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Keyword: brain

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  • Skunk Weed Cannabis Can Seriously Damage Vital Nerve Fibers In The Brain

    11/27/2015 7:39:52 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 49 replies
    techtimes ^ | Alyssa Navarro,
    Dazzan said that when they looked at the corpus callosum of those who smoke high-strength cannabis, they found that there was a significant difference in the white matter compared to people who have never tried the drug, and people who smoke low-strength cannabis. The THC chemical acts on cannabinoid receptors which the corpus callosum contains. The team utilized two scanning methods to examine the corpus callosum in the brains of 56 patients who reportedly experienced a first episode of psychosis, and 43 healthy participants from the local community. One method required the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) while the...
  • Researchers decode patterns that make our brains human

    11/16/2015 3:16:32 PM PST · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/16/2015 | Allen Institute
    The human brain may be the most complex piece of organized matter in the known universe, but Allen Institute researchers have begun to unravel the genetic code underlying its function. Research published this month in Nature Neuroscience identified a surprisingly small set of molecular patterns that dominate gene expression in the human brain and appear to be common to all individuals, providing key insights into the core of the genetic code that makes our brains distinctly human. "So much research focuses on the variations between individuals, but we turned that question on its head to ask, what makes us similar?"...
  • Doctors find tapeworm larva in California man's brain

    11/05/2015 11:59:55 AM PST · by Gamecock · 23 replies
    Click On Detroit ^ | Nov 05 2015 | Ken Haddad
    A California man went to an emergency room with a terrible headache and nausea, slipped into a coma, and was told a tapeworm larva had been living in his brain when he woke up. The surgery and the aftermath have greatly impacted his life, Ortiz said. He had to drop out of school, move back home and find a temporary place for his dog. He can't drive or work. "My memory is like a work in progress," he said. "It gets better from therapy," but he has to remind himself to do his memory exercises and other daily tasks. The...
  • Common myths about the brain debunked

    11/02/2015 5:28:17 PM PST · by Kaslin · 35 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 2, 2015 | Ashley Welch
    The brain is central to our health and sense of self, but when it comes to how it works, there is still much to be understood. Maybe you've heard that doing crossword puzzles can improve memory, that playing classical music makes babies smarter, or that drinking alcohol kills brain cells -- but are these and other common claims about the brain really true? An article in this month's issue of Popular Science seeks to separate brain facts from myths. One of the first questions that come to mind regarding the brain is how much of it we actually use. Science...
  • Biologists discover bacteria communicate like neurons in the brain

    10/21/2015 1:13:24 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/21/2015 | University of California - San Diego
    Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that bacteria--often viewed as lowly, solitary creatures--are actually quite sophisticated in their social interactions and communicate with one another through similar electrical signaling mechanisms as neurons in the human brain. In a study published in this week's advance online publication of Nature, the scientists detail the manner by which bacteria living in communities communicate with one another electrically through proteins called "ion channels."
  • Scientists reduce belief in God by shutting down the brain’s medial frontal cortex

    Someone I know just sent me this extraordinary article, very alarming to say the least: "New research involving a psychologist from the University of York has revealed for the first time that both belief in God and prejudice towards immigrants can be reduced by directing magnetic energy into the brain. Dr Keise Izuma collaborated with a team from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), to carry out an innovative experiment using transcranial magnetic stimulation, a safe way of temporarily shutting down specific regions of the brain. The researchers targeted the posterior medial frontal cortex, a part of the brain...
  • Scientists Claim Zapping Brains with Magnets Can Treat Belief in God

    10/16/2015 9:14:18 AM PDT · by detective · 74 replies
    The Stream ^ | October 15, 2015 | William M Briggs
    Here’s the breathless headline: “Scientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God — with MAGNETS.” Wait. Attitudes toward God and immigrants? Are these a natural pair? The newspaper thought so. They tell of an experiment which “claims to be able to make Christians no longer believe in God and make Britons open their arms to migrants.” How’s it done? “Using a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulation” researchers can “safely shut down certain groups of neurones” in the brain. It seems to have worked. Volunteers were coaxed into having their brains zapped by giant magnets. And, lo! “Belief...
  • Male brain is programmed to seek out sex over food

