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Keyword: ccbs

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  • Calcium channel blockers linked to breast cancer: Should women stop taking the drugs?

    08/06/2013 2:02:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    eMaxHealth ^ | August 5, 2013 | Kathleen Blanchard RN
    Women taking drugs known as calcium channel blockers (CCBs) for high blood pressure and other health conditions may be at higher risk for breast cancer if the drug is used long-term, according to a study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). The finding is particularly important because so many people take drugs to lower blood pressure. It’s also important because studies about risk of breast cancer from the drugs that are the most commonly prescribed medication in the U.S. have yielded inconsistent results. Christopher I. Li, M.D., Ph.D., of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle...
  • Not Defending The Brand (Viacom/CBS Commit Corporate Suicide)

    09/16/2004 8:50:12 PM PDT · by FormerACLUmember · 29 replies · 1,039+ views
    HughHewitt.com ^ | 9/16/04 | Hugh Hewitt
    In October of 1982, someone began to put poison into Tylenol bottles, and seven deaths resulted. Johnson & Johnson, the owner of the brand, responded immediately and aggressively to the consumer reaction, and the response has become a model for corporate crisis managers, and a famous "case study" at Harvard Business School. Commentary on the episode has always focused on the company's decision to put the public interest first. One historian of the crises wrote: "The public relations decisions made as a result of the Tylenol crisis, arrived in two phases. The first phase was the actual handling of the...