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Keyword: churchhistory

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  • 1,500-year-old 'magical' papyrus is first to refer to Last Supper

    09/02/2014 10:11:49 AM PDT · by CorporateStepsister · 72 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 2 September 2014 | Sarah Griffiths for
    It has laid largely unstudied in a university library for more than 100 years. But now a 1,500-year-old papyrus has been identified as one of the world’s earliest surviving Christian charms. The ‘remarkable’ document contains some of the earliest documented references to The Last Supper and sheds new light on early Christian practices, experts say.
  • Real History Of The Crusades,The

    08/09/2014 1:09:08 PM PDT · by EBH · 57 replies
    Catholic Culture ^ | Thomas F. Madden
    As a Crusade historian, I found the tranquil solitude of the ivory tower shattered by journalists, editors, and talk-show hosts on tight deadlines eager to get the real scoop. What were the Crusades?, they asked. When were they? Just how insensitive was President George W. Bush for using the word "crusade" in his remarks? With a few of my callers I had the distinct impression that they already knew the answers to their questions, or at least thought they did. What they really wanted was an expert to say it all back to them. For example, I was frequently asked...
  • Pope Francis recalls birth of Church in Upper Room

    05/26/2014 12:21:12 PM PDT · by NYer · 34 replies
    cna ^ | May 26, 2014
    Pope Francis incenses the altar during Mass in the Upper Room on May 26, 2014. Credit: EWTN. Jerusalem, Israel, May 26, 2014 / 09:44 am (CNA/EWTN News).- At the conclusion of his pilgrimage to the Holy Land, Pope Francis focused his homily at Mass on the significance of the Upper Room, held to be the site of the descent of the Holy Spirit upon Jesus' apostles. “It is a great gift that the Lord has given us by bringing us together here in the Upper Room for the celebration of the Eucharist,” said Pope Francis on May 26 in Jerusalem....
  • How a Protestant spin machine hid the truth about the English Reformation

    05/25/2014 10:52:33 AM PDT · by Not gonna take it anymore · 173 replies
    Telegraph UK blog ^ | Sunday 25 May 2014 | Dominic Selwood
    . . . . For centuries, the English have been taught that the late medieval Church was superstitious, corrupt, exploitative, and alien. Above all, we were told that King Henry VIII and the people of England despised its popish flummery and primitive rites. England was fed up to the back teeth with the ignorant mumbo-jumbo magicians of the foreign Church, and up and down the country Tudor people preferred plain-speaking, rational men like Wycliffe, Luther, and Calvin. Henry VIII achieved what all sane English and Welsh people had long desired ­– an excuse to break away from an anachronistic subjugation...
  • Pope, Netanyahu spar over Jesus' native language

    05/26/2014 10:50:43 AM PDT · by VitacoreVision · 91 replies
    Reuters ^ | 26 May 2014 | Reuters
    Pope Francis and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu traded words on Monday over the language spoken by Jesus two millennia ago. "Jesus was here, in this land. He spoke Hebrew," Netanyahu told Francis, at a public meeting in Jerusalem in which the Israeli leader cited a strong connection between Judaism and Christianity. "Aramaic," the pope interjected. "He spoke Aramaic, but he knew Hebrew," Netanyahu shot back. Like many things in the Middle East, where the pope is on the last leg of a three-day visit, modern-day discourse about Jesus is complicated and often political. A Jew, Jesus was born in...
  • Is the Founder of the Christian Religion Paul of Tarsus or Jesus of Nazareth?

    02/24/2014 2:10:01 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 111 replies
    Evidence for God ^ | 02/24/2014 | Rich Deem
    Many skeptics assert that Paul of Tarsus (the apostle Paul) hijacked the early Christian religion, changing the theology from what Jesus originally taught. Usually offered as proof for this claim are the doctrines found in Paul's great theological work, his letter to the Romans. Without a doubt, the book of Romans contains the most complete exposition of orthodox Christian doctrines. Are these doctrines contrary to what Jesus taught? Do they conflict with the teachings of the Old Testament from which they were purportedly derived? If Paul really "invented" Christianity, then one would expect that his teachings would be different from...
  • Why did so many seek to revolutionize the Church in the 60s and 70s?

