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Posts by wtd

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  • Fox You're Pinheads if you don't bring back Bill O'Reilly

    04/23/2017 12:40:55 PM PDT · 37 of 63
    wtd to CptnObvious
    I, for one, would prefer Fox bring back E.D. Hill

    ...lost her Fox News show after [Obama's]‘terrorist fist jab’ remark.

  • Saudi king names son as US envoy as ties boosted with Trump

    04/23/2017 12:13:05 PM PDT · 12 of 13
    wtd to 2ndDivisionVet
    It has also been reported that
    Salman has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease, and at many times cannot remember his own name. link
  • Muslim Immigrant Charged with Terrorism After Barging into Christian Conference & Making Threats

    04/22/2017 7:58:15 AM PDT · 21 of 43
    wtd to davikkm
    • http://news.sd.gov/newsitem.aspx?id=21486

      Quote:

      "South Dakotans do not need a permit to purchase a firearm in our state. The firearm requirements we have in state law are few and reasonable. One such requirement is that if you want to carry a concealed pistol – under your coat, for example – you must obtain a permit. You pay $10 and undergo a background check. The background check is a safety measure to identify applicants who may NOT be eligible to carry a concealed weapon because they have a criminal record or a history of mental instability. Barring those few exceptions, it’s easy and cheap, and it usually takes only a few days to receive a permit. "

      So....

    • did this individual obtain the necessary license?
    • Did he undergo a background check? His video where he displays his weapons and directly threatens 'be afraid' should provide enough proof to investigate this individual and his intentions as well as to question whether his threats pose actual and immediate threats to law abiding 2A supporters and citizens at large.

      Interesting point made by the link about SD law

    • - if Muslim immigrant Ehab Abdulmutta Jaber, from Saudi Arabia claims mental illness he does so at the risk of sacrificing any right to 2A. Should he avoid the 'mental illness' excuse, he will open himself to terrorism charges...and rightly so.
  • Gunman 'randomly' opens fire on Laclede Gas workers in St. Louis

    04/20/2017 11:47:58 AM PDT · 4 of 69
    wtd to Repealthe17thAmendment
    Video report:

  • Reeling From Low Oil Prices, Saudis Look To Freeze Megaprojects

    04/19/2017 11:37:41 AM PDT · 18 of 22
    wtd to DUMBGRUNT
    I'm glad you pointed this out. Good to know.

    Shutterstock video clips reveal the shia stand and pray with arms extended at sides.

    Whereas the Sunni are seen with their arms across their chests as here:

    and

  • Reeling From Low Oil Prices, Saudis Look To Freeze Megaprojects

    04/19/2017 10:15:35 AM PDT · 14 of 22
    wtd to DUMBGRUNT
    DUMBGRUNT wrote:"... it would be fatal to walk into the wrong mosque, they form their hands differently, a dead giveaway."

    Interesting observation. I wonder if such is visibly identifiable within the organized street prayers and protest marches when they stop-drop-pray-antagonize-general public.

  • MSNBC Terror Analyst Wants ISIS to Bomb Trump Tower Istanbul

    04/19/2017 9:09:11 AM PDT · 15 of 18
    wtd to detective

    Our nation’s sacred First Amendment serves in many ways, particularly when our rights to protected speech unveils traitors - through their own words.

  • Facebook killer may be on the loose in another state

    04/17/2017 4:41:29 AM PDT · 37 of 53
    wtd to RummyChick
    RummyChick wrote: "Twitter saying photoshopped",/i>

    Quote from linked article:

    "While cops initially said the murder was broadcast on Facebook Live, the social media site later confirmed that it had been filmed separately, then posted online. Stephens did go live, but not during the killing, they said."
  • US Said Preparing Strike To 'Utterly Destroy' N. Korean Nuclear Program

    04/16/2017 5:52:27 AM PDT · 62 of 81
    wtd to Fennie
    A more accurate title would read:

    "US Said Preparing Strike To 'Utterly Destroy' N. Korean Nuclear Program" aka Clinton/Albright legacy

  • RAW: SYRIA: Horrifying video 100 Killed as Bomb Hits Buses Awaiting Evacuation 4/15/17

    04/16/2017 5:47:30 AM PDT · 54 of 59
    wtd to Fitzy_888
    Fitzy_888 wrote: "ISIS has a 288 page document titled “Management of Savagery: The Most Critical Stage Through Which the Islamic Nation Will Pass”.

