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Keyword: computer

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  • DecryptorMax Ransomware Decrypted, No Need to Pay the Ransom

    11/28/2015 6:55:45 PM PST · by Utilizer · 9 replies
    Softpedia ^ | 28 Nov 2015, 10:31 GMT | Catalin Cimpanu
    ... Fabian Wosar of Emisoft has created a tool capable of decoding files encrypted by the DecryptorMax ransomware, also known as CryptInfinite. The ransomware gets its name from the fact that the "DecryptorMax" string is found in multiple places inside its source code. Additionally, the CryptInfinite moniker is also used by some researchers because the ransomware adds the CryptInfinite key to the Windows registry, using it to store a list of all encrypted files and their location on disk. According to Bleeping Computer's Lawrence Abrams, the ransomware is spread via Word documents attached to spam email. These files pose as...
  • Dell security error widens as researchers dig deeper (Earlier problem is worse than was thought)

    11/23/2015 9:56:26 PM PST · by dayglored · 11 replies
    PCWorld ^ | Nov 23, 2015 | Jeremy Kirk
    Duo Security researchers found a second weak digital certificate on a new Dell Inspiron laptop The fallout from a serious security mistake made by Dell is widening, as security experts find more issues of concern. Researchers with Duo Security have found a second weak digital certificate in a new Dell laptop and evidence of another problematic one circulating. The issue started after it was discovered Dell shipped devices with a self-signed root digital certificate, eDellRoot, which is used to encrypt data traffic. But it installed the root certificate with the private encryption key included, a critical error that left many...
  • Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time

    11/17/2015 6:53:19 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Science alert ^ | 11/17/15 | FIONA MACDONALD
    Researchers have written quantum code on a silicon chip for the first time And so it begins... FIONA MACDONALD 17 NOV 2015           For the first time, Australian engineers have demonstrated that they can write and manipulate the quantum version of computer code on a silicon microchip. This was done by entangling two quantum bits with the highest accuracy ever recorded, and it means that we can now start to program for the super-powerful quantum computers of the future.Engineers code regular computers using traditional bits, which can be in one of two states: 1 or 0. Together, two bits...
  • Computer question: Green screen

    11/08/2015 10:20:41 PM PST · by An American in Turkiye · 22 replies
    Self | An American In Turkiye
    So I have been having some issues with video playback on my laptop. It doesn't happen often, but every once in awhile, I'll try to play a YouTube video or Windows Media Player vid, and the video is green. Audio still plays, but the screen is green. In some cases, WMV's are just a black screen, with audio playing. Any help/suggestions are appreciated. Running Windows 8, BTW. I have 10 downloaded, just haven't upgraded yet
  • Computer Question - Iso File Burner

    11/08/2015 6:11:21 PM PST · by 50sDad · 28 replies
    Self | 11/08/15 | 50sDad
    I am looking for a freeware program that will take .iso files and burn them to disk.
  • Netgear router exploit detected

    10/09/2015 10:56:42 PM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 9 October 2015 | Chris Baraniuk, Technology reporter
    A security researcher in the US has said his Netgear router was hacked after attackers exploited a flaw in the machine. Joe Giron told the BBC that he discovered altered admin settings on his personal router on 28 September. The compromised router was hacked to send web browsing data to a malicious internet address. Netgear says the vulnerability is "serious" but affects fewer than 5,000 devices. Mr Giron found that the Domain Name System (DNS) settings on his router had been changed to a suspicious IP address. "Normally I set mine to Google's [IP address] and it wasn't that, it...
  • Vanity: Threat detected by Avast

    10/07/2015 8:26:09 PM PDT · by Mama Shawna · 18 replies
    I just clicked on a thread titled 'Steve King Endorses Daniel Webster for Speaker of the House' posted by E. Pluribus Unum from Breitbart, and both times, my Avast virus protection popped up with 'threat detected'. Anyone else get this when clicking on this title? First time I've EVER gotten this while browsing FR.
  • A walk around the office can reverse vascular dysfunction caused by hours at a computer

    09/29/2015 4:09:51 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 44 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | September 28, 2015 | University of Missouri-Columbia
    Across the country, many employees are seated at desks for the majority of an eight-hour workday. As technology creates an increase in sedentary lifestyles, the impact of sitting on vascular health is a rising concern. Now, researchers have found that when a person sits for six straight hours, vascular function is impaired -- but by walking for just 10 minutes after a prolonged period of sitting, vascular health can be restored.
  • Clumps of gold nanoparticles can evolve to carry out computing

