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Agriculture (General/Chat)

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  • How to Prepare for a Collapse in 9 Steps – a Case Study with David Holmgren

    06/25/2015 8:58:34 AM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 17 replies
    Walden Labs ^ | 6-26-15 | William Horvath
    How to Prepare for a Collapse in 9 Steps – a Case Study with David Holmgren By William Horvath It’s 2025, the long troubled financial markets have finally crashed the overleveraged banking system and the world is experiencing global depression on a massive scale. Precipitated by environmental destruction, heatwaves are scorching the planet, destroying the monoculture food crops, and there are food riots in every major city. In order to maintain the social order upon panicked and desperate populations governments are forced to introduce a command economy, issuing people supermarket food stamps.But for you and your family nothing has changed,...
  • Undergraduate discovers new firefly species [CA]

    06/25/2015 8:46:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-25-2015 | Iqbal Pittalwala & Provided by University of California - Riverside
    The Entomology Research Museum at the University of California, Riverside today announced the discovery of a new species of firefly from Southern California, collected by an undergraduate student as part of his semester's insect collection. Doug Yanega, senior museum scientist, said the student, Joshua Oliva, obtained one specimen of the new species while collecting near Topanga, Calif. "He wasn't 100 percent certain it was a firefly, and brought it to me for confirmation," Yanega said. "I know the local fauna well enough that within minutes I was able to tell him he had found something entirely new to science. I...
  • Tell Us Something Good About Your Dad

    06/21/2015 11:13:44 AM PDT · by blueunicorn6 · 101 replies
    blueunicorn6 | 6/21/15 | blueunicorn6
    My Dad taught me how to drive a car with a manual transmission. "Let the clutch out slower next time."
  • Finland: Horse manure plan to heat homes

    06/17/2015 6:33:17 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | June 15, 2015
    Finland's government wants the country to turn away from fossil fuels and look towards horse manure to heat its homes instead, it's reported. The new coalition's manifesto sets out plans for the large-scale use of horse dung as a renewable source of energy, the national broadcaster Yle reports. One energy company is already trying out a biofuel made by mixing horse manure with a wood-based litter, which is then burned to create power. The Fortum group says the annual waste created by three horses would be enough to heat a family home for a year. And with about 77,000 horses...
  • Couple Paints American Flag On Brown Lawn As San Jose Forces Water Cutbacks During Drought

    06/16/2015 7:11:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com ^ | June 15, 2015 10:39 PM | Andria Borba
    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — San Jose is forcing its residents to cut back on water use during the drought, so one couple found a patriotic solution to their ugly brown lawn by painting an American flag on it. Claudia Decker and her husband stopped watering their lawn in January. Tired of looking at the patchy turf and dirt, they wanted to increase their curb appeal. “People are painting their lawns green because of the drought,” Decker told KPIX 5. Instead of green, the couple painted an American flag on the lawn, in honor of Flag Day. The flag even...
  • Rare 15-Foot Agave Plant Blooms in Dallas

    06/11/2015 10:51:20 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    NBC DFW ^ | 6/11
    A 15-foot-tall Agave plant is blooming and drawing crowds to the Dallas Arboretum. The Arboretum says the Agave victoriae-reginae is 20 years old and this will be the only time it blooms in its lifetime. Once it finishes blooming, the plant will die, but not before sowing seeds for the next generation. The plant just started opening up and will bloom in the Garden's Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden for two to four weeks. Agave victoriae-reginae plant is endangered in its native Sierra Madre mountain range of Chihuahua, Mexico.
  • Vanity: Who has a good recipe for Garlic / Deli Style pickles?

    06/10/2015 2:19:09 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    My dark and forboding mind................... | 06-10-2015 | Red Badger
    I'm tired of paying good money for soft pickles..................
  • Doctors remove 420 kidney stones 'caused by excessive tofu' from patient in China

    06/09/2015 11:00:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 76 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk/news ^ | 10:48AM BST 09 Jun 2015 | By Charlotte Middlehurst, Shanghai
    The operation to remove hundreds of tiny stones took doctors around two hours Doctors in China have removed 420 kidney stones from a man's body, blaming an excessive amount of tofu in his daily diet. Mr He from Zhejiang Province in eastern China, checked into the Dongyang People's Hospital complaining of intense pain in his abdomen last month. A CT scan revealed that his left kidney was packed full of stones, most of them tiny. Doctors operated on Friday in an agonising procedure that lasted about two hours. Mr He said he had a history of suffering from kidney stones....
  • Yes, that ant does smell like blue cheese