    02/24/2014 2:34:59 AM PST · by markomalley · 32 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 2/23/2014 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    In my college years I worked with a company that built and serviced pipe organs around the Washington DC area. During those years I probably entered some 300 different churches both Catholic and Protestant.Of course, as a Catholic, I particularly loved going to the Catholic churches. I especially loved visiting the older city parishes that were built back before the revolution. I had grown up in the suburbs where almost every church was built after 1955, when church building took a decided turn for the worse: Ugly bland, beige buildings with carpeted floors and potted plants. A plain wooden table...
  • Muslims Demand "Right of Return" to Spain

    02/23/2014 9:21:03 AM PST · by marshmallow · 36 replies
    The Gatestone Institute ^ | 2/21/14 | Soeren Kern
    Observers say that by granting citizenship to all descendants of expelled Muslims, Spain, virtually overnight, would end up with the largest Muslim population in the European Union."Is Spain aware of what might be assumed when it makes peace with some but not with others? Is Spain aware of what this decision [not to include Muslims in the return] could cost?... Does Spain have alternatives to the foreign investment from Muslims? — Ahmed Bensalh, Morisco-Moroccan journalist. "Persecution of Jews was just that, while what happened with the Arabs was part of a conflict. There is no basis for comparison." — Jose...
  • Dr. David Jeremiah's historical revisionism

    02/10/2014 8:17:44 AM PST · by cleghornboy · 24 replies
    La Salette Journey ^ | February 10, 2014 | Paul Melanson
    Dr. David Jeremiah, senior pastor of Shadow Mountain Community Church in El Cajon, California, in his book entitled "I Never Thought I'd See The Day," which is listed as a "# 1 New York Times Bestseller," engages in historical revisionism as he attempts to portray William Tyndale as a "martyr" for the Bible. On page 161 of his book, Dr. Jeremiah asserts that, "..because TYndale believed that every English-speaking person deserved to have access to the Bible in English, he labored to produce the first complete New Testament (and part of the Old Testament) in English translated directly from the...
  • Spain grants right of dual nationality to Sephardi Jews

    02/10/2014 5:13:52 AM PST · by cll · 20 replies
    Israel Hayom ^ | 2/09/2014 | Eli Leon
    More than 500 years after the Spanish Inquisition, the Spanish government has voted to facilitate the naturalization of Jewish families of Spanish descent, without demanding they give up their other citizenship. Queen Isabella and King Ferdinand of Spain must be rolling in their graves: The government in Madrid on Friday approved legislation that would allow descendents of Jews who were exiled from Spain to be naturalized in the country without having to give up their former citizenship, which had been the law until now. Spanish Justice Minister Alberto Ruiz-Gallardon said that Spain "is indebted to Spanish Jews for spreading the...
  • Remembering the Early Church

    02/09/2014 2:09:50 PM PST · by NYer · 151 replies
    Catholic Education ^ | February 9, 2014 | GEORGE SIM JOHNSTON
    Remembering the Early ChurchGEORGE SIM JOHNSTONLately, I have been hearing a lot about how the primitive Church was not Roman Catholic. Virgin and Child from the catacombs Rome, 4th century I don't know why it is, but this information keeps bursting upon me in the most unlikely settings — a lunch party near the sand dunes, cocktails on the upper east side — where a kindly soul informs me between sips of Dubonnet that the Catholic Church really began as an episcopal conspiracy centuries after Christ. My interlocutor has usually been reading a book by Garry Wills or Elaine Pagels,...
  • Forget The Da Vinci Code: This is The Real Mystery of the Knights Templar

    01/10/2014 5:14:25 AM PST · by lbryce · 52 replies
    Telegraph ^ | December 29, 2013 | Dominic Selwood
    Not so long ago, casually throwing the Knights Templar into polite conversation was a litmus test of mental health. One of Umberto Eco’s characters in Foucault’s Pendulum summed it up perfectly. He declared that you could recognise a lunatic "by the liberties he takes with common sense, by his flashes of inspiration, and by the fact that sooner or later he brings up the Templars". But all good things come to an end. The enigmatic medieval monk-knights are no longer a fringe interest for obsessives. They are now squarely mainstream. And as 18 March 2014 draws closer, Templarmania is going...
  • 12 Historical Quotes Against Sodomy That Every Christian Should Know