    10/15/2015 5:55:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 82 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | October 14, 2015 | Sarah Knapton
    It is said that the way to a man’s heart is through his stomach, but a new study suggests that when it comes to sex, food is the last thing on his mind. Researchers have found that the male brain is hardwired to seek out sex, even at the expense of a good meal, with specific neurons firing up to over-ride the desire to eat. Intriguingly, women do not have the same neurons, suggesting that sex for females comes secondary to sustenance.
  • 1984: Researchers Prove Brain Manipulation Can Lessen Belief in God, Alter Views on Immigrants

    10/14/2015 7:29:46 PM PDT · by hulagirl · 23 replies
    Truth Revolt ^ | 10.14.2015 | Tiffany Gabbay
    Day by day, the dystopian universe depicted in George Orwell’s magnum opus rings more like an omen than a work of fiction. In the day and age of political correctness run amok, where “offenders” are often forced to attend sensitivity-training, a new experiment that claims to alter the way participants view religion and immigrants, proves that the thought-police may, in fact, be coming. In a joint study conducted by scientific researches in the U.S. and U.K., a technique dubbed “transcranial magnetic stimulation,” or TMS, was used on participants to essentially turn off groups of neurons in the brain that control...
  • Scientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God – with magnetic field exposure

    10/14/2015 6:48:06 AM PDT · by MarchonDC09122009 · 56 replies
    express.co.uk ^ | 10/14/2015 | Selina Sykes
    Scientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God – with MAGNETS http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/611992/Scientists-experiment-magnets-immigrants-God-magnetic-waves Scientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God – with MAGNETS ATTITUDES towards God and immigrants can be changed by beaming magnetic waves into the brain, scientists have claimed. By Selina Sykes Wed, Oct 14, 2015  A bizarre experiment claims to be able to make Christians no longer believe in God and make Britons open their arms to migrants in experiments some may find a threat to their values. Scientists looked at how the brain resolves abstract ideological problems. Using a technique...
  • Psychologist blinds woman with drain cleaner - because she wanted to be disabled

    10/01/2015 1:30:05 PM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 44 replies
    Mirror (UK) ^ | 1 Oct 2015 | Tom Midlane
    For most people becoming blind would be a living nightmare - but for Jewel Shuping it was the fulfilment of a lifelong dream. Jewel has Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID), a condition in which able-bodied people believe they are meant to be disabled. Her need to lose her sight was so strong that in 2006 she decided to blind herself - by having a sympathetic psychologist pour DRAIN CLEANER into her eyes. According to Jewel, her fascination with blindness began early in childhood. She said: "When I was young my mother would find me walking in the halls at night,...
  • DARPA is testing implanting chips in soldiers’ brains

    09/28/2015 5:44:15 PM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 6 replies
    Fusion ^ | 09/27/15 | Kristen V. Brown
    For decades, DARPA, the secretive research arm of the Department of Defense, has dreamed of turning soldiers into cyborgs. And now it’s finally happening. The agency has funded projects that involve implanting chips into soldiers’ brains that could one day enhance performance on the battlefield and repair traumatized brains once the fog of war has lifted. “Of the 2.5 million Americans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, 300,000 of them came home with traumatic brain injury,” journalist Annie Jacobsen told NPR. “DARPA initiated a series of programs to help cognitive functioning, to repair some of this damage. And those programs...
  • Rep. Franks: ‘The Only Time This Little Baby Was Ever Held … Was by Those Who Cut His Face Open