    06/08/2015 10:49:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-08-2015 | Matt Shipman & Provided by North Carolina State University
    If you live in the United States, you've probably seen an odorous house ant (Tapinoma sessile) – one of the most common ants in the country. And for more than 50 years they've been described as smelling like rotten coconut. But Clint Penick thinks they smell like blue cheese. And he can prove he's right. Penick is postdoctoral researcher at NC State. Most of his work revolves around ants, and for years he's been fascinated by the fact that you can identify some ant species by smell – such as T. sessile. In grad school he heard that T. sessile...
  • Search is on for World’s Best Steak

    06/06/2015 9:55:26 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    Global Meat News ^ | Friday, Jun 5, 2015 | Georgi Gyton
    A new international competition, from the team behind GlobalMeatNews, launches today (5 June) - the World Steak Challenge.
  • So ... Cattle Rustlin' Is Still A Thing

    06/05/2015 3:41:18 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    San Antonio Current ^ | Fri, Jun 5, 2015 | Mark Reagan
    A 56-year-old man from North Texas is accused of stealing 144 head of cattle from two ranchers, including one who is elderly. The Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association announced in a press release that Jerry Dean Kulow, who is accused of third degree felony theft of livestock and second degree felony theft of livestock from the elderly on May 4 was arrested Thursday. Kulow was a ranch foreman for one of the victims. All of the cattle stolen were worth nearly $100,000. According to the TSCRA, Kulow confessed to the crime, but didn't tell authorities where the money went....
  • The Quest to Engineer the Perfect Potato

    06/05/2015 12:25:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | June 5, 2015 | By Mike Orcutt
    Researchers in the U.K. aim for a new commercial potato that resists many of the worst vulnerabilities of potato crops around the world. Super spuds are coming. A genetically modified potato that could resist destructive blight, defend itself against parasitic worms, avoid bruising, and cut down on the accumulation of a suspected carcinogen during cooking would be worth many billions of dollars per year to potato producers across the world. It could also serve as a model technology for addressing issues that affect many different crops and are increasingly likely to cause concerns about global food security as the population...
  • Millions of Flies Invade Dozens of Isanti (MN) County Homes for Weeks

    06/04/2015 8:34:07 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 15 replies
    KSTP.com ^ | 6/4/15 | Brett Hoffland
    Millions of flies are invading one Minnesota neighborhood, and nothing his being done. Officials say one farmer is responsible for the infestation. "We've been getting these flies like this. They're all over the car, they're all over the house, they're in our full barn, they're in our patio by the billions," Tom Hanson said. Hanson says it started thanks to their neighbor across the street who owns the property, but doesn't normally live there. "The gentleman across the road has been dumping this stuff since last winter and he has no intention of cleaning it up. He doesn't care what...
  • World Grain Markets: Record Supplies Support Growing Global Consumption

    06/03/2015 7:50:59 AM PDT · by jjotto · 4 replies
    AGFAX ^ | May 13, 2015 | USDA
    Global corn production in 2015/16 is projected down from last year’s record, with lower forecasts for the United States, EU, Brazil, and Ukraine. Global corn consumption is expected to climb slightly above production for the first time in 5 years. Global ending stocks are forecast mostly unchanged, with growth in China nearly offsetting stocks declines in the United States and other foreign countries. World corn import demand is expected higher, led by the EU and Saudi Arabia. Wheat production is forecast down from last year’s record, but still above consumption for the third straight year. Global consumption is projected up...
  • Is Grass-Fed Really Better?

