Posts by presidio9

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  • Elizabeth Warren Not Running For President Is Good News (for Democrats)

    12/20/2014 5:41:28 PM PST · 1 of 34
    presidio9
  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/19/2014 8:28:30 AM PST · 119 of 128
    presidio9 to Sirius Lee
    Maybe, but nothing like what is required to write, compose, paint. These are the true artists. These are the true creators.

    You are attempting, however inartfully, to quantify the value of the so-called "performing arts" versus the "creative arts." I am an architectural designer, who also draws and sculpts on the side -so I presume to speak with some authority on this issue. I am also a conservative heterosexual male -which makes me something of a rare bird in my field -but that's a different story.

    The question of "what is art?" is something that has thus far never been successfully answered, and is best left to philosophers. For example, I still believe the sight of Barry Sanders running with the football was its own art form. I will say this on this issue: While there is no shortage of bad singers and bad actors, great singing or great acting takes talent and training, as do the creative arts. A great actor (the best I was ever lucky enough to see was Alec Guinness -on Broadway, not in a space ship) can take a script and play bring forth thoughts and emotions that weren't there). It is important to realize that the performing arts are, for the most part, collaborative pieces. Sort of like architectural design, come to think of it. And, as a capitalist, I will point out that in today's culture, the performing arts are, by far, the disciplines of greatest financial reward.

  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 3:41:31 PM PST · 75 of 128
    presidio9 to Clemenza
    And nobody cares about doo wop anymore, except for aging Italian American proles on social security.

    Clint Eastwood did a major biopic on a do-wop group last year.

    In fairness, it did terrible in the box office.

    And kids today probably have no idea who Clint Eastwood is either.

  • Artificial Intelligence Isn’t a Threat—Yet

    12/18/2014 3:13:07 PM PST · 13 of 17
    presidio9 to Born to Conserve
    We used to measure computers against each other. Now we measure computers against humans. In the future, computers will measure themselves against each other — humans will be irrelevant.

    The North Korea story makes me think that we are not far from a time when nations will use limited AI to hack their enemies more quickly and more efficiently.

  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 3:10:59 PM PST · 69 of 128
    presidio9
    Correcting my own mistake: PewDiePie has 6.6 billion YouTube views. And 35 million subscribers...
  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 3:05:50 PM PST · 66 of 128
    presidio9 to greene66

    I believe the disconnect to our earlier, shared culture is becoming greater and greater. Partly due to technology, which has created a fragmentation of outlets and put people into smaller, ghetto-ized hollows of their own makings.

    Last night, I found out by accident who PewDiePie is. If you have never heard of him don't bother Googling. You only need to know that he is THE most popular personality on Youtube. His videos have been viewed a BILLION (with a "B") times. His "talent" is watching people play video games and commenting on it. Kids today LOVE him. I tried watching three of his videos, and I flat-out did not get it. It is not entertaining even for a second or two. Made me think that I finally belong on the Muppet Show balcony, next to Stadtler and Waldorf. This is the best example that I can think of of our disconnect.

  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 2:49:02 PM PST · 51 of 128
    presidio9 to Musket
    For the World to forget the music of the 60s and 70s something better has to replace it. That hasn’t happened.

    Incorrect. Again, a good proportion of every generation thinks that their music is the best. There are plenty of people my age who prefer Nirvana, or U2, or Green Day to the Beatles -I'm not one of them, but I would call myself outnumbered.

  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 2:45:32 PM PST · 47 of 128
    presidio9 to Liberty Valance
    Didn't you hear? It's all about that bass now ...

    Am I the only one who is completely fed up with Youtube videos that make you sit through a 30 second advertisement?

    As for Meghan, formerly of Nantucket and now Hyannis, she is one of a long line of spoiled rich girls who have achieved their allotted 15 minutes by ripping off someone else's music. If Playboy is around in 20 years, she will be heard from again when she does her nude pictures.