    09/22/2015 2:10:36 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    Move over, microchip. A random assembly of gold nanoparticles can perform calculations normally reserved for neatly arranged patterns of silicon. Traditional computers rely on ordered circuits that follow preprogrammed rules, but this strategy limits how efficient they can be. “The best microprocessors you can buy in a store now can do 1011 operations per second and use a few hundred watts,” says Wilfred van der Wiel of the University of Twente in the Netherlands. “The human brain can do orders of magnitude more and uses only 10 to 20 watts. That’s a huge gap.” To close that gap, researchers have...
  • Need help with a Surface 3 Table (connect to TV)

    09/20/2015 7:07:29 PM PDT · by ak267 · 27 replies
    ak267 | 9-20-2015 | ak267
    My brother just acquired a MS Surface 3 tablet. He wanted to know how to connect it to a TV and "mirror" the table image on to the TV (not wireless but with wires). Any advice?
  • Russia and China Use Data Received From Hackers to ID U.S. Spies

    09/02/2015 1:44:40 PM PDT · by detective · 9 replies
    The New American ^ | September 1, 2015 | Warren Mass
    Both Russian and Chinese government security agencies have compiled data obtained from hackers who breached security protecting U.S. computer databases containing security clearance applications, airline records, and medical insurance forms, and then used the data to identify U.S. intelligence officers and agents. As a result of cyberattacks, at least one clandestine network of American engineers and scientists who provide technical assistance to U.S. undercover operatives and agents overseas has been compromised, according to two U.S. officials. The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, revealed the security breach to the Los Angeles Times, which broke the story on August 31. The...
  • Quantum computer that 'computes without running' sets efficiency record

    09/01/2015 10:33:43 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 29 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 8/31/15 | Lisa Zyga
    (Phys.org)—Due to quantum effects, it's possible to build a quantum computer that computes without running—or as the scientists explain, "the result of a computation may be learned without actually running the computer." So far, however, the efficiency of this process, which is called counterfactual computation (CFC), has had an upper limit of 50%, limiting its practical applications. Now in a new paper, scientists have experimentally demonstrated a slightly different version called a "generalized CFC" that has an efficiency of 85% with the potential to reach 100%. This improvement opens the doors to realizing a much greater variety of applications, such...
  • Need Help with Opera Spell Checking

    08/26/2015 5:39:35 PM PDT · by Bigg Red · 20 replies
    My lame abilities ^ | 26 August 2015 | self
    When I compose a comment here or on Facebook, the spelling check function underlines every single word in red. Problem began about 1 week ago and occurs only when I am using Opera. I went to the Opera settings, but I could not find a way to correct this. Sorry, I am not tech savvy, and I would appreciate advice from someone who is.
  • DIY Tractor Repair Runs Afoul Of Copyright Law

    08/18/2015 11:31:17 AM PDT · by Theoria · 35 replies
    NPR ^ | 18 Aug 2015 | Laura Sydell
    The iconic image of the American farmer is the man or woman who works the land, milks cows and is self-reliant enough to fix the tractor. But like a lot of mechanical items, tractors are increasingly run by computer software. Now, farmers are hitting up against an obscure provision of copyright law that makes it illegal to repair machinery run by software. Take Dave Alford. He fits that image of the iconic farmer. "I do farming on the family ranch," says Alford, standing on a piece of grassy earth with a white barn behind him. "I've been farming for the...
  • Windows 10 appears to be mainly spyware - I'm uninstalling Windows 10 and going back to Windows 7

    08/08/2015 8:29:27 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 92 replies
    August 8, 2015 | Vanity
    Last weekend I loaded Windows 10 on an old laptop I rarely use. I immediately noticed several privacy issues with new open windows (pun intended) for spying on what I do, where I go and what I say online. After reading some to the reviews and discussions I think it's time to revert back to Windows 7 ASAP. Thanks, but no thanks Microsoft! The police state is doing a fine job without any additional help from you and me. I haven't turned the laptop on since I loaded Windows 10, but the next time I do, it will be for...
  • Spyware, Key Logger: Exoprience, Expertise Requested

