forthcoming security conference but in the meantime it’s important to stress that no real-world attacks using it have yet been detected. That said, an attacker exploiting the flaw would be able to monitor all data travelling through a gateway such as files, emails and logins and have the power to infect connected...
  • Advice please: Dumping gmail and looking for email recommendations (Vanity)

    11/06/2014 1:59:06 PM PST · by tang-soo · 29 replies
    Self ^ | 11/6/2014 | Myself
    After about 10 years with gmail.com, I've decides to migrate to a new email address. I figure it will take few months, and will insert a forward rule in my current gmail account. I'd like to find another free provider if possible. I don't mind using a service that wraps advertising around received message, but I don't want to use a provide that wraps around sent messages. I know about reagan.com but they charge. I know they advertise explicitly that they do not browse messages for social engineering, advertising ... etc. That attracts me and if I do choose a...
  • How to protect OS X from the “rootpipe” vulnerability

    11/04/2014 7:32:21 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 19 replies
    Mac Issues ^ | November 4, 2014 | by Topher Kessler
    A relatively long-standing vulnerability in OS X has been uncovered by a Swedish hacker, Emil Kvarnhammar, who has dubbed it “rootpipe” by the so-far undisclosed method in which it can be used to take control of your Mac. In this vulnerability, a flaw allows a hacker to gain administrative access of a system without supplying a password, and then be able to interact with your Mac as an administrator. In an interview with MacWorld, Kvarnhammar describes this bug as having been present in OS X 10.8.5, but he was not able to replicate it in 10.9; however, Apple has shuffled...
  • Google’s New Computer With Human-Like Learning Abilities Will Program Itself

    10/29/2014 1:56:10 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 43 replies
    betabeat.com ^ | 10/29 3:22pm | By Sage Lazzaro
    The new hybrid device might not need humans at all. In college, it wasn’t rare to hear a verbal battle regarding artificial intelligence erupt between my friends studying neuroscience and my friends studying computer science. One rather outrageous fellow would mention the possibility of a computer takeover, and off they went. The neuroscience-savvy would awe at the potential of such hybrid technology as the CS majors argued we have nothing to fear, as computers will always need a programmer to tell them what to do. Today’s news brings us to the Neural Turing Machine, a computer that will combine the...
  • Ex-CBS reporter: Government agency bugged my computer {Sharyl Attkinson]

    10/27/2014 7:24:48 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 35 replies
    New York Post ^ | 10/27/2014 | By Kyle Smith and Bruce Golding
    A former CBS News reporter who quit the network over claims it kills stories that put President Obama in a bad light says she was spied on by a “government-related entity” that planted classified documents on her computer. In her new memoir, Sharyl Attkisson says a source who arranged to have her laptop checked for spyware in 2013 was “shocked” and “flabbergasted” at what the analysis revealed. “This is outrageous. Worse than anything Nixon ever did. I wouldn’t have believed something like this could happen in the United States of America,” Attkisson quotes the source saying. She speculates that the...
  • U.S. Homeland Security contractor reports computer breach (Illegal aliens not mentioned)

    08/06/2014 8:16:01 PM PDT · by Libloather · 7 replies
    MSN ^ | 8/06/14
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A company that performs background checks for the U.S. Department of Homeland Security said on Wednesday it was the victim of a cyber attack, adding in a statement that "it has all the markings of a state-sponsored attack." The computer breach at Falls Church, Virginia-based US Investigations Services (USIS) probably involved the theft of personal information about DHS employees, according to the Washington Post, which first reported the story. DHS has suspended all work with the company amid an investigation by the FBI, the Post reported. A U.S. government official confirmed to Reuters that the FBI is...
  • Why any decent website doesn't know your password. (video)

    08/06/2014 7:24:21 AM PDT · by servo1969 · 10 replies
    dump.com ^ | 8-6-2014 | Tom Scott
    A brief introduction to password hashing for the uninitiated -- and why you should never trust a site that emails your password back to you!
  • Visit the Wrong Website, and the FBI Could End Up in Your Computer