  • Artificial Intelligence Isn’t a Threat—Yet

    12/18/2014 2:38:45 PM PST · 1 of 17
    presidio9
  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 2:30:37 PM PST · 32 of 128
    presidio9 to dfwgator
    Some only know Bing from when he did that duet with David Bowie.

    Not to make you feel really old, but David Bowie will turn 68 next month, and is therefore a dinosaur himself. I just asked my teenaged nephew, and he had no idea who David Bowie is. On the plus side, he has heard of Bing Crosby: "Was he a golfer?"

  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 2:24:18 PM PST · 26 of 128
    presidio9 to henkster

    I would add to what I just said in my previous post that, to some extent, the Beatles are still held out as the template of Rock music. People who are familiar with the history of popular music know this not to be true. We also know that the music that “the kids are listening today” sounds nothing like the Beatles. Music continues to evolve. At some point, most of their catalogue (but probably not “A Day in the Life,” for example) will sound as antiquated as Glenn Miller does to millenials today.

  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 2:20:53 PM PST · 24 of 128
    presidio9 to the OlLine Rebel

    Music might be man’s greatest invention (the birds may have a say in that debate). Anyone who limits their selections to what other people are currently listening to is missing out on endless possibilities. There has been great music (and terrible music) recorded in every single decade since Edison perfected the phonograph. Believe it or not, there is great music even today, but that is not all that anybody should be listening to.

    Because recorded popular music is only a century old, I believe that many of the greatest examples (these would include every artist mention in the article) will continue to be heard as long as people are listening to music. However, I also believe that a large percentage of every generation is POSITIVE that theirs had the greatest music. When there are no more Boomers, people certainly will not appreciate the Beatles to the extent they were once appreciated(when is the last time you heard a Rolling Stones song on the radio?), but they will continue to be heard from.

  • Famous Today, Forgotten Tomorrow (We've forgotten Hope & Crosby. Will we forget the Beatles?)

    12/18/2014 2:10:08 PM PST · 1 of 128
    presidio9
  • Oregon woman persuades judge to give her more jail time

    12/17/2014 4:15:20 PM PST · 1 of 24
    presidio9
  • The Rabbi and the Friar (an unlikely friend remembers Father Benedict Groeschel)

    10/29/2014 12:14:10 PM PDT · 6 of 6
    presidio9 to tjd1454; If You Want It Fixed - Fix It

    Santo subito.

  • The Rabbi and the Friar (an unlikely friend remembers Father Benedict Groeschel)

    10/28/2014 9:18:10 PM PDT · 2 of 6
    presidio9 to presidio9
  • The Rabbi and the Friar (an unlikely friend remembers Father Benedict Groeschel)

    10/28/2014 9:14:00 PM PDT · 1 of 6
    presidio9
  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 11:51:39 PM PDT · 101 of 101
    presidio9 to sam_whiskey
    I think the poster was trying to say that limiting abortion to only cases involving rape, incest, and life of the mother would be a good start. I personally believe that abortion should only be permitted when a mother’s life is in danger, but incrementalism doesn’t seem like such a bad thing when you compare it to the status quo.

    I tend to agree with you, but am reminded of three facts:

    1) Mental illness can and does become a life threatening condition for many women. Aside from accidents, suicide is by far the number one cause of death for women of childbearing years (according to the CDC). And some of those "accidents," when examined more closely, may not have been quite so accidental.

    2) Mental illness is often very difficult to diagnose without the benefit of a doctor's extended access and close personal relationship with a patient.

    3) Medical marijuana, prescription drug, and insurance fraud fiascos have all demonstrated that hospitals are full of dishonest doctors who, for the right price, will diagnose anything a patient requests. And, as a lot of conservatives have pointed out, mental illness is a lot easier to fake than a heart condition.

    It seems to me that the ultimate morally consistent solution is to outlaw all abortions, and provide better care and assistance to all expectant mothers who need it.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 5:18:23 PM PDT · 90 of 101
    presidio9 to cornelis

    Look at the 2012 presidential election. Do you suppose that Todd Akin’s comment about “legitimate rape” in a Missouri House race might have helped Obama win reelection? I do. The Democrats certainly did.

