Keyword: brain

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  • A Brain-damaged US President with Finger on the Nuclear Button?

    08/28/2016 4:30:46 PM PDT · by Jyotishi · 47 replies
    New Eastern Outlook, journal-neo.org ^ | August 24, 2016 | F. William Engdahl
    Hillary Rodham Clinton seems to surround herself with more scandals than you can shake a stick at, as we said when I was growing up in Texas. We had the Mena, Arkansas scandals when her husband, Bubba, otherwise known as William Jefferson Clinton, was Attorney General and then Governor. Ambrose Evans Pritchard, the British Telegraph investigative journalist did a masterful documentation of that in his The Secret Life of Bill Clinton, when Bill was President facing impeachment in the 1990's. Then there are the Clinton Foundation scandals documented in the 2015 Peter Schweitzer book, Clinton Cash: The Untold Story of...
  • Fourth brain-eating amoeba case of the year being treated ( Florida )

    08/18/2016 11:54:23 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 9 replies
    CNN ^ | 8/18/2016 | Debra Goldschmidt
    An unidentified patient in Florida is being treated after being infected with a brain-eating amoeba last week, according to the Florida Department of Health. It is the fourth known case this year of infection by the parasite Naegleria fowleri. "We believe that the individual contracted the infection after swimming in unsanitary water on a single private property," said Mara Gambineri, the health department's communications director, noting that there is no risk to the general public. The parasite is almost always deadly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, between 1962 and 2015 there were 138 known cases of...
  • Zika infection may affect adult brain cells

    08/18/2016 9:56:28 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 19 replies
    medicalxpress ^ | August 18, 2016 | Joseph Gleeson & Howard Hughes
    Concerns over the Zika virus have focused on pregnant women due to mounting evidence that it causes brain abnormalities in developing fetuses. However, new research in mice from scientists at The Rockefeller University and La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology suggests that certain adult brain cells may be vulnerable to infection as well. Among these are populations of cells that serve to replace lost or damaged neurons throughout adulthood, and are also thought to be critical to learning and memory. "This is the first study looking at the effect of Zika infection on the adult brain," says Joseph Gleeson,...
  • Cognitive offloading: How the Internet is increasingly taking over human memory

    08/16/2016 4:05:14 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/16/2016 | Taylor & Francis
    Our increasing reliance on the Internet and the ease of access to the vast resource available online is affecting our thought processes for problem solving, recall and learning. In a new article published in the journal Memory, researchers at the University of California, Santa Cruz and University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign have found that 'cognitive offloading', or the tendency to rely on things like the Internet as an aide-mťmoire, increases after each use. We might think that memory is something that happens in the head but increasingly it is becoming something that happens with the help of agents outside the...
  • Study: Fat People More Likely to Be Stupid

    07/14/2016 1:46:49 PM PDT · by bkopto · 83 replies
    Breitbart ^ | 7/14/2016 | Ben Kew
    A new study suggests that people are are overweight tend to be less intelligent than those who are not. According to the study, people who are overweight have less grey and white matter in key parts of the brain, meaning their brain develops an ďaltered reward processing,Ē effectively meaning they lack the ability to control their eating. The results were extracted from ďvery thoroughĒ brain scans of 32 people from Baltimore....
  • A bug in fMRI software could invalidate 15 years of brain research

    07/08/2016 7:45:39 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    sciencealert ^ | 6 JUL 2016
    There could be a very serious problem with the past 15 years of research into human brain activity, with a new study suggesting that a bug in fMRI software could invalidate the results of some 40,000 papers. That's massive, because functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is one of the best tools we have to measure brain activity, and if itís flawed, it means all those conclusions about what our brains look like
  • Exercise triggers brain cell growth and improves memory, scientists prove