    08/05/2014 10:18:32 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 58 replies
    W I R E D ^ | 08.05.14 6:30 am | Kevin Poulsen
    Apparently, the feebs have been using malware and the TOR network to snoop on quite a bit more information than one might have suspected. Use the following link here for more info: http://www.wired.com/2014/08/operation_torpedo/
  • This thumbdrive hacks computers. “BadUSB” exploit makes devices turn “evil”

    07/31/2014 10:16:53 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 18 replies
    ars technica ^ | July 31 2014, 6:21am -0700 | Dan Goodin
    This thumbdrive hacks computers. “BadUSB” exploit makes devices turn “evil” Per FR posting rules, ars technica can not be posted, so a link to the article referring to USB thumbdrives hacking computers is listed instead. Ignore the "source url", it just points back to the FR website. Article here: http://arstechnica.com/security/2014/07/this-thumbdrive-hacks-computers-badusb-exploit-makes-devices-turn-evil/
  • moving all the data from one laptop to another...help

    07/13/2014 6:49:41 AM PDT · by TurboZamboni · 77 replies
    myself | 7-13-14 | TZ
    I was given the gift of a new laptop- HP Pavilion Smartouch 17. not my first choice, but it was a nice gift and the giver knew my old Toshiba Satellite L505-a6946 is dying and that I'm too cheap to buy a new one. The Satellite uses Vista and the new HP is Windows 8.1 . I need to know what's the best(easiest) way to move all my data from one to the other including AVG,Hitman Pro, Malwarebytes,emails(Outlook)and other vital programs. While I'm at it, I assume it came with all sorts of unwanted 'bloatware' so I will need to...
  • 19th century math tactic gets a makeover—and yields answers up to 200 times faster

    06/30/2014 10:09:28 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-30-2014 | Provided by Johns Hopkins University
    A relic from long before the age of supercomputers, the 169-year-old math strategy called the Jacobi iterative method is widely dismissed today as too slow to be useful. But thanks to a curious, numbers-savvy Johns Hopkins engineering student and his professor, it may soon get a new lease on life. With just a few modern-day tweaks, the researchers say they've made the rarely used Jacobi method work up to 200 times faster. The result, they say, could speed up the performance of computer simulations used in aerospace design, shipbuilding, weather and climate modeling, biomechanics and other engineering tasks. Their paper...
  • Need operating system suggestions for old laptop (Vanity)

    06/25/2014 10:02:22 AM PDT · by deoetdoctrinae · 58 replies
    Yours truly | 6/25/2014 | Me
    I'm trying to determine if it's worth messing with to find a different (and free) operating system for my very old Dell Latitude laptop. It currently has Windows XP SP3, which of course Microsoft no longer supports.
  • 7 Hard Drives Failing: What are the odds? These are the odds. [IRS SCANDAL]

    06/24/2014 1:29:22 PM PDT · by QT3.14 · 57 replies
    American Digest ^ | June 22, 2014 | Gerard Vanderleun
    I run a data center. Disk drives that are left running continuously last between two and three years. Three years is about 36 months. The odds of a disk failing in any given month are roughly one in 36. The odds of two different drives failing in the same month are roughly one in 36 squared, or 1 in about 1,300. The odds of three drives failing in the same month is 36 cubed or 1 in 46,656. The odds of seven different drives failing in the same month is 37 to the 7th power = 1 in 78,664,164,096.
  • Did Lois Lerner have laptop, blackberry

    06/20/2014 9:09:11 AM PDT · by airedale · 58 replies
    vanity
    We know that Lois Lerner' s computer crashed at some time and per this morning it was just before "she learned of the rogue agents in Cincinnati." Since she was a fairly high level employee whose job required travel did she have a laptop? The way they describe their email system (not the way most systems work) not only would the desktop which crashed have a complete copy of all e-mails both incoming and outgoing so would the laptop. If she did have a laptop did it crash as well; did the agency give it to another employee at some...
  • The Tuesday List - Ten Inventions That Changed The World