    English translation:

    FWIW...I copied and pasted your links to VladTepesblog which also offers the following option to download related material:

  • Fake missiles on display by North Korean regime?

    04/16/2017 5:16:32 AM PDT · 5 of 27
    wtd to Mean Daddy
    First comment at the LiveLeak video illustrates and states:

    "... it's a soviet SA-5, it's meant to look like that."

  • Assad claims US worked with terrorists to carry out gas attack

    04/13/2017 8:38:26 AM PDT · 12 of 48
    wtd to ColdOne; marron; dynoman; Jane Austen; alloysteel; Socon-Econ; bioqubit; rrrod
  • Tillerson asks European diplomats why US taxpayers should care about Ukraine

    04/12/2017 5:20:42 AM PDT · 16 of 28
    wtd to CitizenUSA
    CitizenUSA wrote: "... especially when we’re still paying the lion’s share of the bills?"

    The reference quote above reminds me of this essay posted at the Gates of Vienna blog earlier this week:

    • How Long Before the Dark Ages Return? (Part 2)

      by H. Numan

      In my previous essay I gave one of the many reasons why the West Roman Empire fell, while the East Roman (Byzantine) Empire didn’t. The circumstances of our present situation are strikingly similar. Before we continue, you’ll need some background information.

      Agriculture: until about 1800 most people were farmers. Most certainly during the ancient period. The percentage varied, but you can safely assume well over 90% of the entire population was working in the fields. Experts set this percentage even higher, at 95%. What we learn from history is what the other 5% did. That 5% consisted of urban citizens, the middle class, civil servants, the church, nobles (equites and senatores) and the imperial court. Only after the invention of inorganic chemistry (fertilizer) and steam power did the 95% go down drastically. That’s around 1850; not that long ago. Before that starvation and famine were very serious problems.

      Money: yes, it existed. But not as we know it today. Wealth wasn’t measured in coins or gold, but in arable land. Especially during the later days of the empire. Mining for gold and silver was no longer possible; the European mines were exhausted. The later Roman empire had a chronic shortage of money. Sound familiar? The EU has the same problem.

      Real insecurity: Castles — the word comes from the Roman word castelum — look so romantic. I can’t feel any more at ease than when quietly strolling over ancient town walls in a medieval town. That’s how we look at them now. Entirely wrong! Those walls and castles weren’t build to promote tourism but out of sheer necessity. You needed them to stay alive. To get a taste of why they were built, watch a Mad Max movie. The Roman empire didn’t have or need any walls until the 2nd century, when the barbarian raids became an everyday threat in all parts of the empire. Until that time the elites invested in public buildings (bath houses, temples, markets, etc.) and games (theaters, chariot races, gladiatorial games). Not in fortifications. After the 2nd century that stopped and money was diverted to provide for more security. Sound familiar?

      [Roman ruins]

      We’re not done yet. Rampant insecurity necessitated that the elite invest massively in protecting their property and assets. Cities were walled, villas (a roman villa was usually a very large farm anyway) were fortified. They didn’t do that free of charge for the public good. Surrounding free farmers got an offer they couldn’t refuse: remain a free independent farmer, and die for sure during the next barbarian raid. Or become a serf. In that case you could flee to the nearby villa for protection. Sounds a bit like the currently fashionable economic freelance contracts? You’re probably right. People didn’t fancy becoming serfs, just as most people in Europe really don’t want to become freelancers. Both simply didn’t have another choice.

      Education: The Roman elite invested a lot of money in their education. Only the very wealthy could afford it. You weren’t really an upper crust Roman unless you were 100% fluent in Latin and Greek. Mathematics, law and rhetoric were essential part of the curriculum. Education was privately funded and very expensive. Without it, you couldn’t build a career.

      Vicious circle: The Roman empire had to be defended. That cost money, and a lot of it. There is a maximum limit how much tax can be levied. The Dutch prime minister is unaware that it exists, but it does. During the late Roman empire taxation was at its absolute maximum. More could not be extracted. It was barely enough to provide security most of time to keep the barbarians at bay.