    01/03/2014 8:40:04 PM PST · by ReformationFan · 19 replies
    Virtue Online ^ | 12-14-13 | TFP Student Action
    For millennia the Catholic Church has consistently opposed unnatural vice. Here is a brief sampling of useful quotes from Saints, Doctors of the Church, Church Fathers and Ecclesiastical Writers who condemn homosexual vice in their writings. 1. Athenagoras of Athens (2nd Century) Athenagoras of Athens was a philosopher who converted to Christianity in the second century. He shows that the pagans, who were totally immoral, did not even refrain from sins against nature: "But though such is our character (Oh. why should I speak of things unfit to be uttered?), the things said of us are an example of the...
  • HEY, NANCY BOYS: The Early Church Rebelled Against Oppressive Governments

    10/06/2013 5:56:07 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 34 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | October 6, 2013 | Doug Giles
    The Christians of the first century were rebels with a cause. They weren’t the hair-spray-addicted, religious sponges of pop culture and oppressive governments looking to be ogled by an Oprah-addled crowd or breastfed by some big government tit . Oh, no, senorita. The primitive church was out to change the world. After Jerusalem fell in AD 70, the church, birthed by the Holy Spirit during Rome’s heyday, exploded with growth in Asia Minor — which happened to be Ground Zero for Caesar worship. The punch-drunk citizens of Roman rule thought the various Caesars, their laws, and their government were...
  • Archaeologists unearth section of an Anglo Saxon cross in Weardale

    09/28/2013 11:50:09 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    The Northern Echo ^ | Wednesday, September 25th, 2013 | Crook & Weardale desk
    Archaelogists excavating a medieval church in a dales village have found further evidence that the site was an Anglo Saxon settlement. A carved section from an eighth century stone cross was unearthed during a dig at St Botolph"s field in Frosterley in Weardale this week. The discovery was met with great excitement from the archaeologists and volunteers who were digging on the site as part of the Altogether Archaeology project... Mr Frodsham said Frosterley was largely a post-medieval village but recent finds have suggested people lived in the area much earlier... It has already attracted more than 500 volunteers who...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "Peter And Paul"(1981)

    05/19/2013 12:29:36 PM PDT · by ReformationFan · 5 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1981 | Robert Day
  • Did the early Church move the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday? (Ecumenical)

    05/12/2013 5:55:26 PM PDT · by narses · 401 replies
    Catholic.com ^ | Peggy Frye
    Full Question Until recently, I always thought Catholics worshiped on the Sabbath, and that the early Church moved the Sabbath from Saturday to Sunday. Is this true? Answer This is a common misunderstanding. Catholics do not worship on the Sabbath, which according to Jewish law is the last day of the week (Saturday), when God rested from all the work he had done in creation (Gen. 2:2-3). Catholics worship on the Lord’s Day, the first day of the week (Sunday, the eighth day); the day when God said "Let there be light" (Gen. 1:3); the day when Christ rose from...
  • 11 Reasons the Authority of Christianity Is Centered on St. Peter and Rome

    01/06/2013 3:56:49 PM PST · by NYer · 3,032 replies
    stpeterslist ^ | December 19, 2012
    Bl. John Henry Newman said it best: “To be deep in history is to cease to be Protestant.” History paints an overwhelming picture of St. Peter’s apostolic ministry in Rome and this is confirmed by a multitude of different sources within the Early Church. Catholic Encyclopedia states, “In opposition to this distinct and unanimous testimony of early Christendom, some few Protestant historians have attempted in recent times to set aside the residence and death of Peter at Rome as legendary. These attempts have resulted in complete failure.” Protestantism as a whole seeks to divorce Christianity from history by rending Gospel...
  • Was there a church in Mecca? Chiselled stonework with 'Christian figure' ... in Yemen

    01/01/2013 5:55:10 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 14 replies
    daily mail ^ | 18:59 EST, 29 December 2012
    An Archaeologist has discovered what he believes to be the ruins of a buried Christian empire in the highlands of Yemen. The find has led to theories that there may have once been a Christian church in Mecca. A stone carving of a Christian figure was found in Zafar, some 581 miles south of the Holy City, and is thought to have been made in the era of the Prophet Muhammad. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2254657/Was-church-Mecca-Chiselled-stonework-Christian-figure-discovered-holy-site-Yemen.html#ixzz2GmL9IgsA Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
  • Was there a church in Mecca? ... Christian figure discovered at holy site in Yemen