    06/02/2015 8:08:34 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 86 replies
    New York Post ^ | 6.2 | Jane Black
    For you? For anyone?While cows are four-stomached ruminants designed to eat grass, not grain, burgers made from them aren’t exactly health food and won’t reverse climate change. The meat might be leaner (a pro or con, depending on who’s eating it) and contain higher levels of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and a lower ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids. But only very marginally: An eight-ounce grass-fed burger has between 45 and 68 milligrams of omega-3s. The equivalent portion of sockeye salmon serves up 65 times that much. “The omega-3s come from eating greens — grass if you’re a cow,...
  • Feds Inspect Fla. Monkey Farm at PETA's Behest

    06/01/2015 8:26:51 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is investigating a monkey breeding facility in southwest Florida after an animal welfare group said an undercover worker found sick and injured monkeys living in inhumane and unsanitary conditions. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals released a video Monday purporting to show conditions at Primate Products Inc. in Hendry County. PETA spokesman Dan Paden said the video was taken by a PETA employee who was hired to work undercover at the facility. PETA first gave the video exclusively to The Associated Press. After meeting with PETA, inspectors from the USDA's Animal and Plant Health...
  • California’s largest lake is slipping away amid an epic drought

    05/29/2015 11:06:23 AM PDT · by CedarDave · 49 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | May 28, 2015 | Todd C. Frankel
    The Salton Sea is the largest lake in California, 360 square miles of unlikely liquid pooled in the middle of the Sonoran Desert. Now the sea is slipping away. The Salton Sea needs more water — but so does just about every other place in California. And what is happening here perfectly illustrates the fight over water in the West, where epic drought has revived decades-old battles and the simple solutions have all been tried. Allowing the Salton Sea to shrink unabated would be catastrophic, experts say. Dried lake bed, called playa, is lighter and flies farther than ordinary soil....
  • Volunteers Fight Brazilian Pepper Tree in Flagler County

    05/28/2015 1:36:18 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    MyNews13 ^ | 5/28
    There's something in the trees of Betty Steflik Memorial Preserve in Flagler Beach. It is not the elusive Florida Skunk Ape though. It's something much more real and dangerous: pepper pickers -- a group of volunteers trying to remove invasive Brazilian pepper trees from the park. Mike Lagasse is the Flagler County Land Management Coordinator. “Even if we knock it out of this park, you know, it's in people's yards," He said. "And birds don't know boundaries, you know.” That's because birds like the bright red berries the trees produce in the winter and have helped spread the plant. The...
  • A century on, experts crack mystery of holes in Swiss cheese

    05/28/2015 10:05:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-28-2015 | Staff
    Eureka! After about a century of research, Swiss scientists have finally cracked the mystery of the holes in Swiss cheese. Despite what you may have been told as a child, they are not caused by mice nibbling away inside cheese wheels. Experts from Agroscope, a state centre for agricultural research, said the phenomenon—which marks famous Swiss cheeses such as Emmental and Appenzell—was caused by tiny bits of hay present in the milk and not bacteria as previously thought. They found that the mystery holes in such cheeses became smaller or disappeared when milk used for cheese-making was extracted using modern...
  • Fewer students study botany, more plant collections closing

    05/25/2015 9:39:52 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 38 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 25, 2015 12:36 PM EDT | Claudia Lauer
    The teeming plant world could become a virtual mystery in the coming decades as college students increasingly shy away from studying botany and universities across the U.S. shutter their long-standing herbaria. Since 1988, the number of research universities offering botany degrees has dropped by half, according to National Science Foundation research funding statistics. And the National Center for Education Statistics reports that fewer than 400 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral botany degrees were awarded in 2012. Educators say that’s because students are being pushed into more modern, technology-related majors. Current botanists fear that will lead to a dearth of people able...
  • German government to boost organic farming

    05/22/2015 12:58:14 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 1 replies
    EurActiv ^ | 22/05/2015 - 08:16 | Nicole Sagener | translated from German by Erika Körner
    Between 2010 and 2013, Germany’s market for organic foods increased by one-fourth to almost €8 billion. Still, switching to organic cultivation remains a difficult process for farmers. While revenue from organic products has enjoyed an annual increase of 5-9% since 2011, the parallel increase in surface area over the past four years has only been 1-3%. Agriculture Minister Christian Schmidt hopes to change this. “We want a timetable for growth that allows domestic producers to benefit more from the boom,” he said on Tuesday (19 May) in Berlin. Organic must be strengthened, he said, with the help of the Future...
  • Farmer Delays Harvesting Crops to Save Baby Blackbirds, Earning Flock of Praise

    05/21/2015 9:38:41 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 15 replies
    A central California farmer is holding off on harvesting his fields until thousands of imperiled tricolored baby blackbirds can fly from their nests. The Fresno Bee reports Thursday that Frank Mendonsa, owner of a dairy farm south of Tulare, California, was recognized Wednesday by Audubon California and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service. About 15,000 tricolored blackbirds are temporarily nesting in fields of triticale silage that Mendonsa is growing for cow feed, the newspaper reported.
  • Ultrasonic production of skimmed milk [Faster Cheese!]