    09/09/2015 11:48:47 AM PDT · by xzins · 35 replies
    CNS ^ | September 9, 2015 | Melanie Hunter
    During a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Planned Parenthood’s abortion practices on Wednesday, Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) described how two Planned Parenthood employees recorded during an undercover video operation removed the brain of an unborn baby whose heart was still beating. “One of these videos describes an incident where one of Planned Parenthood’s employees calls one of the younger employees over to witness something that was ‘kinda cool,’ that one of the babies’ hearts was still beating,” said Franks. “The older employee then said, ‘Okay, this is a really good fetus, and it looks like we can procure a lot...
  • Omega-3 fish oil ‘does not boost elderly brains’

    08/26/2015 9:00:49 AM PDT · by Signalman · 13 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 8/25/2015 | The Telegraph
    Millions of older people are wasting their time and money taking fish oils supplements to boost brain power after a study showed they do not slow mental decline. Scientists who monitored the progress of 4,000 people over five years found no evidence that omega-3 capsules kept them any sharper witted as they aged. Other studies have associated regular fish consumption with lower rates of the eye condition age-related macular degeneration (AMD), heart disease, and dementia, as well as larger brain volumes. So it has been widely assumed that the omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish are behind the health boost....
  • Jimmy Carter Says Doctors Found Cancer in His Brain

    08/20/2015 7:50:42 AM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 74 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 20, 2015 14:36 UTC | Alan Blinder
    ATLANTA — Former President Jimmy Carter said Thursday that doctors had found cancer on his brain and that he would begin radiation treatment later in the day. Mr. Carter, speaking at a news conference at the Carter Center here, said his health had been under scrutiny since May, when he had a cold while traveling in Guyana. The former president added that the cancer, which he said was melanoma, had been found in his liver, part of which was removed during a procedure on Aug. 3. He described the melanoma on his brain as four “very small spots.”
  • Scientists uncover a difference between the sexes

    08/12/2015 1:22:59 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 66 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | August 12, 2015 | Provided by: Northwestern University
    The hippocampus is a region of the brain largely responsible for memory formation. Credit: Salk Institute ============================================================================================================================================== Male and female brains operate differently at a molecular level, a Northwestern University research team reports in a new study of a brain region involved in learning and memory, responses to stress and epilepsy. Many brain disorders vary between the sexes, but how biology and culture contribute to these differences has been unclear. Now Northwestern neuroscientists have found an intrinsic biological difference between males and females in the molecular regulation of synapses in the hippocampus. This provides a scientific reason to believe that...
  • Animal brains connected up to make mind-melded computer

    07/09/2015 8:45:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.newscientist.com ^ | 14:38 09 July 2015 | by Jessica Hamzelou
    Two heads are better than one, and three monkey brains can control an avatar better than any single monkey. For the first time, a team has networked the brains of multiple animals to form a living computer that can perform tasks and solve problems. If human brains could be similarly connected, it might give us superhuman problem-solving abilities, and allow us to communicate abstract thoughts and experiences. "It is really exciting," says Iyad Rahwan at the Masdar Institute in Dubai, UAE, who was not involved in the work. "It will change the way humans cooperate." The work, published today, is...
  • Obama's BRAIN Initiative yields first study results

    07/01/2015 12:03:19 PM PDT · by Lazamataz · 42 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Apr 30, 2015 12:05pm EDT | BY SHARON BEGLEY
    The mouse walked, the mouse stopped; the mouse ignored a bowl of food, then scampered back and gobbled it up, and it was all controlled by neuroscientists, researchers reported on Thursday. The study, describing a way to manipulate a lab animal's brain circuitry accurately enough to turn behaviors both on and off, is the first to be published under President Barack Obama's 2013 BRAIN Initiative, which aims to advance neuroscience and develop therapies for brain disorders. The point of the remote-control mouse is not to create an army of robo-rodents. Instead, neuroscientists hope to perfect a technique for identifying brain...
  • How your brain is telling you to vote