    Obama won the male vote by one point in 2008, and lost it by seven in 2012. The female vote was unchanged from +13% to +11%. How else do you account for that?

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 4:55:22 PM PDT · 87 of 101
    presidio9 to x
    I notice that Kevin Williamson is for marijuana legalization, maybe that could have something to do with his getting into scrapes like this.

    I'm not surprised. Look: There are a lot of libertarians that I respect, but the libertarian mindset lends itself to this sort of stupidity.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 4:13:30 PM PDT · 79 of 101
    presidio9 to Huntress
    More proof that nothing good ever comes from Twitter. You can’t have a serious discussion of big issues in 140 characters or less.

    Nicely said.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 4:12:09 PM PDT · 78 of 101
    presidio9 to Responsibility2nd

    ...and let me clarify that further:

    I am not saying that this is the correct and final moral position on this issue. I am saying that it is the correct answer to that question when it comes from a Clymer like Charles Johnson.

    And it is.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 4:00:59 PM PDT · 77 of 101
    presidio9 to Responsibility2nd
    You are the one who postured that ridiculous comment, so I think you believe it.

    Clearly you are looking for a fight. I think that would be a waste of time, because I am assuming that you and I agree 100% on the morality of this issue and its philosophical underpinnings. My interest here was in the stupidity of an otherwise smart guy like Williamson giving liberals ammunition when they are starving for it. From where I'm standing, the only issue that Democrats have to work with in the upcoming election is the so-called "war on women." Race relations won't work, because a large majority of voters believe that these have suffered under the current administration. Income inequality won't be effective, because the voters believe that the economy is worse off under the current administration. The truth is that they are ready for a guy like Reagan: A guy who can simply explain that government isn't the solution to all of our problems. Reagan was as pro-life as you or I, but you will notice that he did not confuse things by spending a lot of time campaigning on that issue.

    If you re-read my post you will notice that I am not suggesting that outlawing abortion with some exceptions in the only step. I said it was "the first" step. The adults in the Democrat Party have gotten much better than us at understanding that Democracy is about compromise, and that change happens incrementally.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 1:45:21 PM PDT · 40 of 101
    presidio9 to Tenacious 1; trisham
    Mind you, I am not suggesting I support what was said. But I am pointing out that, as proof on this thread, the comment was not "needlessly provocative".

    Given the context, it certainly was. Or do you believe that Williamson was somehow going to make Charles Johnson see the light on this issue.

    The places for philosophical conversations such as this one are in private and in forums like FR. Not in public arguments with dweebs from Little Green Footballs. Williamson let himself get played. That's what's most disturbing to me about this whole episode.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 1:40:56 PM PDT · 34 of 101
    presidio9 to Responsibility2nd
    Do you believe this? Are you pro-abortion?

    Are you having some difficulty with the words "the first step," or is it just that you don't understand the basic concepts of political messenging?

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 1:32:44 PM PDT · 22 of 101
    presidio9 to Morgana
    Women who have abortions should be prayed for.

    Far better answer than the one that I just provided.

    This is the one that I will use from now on. So thanks.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 1:31:38 PM PDT · 19 of 101
    presidio9 to Regulator
    Hey, murder used to carry that penalty...

    Look, I get it. I believe that abortion is murder. However, if you are a politician, or if you write opinions for the leading conservative magazine, you don't answer hypothetical questions like that on the record. For that same reason, you will never hear a liberal commentator share that it is their party's best interest to keep as many people as possible on public assistance. On rare occasions you have heard an honest one say that they were rooting against our troops in Iraq. But you get the point.

    The answer to this question is as follows: "The first step is to pass laws to outlaw abortion with the exception of cases of rape, incest and where the life of the mother is physically endangered. We are a long way away from that point. Until we get there, there is no reason to address penalties or what comes next."