    05/20/2015 8:37:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-20-2015 | Provided by Acoustical Society of America
    Recently, scientists from Swinburne University of Technology in Australia and the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization (CSIRO) have jointly demonstrated cream separation from natural whole milk at liter-scales for the first time using ultrasonic standing waves—a novel, fast and nondestructive separation technique typically used only in small-scale settings. At the 169th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA), being held May 18-22 2015 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, the researchers will report the key design and effective operating parameters for milk fat separation in batch and continuous systems. The project, co-funded by the Geoffrey-Gardiner Dairy Foundation and the Australian Research...
  • Gardening Thread/So what plants have each of you put in as of yet?

    05/20/2015 6:59:43 AM PDT · by US Navy Vet · 27 replies
    20 May 2015 | US navy Vet
    I put in(pots) 5 varieties of Tomato from this outfit(got them all at Bamgaars)(http://chefjeffsgarden.com/about.html) and one Pepper Plant(also in a pot).
  • Canada vows 'retaliatory' sanctions against U.S. after WTO meat-labelling win

    05/19/2015 6:27:34 PM PDT · by rickmichaels · 23 replies
    Toronto Sun ^ | May 19, 2015 | Postmedia Network
    Canada vowed on Tuesday to give the Americans a taste of their own medicine by making it harder for the U.S. to peddle its wares in the Great White North. Agriculture Minister Gerry Ritz and Trade Minister Ed Fast said they plan to enact "retaliatory measures" against U.S. exports after winning a meat-labelling dispute at the World Trade Organization on Monday. The WTO upheld a complaint by Canada and Mexico that U.S. laws -- which require retailers to label meat with the country where the animal was born, raised and slaughtered -- discriminate against imported livestock. "The WTO has been...
  • America's biggest ranch, larger than New York City, goes on sale for $713 million in Texas

    05/19/2015 10:22:22 AM PDT · by dennisw · 51 replies
    @MailOnline ^ | 19 May 2015 | By James Dunn
    America's biggest ranch, which is larger than New York City, goes on sale for $713million in Texas The Waggoner Ranch is the largest contiguous ranch in the United States spanning six counties in Northern Texas Listing marks end of decades-long court battle among heirs of cattle baron W.T. Waggoner who founded it in 1923 The estate includes the 510,000-acre ranch with two main compounds, hundreds of homes and 20 cowboy camps Also included are hundreds of quarter-horses, thousands of cattle, 1,200 oil wells and 30,000 acres of cultivated land It reportedly falls within 'super asset class', akin to selling the...
  • New species of marine roly poly pillbug discovered near Port of Los Angeles

    05/18/2015 9:05:18 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 37 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | 05/18/2015 | Staff
    A new research paper published in the open access journal ZooKeys reports on a discovery made during a Los Angeles class fieldtrip—a new species of marine pillbug (Crustacea: Isopoda). While documenting that new species, a second new species of pillbug originally collected 142 years ago by biologists on a wooden sailing ship in Alaska was discovered in a collection room at the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County (NHM) by researchers Adam Wall and Dr. Regina Wetzer. The Los Angeles discovery was made during a Loyola Marymount University field trip for an invertebrate zoology lab course taught by NHM...
  • Almonds Not the State's Worst Water Offender

    05/13/2015 10:01:38 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 27 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | 5/13 | Sam Brock and Rachel Witte
    The California almond is getting a bad reputation. At least that’s what the numbers show. According to an April report released by the Pacific Institute, a non-profit research firm based in Oakland, almonds are not the most water intensive crop grown in the Golden State. In fact, almonds tie with pistachios for fourth place in the ranking of California’s water intensive crops and require on average four acre-feet of water per acre. One acre-foot is approximately 326,000 gallons of water. Alfalfa and rice are the top two water users, averaging five acre-feet of water per acre a piece, though alfalfa...
  • Producing jet fuel compounds from fungus