    06/17/2014 11:35:24 AM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 66 replies
    Stuff of Genius ^ | June 24, 2013 | Ed Grabianowski
    If you think that the world's greatest inventions came from the fevered minds of solitary geniuses, think again. As you scan this list of the 10 inventions that changed the world, note how many of them perfected workable designs. 10. Plow Compared to some of the gleaming, electronic inventions that fill our lives today, the plow doesn't seem very exciting. It's a simple cutting tool used to carve a furrow into the soil, churning it up to expose nutrients and prepare it for planting. Yet the plow is probably the one invention that made all others possible. No one knows...
  • I may have to give up the Internet [Updated at #94]

    06/12/2014 6:51:39 PM PDT · by Zionist Conspirator · 93 replies
    Self | 6/12/'14 | Zionist Conspirator
    I'll try to make this as short as possible, because I never know when a page is going to load. As you may recall, I started having connection issues about three and a half months ago. After eliminating every other issue I wound up getting another (rebuilt) computer. Late last month the same issue began showing up so I returned the computer to the repair shop at which I bought it. They hooked it up to their connection and announced that there was nothing wrong with it. As recently as last Sunday this thing was working like a top. Now...
  • No, A 'Supercomputer' Did NOT Pass The Turing Test For The First Time

    06/10/2014 10:49:04 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 21 replies
    techdirt ^ | 9 June 2014 | Mike Masnick
    So, this weekend's news in the tech world was flooded with a "story" about how a "chatbot" passed the Turing Test for "the first time," with lots of publications buying every point in the story and talking about what a big deal it was. Except, almost everything about the story is bogus and a bunch of gullible reporters ran with it, because that's what they do. First, here's the press release from the University of Reading, which should have set off all sorts of alarm bells for any reporter. Here are some quotes, almost all of which are misleading...
  • Why You, Non-Nerd, Should Get Excited about Graphene

    05/31/2014 1:27:07 AM PDT · by kingattax · 18 replies
    Yahoo ^ | May 30, 2014 | Joshua Fruhlinger
    Let’s talk about the coolest substance ever: graphene. It’s one atom thick, (about one-millionth the thickness of a single strand of hair), it’s 100 times stronger than steel, and it conducts electricity like nothing else. It’s a supermaterial that is quietly changing the course of technology. Here’s why you should get excited about it: It will turn computers into transformers It is now being suggested that graphene can be changed into different configurations on the fly by simply manipulating it with lasers. That means that it could take on the form of different computers in just seconds, freeing us from...
  • Snowden Strikes Back at NSA, Emails NBC News

    05/30/2014 7:48:21 PM PDT · by Dave346 · 84 replies
    NBC News ^ | May 30th 2014, 4:26 pm | Mike Brunker and Matthew Cole
    Fugitive Edward Snowden on Friday challenged the NSA’s insistence that it has no evidence he tried to raise concerns about the agency’s surveillance activity before he began leaking government documents to reporters, calling the response a “clearly tailored and incomplete leak ... for a political advantage.” “The NSA's new discovery of written contact between me and its lawyers -- after more than a year of denying any such contact existed - raises serious concerns,” Snowden said in an email Friday to NBC News. “It reveals as false the NSA's claim to Barton Gellman of the Washington Post in December of...
  • [LINUX TECH] Experience with btrfs?