    What Williamson just did was provide a useful talking point for swing voters because his ego was threatened.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 1:22:03 PM PDT · 3 of 101
    presidio9 to skeeter

    The Twitter exchange is included with the article. It appears to me that he allowed himself to get backed into a corner by Charles Johnson of Little Green Footballs.

    Still, it is an interesting philosophical question.

  • National Review Writer: Women Who Have Abortions Should Be Hanged

    09/30/2014 1:18:59 PM PDT · 1 of 101
    presidio9
    Let me be clear on why I am posting this: I like Kevin Williamson. I think he's generally a smart guy. I am hoping someone can shed some light for me on why he would say something so volatile two months in front of such an important election. All of the news that I am seeing on this is from one perspective.
  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/16/2014 11:19:55 PM PDT · 86 of 91
    presidio9 to Kenny Bunk

    Somehow I made it through my thesis without your help. The composition is quite different from the colloquial manner of social media. But again, if lecturing people on formatting errors (as opposed to actually reading threads and contributing intelligently -or not) is the best that you can manage, then I salute your effort sir. It takes a village.

    I’ll keep that link handy though. Just in case LIU ever offers my field of study and I opt to double down. Or perhaps someday I’ll change my mind and decide to become a librarian or pharmacist. Go Blackbirds.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/16/2014 3:11:02 PM PDT · 83 of 91
    presidio9 to Elsie
    Do ya think the GOP powers that be have learned their lesson about backing a man whose chosen religion is an anathema to a Nation of Christian voters?

    Not sure how that could have been this issue when his opponent was a Muslim/atheist/religious opportunist.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/16/2014 3:07:27 PM PDT · 82 of 91
    presidio9 to Kenny Bunk
    I do confess that after 15 years and 30,000 posts to FR, it does still amuse me when intellectual heavyweights still feel like observations on formatting, typos or grammar pass for essential dialog. Particularly so from those who apparently believe that the "RTFT before posting" guideline does not apply to them. For all the problems you had reading the initial post, you could have saved yourself the effort of responding, had you simply scrolled down to post 30 of this thread. But that wasn't your mission here. You wanted make sure I knew that that you think graduate degrees are a waste of time. Some are. Some are essential.

    I have no idea what it is that you think I plagiarized (perhaps you're confused), but I will assure you that I worked full time during the day and went to school at night. I received an academic scholarship, and paid the rest myself. I can afford it. I happen to know this year's commencement speaker, but I won't be attending.

    I posted my observations from the unique perspective of someone who actually attended a school that is a frequent topic of conversations for conservatives. Apparently you'd rather form your own benighted opinions stick to trying to convince yourself that you know everything. Best of luck with that. And smile: God loves you.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 10:38:40 PM PDT · 74 of 91
    presidio9 to demshateGod
    I was just telling someone the other day that I believe the rise of conservative media has caused the untended consequence of pushing mainstream media all the way to the left. Before they reported bad things about their heroes, then made excuses. Now they don’t even report it.

    Sadly, 100% accurate. Just ask liberal but honest former CBS correspondent Sharyl Attkisson. My lefty friends never heard of her either. There was a time when every journalist alive would have thought that the circumstances of her departure were big news. Even if they disagreed with her completely. Today, its quite clear that they would rather turn a blind eye to her professional integrity than risk criticism of the current administration.

    Even four years ago, I figured this was all a house of cards. Now, apart from the fact that Clintons do still have a lot of enemies on the left side of the aisle, I'm not so sure.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 10:22:57 PM PDT · 73 of 91
    presidio9 to 2ndDivisionVet
    Other than that....

    ...WaPo counts as mainstream media in this country. The Week does not. That is the difference.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 10:20:42 PM PDT · 72 of 91
    presidio9 to tumblindice
    You may be experiencing something the sociologists/behavioral scientists call the `halo effect’: `This lefty went to Columbia, so did I.’

    So he can’t be all bad, hmmm?