    05/06/2015 11:57:27 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-05-2015 | Provided by Washington State University
    Washington State University researchers have found a way to make jet fuel from a common black fungus found in decaying leaves, soil and rotting fruit. The researchers hope the process leads to economically viable production of aviation biofuels in the next five years. The researchers used Aspergillus carbonarius ITEM 5010 to create hydrocarbons, the chief component of petroleum, similar to those in aviation fuels. Led by Birgitte Ahring, director and Battelle distinguished professor of the Bioproducts, Sciences and Engineering Laboratory at WSU Tri-cities, the researchers published their work in the April edition of Fungal Biology. The fungus produced the most...
  • Ag Secretary Vilsack to announce national conservation work

    05/04/2015 9:31:04 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 9 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 4, 2015 11:32 AM EDT
    U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack is traveling to Colorado to announce funding for conservation projects in all 50 states. […] The Department of Agriculture says the projects concern water quality, soil health, wildlife habitat and agricultural viability. …
  • Insurance and Kiowa the Dog

    05/03/2015 7:50:36 AM PDT · by waterhill · 27 replies
    Insurance lady asked me what kind of dog do I have.... I said half red heeler half lab and she is a good dog. She asked me how big she was (she is 80 lbs, but I said none of your business) I am getting upset at this point. I told her that if ever Ki was to get out of control that I would 'fix' it. I am not above certain things. I just don't like noses being stuck up my ass. I live on the family ranch and I have to have big dogs. This is just pissing...
  • 'Three Pumpkins' Wine Ready to Hit the Shelves

    04/30/2015 10:31:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    Boreal Winery in Warren, east of Sudbury, is trying something new: pumpkin wine. They've used some giant pumpkins grown in Sudbury, and fermented the wine right inside the pumpkins. It was bottled just a few weeks ago, and the winery will start selling it this weekend. Owner of Boreal Winery Greg Meilien said the wine is fantastic. "[We were] quite surprised. We weren't sure what was going to happen but it turned out very, very nice," he said. Meilien said as for the taste, it's something you need to try for yourself, but added it does have a melon mid-palette...
  • Couple to give away their $350,000 Alabama goat cheese farm

    04/30/2015 6:35:56 PM PDT · by Roos_Girl · 97 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | April 30, 2015 | Lydia Warren
    If you've ever dreamed of owning your own patch of land and a successful home-grown business then a 200-word essay and $150 is all is could take for it to become a reality. Paul and Leslie Spell, of Humble Heart Farms in Elkmont, Alabama, are giving away their goat cheese farm - complete with their house, 20 acres of land, 56 goats, cheese-making equipment, recipes and even a dog - to the person who writes the best essay about why they should run it. It will cost entrants just $150 to apply and, with an expected 2,500 applications, the couple...
  • AT LAST .. acceptable Saturday morning animation !

    04/25/2015 2:48:59 AM PDT · by knarf · 9 replies
    FreeRangeStudios ^ | April 25, 2015 | knarf
    Opened my e-mail this morning and just flat out enjoyed this short
  • US to announce plans to reduce agricultural carbon emissions

    04/23/2015 12:41:59 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 8 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Apr 23, 2015 1:26 AM EDT | Jeff Karoub
    Federal agricultural officials are planning to announce voluntary programs and initiatives for farmers, ranchers and foresters meant to build on President Barack Obama’s efforts to combat global warming—and don’t require congressional approval.Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack is expected to unveil plans Thursday at Michigan State University, where Obama signed the sweeping farm bill into law last year. The efforts, many of which have their roots in that law, aim to reduce net greenhouse gas emissions, boost carbon capture and storage and come with various enticements, including grants, low-interest loans and technical assistance. […] Obama administration aides have said the issue of...
  • Problems Multiply for Vet Who Bragged of Cat-Killing

    04/21/2015 12:50:28 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 66 replies
    Newser ^ | 21 Apr 2015 | Rob Quinn
    The problems are multiplying for the Texas veterinarian... "Current interests: Living my days to the fullest, finding the meaning of happiness, killing things or trying to kill things (animals, a full glass of whiskey, hangovers, etc)..."
  • Mad Cow Disease In Texas Man Has Mysterious Origin