    12/29/2012 2:05:01 PM PST · by george76 · 32 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 29 December 2012
    Archaeologists have discovered the ruins of a buried Christian empire in the highlands of Yemen, leading to theories that there may have once been a church in Mecca. A stone carving of a Christian figure was found in Zafar, some 581 miles south of Mecca, and is thought to have been made in the era of the Prophet Muhammad. Paul Yule, an archaeologist from Heidelberg in Germany, has dated the 5feet 7inch tall relief which shows a man with chains of jewellery, curls and spherical eyes to around 530AD. ... The figure is barefoot, which was typical of Coptic saints....
  • Buried Christian Empire Casts New Light on Early Islam

    12/29/2012 4:19:03 AM PST · by txnativegop · 10 replies
    ABCNews/SpiegelOnline ^ | December 29, 2012 | Matthias Schulz
    Story at link.
  • Is Christmas Pagan? No! It's time to learn some real history....

    12/23/2012 1:28:36 PM PST · by Salvation · 91 replies
    CatholicKnight.blogspot.com ^ | December 2012 | CatholicKnight
    Is Christmas Pagan? A Jewish Star of David Tops This Christmas Tree   THE CATHOLIC KNIGHT:   About this time every year we hear the usual misnomer that Christmas is a Pagan celebration whitewashed by the medieval Catholic Church. We hear this from all corners. Secularists just accept it as fact. Catholics, rather embarrassingly, often try to gloss over it. While Protestant Fundamentalists frequently rail against it, usually calling for either a boycott of the holiday, or else a return to the Jewish festival of Hanukkah. (For some ridiculous reason, some Fundamentalists subscribe to the notion that if a certain...
  • The great Church scholar who lived in a cave for 32 years

    09/30/2012 2:44:34 PM PDT · by NYer · 15 replies
    Catholic Herald ^ | September 30, 2012
    Tintoretto’s painting of the ascetic and acerbic St Jerome Jerome (c 347-420), the greatest scholar among the Church Fathers, made the Latin translation of the Bible which became known as the Vulgate.He was, however, a contentious individual, with a penchant for sarcasm which readily created enemies. “If he will only conceal his nose and hold his tongue,” he wrote of one opponent, “he might yet be taken as handsome and learned.”Jerome was born at Stridon, near Ljubljana in modern Slovenia. He was not baptised until he went to study in Rome as a teenager.His early propensity for idleness and amusement...
  • Why Did the Jews Reject Christianity?

    08/12/2012 9:20:00 PM PDT · by Phinneous · 304 replies
    The Yeshiva.net ^ | 8/1/2010 | Rabbi Joseph Isaac Jacobson
    A Jewish class on why Jews do not accept Christianity. I post for Jews to self-educate and for Christians to understand the Jewish point of view--not that it matters (that they do.)
  • Ancient Testimonies Against Abortion

    08/09/2012 2:24:57 PM PDT · by iowamark · 15 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 08/07/2012 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    In doing research for an Our Sunday Visitor column (my regular Q and A column), I found it necessary to comb through some of the early Church sources regarding the teaching against abortion. I thought it might be helpful here, by way of a resource, to post some of those teachings here. While I have seen a quote here and there, I was actually quite pleased to find several quotes I had not seen or read before on the question of abortion and to assemble in one place a good number of quotes. I also ask your help in adding...
  • Early Christian Communism

    05/24/2012 9:59:00 AM PDT · by Para-Ord.45 · 9 replies
    http://mises.org ^ | May 24, 2012 | Murray N. Rothbard
    For centuries the alleged ideal of communism had come to the world as a messianic and millennial creed. Various seers, notably Joachim of Fiore, had prophesied the final state of mankind as one of perfect harmony and equality, one where all things are owned in common, where there is no necessity for work or need for the division of labor. In the case of Joachim, of course, problems of production and property, indeed of scarcity in general, were "solved" by man no longer possessing a physical body. As pure spirits, men as equal and harmonious psychic entities spending all their...
  • The First Crusade, the true story

    02/27/2012 12:07:26 AM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 38 replies · 2+ views
    ekathimerini.com ^ | By Peter Frankopan
    Why was there a sudden need to recover the city where Jesus Christ lived and was crucified? The answer, writes Peter Frankopan, lies in the imperial capital of Constantinople. On November 27, 1095, Pope Urban II stood up at the Council of Clermont in central France to make an important announcement. Persians (by whom he meant the Turks), “a people rejected by God,” had risen up against the Christians in the East, he said. It was imperative for the knighthood of Europe to rush to defend their brethren. Take up arms, he urged, and defend the faithful who were suffering...
  • EWTN Live: Fr. M. Pacwa w/ Prof. Sharon Davies, author of "Rising Road"&the Fr. James Coyle Project