    07/31/2015 8:02:12 PM PDT · by Hostage · 32 replies
    Self ^ | July 31, 2015 | Histage
    A neighbor's estranged Ex has possibly installed spyware and a key logger onto a new notebook given as a 'gift' to both neighbor and teenage daughter. The neighbor is the custodial parent of the one teenage daughter who recently received the new 'spy loaded' notebook computer from her estranged parent. The notebook runs Win 8.1 and is to be eventually upgraded to Windows 10. The teenager was told directly by the estranged parent that everything the custodial parent does could be seen and recorded and then messaged out clandestinely. The neighbor would like to know the following: 1. How to...
  • OS X Yosemite vs Windows 10: The Mac and PC operating systems go head to head UPDATED

    07/30/2015 11:45:36 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 39 replies
    Macworld UK ^ | July 30, 2015, 2015 | by Keir Thomas
    OS X Yosemite vs Windows 10 It's been a rough few years for Microsoft.  Sure, it still makes more money than several European countries but the issue has been one of relevance. It missed the boat when it came to mobile and their efforts to repair the situation with Windows 8 were met with laughter at best, but sometimes even hatred.  The all-new Windows 10, which was released on 29 July, is designed to stem the blood loss. We took a look at the latest preview (Microsoft took the wraps off the new operating system at a developer event in...
  • Problems With Drudge Report?

    07/21/2015 5:59:16 PM PDT · by hulagirl · 35 replies
    Self ^ | 7/21/2015 | Self
    My own experience
  • Wow! DOS attack this past weekend in Michigan

    07/14/2015 3:12:03 AM PDT · by taildragger · 11 replies
    Email | N/A
    Dear Valued WOW! Customer, Please accept my sincere apology for any problems you may have recently experienced with your WOW! Internet service. On Sunday, 07/12, 2015, there was a malicious and coordinated action from an external party or parties that disrupted Internet service for our Michigan customers. What happened is known in technical circles as a Denial of Service or DOS attack. Essentially, these external sources intentionally overloaded the servers we use to route Internet traffic and created the access problems you may have experienced. As soon as the issue was detected, our engineers and technicians were immediately dispatched to...
  • Computer hack reveals identity of Syrians in contact with Israel

    07/12/2015 10:16:23 PM PDT · by Nachum · 9 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | 7/12/15 | Elhanan Miller
    Computer hackers likely working for the Syrian regime and Hezbollah have managed to penetrate the computers of Israeli and American activists working with the Syrian opposition, exposing sensitive contacts between the sides. Al-Akhbar, a newspaper serving as Hezbollah’s mouthpiece in Lebanon, published a series of articles over the weekend purporting to divulge correspondence between Mendi Safadi, a Druze Israeli and former political adviser to Deputy Regional Cooperation Minister Ayoub Kara, with members of the Syrian opposition around the world, taken from taken from Safadi’s computer. The article also contains screenshots of word documents and text message exchanges saved on Safadi’s...
  • Why Google’s nightmare AI is putting demon puppies everywhere

    07/11/2015 11:38:58 AM PDT · by Lazamataz · 204 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Jul 8, 2015 | by Jeff Guo
    A few weeks ago, Google researchers announced that they had peered inside the mind of an artificial intelligence program. What they discovered was a demonic hellscape. You’ve seen the pictures. These are hallucinations produced by a cluster of simulated neurons trained to identify objects in a picture. The researchers wanted to better understand how the neural network operates, so they asked it to use its imagination. To daydream a little. At first, they gave the computer abstract images to interpret — like a field of clouds. It was a Rorschach test. The artificial neurons saw what they wanted to see,...
  • Animal brains connected up to make mind-melded computer

    07/09/2015 8:45:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.newscientist.com ^ | 14:38 09 July 2015 | by Jessica Hamzelou
    Two heads are better than one, and three monkey brains can control an avatar better than any single monkey. For the first time, a team has networked the brains of multiple animals to form a living computer that can perform tasks and solve problems. If human brains could be similarly connected, it might give us superhuman problem-solving abilities, and allow us to communicate abstract thoughts and experiences. "It is really exciting," says Iyad Rahwan at the Masdar Institute in Dubai, UAE, who was not involved in the work. "It will change the way humans cooperate." The work, published today, is...
  • No One Is Safe: $300 Gadget Steals Encryption Keys out of the Air, and It’s Nearly Unstoppable