    06/08/2015 10:10:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | 06-08-2015 | by Anita Kar & Provided by McGill University
    A new joint study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, both at McGill University, has cast some light on the brain mechanisms that support people's voting decisions. Evidence in the study shows that a part of the brain called the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (LOFC) must function properly if voters are to make choices that combine different sources of information about the candidates. The study found that damage to the LOFC leads people to base their vote on simpler information, namely the candidate's good looks. Healthy individuals and those with brain...
  • Expert Told Congress Unborn Babies Can Feel Pain Starting at 8 Weeks

    05/13/2015 11:03:05 PM PDT · by kathsua · 9 replies
    Life News ^ | May 12, 2015 | Steven Ertelt
    This week, the House of Representatives is voting on a bill that would ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The last time the House considered this bill, an expert on human embryonic development informed members of the committee that unborn babies have the capacity to feel pain as early as 8 weeks. Maureen Condic, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Utah and obtained her Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley. She is a widely-published scientist whose works have appeared in a wide variety of peer-reviewed journals. “The earliest “rudiment” of the human...
  • Air Pollution May Shrink the Brain, Study Suggests

    04/27/2015 8:56:58 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 4/27/15 | Agata Blaszczak Boxe - Livescience.com
    Breathing polluted air every day may change a person's brain in ways that end up leading to cognitive impairment, according to a new study. In the study, researchers examined 943 healthy adults who were at least 60 years old and lived the New England region. The investigators used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to look at the participants' brain structures, and compared the images with the air pollution levels in the places where the participants lived. The researchers found that an increase of 2 micrograms per cubic meter in fine-particle pollution — a range that can be observed across an average...
  • Embryonic Twin Discovered in Woman's Brain During Surgery in LA

    04/23/2015 9:35:58 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 35 replies
    KNBC Channel 4 Los Angeles ^ | April 23, 2015 | John Cádiz Klemack
    An Indiana woman undergoing surgery in Los Angeles to remove a tumor experienced a twist worthy of a sci-fi plot when doctors discovered an embryonic twin in her brain. Yamini Karanam, 26, was unaware of what was happening in her head until she underwent a procedure designed to reach deep into the brain to extract the tumor. After waking up from the surgery, Karanam was surprised to learn of the "teratoma" -- her embryonic twin, a rarity in modern medicine, complete with bone, hair and teeth.
  • Eight nutrients to protect the aging brain

    04/18/2015 10:27:44 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 173 replies
    sciencedaily.com ^ | April 15, 2015 | Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)
    Brain health is the second most important component in maintaining a healthy lifestyle according to a 2014 AARP study. As people age they can experience a range of cognitive issues from decreased critical thinking to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers write about eight nutrients that may help keep your brain in good shape.
  • Poor Children May Have Smaller Brains Than Rich Children. Does That Tell Us Anything?

    04/18/2015 2:50:13 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 102 replies
    Slate ^ | April 17, 2015 | Jordan Weissmann
    Social scientists have found that by the time children enter kindergarten, there is already a large academic achievement gap between students from wealthy and poor families. We still don't know exactly why that's the case. There's a sense that it at least partly has to do with the fact that affluent mothers and fathers have more intensive parenting sytles—they're more likely to read to their kids, for instance—and have enough money to make sure their toddlers grow up well-nourished, generally cared for, and intellectually stimulated. At the same time, poor children often grow up in chaotic, food-insecure, stressful homes that...
  • HIV can spread to brain in 4 months (causes Dementia)

    03/28/2015 7:47:09 PM PDT · by NetAddicted · 9 replies
    Times of India ^ | 3/27/2015 | IAMS
    In the absence of antiretroviral therapy, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS can begin replicating in the brain as early as four months after initial infection, a new research has found.
  • Are smartphones making our children mentally ill?