    08/01/2011 10:05:49 AM PDT · by Coleus · 4 replies
    YouTube, EWTN ^ | 7-20-2011
    EWTN Live - hosted by Fr. Mitch Pacwa with Professor Sharon Davies, author of "Rising Road, A True Tale of Love, Race, and Religion in America," 7-20-2011
  • When America Feared and Reviled Catholics

    10/11/2010 8:46:02 PM PDT · by marshmallow · 39 replies · 1+ views
    The Los Angeles Times ^ | 10/10/10 | Sharon Davies
    In the early 1900s, many Americans — from ordinary citizens to those in high office — were frightened by the perceived threat from the Roman Catholic Church. Their fear had tragic consequences.The mind-set is all too familiar: A radical religious group, lurking inside the country, owing loyalty to a foreign power, threatens America. No one denies that its members have a right to worship as they please, but good Americans, patriots, feel compelled to call for curbs against the menace they present. Because of the number of Americans sharing these fears, calls for restrictions on the religion are voiced openly...
  • Which Came First: New Testament or the Church?

    05/09/2011 10:59:18 AM PDT · by Bokababe · 192 replies
    Journey to Orthodoxy ^ | May 8, 2011 | Fr. James Bernstein
    .....The guidelines I used in interpreting Scripture seemed simple enough: When the plain sense of Scripture makes common sense, seek no other sense. I believed that those who were truly faithful and honest in following this principle would achieve Christian unity. To my surprise, this “common sense” approach led not to increased Christian clarity and unity, but rather to a spiritual free-for-all! Those who most strongly adhered to believing “only the Bible” tended to become the, most factious, divisive, and combative of Christians-perhaps unintentionally. In fact, it seemed to me that the more one held to the Bible as the...
  • Hallelujah! At Age 400, King James Bible Still Reigns

    04/18/2011 5:23:54 PM PDT · by Colofornian · 51 replies · 1+ views
    NPR.org ^ | April 18, 2011 | Barbara Bradley Hagerty
    This year, the most influential book you may never have read is celebrating a major birthday. The King James Version of the Bible was published 400 years ago. It's no longer the top-selling Bible, but in those four centuries, it has woven itself deeply into our speech and culture. Let's travel back to 1603: King James I, who had ruled Scotland, ascended to the throne of England. What he found was a country suspicious of the new king. "He was regarded as a foreigner," says Gordon Campbell, a historian at the University of Leicester in England. "He spoke with a...
  • GEM OF CHRISTIAN HISTORY AT RISK IN TURKEY

    02/25/2011 8:47:24 AM PST · by robowombat · 9 replies
    Zenit ^ | 2011-02-18 | By Paul de Maeyer
    Expropriation of Monastery Land Seen as Effort to Squash Syriacs ROME, FEB. 18, 2011 (Zenit.org).- Not even the Mongols of the 14th century, when they killed 40 monks and some 400 faithful, succeeded in making one of the most ancient Christian convents in the world disappear, but perhaps Prime Minister Recep Tayyip ErdoÄźan of Turkey, can. This appears to be the case of the Syro-Orthodox monastery of Mor Gabriel or "Dayro d-Mor Gabriel," called "Deyrulumur" in Turkish. It is located in the region of Turabdin in the southeast of Anatolia. The convent bears the name of Mor Gabriel (634-668), bishop...
  • The Great Heresies

    03/21/2010 3:03:29 PM PDT · by NYer · 451 replies · 2,827+ views
    From Christianity’s beginnings, the Church has been attacked by those introducing false teachings, or heresies. The Bible warned us this would happen. Paul told his young protégé, Timothy, "For the time is coming when people will not endure sound teaching, but having itching ears they will accumulate for themselves teachers to suit their own likings, and will turn away from listening to the truth and wander into myths" (2 Tim. 4:3–4). What Is Heresy? Heresy is an emotionally loaded term that is often misused. It is not the same thing as incredulity, schism, apostasy, or other sins against faith. The...
  • Apostle to the Irish (Who is the REAL St. Patrick ?)