    07/08/2015 6:56:44 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    BGR ^ | July 8, 2015 | Zach Epstein
    Just when you thought you were safe, a new hacking toy comes along and rocks your world. Imagine a tool exists that lets hackers pluck encryption keys from your laptop right out of the air. You can’t stop it by connecting to protected Wi-Fi networks or even disabling Wi-Fi completely. Turning off Bluetooth also won’t help you protect yourself. Why? Because the tiny device that can easily be hidden in an object or taped to the underside of a table doesn’t use conventional communications to pull off capers. Instead it reads radio waves emitted by your computer’s processor, and there’s...
  • Artificial Intelligence Machine Gets Testy With Its Programmer

    06/29/2015 10:36:07 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 56 replies
    WSJ ^ | 1:56 pm ET Jun 26, 2015 | By Amir Mizroch
    Researchers have shown that machines are inching closer to self-learning, and perhaps even copping a little attitude. Over at Google, a computer program using a database of movie scripts was asked again and again by researchers to define morality. It struggles to do so, and in a conversation recorded by its human engineers, becomes exasperated and ends the conversation by lashing out at its human inquisitor. Here’s part of the exchange, as related in a paper presented this week: Human: Tell me the definition of morality. Machine: I don’t have ethics. Human: Look, I need help; I need to know...
  • Fed personnel agency admits history of security problems

    06/16/2015 9:52:46 AM PDT · by Enterprise · 2 replies
    juno-news.com ^ | 6/16/2015 | KEN DILANIAN
    An Office of Personnel Management investigative official said Tuesday the agency entrusted with millions of personnel records has a history of failing to meet basic computer network security requirements.Michael Esser, assistant inspector general for audit, said in testimony prepared for delivery that for years many of the people running the agency's information technology had no IT background.
  • Google Wants to Turn Your Clothes Into a Computer

    05/30/2015 6:15:31 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 11 replies
    NY Times ^ | 05/29/15 | Conor Dougherty
    On Friday, the second day of its annual developer conference, Google I/O, one of the search giant’s semi-secretive research divisions announced a project that aims to make conductive fabrics that can be weaved into everyday clothes. The effort, called Project Jacquard, is named for the French inventor of the Jacquard Loom, which revolutionized textile manufacturing and helped pave the way for modern computing. Much like the screens on mobile phones, these fabrics could register the user’s touch and transmit information elsewhere, like to a smartphone or tablet computer. They are made from conductive yarns that come in a rainbow of...
  • Police explode briefcase left for literary agent

    08/11/2011 3:07:03 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies
    Mercury news ^ | 8/11/11 | AP
    BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. — A writer desperate to get a movie script read suffered the ultimate rejection Thursday when police blew up a briefcase he said contained the screenplay after an agent refused to read it, police said. The bizarre story was set in Beverly Hills, where a man visited the office of a literary agent and left behind a briefcase that he said contained a computer, police Sgt. Brad Cornelius said. The man left instructions for it to be delivered to someone at the business, who told another person in the office, "This guy's been kind of pestering me...
  • New maze-like beamsplitter is world's smallest

    05/25/2015 4:57:28 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 50 replies
    Physics World ^ | 05/25/2015 | Ker Than
    An ultracompact beamsplitter – the smallest one in the world – has been designed and fabricated by researchers in the US. Using a newly developed algorithm, the team built the smallest integrated polarization beamsplitter to date, which could allow computers and mobile devices of the future to function millions of times faster than current machines.
  • Critical vulnerability in NetUSB driver exposes millions of routers to hacking

    05/20/2015 9:48:26 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 13 replies
    ITworld.com ^ | May 19, 2015 | Lucian Constantin
    Millions of routers and other embedded devices are affected by a serious vulnerability that could allow hackers to compromise them. The vulnerability is located in a service called NetUSB, which lets devices connected over USB to a computer be shared with other machines on a local network or the Internet via IP (Internet Protocol). The shared devices can be printers, webcams, thumb drives, external hard disks and more. NetUSB is implemented in Linux-based embedded systems, such as routers, as a kernel driver. The driver is developed by Taiwan-based KCodes Technology. Once enabled, it opens a server that listens on TCP...
  • 10 Keyboard Hacks That Will Change Your Life