    06/24/2016 11:23:49 AM PDT · by RoosterRedux · 22 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | Sarah Knapton
    Exercising may help boost memory because it triggers a protein which boosts brain cell growth, scientists believe. For several years, researchers have noticed that aerobic exercise, of the kind which gets the heart pumping, also appears to improve memory and learning. But nobody knew how. Now researchers at the National Institute on Ageing in the US have discovered that when muscles exercise they produce a protein called cathepsin B which travels to the brain and triggers neuron growth. The team has also shown that the levels of the protein soars when humans exercise. "Overall, the message is that a consistently...
  • Study: MRI scans prove schizophrenic brains attempt self-repair

    05/28/2016 12:36:31 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 6 replies
    upi ^ | 05/28/2016
    Following 98 patients with schizophrenia and 83 without, the team used MRI technology and a special method called "covariance analysis," to distinguish the increase of brain tissue. This is the first time such a method has been used to prove the brain's ability to reverse the illness' effects, and opens doors to possible cures. "Even the state-of-art frontline treatments aim merely for a reduction rather than a reversal of the cognitive and functional deficits caused by the illness," said research team member Dr. Lena Palaniyappan, Medical Director at the Prevention & Early Intervention Program for Psychoses at London Science Centre....
  • STUDY: BRAIN SCANS REVEAL HIDDEN CONSCIOUSNESS IN PATIENTS

    05/26/2016 10:15:50 AM PDT · by Prov1322 · 22 replies
    AP ^ | 05.26.2016 | MALCOLM RITTER
    A standard brain scanning technique is showing promise for helping doctors distinguish between patients in a vegetative state and those with hidden signs of consciousness. A study released Thursday is the latest to investigate using technology to help meet the challenge of making that distinction, which now is generally based on a doctor's bedside exam. Patients in a vegetative state have open eyes and show periods of sleep and wakefulness, but they are unaware of themselves or others and unable to think, respond or do anything on purpose. Patients in a minimally conscious state show only intermittent and minimal signs...
  • Revealed: Why our brains get so tired in the afternoon - and how to beat the slump

    05/26/2016 6:31:43 AM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 49 replies
    telegraph ^ | 26 May 2016 | Mark Molloy
    Feeling drowsy after lunch is completely natural, according to Dr Fiona Kerr, a neuro specialist from the University of Adelaide, who explains that humans are ďbuilt for two sleeps a dayĒ.
  • A 29-Year Study Has Found No Link Between Brain Cancer and Cellphones

    05/06/2016 11:39:23 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 34 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | Thursday May 5, 2016 11:50pm | By Chris Mills
    A 29-Year Study Has Found No Link Between Brain Cancer and Cellphones If, and by how much cellphones increase the risk of brain cancer is a long and disputed argument. No one study is going to settle anything, but one statistical analysis of data in Australia hints at cellphones being reasonably safe. The study examines the incidence of brain cancer in the Australian population between 1982 to 2013. The study pitted the prevalence of mobile phones among the populationóstarting at 0 percentóagainst brain cancer rates, using data from national cancer registration data. The results showed a very slight increase in...
  • Salts in the brain control our sleep-wake cycle

    04/30/2016 5:40:04 AM PDT · by molewhacka · 80 replies
    Eureka Alert ^ | 4/29/2016 | University of Copenhagen The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences
    Danish research is behind a new epoch-making discovery, which may prove decisive to future brain research. The level of salts in the brain plays a critical role in whether we are asleep or awake. This discovery may be of great importance to research on psychiatric diseases such as schizophrenia and convulsive fits from lack of sleep as well as post-anaesthetization confusion, according to Professor Maiken Nedergaard. Salts in our brain decide whether we are asleep or awake. For the first time, researchers have shown that the level of salts in our body and brain differ depending on whether we are...
  • Problems Finding Your Way Around May Be Early Sign Of Alzheimer's

    04/24/2016 8:19:00 PM PDT · by Innovative · 85 replies
    techtimes.com ^ | April 23, 2016 | Katherine Derla
    Scientists from Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and Glasgow University injected mice with a protein called IL-33 on a daily basis, which resulted in a full reversal in cognitive decline and the symptoms of Alzheimerís in a matter of days. Though the tests have so far been limited to rodents, the team believes it possible that the same technique could be used to treat human patients. The mice had been bred to exhibit the same kinds of symptoms as those of Alzheimerís, though within a week were brought back to their prior cognitive capacities with the protein injections....
  • This is your brain on LSD, Literally