    03/17/2010 12:58:48 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 117 replies · 912+ views
    Christian Post ^ | March 17 | Charles Colson
    If you ask people who Saint Patrick was, you're likely to hear that he was an Irishman who chased the snakes out of Ireland. It may surprise you to learn that the real Saint Patrick was not actually Irish—yet his robust faith changed the Emerald Isle forever. Patrick was born in Roman Britain to a middle-class family in about A.D. 390. When Patrick was a teenager, marauding Irish raiders attacked his home. Patrick was captured, taken to Ireland, and sold to an Irish king, who put him to work as a shepherd. In his excellent book, How the Irish Saved...
  • When Was the Bible Really Written?

    01/09/2010 5:55:26 PM PST · by driftdiver · 32 replies · 1,212+ views
    Foxnews ^ | Jan 9, 2010 | foxnews
    By decoding the inscription on a 3,000-year-old piece of pottery, an Israeli professor has concluded that parts of the bible were written hundreds of years earlier than suspected. The pottery shard was discovered at excavations at Khirbet Qeiyafa near the Elah valley in Israel -- about 18 miles west of Jerusalem. Carbon-dating places it in the 10th century BC, making the shard about 1,000 years older than the Dead Sea scrolls. ...... English translation of the deciphered text: 1' you shall not do [it], but worship the [Lord]. 2' Judge the sla[ve] and the wid[ow] / Judge the orph[an] 3'...
  • A History of the Baptists, Chapter 8 - The Character of the Anabaptists

    12/03/2009 7:31:28 AM PST · by Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus · 13 replies · 470+ views
    Providence Baptist Ministries ^ | 1921 | John T. Christian
    It is amazing how many names were applied, in the period of the Reformation, to the Baptists. They called each other brethren and sisters, and spoke of each other in the simplest language of affection. Their enemies called them Anabaptists because they repeated baptism when converts came from other parties. This name Anabaptist is a caricature. It damns first by faint praise and then by distortion. "The opprobrious term ‘Anabaptist’ was and is a vile slander. It was invented to conceal thought. It shrouded in a fog the grand ideals of a people loving peace and truth. The term is...
  • Philip Schaff's History of the Church - Passages on the Eucharist

    11/05/2009 8:59:31 AM PST · by Mr Rogers · 63 replies · 933+ views
    Before starting the text of a long article, I want to explain what it is. In discussing the meaning of the Eucharist with Catholics on FreeRepublic, I've frequently been told that the Church Fathers, from the very beginning, have taught it was a 're-presentation' of Calvary. I've read little of the Church Fathers - as have many who have lectured me, I suspect. The norm on both sides of the argument is to pull quotes from those who help your case, and ignore what does not. In excerpts below, taken from his 7,000 page history, Philip Schaff discusses the nuance...
  • Spooky: This Halloween, Protestants celebrate "Reformation Day"

    10/16/2009 4:19:52 PM PDT · by NYer · 55 replies · 2,078+ views
    American Papist ^ | October 16, 2009 | Thomas Peters
    As we prepare for the Holloween season (which seems to become a bigger and bigger deal in the United States each year, and that probably isn't a healthy sign), let's see what our Protestant brothers and sisters are planning. PCANews at the Christian Broadcasting Network website has come up with a way to overcome the satanic/occult aspects of Halloween - a Reformation Day party! They explain it: October 31 celebrates the day that the Reformation in Europe began with Martin Luther posting his 95 theses on the Wittenburg church door, leading to a firestorm response in Germany. Why not...
  • The Russian Primary Chronicle on how Russia was Christianized

    09/25/2009 1:21:12 PM PDT · by Nikas777 · 5 replies · 564+ views
    uoregon.edu ^ | 1978 | Dmitrii Likhachev
    The Russian Primary Chronicle on how Russia was Christianized "Invitation to the Rus" 860-862 (6368-6370) [The four tribes who had been forced to pay tribute to the Varangians--Chuds, Slavs, Merians, and Krivichians] drove the Varangians back beyond the sea, refused to pay them further tribute, and set out to govern themselves. But there was no law among them, and tribe rose against tribe. Discord thus ensued among them, and they began to war one against the other. They said to themselves, "Let us seek a prince who may rule over us, and judge us according to custom [po nravu]". Thus...
  • Hagia Sophia angel uncovered in Turkey