    05/20/2015 10:54:01 AM PDT · by lulu16 · 38 replies
    Refinery 29 ^ | 5/20/15 | Christina Bonnington
    Turns out, there are a few savvy (and super-easy) keyboard tricks that can do just that. Your desktop, browser, Gmail, and even Facebook all have simple keyboard-based shortcuts you can press to more quickly accomplish things you do all the time — things like creating a new tab in Chrome or favoriting a tweet. We’ve rounded up 10 super-handy keyboard hacks that will help you zip through your daily grind, so you can spend more time on things that matter — or at least save your index finger from repetitive stress syndrome. And, we've organized them from the most basic...
  • Funds sought for tiny £6 computer

    05/12/2015 4:13:25 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | 11 May 2015 | BBC
    A Californian start-up is seeking funding to make a computer that will cost $9 (£6) in its most basic form. Next Thing wants $50,000 to finish development of the credit-card sized Chip computer. The first versions will have a 1Ghz processor, 512MB of Ram and 4GB of onboard storage. The gadget, due to go on general release in early 2016, could become yet another rival to the popular Raspberry Pi barebones computer.
  • The number glitch that can lead to catastrophe

    05/06/2015 7:28:17 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    BBC ^ | Chris Baraniuk
    Such glitches emerge with surprising frequency. It’s suspected that the reason why Nasa lost contact with the Deep Impact space probe in 2013 was an integer limit being reached. And just last week it was reported that Boeing 787 aircraft may suffer from a similar issue. The control unit managing the delivery of power to the plane’s engines will automatically enter a failsafe mode – and shut down the engines – if it has been left on for over 248 days. Hypothetically, the engines could suddenly halt even in mid-flight. The Federal Aviation Administration’s directive on the matter states that...
  • Why Coding Is Your Child’s Key to Unlocking the Future

    04/29/2015 7:26:19 AM PDT · by Borges · 43 replies
    WSJ ^ | 4/29/2015 | CHRISTOPHER MIMS
    Racing across the U.S. in your taco truck, you must fight off animals mutated by fallout from a nuclear war, and you must also turn them into delicious filling for the tacos you sell inside fortified towns. Your mission: Make it to the Canadian city of Winnipeg. You are “Gunman Taco Truck.” “It’s pretty much only a game that a kid would come up with,” says Brenda Romero, a videogame designer for more than 30 years and the mother of Donovan Romero-Brathwaite, the 10-year-old inventor of the game. And yet GTT already has been licensed by a videogame publisher for...
  • Beyond the lithium ion—a significant step toward a better performing battery

    04/17/2015 2:27:18 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-17-2015 | Provided by University of Illinois at Chicago
    The race is on around the world as scientists strive to develop a new generation of batteries that can perform beyond the limits of the current lithium-ion based battery. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have taken a significant step toward the development of a battery that could outperform the lithium-ion technology used in electric cars such as the Chevy Volt. They have shown they can replace the lithium ions, each of which carries a single positive charge, with magnesium ions, which have a plus-two charge, in battery-like chemical reactions, using an electrode with a structure like those...
  • Engineer improves rechargeable batteries with MoS2 nano 'sandwich'

    04/17/2015 2:21:31 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 04-17-2015 | Provided by Kansas State University
    Molybdenum disulfide sheets -- which are "sandwiches" of one molybdenum atom between two sulfur atoms -- may improve rechargeable lithium-ion batteries, according to the latest research from Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering. Credit: Kansas State University The key to better cellphones and other rechargeable electronics may be in tiny "sandwiches" made of nanosheets, according to mechanical engineering research from Kansas State University. Gurpreet Singh, assistant professor of mechanical and nuclear engineering, and his research team are improving rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. The team has focused on the lithium cycling of molybdenum disulfide, or MoS2, sheets, which Singh...
  • Tech Ping: Bought the Computer, Trying to Do Wireless File Transfer HELP!!