      The crux is in ‘most of the time’. Sometimes it wasn’t. Barbarians weren’t fools. They usually waited for a weak emperor or governor or a civil war. As soon as the attention of the empire was focused elsewhere, they attacked the weakest spot. Usually in hope of booty, but should the opportunity present itself they happily dropped anchor and settled down. That area was lost for taxation. The empire had less money to pay the army, which caused more attacks, which caused less tax revenue. A vicious circle the Roman empire couldn’t get out of. Now you have the groundwork we need to continue.

      [Luigi Rossini, 'Veduta Generale del Foro Romano', 1821]

      How long before the Dark Ages return? Just three generations. That’s the short answer. Here’s the explanation:

      A generation is a time period of approximately fifteen years, in which people grow up in the same circumstances and within the same time period. That’s in peacetime. In war, that period is much shorter. I can’t say exactly how long but less than five years up to ten is a good estimate. Three generations therefore is less than fifteen years up to a maximum of thirty years, as we are not living in peacetime conditions anymore. In other words: our dark ages will take hold serious between 2025 and 2035. You don’t notice much. At best that in the past everything was better. Every step is small step back. Usually baby steps. And suddenly …. WHAM! You’re again in the dark ages. That’s how it worked in the Roman empire, and that’s how it can work for us.

      The barbarians lived mostly outside the Roman empire. Their societies were constantly at war. For them, peace was the short period between wars. They lived in semi-nomadic or basic permanent settlements, spoke their own languages, had their own religions. Most often they were illiterate or barely literate (and then only the elite), and had their own form of law. Usually spoken only. Raids against neighbors were the rule. Who that neighbor was didn’t really matter. If your neighbor was foolish enough not to guard his herd of cattle, you ended up with a much bigger herd the next day.

      As long as Rome was strong and powerful, the raids (most often for plunder and cattle) were limited. During the 2nd and 3rd turbulent centuries, the power of Rome vastly declined, and raids became more common. The opportunity presented itself to settle down permanently. Large areas of the empire were lost that way, before it actually fell. In today’s terms: large areas are now no-go areas, where the police dare not enter without military support. The inhabitants live there in their own societies under their own rules and religion.

      The problem the barbarian realms had was management. Let’s look at the Goths and Burgundians. The Visigoths took over Spain, the Burgundians the south of France. Rome was no longer able to drive them out. Their settlements were now permanent. In Spain they were very strong, in the South of France much less so. Controlling an area militarily is one thing. To administer and manage it, quite another. For that you need people with much better education and experience. The Romans had it, the new rulers lacked it.

      The local Roman elites also had a problem. Their wealth was in land. What they would have liked to do was to bundle everything up and move elsewhere, but that was impossible. You can’t move land. Either you move yourself and live elsewhere, in Constantinople for example, poor as church mice. A few did so, but not a lot. Or you look to see if a deal is possible.

      The new barbarian kingdoms needed managers. The managers were available and willing. Both needed something from the other. The Roman elite in the South of France got a fairly good deal, their colleagues in Spain less so. They could keep part of their possessions and in return they managed the Visigoth and Burgundian kingdoms for their new overlords. Roman law applied to Roman citizens, Gothic law for the others. The Burgundians fairly quickly converted to Roman Catholicism, the Visigoths remained Arians. The Roman elites collected taxes, administered law and handled foreign correspondence. The difference was that they didn’t get to keep the money anymore. Everything remained — outwardly — pretty much the same.

      The kings themselves could read and write, but not a lot. Their expertise was in waging war. One doesn’t need an expensive education in rhetoric for that, nor did they have to. They had the Roman elites to do it for them. Make no mistake, the first generation of barbarians had one big ideal: to become real Roman citizens. They — very much unlike our own barbarians — admired Roman civilization. They wanted to be part of that, with as little (mental) effort as possible. If they looked down upon anything at all, it was their own, definitely not Roman, culture. Therefore, after a hard day of work at the court, the king happily invited his Roman managers to entertain him and his court with some rhetoric performances or quoting Homerus. The Roman managers, of course, duly obliged. Just as ours do today.