    Actually, I very rarely think anybody is "all bad." If that's the reaction to certain people that I should be striving for, then I guess my parents failed me in that regard.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 2:48:34 PM PDT · 59 of 91
    presidio9 to 2ndDivisionVet

    There’s a big difference between “The Week,” and WaPo.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 2:44:49 PM PDT · 58 of 91
    presidio9 to miss marmelstein

    I think you are missing my point. I had no preconceptions. I was also studying a topic more related to science than politics of philosophy. But even in that area, I was shocked at some of the things I heard (on a regular basis): “The ‘science’ of Climate Change’ is settled,” “’Fracking’ is ‘dangerous,’” etc. I do agree with you that financial pressure is the best way to get these institutions to change. But (you’ll have to trust me on this one) For the field of study that I was interested in (somewhat obscure, but with immediate professional utility for me personally), there simply was no alternative in the United States. Its a pain in the ass, but it is possible to learn for some of these experts without agreeing with them on every subject.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 2:18:45 PM PDT · 49 of 91
    presidio9 to miss marmelstein
    No, I knew pretty much what I was getting myself into when I signed up for the place that welcomed the opinions of Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

    What shocked me was just how complete the level of ignorance actually was. Even before I went to Columbia, I occasionally watched MSNB (especially on big political nights like the SoTU or elections), just to see what the other side was hearing. I preferred Rachael Maddow, because (while she is sarcastic and condescending), at least she doesn't yell. The big moment, for me, was when was having a conversation with a classmate who is religious (Epsicopalian, I believe), southern, sensitive, and very bright. He's also in his 70's and gay (which, I suppose is one of the ways a southerner gets to be a liberal). I mentioned Kermit Gosnell, and he said "Who's he?" This was while the trial was going on. Never heard the name. Even if you are the most pro-abortion person in the world, how can that be possible?

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 2:04:48 PM PDT · 44 of 91
    presidio9 to righttackle44
    but he would qualify, by most standards, as highly educated. I believe that he has a masters in journalism from the Pulitzer school at Columbia.
  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 2:01:03 PM PDT · 42 of 91
    presidio9 to miss marmelstein

    Actually, I learned a great deal about my chosen profession. The insight into the black hole that is the educated liberal mind was a side effect. I already knew a great deal from having lived for a decade in Greenwich Village, and in Westchester and Palm Beach counties. But one does get a unique level of insight by spending every night for two years walking around the campus of Columbia.

    I used to think a lot of these people, Obama included, were evil geniuses. It turns out that most of them just don’t care to know the truth about a lot of things.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 1:51:36 PM PDT · 35 of 91
    presidio9 to kingattax; miss marmelstein
    if you decide to dive in there, please take some survival gear with you.

    Sorry, never heard of you. Hope whatever is bothering you personally works out for you. Whatever it was: Dude, that was (at least) two years ago. I haven't been here. Have a great day.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 1:45:56 PM PDT · 30 of 91
    presidio9 to Mycroft Holmes; miss marmelstein
    Thanks Mycroft. I did pick up a thing or two in 30,000 posts to FR, and agree that a lack of paragraph breaks can be confusing. It's just been so long that I posted here, and I assumed (incorrectly it turns out) that HTLM formatting was not required in the post commentary. I'll try to never let it happen again (what was I thinking?).

    Under deep cover as a graduate student at perhaps the most liberal University in the United States, I have been away from FR for quite some time now. I've learned a lot about the way an intelligent and highly educated liberal east coast mind works. I believe that this article presents something of a teachable moment in that regard. I won’t speak to Mr. Cohen’s intelligence, but he would qualify, by most standards, as highly educated. I believe that he has a masters in journalism from the Pulitzer school at Columbia. He has also shown a willingness to cross the aisle on matters of foreign policy, particularly when the pertain to Israel. When he writes about terrorism, I read him, if only to hear what the other side is being told about an issue. –And that, in a nutshell, is the main issue for Conservatives when it comes to Benghazi. We are appalled at the death of four Americans, and the fact that the perpetrators are still at large. Given the duration of the attack, we wonder whether anything could have been done to save them. We recognize the White House’s response for what it was: A misuse of power in an attempt to sweep inconvenient facts under the rug so as not to allow them to influence an upcoming election. We are angered by the actions of sworn public servants to hinder subsequent investigations. But, most of all, we see this issue as a touchstone for something very wrong in today’s political marketplace: A complete breakdown in the media’s obligation to present all of the facts to their audience.