    04/20/2016 6:19:51 AM PDT · by Pearls Before Swine · 25 replies
    CNN ^ | April 13, 2016 | James Griffity
    (CNN)Scientists have for the first time visualized the effects of LSD on the human brain. Using brain scanning and other techniques, researchers at Imperial College London were able to show what happens when someone takes the popular (and illegal) psychedelic, scientific-name Lysergic acid diethylamide. The findings may indicate how the drug produces the complex visual hallucinations often associated with its use.
  • Brain cancer: Two essential amino acids might hold key to better outcomesThe discovery of two amino

    03/31/2016 8:20:17 PM PDT · by se99tp · 21 replies
    Science Daily ^ | March 31, 2016 | Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center
    Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins. Tryptophan and methionine are essential amino acids -- the diet must provide them because cells cannot make them. Normally, the lack of an essential amino acid in the diet can lead to serious diseases and even death. Foods rich in tryptophan and methionine include cheese, lamb, beef, pork, chicken, turkey, fish, eggs, nuts and soybeans.
  • Why sexy kissers keep their eyes closed

    03/21/2016 5:10:27 AM PDT · by Mr_Moonlight · 39 replies
    New York Post ^ | March 20 2016 | Lindsay Putnam
    Closing your eyes while you kiss isnít just romantic, itís a necessity. Thatís the word from scientists in the UK who found that the reason so many lovebirds keep their peepers closed during intimate moments is that our brains are unable to process all the sensations at once. ďShutting out the visual input leaves more mental resources to focus on other aspects of our experience,Ē the brainiacs say.
  • (Vanity) Carson the Brain Surgeon Mind Melds with Trump's Cerebrum

    03/11/2016 7:32:13 PM PST · by poconopundit · 13 replies
    http://freerepublic.com ^ | 3/11/2016 | PoconoPundit
    Today's Carson / Trump press conference was an extraordinary event.† It answered many questions about the two's relationship.† Both men captivated us with their 45 minute talk where they spoke about each other and explained their passion for the mission ahead: to put America back on the course of greatness. From the beginning of the race, we could sense the men liked and respected each other.† But until today we never quite knew what Carson thought about Trump's political take down of Carson last year. † As you'll recall, in his autobiography, Gifted Hands, Carson claimed he was a...
  • Girl ‚Äėbrain-dead‚Äô after Uber shooting gives thumbs-up before organs harvested

    02/22/2016 8:37:48 PM PST · by Behind Liberal Lines · 74 replies
    NY Post ^ | 02.22.16
    A 14-year-old girl wounded during the shooting rampage in Kalamazoo, Mich., was declared brain-dead and about to have her organs harvested when she suddenly showed signs of life, according to a new report Monday. Michigan State Police Lt. Dale Hinz told ABC that the girl's family said Bronson Methodist Hospital was preparing to remove the girl's organs for donation when she squeezed her distraught mom's hand. The girl squeezed her mother's hand again when the mom asked if her daughter could hear her, Hinz said. She also gave thumbs-up signs with both hands when a doctor asked her to give...
  • Scientists have discovered how to 'delete' unwanted memories

    02/14/2016 6:33:46 AM PST · by Dallas59 · 23 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 11 Feb 2016 | The Telegraph
    Are there any memories you'd like to permanently remove from your head? Or what if you could alter unpleasant memories so they're no longer upsetting? Or create entirely new memories of events that never occurred? It sounds like the stuff of science fiction, but according to a new documentary that premiered in the US this week, scientists have discovered how to do just that - and more.
  • Cryogenics: Entire Rabbit Brain Successfully Frozen and Revived For First Time