    03/22/2015 7:01:34 AM PDT · by CharlesOConnell · 58 replies
    Telegraph UK ^ | 7:00AM GMT 21 Mar 2015 | By Peter Stanford
    Are smartphones making our children mentally ill?Leading child psychotherapist Julie Lynn Evans believes easy and constant access to the internet is harming youngsterstelegraph.co.uk/news/health/children/11486167/Are-smartphones-making-our-children-mentally-ill.html
  • New memories implanted in mice while they sleep

    03/10/2015 6:07:41 AM PDT · by C19fan · 9 replies
    New Scientist ^ | March 9, 2015 | Jessica Hamzelou
    Sleeping minds: prepare to be hacked. For the first time, conscious memories have been implanted into the minds of mice while they sleep. The same technique could one day be used to alter memories in people who have undergone traumatic events. When we sleep, our brain replays the day's activities. The pattern of brain activity exhibited by mice when they explore a new area during the day, for example, will reappear, speeded up, while the animal sleeps. This is thought to be the brain practising an activity - an essential part of learning. People who miss out on sleep do...
  • Dogs Don't Remember

    03/02/2015 10:55:47 AM PST · by Red Badger · 131 replies
    www.psychologytoday.com ^ | May 01, 2010 | by Ira Hyman
    Dogs Don't Remember: Episodic Memory May Distinguish Humans Dogs are wonderful creatures. Our dogs recognize me and are always happy to see me. Dogs are also smart and successful creatures. Our dogs have learned several cute tricks. But dogs (and other non-human animals) are missing something we take for granted: episodic memory. Dogs don't remember what happened yesterday and don't plan for tomorrow. In defining episodic memory, Endel Tulving argued that it is unique to humans. Experience influences all animals. Most mammals and birds can build complex sets of knowledge or semantic memory. You and I also remember the experience...
  • Alzheimer's breakthrough....

    02/16/2015 10:50:49 PM PST · by Reverend Saltine · 38 replies
    DailyMail.Co.UK ^ | February 16, 2015 | Ben Spencer
    Scientists have discovered the key to stopping Alzheimer’s disease in its earliest stages. The breakthrough paves the way for a ‘statin-like’ drug that could be taken by millions to prevent dementia. Cambridge University researchers have found a naturally occurring molecule that can slow the formation of plaques in the brain. Amyloid plaques are closely associated with declining memory and other Alzheimer’s symptoms. The discovery raises the prospect of a treatment which could be routinely taken in middle age to stop dementia. It could even result in a pill that could be used to treat dementia in the same way that...
  • Chinese mummy suggests brain surgery was carried out 3,600 years ago...

    02/03/2015 2:28:29 PM PST · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 16:13 EST, 3 February 2015 | By Victoria Woollaston
    A skull that's more than three and a half millennia old has revealed signs of an early form of brain surgery. The perforated skull belongs to a mummified woman found in the Xiaohe tomb in China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region. Experts said that the hole, which measures around 2 inches (50mm) in diameter, was most likely an early form of craniotomy. A craniotomy involves temporarily removing a 'flap' of bone from the skull to give surgeons access to the brain. The amount of skull removed depends on the type of surgery being performed, and the flap is later replaced using...
  • Beer could help 'protect brain against Parkinson's and Alzheimer's'

    02/02/2015 1:11:36 PM PST · by wtd · 49 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 10:55AM GMT 02 Feb 2015 | Telegraph Men
    Beer could help 'protect brain against Parkinson's and Alzheimer's' " As self-delusional arguments go, it sounds like it is up there with claims that a bowl of ice-cream supplies a quarter of your daily calcium needs. However, scientists in China have found that drinking beer could help protect the brain from a number of degenerative brain diseases. A team of researchers at Lanzhou University have published a study which claims that xanthohumol, a type of flavinoid found in hops, could help protect the brain against the onset of diseases such as Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and dementia. According to Jianguo Fang,...
  • Is consciousness {Freedom] an illusion?