    04/14/2015 4:57:49 PM PDT · by Chickensoup · 87 replies
    04.14.15 | chickensoup
    Tech Ping: Bought the Computer, Trying to Do Wireless File Transfer HELP!! Is there any help out there for Win7 among the Freepers? Wanted to file transfer from the old WIN 7 machine to the new WIN7 machine and the new computer wont recognize the old computer and vice versa. Both computers I think have the same name, could that be a problem. The old computer has a home group and the new computer keeps trying to make its own home group, the hussy! The last legs are rapidly approaching for old computer Last conversation was this: Question about Laptop...
  • 8th Grader Faces Felony Charges for Changing Teacher’s Computer Background

    04/13/2015 1:19:58 PM PDT · by yuffy · 39 replies
    Time.com ^ | April 10, 2015 | Laura Stampler
    Pranksters be warned Eight-grader Domanik Green was arrested on felony charges in Holiday, Fla. Wednesday after breaking into his teacher’s computer to change the background picture to two men kissing. Green, 14, who was released the day of his arrest, said that he broke into the computer of teacher he didn’t like after realizing that faculty members’ passwords were simply their last names, the Tampa Bay Times reports. Green, who previously faced a three-day suspension for a similar prank, said that many students got in trouble for breaking into teachers’ computers.
  • Are smartphones making our children mentally ill?

    03/22/2015 7:01:34 AM PDT · by CharlesOConnell · 58 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | 7:00AM GMT 21 Mar 2015 | By Peter Stanford
    Are smartphones making our children mentally ill?Leading child psychotherapist Julie Lynn Evans believes easy and constant access to the internet is harming youngsterstelegraph.co.uk/news/health/children/11486167/Are-smartphones-making-our-children-mentally-ill.html
  • Chromium Hack : special 13 character can crash Chrome Browser Tab on a Mac PC

    03/21/2015 7:36:39 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 30 replies
    TechWorm ^ | on March 21, 2015 | Vijay
    No browsers are safe as proved yesterday at Pwn2Own, but crashing one of them with just one line of special code is slightly different. A developer has discovered a hack in Google Chrome which can crash the Chrome tab on a Mac PC. The code is a 13 character special string which appears to be written in Assyrian script *break* Matt C has reported the bug to Google, who have marked the report as duplicate. This means that Google are aware of the problem and are reportedly working on it.
  • Cambridge Consultants reveal world’s first all-digital radio transmitter

    03/13/2015 2:31:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    www.theengineer.co.uk ^ | 03-13-2015 | By Julia Pierce
    The world’s first fully digital radio transmitter has been developed by Cambridge Consultants, paving the way for 5G high-speed broadband for mobile devices. Unlike software-defined radio (SDR), the breakthrough – named Pizzicato – is not a mixture of analogue and digital components but is completely digital, which can enable new ways of using the radio spectrum intelligently. When transmitting data, only low frequency signals of 1GHz or lower propagate well over distance or through walls, so they are in great demand. Expanding to make use of frequencies of 10GHz and beyond will require techniques such as meshing and beamforming...
  • Chinese immigrant spared prison for Chicago Merc trade secrets theft

    03/09/2015 5:41:50 PM PDT · by george76 · 9 replies
    Chicago Sun Times ^ | 03/03/2015 | Kim Janssen
    A Chinese immigrant who stole trade secrets from the Chicago Merc worth an estimated $50 million was spared prison Tuesday by a federal judge who cited his otherwise “exemplary life.” Chunlai Yang, 50, of Libertyville, was instead sentenced to just four years probation for stealing software that underpinned the CME Group’s Globex trading platform. Yang, who worked as a high-ranking programmer for the Merc from 2000 until his arrest in 2011, pleaded guilty in 2012 to the theft, admitting he was trying to create a similar product in China when he illegally downloaded more than 10,000 computer source code files....
  • Intel: Moore's Law will continue through 7nm chips

    02/22/2015 4:47:42 PM PST · by ckilmer · 57 replies
    pcworld.com ^ | Feb 22, 2015 12:00 PM | Mark Hachman
    Eventually, the conventional ways of manufacturing microprocessors, graphics chips, and other silicon components will run out of steam. According to Intel researchers speaking at the ISSCC conference this week, however, we still have headroom for a few more years. Intel plans to present several papers this week at the International Solid-State Circuits Conference in San Francisco, one of the key academic conferences for papers on chip design. Intel senior fellow Mark Bohr will also appear on a panel Monday night to discuss the challenges of moving from today's 14nm chips to the 10nm manufacturing node and beyond.
  • The Unending High-Frequency Rip-Off