    02/11/2016 5:03:24 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 76 replies
    natureworldnews ^ | Feb 11, 2016 05:59 PM EST | Samantha Mathewson
    "Using a combination of ultrafast chemical fixation and cryogenic storage, it is the first demonstration that near­ perfect, long-term structural preservation of an intact mammalian brain is achievable," the Brain Preservation Foundation wrote in a news release. The team, led by recent Massachusetts Institute of Technology graduate Robert McIntyre, filled the vascular system of the rabbit brain with chemicals that prevent decay and allow it to be cooled to -211 degrees Fahrenheit. When thawed, the brain was found to have all of its synapses, cell membranes, and intracellular structures intact. "Every neuron and synapse looks beautifully preserved across the entire...
  • Henry VIII‚Äôs erratic behavior was likely caused by an NFL-style injury, argue Yale researchers

    02/06/2016 1:17:28 PM PST · by beaversmom · 71 replies
    Phys ^ | February 3, 2016 | Bill Hathaway
    Did Henry VIII suffer same brain injury as some NFL players? February 3, 2016 by Bill Hathaway Henry VIII may have suffered repeated traumatic brain injuries similar to those experienced by football players and others who receive repeated blows to the head, according to research by a Yale University expert in cognitive neurology. Traumatic brain injury explains the memory problems, explosive anger, inability to control impulses, headaches, insomnia‚ÄĒand maybe even impotence--that afflicted Henry during the decade before his death in 1547, according to a paper published online the week of Feb. 1."It is intriguing to think that modern European history...
  • Your Brain Has More Memory Than the Internet

    02/05/2016 7:39:06 AM PST · by fishtank · 21 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 2-4-16 | Brian Thomas
    Your Brain Has More Memory Than the Internet by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Whoever said the human brain is the most highly organized collection of matter in the universe was more correct than they could have known. New research modeled tiny structures within nerve cells and discovered a clever tactic brains use to increase computing power while maximizing energy efficiency. Its design could form the basis of a whole new and improved class of computer.
  • What happens when you get stoned every single day for five years

    02/01/2016 12:39:58 PM PST · by Mariner · 86 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | February 1st, 2016 | By Christopher Ingraham
    New research published today in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine confirms what many of us have suspected for some time: If you smoke a lot of weed -- like a lot of it -- it can potentially do permanent damage to your short-term memory. Professor Reto Auer of the University of Lausanne led a team of researchers who examined data on the marijuana habits of nearly 3,400 Americans over a 25-year period. At the end of the study period, the subjects took a battery of tests designed to assess cognitive abilities -- memory, focus, ability to make quick decisions, etc....
  • Your Brain Is Hard-Wired to Love Trump

    12/19/2015 9:13:13 AM PST · by Virtuoso80 · 251 replies
    Politico ^ | Dec 16, 2015 | Katelyn Fossett
    (This conversation has been edited and condensed.) *** There have been some high-profile lies this election season. The most recent that comes to mind is the story about the thousands of Muslims that were supposedly having tailgate-style parties celebrating after 9/11. In the book, you say, essentially, we‚Äôre OK with lies. Can you walk me through why we‚Äôre built not only for being deceptive, but also tolerating deception? Trump‚Äôs supporters don‚Äôt particularly care whether he‚Äôs lying or not. Our brain doesn‚Äôt really care‚ÄĒI know that‚Äôs appalling. Our default position is we simply want to be right. This is why our...
  • Don't expect a brain scan to tell you if you're "transgender" or not

    12/01/2015 8:17:17 PM PST · by Kaslin · 29 replies
    Hot Air.com ^ | December 1, 2015 | JAZZ SHAW
    Since it‚Äôs a topic that never seem to fall very far out of the news these days, I was interested to see an analysis at the Washington Post on the subject of ‚Äútransgender‚ÄĚ Americans and how their status has changed under the current administration. Titled, Obama's quiet transgender revolution, the piece tells a rather sad story of a politically motivated, populist deep dive into the confused end of the pool as our own government moved the goalposts of reality back in marked increments. Years before the White House was lit in rainbow colors celebrating the Supreme Court's decision legalizing same-sex...
  • Skunk Weed Cannabis Can Seriously Damage Vital Nerve Fibers In The Brain