    01/27/2015 4:30:19 AM PST · by Reverend Saltine · 9 replies
    Jon Rappoport's Blog ^ | January 26, 2015 | Jon Rappoport
    “Cutting through disinformation about consciousness is vital, because neuroscience is moving toward a mind-controlled society, based on the idea that individual awareness is an illusion, and stimulus-response is the key to shaping a new Collective of synchronized ‘happy’ brains.”
  • Curcumin's ability to fight Alzheimer's studied

    01/20/2015 12:46:10 PM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | 01/13/2015 | Provided by Vanderbilt University Medical Center
    One of the most promising new treatments for Alzheimer's disease may already be in your kitchen. Curcumin, a natural product found in the spice turmeric, has been used by many Asian cultures for centuries, and a new study indicates a close chemical analog of curcumin has properties that may make it useful as a treatment for the brain disease. "Curcumin has demonstrated ability to enter the brain, bind and destroy the beta-amyloid plaques present in Alzheimer's with reduced toxicity," said Wellington Pham, Ph.D., assistant professor of Radiology and Radiological Sciences and Biomedical Engineering at Vanderbilt and senior author of the...
  • MIT scientists find way to more easily map the brain

    01/18/2015 10:46:28 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Boston Globe ^ | 1/15/15 | Carolyn Y. Johnson
    Massachusetts Institute of Technology scientists examining the intricate network of brain cells that underlie sight, thought, and psychiatric disease had a running joke in the laboratory: let’s just make everything bigger. If they could simply enlarge brain cells, they reasoned, the task of mapping the circuits would be easier. Now, they have found a way to do just that, using a technique that has shades of a 1950s science fiction movie. But instead of spawning killer ants or a 50-foot giantess, the researchers have found a controlled way to cause a tissue sample swell to roughly four and a half...
  • US researchers identify gene network linked to autism

    12/30/2014 11:55:35 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 18 replies
    FOX News ^ | December 30, 2014 | FoxNews.com
    U.S. scientists have identified a molecular network of genes known to contribute to autism spectrum disorders, and they say their finding may help uncover new genes linked to these conditions. "The study of autism disorders is extremely challenging due to the large number of clinical mutations that occur in hundreds of different human genes associated with autism," study author Michael Snyder, genetics and personalized medicine professor at Stanford University, said in a news release. "We therefore wanted to see to what extent shared molecular pathways are perturbed by the diverse set of mutations linked to autism in the hope of...
  • Brains of People with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Offer Clues About Disorder

    12/03/2014 11:08:37 AM PST · by Seizethecarp · 55 replies
    New York Times ^ | November 24, 2014 | David Tuller
    Patients with chronic fatigue syndrome are accustomed to disappointment. The cause of the disorder remains unknown; it can be difficult to diagnose, and treatment options are few. Many patients are still told to seek psychiatric help. But two recent studies — one from investigators at Stanford a few weeks ago and another from a Japanese research team published earlier this year — have found that the brains of people with chronic fatigue syndrome differ from those of healthy people, strengthening the argument that serious physiological dysfunctions are at the root of the condition. Both studies were small, however, and their...
  • About 100 brains missing from University of Texas

    12/03/2014 3:39:57 AM PST · by DFG · 70 replies
    AP via Yahoo ^ | 12/02/2014 | AP
    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — The University of Texas at Austin is missing about 100 brains — about half of the specimens the university had in a collection of brains preserved in jars of formaldehyde. One of the missing brains is believed to have belonged to clock tower sniper Charles Whitman. "We think somebody may have taken the brains, but we don't know at all for sure," psychology Professor Tim Schallert, co-curator of the collection, told the Austin American-Statesman (http://bit.ly/11R7vym ). His co-curator, psychology Professor Lawrence Cormack, said, "It's entirely possible word got around among undergraduates and people started swiping them...
  • Are we on the brink of creating artificial life? .....