    08/20/2009 7:15:45 AM PDT · by Nikas777 · 20 replies · 1,159+ views
    haber27.com ^ | 08/20/08
    Hagia Sophia angel uncovered in Turkey Restoration workers have uncovered the mosaic face of an angel in the world-renowned Hagia Sophia Museum in the Turkish city of Istanbul 29 Temmuz 2009 Çarşamba 02:35 The mosaic, believed to be one of a group of six, was found in the pendentive, an arched triangular section supporting the dome of the monument. Some experts believe the six-winged figure dates back to the 14th century, but the Hagia Sofia Science Board is set to determine the relic's true age by comparing it to similar mosaics found in 1935. Built by the Byzantine emperor Justinian,...
  • Review: How the Byzantines Saved Europe

    08/18/2009 6:27:29 AM PDT · by Nikas777 · 42 replies · 1,786+ views
    acton.org ^ | AUGUST 17, 2009 | JOHN COURETAS
    Review: How the Byzantines Saved Europe Posted by JOHN COURETAS on MONDAY, AUGUST 17, 2009 The Oxford Handbook of Byzantine Studies. Edited by Elizabeth Jeffreys, John Haldon, Robin Cormack. Oxford University Press (2008)Byzantium: The Surprising Life of a Medieval Empire by Judith Herrin. Princeton University Press (2008) Ask the average college student to identify the 1,100 year old empire that was, at various points in its history, the political, commercial, artistic and ecclesiastical center of Europe and, indeed, was responsible for the very survival and flourishing of what we know today as Europe and you’re not likely to get the...
  • Constantinople and Norsin

    08/19/2009 6:48:42 AM PDT · by Nikas777 · 6 replies · 574+ views
    sundayszaman.com ^ | 16.08.2009 | MUMTAZER TURKONE
    Constantinople and Norsin MUMTAZER TURKONE m.turkone@todayszaman.com There is a contradiction in a question posed by Devlet Bahçeli to the president, who referred to Güroymak as Norşin. "Will you also change the signboard reading ‘İstanbul' that you encounter on the highway traveling from Gebze to İstanbul to ‘Constantinople'?" asked Bahçeli. Here are my questions: What will happen if we change it? What change will this make? The answer: Only our habits will change. Why? It is because there is nothing in the name “İstanbul” that belongs to Turks, Turkishness or the Turkish language other than our habits. İstanbul as a name...
  • What happened in 1492 to change Spanish Catholic Culture.

    08/18/2009 6:04:20 PM PDT · by Cardhu · 14 replies · 1,347+ views
    Vanity | August 18th 2009 | Cardhu
    I was talking to my daughter at lunch today and she asked me if she had told me about what she had discovered about the Spanish fondness for cured ham. She said she had traveled all over Europe and did not see the cured hams that hang from the ceilings in the delicatessens as is common in Spain. Usually, in the smaller delicatessens they have about fifty to one hundred, "severed legs," as she calls them, hanging from the ceiling, each with a little paper cup hanging below to catch any grease that leeches out of the ham. Here is...
  • Emperor Constantine's Last Walk

    08/17/2009 6:15:37 AM PDT · by Nikas777 · 25 replies · 1,469+ views
    Peterborough Examiner ^ | July 11, 2007 | Erik Blackthrone O'Barr
    Osprey Media. - Peterborough Examiner - Ontario, CA [Emperor] Constantine's Last WalkJunior Fiction winner Local News - Wednesday, July 11, 2007 @ 00:00 By Erik Blackthrone O'Barr Grade 9 Peterborough Collegiate The cannon fire grew closer with each thundering belch of rock and iron, as the walls of Constantinople, wonders of the world that had never been breached save for treachery, groaned under the strain. Buildings crackled with scorching heat, set ablaze by pitch- covered arrows. The shouts and screams of the dying echoed in the empty streets of the once great city. And Constantine XI Palaiologos, last Emperor of...
  • From church to mosque: Istanbul’s forgotten Byzantine heritage

    08/14/2009 8:51:21 AM PDT · by Nikas777 · 8 replies · 783+ views
    todayszaman.com ^ | Aug 09, 2009 | PAT YALE
    Aug 14, 2009 From church to mosque: Istanbul’s forgotten Byzantine heritage Is it a church? Is it a mosque? Is it a museum? Aya Sofya (Hagia Sophia, the Church of Divine Wisdom) may be one of İstanbul's most famous buildings, but it's also one that suffers from an acute identity crisis, having started life as the great sixth century church of the Emperor Justinian, before becoming a mosque after the Ottoman conquest of Constantinople in 1453 and then a museum in 1935 after Mustafa Kemal Atatürk declared the Turkish Republic. Something similar happened to Chora, near Edirnekapı, which also kicked...
  • Were the Church Fathers Closer to Protestantism Than to Catholicism?