    02/17/2015 7:31:08 AM PST · by alexmark1917 · 19 replies
    This is an update to article written a few years ago. Everybody knows that retail and institutional investors are usually late to a trade. When they decide to buy, the wise guys are distributing or selling their shares to them and locking in their gains. When they sell, the wise guys are accumulating or buying their shares from them, again locking in their gains. How do the wise guys pull it off? The answer lies in the combination of reflexive human behavior and the use of high frequency, algorithmic (HFA) trading. With the advance of computer trading on a massive...
  • Computers with consciousness: Stanley Kubrick

    01/29/2015 11:00:31 AM PST · by Reverend Saltine · 21 replies
    Jon Rappoport's Blog ^ | January 29, 2015 | Jon Rappoport
    Computers have as much consciousness as cars or concrete. This will not change. They’re machines. They can be programmed to follow directions and calculate certain kinds of solutions within those directed parameters. That’s it. That’s the beginning and end of the story. Why do some technocrats believe computers will gain actual consciousness? They think a) the brain is a machine that expresses consciousness via information processing, and b) information processing is all the consciousness there is. To sum up, technocrats are high-IQ idiots. You can assemble all the information in the world and cross-reference it 100 billion different ways; you...
  • Taiwanese man dies after three-day computer gaming binge

    01/19/2015 9:22:36 AM PST · by golux · 6 replies
    UPI ^ | Jan. 19, 2015 | Amy Connolly
    KAOHSIUNG, Taiwan, Jan. 19 (UPI) -- A Taiwanese man who was on a three-day computer gaming binge died in an Internet cafe and went unnoticed for hours, the second such death in the area in less than a month. The man, identified as Hsieh, went into the Internet cafe on Jan. 6 and was found motionless on a table on Jan. 8. Investigators said the man had a heart attack. His death went unnoticed for several hours as gamers continued around him. "The CCTV footage from the Internet cafe showed that he had a small struggle before he collapsed motionless,"...
  • easiest non-cloud backup for tech novices?

    01/08/2015 3:36:14 PM PST · by TurboZamboni · 35 replies
    me | 1-8-15 | TZ
    wanted for a dying laptop.
  • If you sign out of G Mail does google still track you?

    12/25/2014 5:51:08 AM PST · by dennisw · 60 replies
    self | Dec 25 | self
    One of my New Years resolutions is to not stay signed into Google mail or Google anything// Does this help with the tracking google does? I use track me not on Firefox and Chrome. I am using Bing and Google for searches Thanks
  • Dangerous 'Misfortune Cookie' flaw discovered in 12 million home routers

    12/19/2014 9:29:02 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 23 replies
    PCWorld ^ | December 19, 2014 | By John E. Dunn
    Researchers at Check Point have discovered a serious security vulnerability affecting at least 12 million leading-brand home and SME routers that appears to have gone unnoticed for over a decade. Dubbed the ’Misfortune Cookie’ flaw, the firm plans to give a detailed account of the issue at a forthcoming security conference but in the meantime it’s important to stress that no real-world attacks using it have yet been detected. That said, an attacker exploiting the flaw would be able to monitor all data travelling through a gateway such as files, emails and logins and have the power to infect connected...
  • Advice please: Dumping gmail and looking for email recommendations (Vanity)

    11/06/2014 1:59:06 PM PST · by tang-soo · 29 replies
    Self ^ | 11/6/2014 | Myself
    After about 10 years with gmail.com, I've decides to migrate to a new email address. I figure it will take few months, and will insert a forward rule in my current gmail account. I'd like to find another free provider if possible. I don't mind using a service that wraps advertising around received message, but I don't want to use a provide that wraps around sent messages. I know about reagan.com but they charge. I know they advertise explicitly that they do not browse messages for social engineering, advertising ... etc. That attracts me and if I do choose a...
  • How to protect OS X from the “rootpipe” vulnerability

    11/04/2014 7:32:21 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 19 replies
    Mac Issues ^ | November 4, 2014 | by Topher Kessler
    A relatively long-standing vulnerability in OS X has been uncovered by a Swedish hacker, Emil Kvarnhammar, who has dubbed it “rootpipe” by the so-far undisclosed method in which it can be used to take control of your Mac. In this vulnerability, a flaw allows a hacker to gain administrative access of a system without supplying a password, and then be able to interact with your Mac as an administrator. In an interview with MacWorld, Kvarnhammar describes this bug as having been present in OS X 10.8.5, but he was not able to replicate it in 10.9; however, Apple has shuffled...