    11/27/2014 8:59:53 AM PST · by GrandJediMasterYoda · 49 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 11/27/14 | By JONATHAN O'CALLAGHAN
    Are we on the brink of creating artificial life? Scientists digitise the brain of a WORM and place it inside a robot The OpenWorm global project is making a 'digital' worm Their project is recreating the neurons and cells in C. elegans It is the simplest organism we know of but has similarities to humans By making a digital worm the team hope to create artificial life They have implanted the digital 'mind' of the worm into a Lego machine In a video it acts and behaves just like the worm would in the real world Next year the team...
  • FLASHBACK: UPDATE 1-U.S. Congress wins relief on Obamacare health plan subsidies (brain drain)

    11/16/2014 5:58:50 AM PST · by Libloather · 4 replies
    Reuters ^ | 8/07/13 | David Lawder
    **SNIP** The amendment's author, Republican Senator Charles Grassley, argued that if Obamacare plans were good enough for the American public, they were good enough for Congress. Democrats, eager to pass the reforms, went along with it. But it soon became apparent the provision contained no language that allowed federal contributions toward their health plans that cover about 75 percent of the premium costs. This caused fears that staff would suddenly face sharply higher healthcare costs and leave federal service, causing a "brain drain" on Capitol Hill. But Wednesday's proposed rule from the OPM, the federal government's human resources agency, means...
  • Regular marijuana use muddles your brain more than you think: Study

    11/11/2014 8:22:52 AM PST · by elhombrelibre · 101 replies
    Tech Times ^ | 11 Nov 14 | Rhodi Lee
    Researchers from the Center for BrainHealth at The University of Texas at Dallas have found evidence that the effects of chronic marijuana use may depend on when a person started smoking pot and for how long. For the study, which was published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Nov. 10, Francesca Filbey from the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences at the University of Texas at Dallas, and colleagues involved 48 adult marijuana users who started to use weed when they were between 14 and 30 years old. The participants smoked pot thrice a day...
  • Regular pot smokers have shrunken brains, study says

    11/11/2014 1:45:49 AM PST · by Libloather · 46 replies
    MSN ^ | 11/11/14 | Melissa Healy
    Experimental mice have been telling us this for years, but pot-smoking humans didn't want to believe it could happen to them: Compared with a person who never smoked marijuana, someone who uses marijuana regularly has, on average, less gray matter in his orbital frontal cortex, a region that is a key node in the brain's reward, motivation, decision-making and addictive behaviors network. More ambiguously, in regular pot smokers, that region is better connected than it is in non-users:The flow of signal traffic is speedier to other parts of that motivation and decision-making network, including across the superhighway of "white matter"...
  • Basketball star diagnosed with inoperable brain tumor gets shot at college hoops dream...

    11/03/2014 2:59:34 AM PST · by Libloather · 3 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 11/03/14 | Pete D'amato
    A cancer sufferer achieved her dream of playing in her first college basketball game on Sunday, scoring the first points of the match. Mount St Joseph freshman Lauren Hill, 19, was diagnosed last year with an inoperable brain tumor and was told she had years to live. In September, doctors had a grim update - she wouldn't make it past December - and after years as a standout high school basketball player, Hill's hopes of playing college ball were put in jeopardy.
  • Compound in cocoa found to reverse age-related memory loss

    10/26/2014 5:34:31 PM PDT · by Innovative · 46 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Oct 26, 2014 | Fredrick Kunkle
    In case anyone needed another reason to love chocolate, a new study suggests that a natural compound found in cocoa, tea and some vegetables can reverse age-related memory loss. The findings suggest that the compound increases connectivity and, subsequently, blood flow in a region of the brain critical to memory, the researchers said. Researchers said that if a person had the memory of a typical 60-year-old at the beginning of the study, after three months, on average, that person’s memory would function more like a 30- or 40-year-old’s. The researchers also cautioned that more work is needed because of the...
  • Brain Bath: A Clever Design Solution

    10/20/2014 7:52:42 AM PDT · by fishtank · 5 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 10-17-2014 | Brian Thomas
    Brain Bath: A Clever Design Solution by Brian Thomas, M.S. * What makes sleep so mentally refreshing? University of Rochester neuroscientist Jeff Iliff addressed the crowd gathered at a September 2014 TEDMED event and explained his amazing new discoveries.1 The words he used perfectly match what one would expect while describing the works of an ingenious designer.2 Other organs rely on the lymphatic system to remove metabolic waste that builds up in the spaces outside cells, but no lymph vessels exist behind the skull. Since the brain uses a fourth of all the body’s energy, there must be some other...
  • Scientists have found “hidden” brain activity that can indicate if a vegetative patient is aware