    In the last three years, for obvious reasons, I went to great efforts to avoid talking about politics. I was surrounded by affable, but true-believing, liberals. I was investing a lot of time and money into an advanced degree. I could not afford to waste it arguing. Nevertheless, I cannot tell you how many times I was surprised to learn that my highly intelligent and successful professional Ivy League classmates in their 30’s and 40’s had not heard names, places and terms that I supposed were common knowledge: “Single Payer System.” “Kermit Gosnell.” “Brian Terry.” The difference between a “machine gun” and a “semi-automatic weapon.” The fact that Mitt Romney had no intention of putting GM out of business and laying off all of its workers. Or that John McCain never said he wanted to go to war with Russia over the Ukraine. Or that Paul Ryan was trying to SAVE Social Security and Medicare. “Benghazi.” Not “didn’t care” –“never HEARD.”

    What became very clear to me during this time is the extent to which liberals and conservatives get their facts from very different sources. Personally, I have always disagreed with the Conservative canon on two or three important issues. Which ones they are is irrelevant. I make a point of never proselytizing here. The point, which most people here are very aware of, is the liberal tendency to form opinions without having all the facts. It seems that we have become so politically divided in this country that virtually everyone who cares about politics gets all of their information from entertainment news shows (like FOX and MSNBC) or simply entertainment (like Comedy Central and the major networks).

    We know that journalism appeals to a disproportionate share of young liberals. There is a liberal culture in media, and that probably will never change. We live in a center-right nation that gets its news from people that it disagrees with. That was the inspiration behind FOX, and the reason why it is the #1 rated cable news channel. Unfortunately, somewhere in the last decade, (I would say it was during the first Obama campaign), liberals on other networks began to assess their ratings correctly: They finally understood the reason behind the fact that 1/3 of the nation preferred to get their news from people they agreed with, and decided to write them off in favor of the other third. In doing this, they put themselves into competition with themselves for the liberal base. At that point, they decided to trust FOX, and only FOX, to present one side of the story.

    Liberals who watched the news used to hear views, news, and opinions about things that they didn’t care about because journalists took their jobs seriously. Now they get a steady stream of what they want to hear, and if they’re lucky, weak straw-man arguments like the ones presented in the last paragraph. Is it any wonder that they (Mr. Cohen included) have finally concluded that a political philosophy that includes geniuses like (you don’t have to agree with everything these people say, just recognize that they are among the smartest political philosophers alive today) Dr. Ben Carson, Charles Krauthammer, Paul Gigot, Thomas Sowell, George Will, Laura Ingraham, Daniel Henninger, Mark Steyn, etc., is nothing but a bunch of uneducated yokels? They are working off a different script.

    I suppose that I will need to turn these thoughts into a standalone vanity piece at some point when I have more time. For the moment, I will say that I have come to the conclusion that FOX is actually part of the problem. The solution is for more conservatives to get themselves hired at liberal news networks. The solution is not another network perceived as only conservative. That will only exacerbate the problem.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 1:28:41 PM PDT · 6 of 91
    presidio9 to miss marmelstein

    A graduate student, who cuts & pastes to save time. These are my sometimes hard-won observations. I’ve bitten my tongue so many times in the last two years that I’m lucky I can still eat a popsicle. I give you dispensation to insert the paragraphs wherever you want. The message is the same.