    04/16/2015 10:41:02 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    NPR ^ | APRIL 16, 2015 | MICHAELEEN DOUCLEFF
    It began with anxiety and depression. A few months later, hallucinations appeared. Then the Texas man, in his 40s, couldn't feel or move the left side of his face. He thought the symptoms were because of a recent car accident. But the psychiatric problems got worse. And some doctors thought the man might have bipolar disorder. Cattle feeding practices have been changed in an effort to halt the spread of mad cow disease. THE SALT Mad Cow Disease: What You Need To Know Now Eventually, he couldn't walk or speak. He was hospitalized. And about 18 months after symptoms began,...
  • Finally! Saudi Arabia opening stock market to foreigners on June 15

    04/16/2015 12:05:17 PM PDT · by Citizen Zed · 5 replies
    cnn money ^ | 4-16-2015
    The oil-rich nation is opening its stock market -- the largest in the Middle East -- to foreign investors on June 15, the government announced Thursday. The Saudi market -- worth an estimated $530 billion -- is more than double the size of the Tel Aviv stock exchange in Israel. Previously, only Saudi-based investors could buy stocks there. By mid-June, international firms will be able to buy stocks in the country's exchange, the Tadawul All Share Index. This will likely encourage mutual funds and ETFs to add some Saudi stocks to their holdings, especially in emerging market funds. The move...
  • Rare jungle nut becomes anti-aging rage

    04/15/2015 11:18:09 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    WND ^ | 04-14-2015 | Staff
    'It's going to be the new little wave' For decades, if not centuries, the Amazon dwellers of southern Colombia didn’t make too much of the cacay nut. They fed it to their livestock, used it to treat wounds and chopped down its trees for firewood. But then, a few years ago, the global jet-setting crowd found out what the yellow-ish oil from the protein-rich nut could do for their skin. And suddenly, the cacay (pronounced kahk-ai) has become a red-hot commodity, providing the key ingredient to anti-aging facial creams that can fetch $200 an ounce in beauty shops in Los...
  • Agriculture poses immense threat to environment, German study says

    04/12/2015 12:37:01 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 22 replies
    EurActiv ^ | 04/10/2015 – 08:12 | Nicole Sagener
    Conventional agriculture is causing enormous environmental damage in Germany, warns a study by the country’s Federal Environment Agency, saying a transition to organic farming and stricter regulation is urgently needed. EurActiv Germany reports. Spanning over 50% of the country, agriculture takes up by far the biggest amount of land in the country, and is one of its most important economic sectors. But intensive farming still harms the environment to an alarming extent, according to a study conducted by the Federal Environment Agency (UBA). The use of pesticides and fertilizers, as well as intensive animal husbandry, have a negative impact on...
  • Ventura Distillers Make Vodka -- From Local Strawberries

    <p>Make vodka from strawberries? No one does that, says Anthony Caspary, co-founder of Ventura Spirits, a bootstrap distillery he started with his brother and two friends in the basement of an old industrial building on the western edge of Ventura. Other than the expense of the strawberries themselves, it's just too much work.</p>
  • California Liberals are now the "SOAP NAZIS"! (Vanity)

    04/07/2015 4:39:12 PM PDT · by LonePalm · 24 replies
    LonePalm | 4/7/2015 | LonePalm
    I was just thinking about the water problems in California. Governor Moonbeam and his fellow travelers opposed a series of water projects in the '70s that would have lessened the severity of the current water shortage in California. Then they invite in a few million illegal aliens. Now he wants to regulate how long people can take showers? They have turned into Soap Nazis.
  • The Best Beer From Every State; Happy National Beer Day!