    11/27/2015 7:39:52 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 52 replies
    techtimes ^ | Alyssa Navarro,
    Dazzan said that when they looked at the corpus callosum of those who smoke high-strength cannabis, they found that there was a significant difference in the white matter compared to people who have never tried the drug, and people who smoke low-strength cannabis. The THC chemical acts on cannabinoid receptors which the corpus callosum contains. The team utilized two scanning methods to examine the corpus callosum in the brains of 56 patients who reportedly experienced a first episode of psychosis, and 43 healthy participants from the local community. One method required the use of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) while the...
  • Researchers decode patterns that make our brains human

    11/16/2015 3:16:32 PM PST · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/16/2015 | Allen Institute
    The human brain may be the most complex piece of organized matter in the known universe, but Allen Institute researchers have begun to unravel the genetic code underlying its function. Research published this month in Nature Neuroscience identified a surprisingly small set of molecular patterns that dominate gene expression in the human brain and appear to be common to all individuals, providing key insights into the core of the genetic code that makes our brains distinctly human. "So much research focuses on the variations between individuals, but we turned that question on its head to ask, what makes us similar?"...
  • Doctors find tapeworm larva in California man's brain

    11/05/2015 11:59:55 AM PST · by Gamecock · 23 replies
    Click On Detroit ^ | Nov 05 2015 | Ken Haddad
    A California man went to an emergency room with a terrible headache and nausea, slipped into a coma, and was told a tapeworm larva had been living in his brain when he woke up. The surgery and the aftermath have greatly impacted his life, Ortiz said. He had to drop out of school, move back home and find a temporary place for his dog. He can't drive or work. "My memory is like a work in progress," he said. "It gets better from therapy," but he has to remind himself to do his memory exercises and other daily tasks. The...
  • Common myths about the brain debunked

    11/02/2015 5:28:17 PM PST · by Kaslin · 35 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 2, 2015 | Ashley Welch
    The brain is central to our health and sense of self, but when it comes to how it works, there is still much to be understood. Maybe you've heard that doing crossword puzzles can improve memory, that playing classical music makes babies smarter, or that drinking alcohol kills brain cells -- but are these and other common claims about the brain really true? An article in this month's issue of Popular Science seeks to separate brain facts from myths. One of the first questions that come to mind regarding the brain is how much of it we actually use. Science...
  • Biologists discover bacteria communicate like neurons in the brain

    10/21/2015 1:13:24 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/21/2015 | University of California - San Diego
    Biologists at UC San Diego have discovered that bacteria--often viewed as lowly, solitary creatures--are actually quite sophisticated in their social interactions and communicate with one another through similar electrical signaling mechanisms as neurons in the human brain. In a study published in this week's advance online publication of Nature, the scientists detail the manner by which bacteria living in communities communicate with one another electrically through proteins called "ion channels."
  • Scientists reduce belief in God by shutting down the brainís medial frontal cortex

    Someone I know just sent me this extraordinary article, very alarming to say the least: "New research involving a psychologist from the University of York has revealed for the first time that both belief in God and prejudice towards immigrants can be reduced by directing magnetic energy into the brain. Dr Keise Izuma collaborated with a team from the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), to carry out an innovative experiment using transcranial magnetic stimulation, a safe way of temporarily shutting down specific regions of the brain. The researchers targeted the posterior medial frontal cortex, a part of the brain...
  • Scientists Claim Zapping Brains with Magnets Can Treat Belief in God

    10/16/2015 9:14:18 AM PDT · by detective · 74 replies
    The Stream ^ | October 15, 2015 | William M Briggs
    Hereís the breathless headline: ďScientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God ó with MAGNETS.Ē Wait. Attitudes toward God and immigrants? Are these a natural pair? The newspaper thought so. They tell of an experiment which ďclaims to be able to make Christians no longer believe in God and make Britons open their arms to migrants.Ē Howís it done? ďUsing a technique called transcranial magnetic stimulationĒ researchers can ďsafely shut down certain groups of neuronesĒ in the brain. It seems to have worked. Volunteers were coaxed into having their brains zapped by giant magnets. And, lo! ďBelief...
  • Male brain is programmed to seek out sex over food