  • Richard Cohen: The GOP’s unhinged Benghazi fixation

    05/13/2014 1:22:42 PM PDT · 1 of 91
    presidio9
    Under deep cover as a graduate student at perhaps the most liberal University in the United States, I have been away from FR for quite some time now. I've learned a lot about the way an intelligent and highly educated liberal east coast mind works. I believe that this article presents something of a teachable moment in that regard. I won’t speak to Mr. Cohen’s intelligence, but he would qualify, by most standards, as highly educated. I believe that he has a masters in journalism from the Pulitzer school at Columbia. He has also shown a willingness to cross the aisle on matters of foreign policy, particularly when the pertain to Israel. When he writes about terrorism, I read him, if only to hear what the other side is being told about an issue. –And that, in a nutshell, is the main issue for Conservatives when it comes to Benghazi. We are appalled at the death of four Americans, and the fact that the perpetrators are still at large. Given the duration of the attack, we wonder whether anything could have been done to save them. We recognize the White House’s response for what it was: A misuse of power in an attempt to sweep inconvenient facts under the rug so as not to allow them to influence an upcoming election. We are angered by the actions of sworn public servants to hinder subsequent investigations. But, most of all, we see this issue as a touchstone for something very wrong in today’s political marketplace: A complete breakdown in the media’s obligation to present all of the facts to their audience. In the last three years, for obvious reasons, I went to great efforts to avoid talking about politics. I was surrounded by affable, but true-believing, liberals. I was investing a lot of time and money into an advanced degree. I could not afford to waste it arguing. Nevertheless, I cannot tell you how many times I was surprised to learn that my highly intelligent and successful professional Ivy League classmates in their 30’s and 40’s had not heard names, places and terms that I supposed were common knowledge: “Single Payer System.” “Kermit Gosnell.” “Brian Terry.” The difference between a “machine gun” and a “semi-automatic weapon.” The fact that Mitt Romney had no intention of putting GM out of business and laying off all of its workers. Or that John McCain never said he wanted to go to war with Russia over the Ukraine. Or that Paul Ryan was trying to SAVE Social Security and Medicare. “Benghazi.” Not “didn’t care” –“never HEARD.” What became very clear to me during this time is the extent to which liberals and conservatives get their facts from very different sources. Personally, I have always disagreed with the Conservative canon on two or three important issues. Which ones they are is irrelevant. I make a point of never proselytizing here. The point, which most people here are very aware of, is the liberal tendency to form opinions without having all the facts. It seems that we have become so politically divided in this country that virtually everyone who cares about politics gets all of their information from entertainment news shows (like FOX and MSNBC) or simply entertainment (like Comedy Central and the major networks). We know that journalism appeals to a disproportionate share of young liberals. There is a liberal culture in media, and that probably will never change. We live in a center-right nation that gets its news from people that it disagrees with. That was the inspiration behind FOX, and the reason why it is the #1 rated cable news channel. Unfortunately, somewhere in the last decade, (I would say it was during the first Obama campaign), liberals on other networks began to assess their ratings correctly: They finally understood the reason behind the fact that 1/3 of the nation preferred to get their news from people they agreed with, and decided to write them off in favor of the other third. In doing this, they put themselves into competition with themselves for the liberal base. At that point, they decided to trust FOX, and only FOX, to present one side of the story. Liberals who watched the news used to hear views, news, and opinions about things that they didn’t care about because journalists took their jobs seriously. Now they get a steady stream of what they want to hear, and if they’re lucky, weak straw-man arguments like the ones presented in the last paragraph. Is it any wonder that they (Mr. Cohen included) have finally concluded that a political philosophy that includes geniuses like (you don’t have to agree with everything these people say, just recognize that they are among the smartest political philosophers alive today) Dr. Ben Carson, Charles Krauthammer, Paul Gigot, Thomas Sowell, George Will, Laura Ingraham, Daniel Henninger, Mark Steyn, etc., is nothing but a bunch of uneducated yokels? They are working off a different script. I suppose that I will need to turn these thoughts into a standalone vanity piece at some point when I have more time. For the moment, I will say that I have come to the conclusion that FOX is actually part of the problem. The solution is for more conservatives to get themselves hired at liberal news networks. The solution is not another network perceived as only conservative. That will only exacerbate the problem.
  • Fox’s Red Eye Announces the Departure of ‘Repulsive Sidekick’ Bill Schulz

    11/23/2013 6:10:41 PM PST · 61 of 63
    presidio9 to GeronL
    I remember “Red Eye” but they spent so much time on crap that I didn’t think it was worth my time to watch, and I gave them a good try.