      [Ruins of the Agora at Smyrna, #2]

      Very soon the need for lengthy correspondence abroad fell away, for Rome itself had fallen. Constantinople was even further away. There wasn’t any need for a very expensive education anymore. The Roman elites had to make both ends meet, just like everyone else. The son got a good education, with some Greek, but not a lot. Some rhetoric, but mainly so he could entertain well. Not to shine in a court of law.

      Now we go forward in time. About five to ten years. The fall of Rome is not forgotten, but it’s the past. About as far away as 9-11 is for us now. What’s going on in Constantinople is no longer of much importance. What happens in the Germanic kingdom across the border is. The new Germanic kingdoms are constantly at war with each other. The son of our first generation Roman elite has taken over the job from his father. A very much diminished job, because the king doesn’t really need them anymore. The deal struck still applies, but the need for it is almost gone. Therefore also the privileges. His son learns to read and write. That’s about it. And how to fight well, so he can stay alive.

      Finally, again we skip five to ten years, money is a now thing of the past. The economy relies entirely on bartering and serfdom. The serfs are now serfs as we know them today. They have no relation anymore with their previous Roman elites. They belong to and work for their Germanic elites. That elite took over their Christian religion (not in Spain, the Visigoths kept to the ‘wrong’ Arian version). Most of the administrative work can be done by lower clergy. A village priest is enough for most administrative jobs. The Roman elites have by now almost completely vanished. Some are still there, but no longer as elites. Perhaps at best as middle class. The elite are now Germanic.

      In a time frame of fifteen to thirty years society changed from a large international one into a bunch of much smaller rural societies constantly at war. The original population — then and now — wasn’t asked anything. The elites were just as eager to strike deals as ours are today. Sometimes it was a good deal, sometimes it wasn’t. The original population barely noticed any difference. They had to toil. Hard. Very hard.

      That’s a difference between then and now, because you will definitely notice that things have changed. For the worse. More about that in the next article.

      — H. Numan

  • The Case for Segregated Islamic Prisons

    04/07/2017 7:54:03 AM PDT · 8 of 12
    wtd to davikkm
    Segregate? Isn't that like surrendering territory? I prefer that any self-declared Muslim convicted of any crime which would require the general non-muslim convict to serve time, should

    1)lose their citizenship

    2) face immediate deportation Permanent cease to all dawa in our nation's prisons, PERIOD. Personally, I would completely outlaw Islam.

  • Evidence Calls Western Narrative About Syrian Chemical Attack Into Question

    04/07/2017 5:28:38 AM PDT · 116 of 138
    wtd to pissant
    A few thoughts . . .

    Quoting Baron at Gates of Vienna:

    ". . . . the Russians, who want to maintain solidarity with their Slavic cousins in the Balkans and prevent an unbroken chain of Islamic territory stretching from the Bosphorus to the border of Croatia."

    That quote reminds me of the following quote from the March 2017 edition of Hillsdale College's "Imprimis" pamphlet/mailer. Written by Senior Editor of 'The Weekly Standard', Christopher Caldwell,

    • How to Think About Vladimir Putin also states similar sentiments:
      "One theme runs through Russian foreign policy, and has for much of its history. There is no country, with the exception of Israel, that has a more dangerous frontier with the Islamic world. You would think that this would be the primary lens through which to view Russian conduct—a good place for the West to begin in trying to explain Russian behavior that, at first glance, does not have an obvious rationale. "

      Another quote worth repeating illustrates why Putin has become the Progressive left's current boogeyman.

      "[President Ronald]Reagan’s gift as a foreign policy thinker, he said, was not his idealism. It was his ability to set priorities, to see what constituted the biggest threat. Today’s biggest threat to the U.S. isn’t Vladimir Putin.

      So why are people thinking about Putin as much as they do? Because he has become a symbol of national self-determination."

      ********

      Now also consider the damage incurred with the insane enabling of Iran through financial and political enrichments which the previous-occupant-of-the-oval-office provided to the nihilist ayatollahs of Iran in his waning months as president. The fierce determination of these ayatollahs to bring harm to the West does present an alarming threat to our current Commander in Chief, hence the suggestion that the latest kinetic action order was in this nation's interest.