    10/15/2015 5:55:23 AM PDT · by C19fan · 82 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | October 14, 2015 | Sarah Knapton
    It is said that the way to a manís heart is through his stomach, but a new study suggests that when it comes to sex, food is the last thing on his mind. Researchers have found that the male brain is hardwired to seek out sex, even at the expense of a good meal, with specific neurons firing up to over-ride the desire to eat. Intriguingly, women do not have the same neurons, suggesting that sex for females comes secondary to sustenance.
  • 1984: Researchers Prove Brain Manipulation Can Lessen Belief in God, Alter Views on Immigrants

    10/14/2015 7:29:46 PM PDT · by hulagirl · 23 replies
    Truth Revolt ^ | 10.14.2015 | Tiffany Gabbay
    Day by day, the dystopian universe depicted in George Orwellís magnum opus rings more like an omen than a work of fiction. In the day and age of political correctness run amok, where ďoffendersĒ are often forced to attend sensitivity-training, a new experiment that claims to alter the way participants view religion and immigrants, proves that the thought-police may, in fact, be coming. In a joint study conducted by scientific researches in the U.S. and U.K., a technique dubbed ďtranscranial magnetic stimulation,Ē or TMS, was used on participants to essentially turn off groups of neurons in the brain that control...
  • Scientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God Ė with magnetic field exposure

    10/14/2015 6:48:06 AM PDT · by MarchonDC09122009 · 56 replies
    express.co.uk ^ | 10/14/2015 | Selina Sykes
    Scientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God Ė with MAGNETS http://www.express.co.uk/news/uk/611992/Scientists-experiment-magnets-immigrants-God-magnetic-waves Scientists claim they can change your belief on immigrants and God Ė with MAGNETS ATTITUDES towards God and immigrants can be changed by beaming magnetic waves into the brain, scientists have claimed. By Selina Sykes Wed, Oct 14, 2015 †A bizarre experiment claims to be able to make Christians no longer believe in God and make Britons open their arms to migrants in experiments some may find a threat to their values. Scientists looked at how the brain resolves abstract ideological problems. Using a technique...
  • Psychologist blinds woman with drain cleaner - because she wanted to be disabled

    10/01/2015 1:30:05 PM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 44 replies
    Mirror (UK) ^ | 1 Oct 2015 | Tom Midlane
    For most people becoming blind would be a living nightmare - but for Jewel Shuping it was the fulfilment of a lifelong dream. Jewel has Body Integrity Identity Disorder (BIID), a condition in which able-bodied people believe they are meant to be disabled. Her need to lose her sight was so strong that in 2006 she decided to blind herself - by having a sympathetic psychologist pour DRAIN CLEANER into her eyes. According to Jewel, her fascination with blindness began early in childhood. She said: "When I was young my mother would find me walking in the halls at night,...
  • DARPA is testing implanting chips in soldiersí brains

    09/28/2015 5:44:15 PM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 6 replies
    Fusion ^ | 09/27/15 | Kristen V. Brown
    For decades, DARPA, the secretive research arm of the Department of Defense, has dreamed of turning soldiers into cyborgs. And now itís finally happening. The agency has funded projects that involve implanting chips into soldiersí brains that could one day enhance performance on the battlefield and repair traumatized brains once the fog of war has lifted. ďOf the 2.5 million Americans who served in Iraq and Afghanistan, 300,000 of them came home with traumatic brain injury,Ē journalist Annie Jacobsen told NPR. ďDARPA initiated a series of programs to help cognitive functioning, to repair some of this damage. And those programs...
  • Rep. Franks: ĎThe Only Time This Little Baby Was Ever Held Ö Was by Those Who Cut His Face Open