    04/07/2015 2:20:16 PM PDT · by Diana in Wisconsin · 89 replies
    Business Insider ^ | April 7, 2015 | Melissa Stanger
    It's National Beer Day, the perfect excuse to break out a frosty mug of your favorite brew. Because everyone's tastes and preferences for beers differ so significantly, it can be hard to objectively decide which ones are the cream of the crop. That's why we enlisted the help of the experts at RateBeer.com to come out with a list of the best beer from every state. Take a look at the map below to see if your favorite local beer made the list, or read the full feature for more information on the best brews.
  • Gardening by the Yard: Planting Woody Stem Plants

    04/07/2015 6:37:48 AM PDT · by Colehill1999 · 5 replies
    Its spring time in America - a time when the musky marxists residue of a long winters night is washed away by the cleansing flood of purer more forgiving capitalism. So as you begin searching for plants to purchase for your landscape, lets discuss: -New and exciting plants for the landscape -Ways to recover from freeze damage -Techniques for planting trees, shrubs, perennials and other plants -General lore, tall tales, and history of gardening
  • Research findings back up Aboriginal legend on origin of Central Australian palm trees

    04/06/2015 10:26:08 AM PDT · by Theoria · 13 replies
    ABC ^ | 03 April 2015 | ABC
    The scientific world is stunned by research which backs an Aboriginal legend about how palm trees got to Central Australia. Several years ago Tasmanian ecologist David Bowman did DNA tests on palm seeds from the outback and near Darwin. The results led him to conclude the seeds were carried to the Central Desert by humans up to 30,000 years ago. Professor Bowman read an Aboriginal legend recorded in 1894 by pioneering German anthropologist and missionary Carl Strehlow, which was only recently translated, describing the "gods from the north" bringing the seeds to Palm Valley. Professor Bowman said he was amazed....
  • Getting bit by the maple syrup bug.

    04/06/2015 7:57:21 AM PDT · by WakeUpAndVote · 15 replies
    Me and my back yard | April 6, 2015 | WUAV
    I took some tours during a local maple weekend in March. It looks to good not to pass up an attempted try for the 2016 season.
  • Tree Grown From 2,000-Year-Old Seed Has Reproduced

    03/29/2015 5:41:32 PM PDT · by EBH · 44 replies
    Smithsonianmag.com ^ | 3/26/2015 | Laura Clark
    et out the cigars—Methuselah, a Judean date palm tree that was grown from a 2,000 year old seed, has become a papa plant. Elaine Solowey, of the Arava Institute for Environmental Studies at Kibbutz Ketura in Israel, recently broke the good news to National Geographic: “He is over three meters [ten feet] tall, he's got a few offshoots, he has flowers, and his pollen is good," she says. "We pollinated a female with his pollen, a wild [modern] female, and yeah, he can make dates." Methuselah sprouted back in 2005, when agriculture expert Solowey germinated his antique seed. It had...
  • Invest in Food

    03/27/2015 8:14:00 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 47 replies
    It is in this environment of extreme financial risk and perpetually spiraling food prices where we consider the proposition of food as an investment asset class. We begin by looking at the “fundamentals” of this market/investment class. And what we see (from this perspective) is extremely encouraging: food prices consistently soaring by roughly 20% per year, and significantly more for some categories of food (notably meat products). With soaring food costs being a serious drain on the budgets of most families, our challenge is to find some way of turning this financial drain into a means of preserving/protecting our wealth:...
  • Southern Oregon medical marijuana growers fear industrial hemp could ruin their crops

    03/22/2015 4:32:29 PM PDT · by gundog · 75 replies
    The Oregonian/Oregon Live ^ | February 17, 2015 | Noelle Crombie
    Southern Oregon marijuana growers want to ban industrial hemp production from the region out of fear that hemp may pollinate their crops and render them worthless. Some outdoor marijuana growers want industrial hemp cultivation to be limited to eastern Oregon - far from their lucrative marijuana crops. At the very least, they don't want hemp in Josephine, Jackson and Douglas counties. Compared to Oregon's marijuana legalization movement, the effort to launch an industrial hemp industry in Oregon has been an understated one propelled by a small but passionate group of advocates. When one of them, Edgar Winters, of Eagle Point,...
  • Popular weed killer deemed “probable carcinogen” by UN (glyphosate, e.g. “Roundup”)

    03/20/2015 11:40:30 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 44 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Mar 20, 2015 2:25 PM EDT | Maria Cheng
    One of the world’s most popular weed killers—and the most widely used kind in the U.S.—has been labeled a probable carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The decision was made by IARC, the France-based cancer research arm of the World Health Organization, which considered the status of five insect and weed killers including glyphosate, which is used globally in industrial farming. […] The new classification is aimed mainly at industrial use of glyphosate. Its use by home gardeners is not considered a risk. Glyphosate is in the same category of risk as things like anabolic steroids and...