    • NewsMax: Ex-CIA Director Woolsey: Strike Iran's Nukes in Syrian Response
  • Evidence Calls Western Narrative About Syrian Chemical Attack Into Question

    04/07/2017 4:49:37 AM PDT · 112 of 138
    wtd to pissant
    Quoting Baron at Gates of Vienna:
    ". . . . the Russians, who want to maintain solidarity with their Slavic cousins in the Balkans and prevent an unbroken chain of Islamic territory stretching from the Bosphorus to the border of Croatia."
    That quote reminds me of the following quote from the March 2017 edition of Hillsdale College's "Imprimis" pamphlet/mailer. Written by Senior Editor of 'The Weekly Standard', Christopher Caldwell,

    • How to Think About Vladimir Putin also states similar sentiments:
      "One theme runs through Russian foreign policy, and has for much of its history. There is no country, with the exception of Israel, that has a more dangerous frontier with the Islamic world. You would think that this would be the primary lens through which to view Russian conduct—a good place for the West to begin in trying to explain Russian behavior that, at first glance, does not have an obvious rationale. "
      Another quote worth repeating illustrates why Putin has become the Progressive left's current boogeyman.
      "[President Ronald]Reagan’s gift as a foreign policy thinker, he said, was not his idealism. It was his ability to set priorities, to see what constituted the biggest threat. Today’s biggest threat to the U.S. isn’t Vladimir Putin. So why are people thinking about Putin as much as they do? Because he has become a symbol of national self-determination."
  • Motivations of Susan Rice Questioned in Requesting Identities of Trump Team

    04/06/2017 7:52:43 AM PDT · 4 of 4
    wtd to Epoch Times
    Today's update from George Webb addresses the Susan Rice unmasking - FWIW: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk34uIy9_7s&t=6m17s George Webb Day 164.2. Update:
    Now, people question the “True Pundit” credibility sometimes. I’ll let Robert Boyce deny that (NYPDetective Wiener server) and I’ll take the chances, you know, in terms of defamation, and so forth. I don’t think . . .he has never said a word. I believe NYPD is on my side and I believe retired FBI are on my side and I believe the people in the field offices of the FBI are on my side because they know McCabe has crushed the Hillary, Huma and now the Awan brothers investigation – AND – he is the one who ordered the wire taps of Trump and all of his associates. Susan Rice is an advisor, she cannot order wire taps. Those wire taps were ordered by McCabe, just like he’s ordered wire taps over the last 20 years. “
  • Multiple Reports: All Unmasking Fingers Pointing Toward Nat Sec Adviser Susan Rice

    04/06/2017 7:45:06 AM PDT · 89 of 97
    wtd to I_be_tc; Whenifhow

    Today’s update from George Webb addresses the Susan Rice unmasking -

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sk34uIy9_7s&t=6m17s

    George Webb 164.2

    Now, people question the “True Pundit” credibility sometimes. I’ll let Robert Boyce deny that (NYPDetective Wiener server) and I’ll take the chances, you know, in terms of defamation, and so forth. I don’t think . . .he has never said a word. I believe NYPD is on my side and I believe retired FBI are on my side and I believe the people in the field offices of the FBI are on my side because they know McCabe has crushed the Hillary, Huma and now the Awan brothers investigation – AND – he is the one who ordered the wire taps of Trump and all of his associates. Susan Rice is an advisor, she cannot order wire taps. Those wire taps were ordered by McCabe, just like he’s ordered wire taps over the last 20 years. “

  • Multiple Reports: All Unmasking Fingers Pointing Toward Nat Sec Adviser Susan Rice

    04/05/2017 1:20:28 PM PDT · 57 of 97
    wtd to gaijin

    This Rebel report ties Obama administration surveillance of Trump with the Seal Team 6 assasination - back to 2011 almost to the day

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NyfSY0-JWeI

  • Truth of Susan Rice Unmasking Trump Transition Team Scandal is in the Timeline

    04/05/2017 8:30:22 AM PDT · 12 of 16
    wtd to Red Badger
    Red Badger wrote:

    The listed timeline is missing Susan Rice's March appearance on PBS stating