    09/09/2015 11:48:47 AM PDT · by xzins · 35 replies
    CNS ^ | September 9, 2015 | Melanie Hunter
    During a House Judiciary Committee hearing on Planned Parenthoodís abortion practices on Wednesday, Rep. Trent Franks (R-Ariz.) described how two Planned Parenthood employees recorded during an undercover video operation removed the brain of an unborn baby whose heart was still beating. ďOne of these videos describes an incident where one of Planned Parenthoodís employees calls one of the younger employees over to witness something that was Ďkinda cool,í that one of the babiesí hearts was still beating,Ē said Franks. ďThe older employee then said, ĎOkay, this is a really good fetus, and it looks like we can procure a lot...
  • Omega-3 fish oil Ďdoes not boost elderly brainsí

    08/26/2015 9:00:49 AM PDT · by Signalman · 13 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 8/25/2015 | The Telegraph
    Millions of older people are wasting their time and money taking fish oils supplements to boost brain power after a study showed they do not slow mental decline. Scientists who monitored the progress of 4,000 people over five years found no evidence that omega-3 capsules kept them any sharper witted as they aged. Other studies have associated regular fish consumption with lower rates of the eye condition age-related macular degeneration (AMD), heart disease, and dementia, as well as larger brain volumes. So it has been widely assumed that the omega-3 fatty acids contained in fish are behind the health boost....
  • Jimmy Carter Says Doctors Found Cancer in His Brain

    08/20/2015 7:50:42 AM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 74 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 20, 2015 14:36 UTC | Alan Blinder
    ATLANTA ó Former President Jimmy Carter said Thursday that doctors had found cancer on his brain and that he would begin radiation treatment later in the day. Mr. Carter, speaking at a news conference at the Carter Center here, said his health had been under scrutiny since May, when he had a cold while traveling in Guyana. The former president added that the cancer, which he said was melanoma, had been found in his liver, part of which was removed during a procedure on Aug. 3. He described the melanoma on his brain as four ďvery small spots.Ē
  • Scientists uncover a difference between the sexes

    08/12/2015 1:22:59 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 66 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | August 12, 2015 | Provided by: Northwestern University
    The hippocampus is a region of the brain largely responsible for memory formation. Credit: Salk Institute ============================================================================================================================================== Male and female brains operate differently at a molecular level, a Northwestern University research team reports in a new study of a brain region involved in learning and memory, responses to stress and epilepsy. Many brain disorders vary between the sexes, but how biology and culture contribute to these differences has been unclear. Now Northwestern neuroscientists have found an intrinsic biological difference between males and females in the molecular regulation of synapses in the hippocampus. This provides a scientific reason to believe that...
  • Animal brains connected up to make mind-melded computer

    07/09/2015 8:45:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    www.newscientist.com ^ | 14:38 09 July 2015 | by Jessica Hamzelou
    Two heads are better than one, and three monkey brains can control an avatar better than any single monkey. For the first time, a team has networked the brains of multiple animals to form a living computer that can perform tasks and solve problems. If human brains could be similarly connected, it might give us superhuman problem-solving abilities, and allow us to communicate abstract thoughts and experiences. "It is really exciting," says Iyad Rahwan at the Masdar Institute in Dubai, UAE, who was not involved in the work. "It will change the way humans cooperate." The work, published today, is...
  • Obama's BRAIN Initiative yields first study results

    07/01/2015 12:03:19 PM PDT · by Lazamataz · 43 replies
    Reuters ^ | Thu Apr 30, 2015 12:05pm EDT | BY SHARON BEGLEY
    The mouse walked, the mouse stopped; the mouse ignored a bowl of food, then scampered back and gobbled it up, and it was all controlled by neuroscientists, researchers reported on Thursday. The study, describing a way to manipulate a lab animal's brain circuitry accurately enough to turn behaviors both on and off, is the first to be published under President Barack Obama's 2013 BRAIN Initiative, which aims to advance neuroscience and develop therapies for brain disorders. The point of the remote-control mouse is not to create an army of robo-rodents. Instead, neuroscientists hope to perfect a technique for identifying brain...
  • How your brain is telling you to vote