    07/28/2009 11:03:59 PM PDT · by bdeaner · 21 replies · 1,412+ views
    Biblical Evidence for Catholicism ^ | August 25, 2006 | Dave Armstrong
    CHURCH FATHERS Protestantism is closer than Catholicism to the beliefs of the Church fathers Many Catholic doctrines were only introduced centuries later and were corruptions Initial reply In fact, the exact opposite is true: the fathers as a whole were much more "Catholic" in their beliefs than they were some kind of primitive "Protestants", and this is amply confirmed by Protestant Church historians themselves. Extensive reply Ten major "distinctively Catholic" doctrines will be supported by documentation (that early Church fathers largely agreed) from the Protestant historians listed below: Bible, Church, and Tradition, not Bible Alone (sola Scriptura) as the...
  • Indiana Jones and the Christian catacombs? Not quite

    07/28/2009 1:34:14 PM PDT · by NYer · 15 replies · 1,516+ views
    cns ^ | July 23, 2009 | Cindy Wooden
    VATICAN CITY (CNS) -- Sometimes a job is just a job, even when from the outside it looks like it involves the stuff of an Indiana Jones movie. Fabrizio Bisconti is the newly named archaeological superintendent of the Pontifical Commission for Sacred Archaeology, which oversees the upkeep and preservation of 140 Christian catacombs from the third and fourth centuries scattered all over Italy. Most of the time, he said, the job is just work and study. Staff members can spend a full month with surgical tools and cotton balls cleaning a third-century sarcophagus, but then there are those stunning, shocking,...
  • Calvin500 Opens in Geneva

    07/06/2009 9:07:27 AM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 4 replies · 247+ views
    ChristianNewsWire ^ | July 5, 2009 | David Hall
    GENEVA, Switzerland, July 5 /Christian Newswire/ -- Calvin 500, the international Quincentenary celebration of the 500th anniversary of John Calvin’s birth (July 10, 1509), opened today at St. Pierre Cathedral in the old town of Geneva. Beginning with a welcome by Mr. Guillaume Taylor from the St. Pierre Parish Council, approximately 500 worshipers attended the opening convocations, featuring morning worship from Calvin’s time and a sermon on Philippians 3:8-12 by Dr. Sinclair Ferguson of the First Presbyterian Church in Columbia, South Carolina. The evening services featured Ugandan Archbishop Henry Luke Orombi, much psalm singing, and a sermon by Dr. Bryan...
  • The Early Church: How Christians elevated culture

    07/02/2009 11:49:01 PM PDT · by bdeaner · 7 replies · 510+ views
    Catholic Education Resource Center ^ | 7/3/09 | Anthony Esolen
    What did the Christians cherish from the pagan traditions, and what did they change? How Christians elevated culture What did the Christians cherish from the pagan traditions, and what did they change? They raised the status of women. It's dogma in our public schools today that women in ancient times were oppressed, because women had no voting rights, women had not the same opportunities as men, and so forth. You will be mocked if you deny that this spells oppression. If you're a college professor and you deny it, get ready for the stake. But the charges are anachronistic and...
  • Ancient Find Proves Christ's Words? (oldest christian church unearthed)

    07/02/2009 6:53:30 AM PDT · by NYer · 16 replies · 1,989+ views
    Netscape ^ | July 2009
    Ancient Find Proves Christ's Words?Archaeologists have unearthed in Jordan what they believe to be the first Christian church in the world. Dating back almost 2,000 years to sometime between 33 AD to 70 AD, the church, which is actually a cave, was found underneath Saint Georgeous Church, which itself dates back to 230 AD, in Rihab in northern Jordan near the Syrian border. Agence France Presse and The Jordan Times report that the church is thought to have sheltered the world's earliest Christians from persecution and certain death. "We have evidence to believe this church sheltered the early Christians--the 70...