    Seek out and get to know xzins. You two were made for each other.

    Also, consider getting a dog.

  • Fox’s Red Eye Announces the Departure of ‘Repulsive Sidekick’ Bill Schulz

    11/23/2013 6:08:31 PM PST · 60 of 63
    presidio9 to xzins
    And, truly, who can fail to see the genius and humor of Neil Cavuto.

    I am seriously considering making this my new tagline for 2014.

  • Fox’s Red Eye Announces the Departure of ‘Repulsive Sidekick’ Bill Schulz

    11/23/2013 5:30:41 PM PST · 57 of 63
    presidio9 to xzins

    No offense taken. People who take the time out of their busy schedules to participate in threads and share their opinions about the 3AM TV programs they could do without are an endless source of fascination for me. Your point seems to be that you would prefer to by yucking it up with the folks at FOX Business Channel. I have no doubt you’re a delight at parties. Good move getting a dog.

  • Fox’s Red Eye Announces the Departure of ‘Repulsive Sidekick’ Bill Schulz

    11/23/2013 4:38:42 PM PST · 55 of 63
    presidio9 to xzins
    Besides all that, I reiterate MY POINT that the world would be better without Red Eye.

    Actually, you're point seems to about proving to the world that you were born without a functioning sense of humor. Why else would you feel so strongly about a cable news show that airs at 3AM, has an audience of about 400,000 viewers, and serves the function of teaching young people that conservatives are allowed to be funny.

    What's the matter? Are there no kids in the neighborhood for you to yell "KEEP OFF MY LAWN!!!" at?

  • Fox’s Red Eye Announces the Departure of ‘Repulsive Sidekick’ Bill Schulz

    11/23/2013 3:10:06 PM PST · 53 of 63
    presidio9 to flaglady47
    Andy was a logical choice, and if Andy didn’t have his own quick humor, he wouldn’t have been on the show in his prior position either. Each to their own, but I like Andy, and I like his sense of humor, different from Bill’s as it may be.

    Would it help if I told you that Andy and Greg go way back, before the show. Andy used to write jokes for Greg on his blog. The two of them put the show together. The found Shultz in a back office (or something like that), took him out drinking, and decided that he needed a place at the table. I agree that Andy can be funny. Unfortunately, his sense of timing stinks, he takes wisecracks directed at him WAY too seriously, and, as I said, he stares at the camera when he's not talking. He was much better off in his role as ombudsman, where he could get his jokes down on paper and read them. Not everybody can do spontaneity. The show suffers with him at the table. He needs to be moved back to his original role and Greg needs to find an affable liberal ASAP. I agree that Bill won't be easy to replace.

  • Fox’s Red Eye Announces the Departure of ‘Repulsive Sidekick’ Bill Schulz

    11/23/2013 3:01:07 PM PST · 52 of 63
    presidio9 to Elle Bee
    You need to keep in mind that Bob Beckel, Juan Williams and Kirsten Powers are all less sleazy versions of Lanny Davis. Their job is to present the liberal point of view. None is a hard core liberal. I agree that they don't always appear to believe the words that are coming out of their own mouths. But, again, that's not what they're there for. The only way to truly understand the strength of an argument is to test it out against the strongest opposing opinions. Keep in mind that Beckel gets along quite well with Conservative brother, and Williams defended Clarence Thomas during the nomination hearings and got fired from PBS for defending Fox News. Powers is the child of academics worked in Democratic campaigns for her entire career before joining Fox and is quite obviously conflicted with herself. At some point for her a domino is going to fall and she is going to step out into the light.