    10/17/2014 1:23:47 PM PDT · by Scoutmaster · 31 replies
    The new research could help doctors to quickly identify patients who are aware despite appearing unresponsive and unable to communicate. Researchers from University of Cambridge in the UK have identified hidden networks in vegetative patients that could support consciousness, even when a patient appear to be unresponsive. There’s been a lot of interest lately into how much patients in vegetative states, such as comas, are aware of their surroundings. Recently, research involving functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning has shown that even patients who are unable to respond or move are able to carry out mental tasks, such as imagining...
  • Life After Death: 'Near-Death Experience' Study Shows Awareness Continues After Brain Shutdown

    10/07/2014 7:42:12 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 39 replies
    IB Times ^ | 10/07/2014 | Lydia Smith
    Researchers conducting the largest ever study into near-death experiences have discovered that awareness may continue even after the brain has shut down, revealing more about what happens when we die. Scientists at the University of Southampton studied more than 2,000 people who suffered cardiac arrests at 15 hospitals across Britain, Austria and the United States. Around 40% of patients who survived described "awareness" during the time before their hearts were restarted, when they were clinically dead. One 57-year-old man, a social worker from Southampton, described the noise of the machines and what the medical staff were doing during this time....
  • Obama's BRAIN initiative awards $46 million in grants

    10/01/2014 3:08:32 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 10/1/14 | Julie Steenhuysen - Reuters
    CHICAGO (Reuters) - Wearable brain scanners and lasers that can turn hundreds of cells on and off were among 58 projects awarded $46 million in federal grants as part of President Obama's $100 million initiative to unlock the secrets of the human brain. Launched in 2013, the Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) Initiative is designed to give scientists greater insight into how the healthy brain works and a better understanding of what systems go awry in diseases ranging from Alzheimer's to schizophrenia. "The human brain is the most complicated biological structure in the known universe. We’ve only just...
  • Woman of 24 found to have no cerebellum in her brain

    09/12/2014 6:25:50 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 70 replies
    www.newscientist.com ^ | 09-11-2014 | Staff
    DON'T mind the gap. A woman has reached the age of 24 without anyone realising she was missing a large part of her brain. The case highlights just how adaptable the organ is. The discovery was made when the woman was admitted to the Chinese PLA General Hospital of Jinan Military Area Command in Shandong Province complaining of dizziness and nausea. She told doctors she'd had problems walking steadily for most of her life, and her mother reported that she hadn't walked until she was 7 and that her speech only became intelligible at the age of 6. Doctors did...
  • Study Claims Marijuana Reshapes Brain Of Users

    08/30/2014 1:11:43 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 113 replies
    designntrend.com ^ | Aug, 27, 2014, 07:10 PM | Carrie Weisman ,
    The paper will be published Wednesday, August 27, 2014 in the Journal of Neuroscience. ... researchers used an MRI machine and the brains of 40 people between the ages of 18 and 25. They claim that the more marijuana a person smokes, the more those two neural regions get "damaged." Dr. Hans Breiter, a professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, co-authored the study. He says, "Anytime you find there's a relationship to the amount of marijuana consumed and you see differences of core brain regions involved in processing of rewards, the making of...
  • Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of brain boosts memory

    08/29/2014 8:47:09 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 4 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | Provided by Northwestern University
    Stimulating a particular region in the brain via non-invasive delivery of electrical current using magnetic pulses, called Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation, improves memory, reports a new Northwestern Medicine study. The discovery opens a new field of possibilities for treating memory impairments caused by conditions such as stroke, early-stage Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, cardiac arrest and the memory problems that occur in healthy aging. "We show for the first time that you can specifically change memory functions of the brain in adults without surgery or drugs, which have not proven effective," said senior author Joel Voss, assistant professor of medical social...