    06/08/2015 10:10:05 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | 06-08-2015 | by Anita Kar & Provided by McGill University
    A new joint study by researchers at the Montreal Neurological Institute and the Centre for the Study of Democratic Citizenship, both at McGill University, has cast some light on the brain mechanisms that support people's voting decisions. Evidence in the study shows that a part of the brain called the lateral orbitofrontal cortex (LOFC) must function properly if voters are to make choices that combine different sources of information about the candidates. The study found that damage to the LOFC leads people to base their vote on simpler information, namely the candidate's good looks. Healthy individuals and those with brain...
  • Expert Told Congress Unborn Babies Can Feel Pain Starting at 8 Weeks

    05/13/2015 11:03:05 PM PDT · by kathsua · 9 replies
    Life News ^ | May 12, 2015 | Steven Ertelt
    This week, the House of Representatives is voting on a bill that would ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. The last time the House considered this bill, an expert on human embryonic development informed members of the committee that unborn babies have the capacity to feel pain as early as 8 weeks. Maureen Condic, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Anatomy at the University of Utah and obtained her Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley. She is a widely-published scientist whose works have appeared in a wide variety of peer-reviewed journals. ďThe earliest ďrudimentĒ of the human...
  • Air Pollution May Shrink the Brain, Study Suggests

    04/27/2015 8:56:58 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 12 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 4/27/15 | Agata Blaszczak Boxe - Livescience.com
    Breathing polluted air every day may change a person's brain in ways that end up leading to cognitive impairment, according to a new study. In the study, researchers examined 943 healthy adults who were at least 60 years old and lived the New England region. The investigators used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to look at the participants' brain structures, and compared the images with the air pollution levels in the places where the participants lived. The researchers found that an increase of 2 micrograms per cubic meter in fine-particle pollution ó a range that can be observed across an average...
  • Embryonic Twin Discovered in Woman's Brain During Surgery in LA

    04/23/2015 9:35:58 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 35 replies
    KNBC Channel 4 Los Angeles ^ | April 23, 2015 | John CŠdiz Klemack
    An Indiana woman undergoing surgery in Los Angeles to remove a tumor experienced a twist worthy of a sci-fi plot when doctors discovered an embryonic twin in her brain. Yamini Karanam, 26, was unaware of what was happening in her head until she underwent a procedure designed to reach deep into the brain to extract the tumor. After waking up from the surgery, Karanam was surprised to learn of the "teratoma" -- her embryonic twin, a rarity in modern medicine, complete with bone, hair and teeth.
  • Eight nutrients to protect the aging brain

    04/18/2015 10:27:44 PM PDT · by ckilmer · 173 replies
    sciencedaily.com ^ | April 15, 2015 | Institute of Food Technologists (IFT)
    Brain health is the second most important component in maintaining a healthy lifestyle according to a 2014 AARP study. As people age they can experience a range of cognitive issues from decreased critical thinking to dementia and Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers write about eight nutrients that may help keep your brain in good shape.
  • Poor Children May Have Smaller Brains Than Rich Children. Does That Tell Us Anything?

    04/18/2015 2:50:13 AM PDT · by Cincinatus' Wife · 102 replies
    Slate ^ | April 17, 2015 | Jordan Weissmann
    Social scientists have found that by the time children enter kindergarten, there is already a large academic achievement gap between students from wealthy and poor families. We still don't know exactly why that's the case. There's a sense that it at least partly has to do with the fact that affluent mothers and fathers have more intensive parenting sytlesóthey're more likely to read to their kids, for instanceóand have enough money to make sure their toddlers grow up well-nourished, generally cared for, and intellectually stimulated. At the same time, poor children often grow up in chaotic, food-insecure, stressful homes that...
  • HIV can spread to brain in 4 months (causes Dementia)

    03/28/2015 7:47:09 PM PDT · by NetAddicted · 9 replies
    Times of India ^ | 3/27/2015 | IAMS
    In the absence of antiretroviral therapy, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) that causes AIDS can begin replicating in the brain as early as four months after initial infection, a new research has found.