    05/28/2014 12:14:45 PM PDT · by re_nortex · 25 replies
    2014-05-28 19:08:22 UTC | /dev/null
    Sure there are technical forums that discuss btrfs, the shiny new filesystem for Linux but my experience has shown that FReepers meet or exceed the technical expertise anywhere on the net. The two cutting-edge filesystems that are (supposedly) impervious to bitrot are btrfs and zfs (which has a Linux implementation, older than what Oracle has now closed off).
  • U.S. Accuses China of Cyber Spying on American Companies

    05/19/2014 4:13:28 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 12 replies
    Reuters ^ | Mon May 19, 2014 | JIM FINKLE, JOSEPH MENN AND ARUNA VISWANATHa
    The United States on Monday charged five Chinese military officers and accused them of hacking into American nuclear, metal and solar companies to steal trade secrets, ratcheting up tensions between the two world powers over cyber espionage. China immediately denied the charges, saying in a strongly worded Foreign Ministry statement the U.S. grand jury indictment was "made up" and would damage trust between the two nations. Officials in Washington have argued for years that cyber espionage is a top national security concern.
  • Department of Justice wants expanded permission to hack and search remote computers

    05/10/2014 7:42:39 PM PDT · by prisoner6 · 9 replies
    http://www.pcworld.com/ ^ | May 9, 2014 | Grant Gross
    The U.S. Department of Justice wants new authority to hack and search remote computers during investigations, saying the new rules are needed because of complex criminal schemes sometimes using millions of machines spread across the country. Digital rights groups say the request from the DOJ for authority to search computers outside the district where an investigation is based raises concerns about Internet security and Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures. “By expanding federal law enforcement’s power to secretly exploit ‘zero-day’ vulnerabilities in software and Internet platforms, the proposal threatens to weaken Internet security for all of us,” Nathan...
  • Florida Man Files Lawsuit to Marry his Computer (MacBook)

    05/08/2014 7:55:52 AM PDT · by Moseley · 48 replies
    American Uncensored News Network ^ | May 8, 2014 | Jonathon Moseley
    A man has filed a lawsuit in Florida for the right to marry his MacBook computer, according to the UK Telegraph newspaper. Chris Sevier argues that if same-sex marriages are allowed, on the grounds that one can marry anyone they love, then Sever should be allowed to marry his computer. Apparently it is not just any computer that turns Sevier’s head, but the massive inventory of pornography stored on it: “Over time, I began preferring sex with my computer over sex with real women. Naturally, I ‘fell in love’ with my computer and preferred having sex with it over all...
  • opinion/feedback on best budget tablet?

    05/01/2014 9:14:21 AM PDT · by NewJerseyJoe · 20 replies
    self | 5/1/14 | NewJerseyJoe
    Asking for opinions on the best budget tablet. Something big enough for me to work on -- i.e., be able to type easily and see the display without holding it six inches from my face. Not worried about communications -- as long as it's got WiFi built in (which I'm sure they all do), I can use my cellphone as a mobile hotspot to transfer/send files. This is intended to be a replacement for a working laptop/notebook. And again -- "budget" is the keyword. Thanks all!.
  • Computer Advice (Need a new Laptop) Vanity

    04/24/2014 3:11:22 PM PDT · by PatrioticRose · 31 replies
    me | 4/24/2014 | chuckster
    The old Dell Latitude e5500 appears to have reached the end of its useful life (Final report from tech due this afternoon) I am loooking for advice on a replacement. I use it for photo, video and audio editing for YouTube, web sites and my radio program. It would have to be very mobile but have a big enough screen for video editing. The Dell Alienware 14 has been suggested, but spec'd out, it runs $1.5K. That seems a little steep to me. Advice?
  • It's good to finally be back.

    04/03/2014 11:26:21 AM PDT · by Zionist Conspirator · 53 replies
    Self | 4/3/'14 | Zionist Conspirator
    Finally! I was without a computer all week last week and then found out frday that the old computer was beyond repair. I got this one for a good price and it seems a much better computer; videos play well for one thing. Right now there are only two problems: 1)Although I set up my two e-mail accounts on Outlook Express correctly and exactly as I'm supposed to, one of them refuses to work (fortunately, not my main one). The other one resolutely refuses to do so even though there is absolutely no logical reason for this. Also, this is...