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Agriculture (General/Chat)

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  • The True Story of Kudzu, the Vine That Never Truly Ate the South

    08/28/2015 4:42:45 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 60 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | September 2015 | Bill Finch
    As s a young naturalist growing up in the Deep South, I feared kudzu. I’d walk an extra mile to avoid patches of it and the writhing knots of snakes that everyone said were breeding within. Though fascinated by the grape-scented flowers and the purple honey produced by visiting bees, I trembled at the monstrous green forms climbing telephone poles and trees on the edges of our roads and towns. Introduced from Asia in the late 19th century as a garden novelty, but not widely planted until the 1930s, kudzu is now America’s most infamous weed. In a few decades,...
  • Harvest time for the “Tree of Life”

    08/24/2015 9:51:32 AM PDT · by SandRat · 1 replies
    Some people love them, some people could live without them. There are differing views on their benefit, but almost everyone is fond of the taste. From the honey and the smoke of the wood, to the highly nutritional flour made from the ground pods, they are a signature flavor here in the desert. The early start to monsoon this year affected the first mesquite harvest, with many finding unacceptable mold, which renders them inedible. However, the second harvest is looking better, and is in progress in parts of the county, although some altitudes have already peaked. “I heard rumor about...
  • First Wolf Pack in 91 Years Photographed in Northern California

    08/20/2015 2:10:39 PM PDT · by Lurkina.n.Learnin · 21 replies
    Lostcoasr Outpost ^ | 8/20/2015 | Ryan Burns
    Scientists are calling it an ecological breakthrough: Two adult wolves and five cubs were recently photographed in Siskiyou County, the first known wolves in California since 1924 (with the exception of the famous wandering OR7, who wound up settling in Southern Oregon).
  • Idaho replaces mile marker 420 with 419.9 to thwart stoners

    08/18/2015 2:28:22 PM PDT · by Responsibility2nd · 107 replies
    BOISE, Idaho – If you're looking for milepost 420, you won't find it in Idaho. Idaho transportation officials say the mile marker has been replaced with 419.9 signs to curb thieves eager to own a number associated with marijuana enthusiasts. Turns out, Idaho isn't alone in this problem. States like Washington and Colorado have also replaced 420 signs with 419.9 after consistently having to replace them after thefts by supposed sticky-fingered stoners. Adam Rush of the Idaho Transportation Department says officials have replaced the old sign along U.S. Highway 95 with "MILE 419.9," just south of Coeur d'Alene. ~snip~ The...
  • BlueBell in 2 weeks! (vanity)

    08/17/2015 3:09:17 PM PDT · by waterhill · 38 replies
    8/17/2015 | me
    Life altering true ice cream..... Homemade Vanilla.
  • Genetically engineered pigs: Advance looks promising [For Transplants]

    08/14/2015 9:17:26 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    medicalxpress.com ^ | August 14, 2015 | by Nancy Owano
    A domestic pig on an organic farm in Solothurn, Switzerland. Image: Wikimedia Commons --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Stories of people waiting for organ transplants that could save their lives are well known. The numbers, though, are not encouraging. The US Department of Health and Human Services has some data: 122,407 people need a lifesaving organ transplant (total waiting list of candidates). The agency said that the gap between supply and demand continues to widen. The total number of donors from January through May this year was 5,975. On average, 22 people die each day while waiting for a transplant. Here is another statistic:...
  • This Renaissance Painting of Fruit Holds a Modern-Day Science Lesson

    08/09/2015 8:31:31 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 31 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 8-8-15 | Helen Thompson
    Paintings can be a window to more than the outmoded dress and strange customs of the past — sometimes, they have modern-day science lessons to impart, too. That's the case with Giovanni Stanchi’s 17th century still life of fruit, as Phil Edwards points out for Vox — just look for the watermelons. Stanchi’s work, painted between 1645 and 1672 (and now up for auction at Christie’s), includes strange watermelons that look so foreign they could be from outer space in the bottom right corner. If watermelons looked like that in the Renaissance, then why do they look so different today?...
  • The plane that can fly backwards

    08/06/2015 2:40:06 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 28 replies
    The verge ^ | 1 Aug 2015 | BBC Future
    "The reason the An-2 still flies is that there is really no other aircraft like it," says aviation writer Bernie Leighton, who has flown in an An-2 in Belarus. "If you need an aircraft that can carry 10 soldiers, people or goats, that can take off from anywhere and land anywhere — it is either that or a helicopter.
  • Coroner issues warning over dangers of ingesting poppies after death of Danish tourist...

    08/06/2015 10:13:47 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.abc.net.au ^ | 08-05-2015 | Staff
    The death of a Danish backpacker who drank a brew of tea made from poppies has prompted a warning from a Tasmanian coroner about the dangers. Jonas Havskov Pedersen died on his 26th birthday in February 2014 as a result of morphine intoxication after drinking poppy tea. He was on a working holiday at the time he climbed a poppy field fence somewhere between Jericho and Oatlands and took some poppy heads. Mr Pedersen began to vomit several hours after drinking the tea and his travelling companion said he looked "scared" and did not "look right". Both men eventually went...
  • Former carnival worker charged under Alabama's new bestiality law (He buttdialed while...)

    08/06/2015 9:17:29 AM PDT · by Responsibility2nd · 68 replies
    AL.com ^ | 08/05/2015 | Jonathan Grass
    A man living in Phil Campbell has become Franklin County's first suspect under the state's bestiality law enacted last year. Franklin County deputies arrested Russell Joseph Meyers, 54, on four counts of bestiality, plus one count of second-degree possession of marijuana and possession of drug paraphernalia. Franklin County Sheriff Shannon Oliver said Meyers admitted he had sexual relations with his female German shepherd on four occasions. Meyers got caught when he accidentally called someone while engaging in one of these acts, Oliver said. He said no one answered the phone, and the act was caught on the recipient's voicemail. This...
  • The astonishing 390-year old bonsai tree that survived the Hiroshima atomic blast

    08/04/2015 2:29:25 PM PDT · by dware · 36 replies
    Fox News ^ | 08.04.2015 | Fox News
    The history of a 390-year old bonsai tree at the National Arboretum that survived the Hiroshima atomic blast is being honored this week. Thursday marks the 70th anniversary of the Hiroshima bombing. The Japanese White Pine is in the Arboretum’s National Bonsai and Penjing Museum. The tree was donated in 1976 by bonsai master Masaru Yamaki as part of Japan’s Bicentennial gift to the American people.
  • Study finds septic tanks don't keep poo out of our water

    08/04/2015 1:26:09 PM PDT · by dware · 88 replies
    Newser via Fox News ^ | 08.04.2015 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    In the largest watershed study of its kind, Michigan State University researchers have sampled 64 river systems in the state for E. coli and the human fecal bacteria B-theta and found that, in a nutshell, septic tanks aren't working. At least not as well as experts thought. The researchers say that "sample after sample" shows bacterial concentrations are "highest where there were higher numbers of septic systems in the watershed area," water expert Joan Rose tells Phys.org.
  • Italian police: The head of the Sicilian Mafia used 'sheep code' to communicate

    08/03/2015 12:37:45 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 12 replies
    www.businessinsider.com ^ | Aug. 3, 2015, 9:43 AM | Barbara Tasch
    The head of the Sicilian Mafia, on the run for over 20 year, has been using "sheep code" to communicate with allies, the BBC reports. Eleven men associated with mob boss Matteo Messina Denaro were arrested recently, and according to the Italian police, Denaro communicated with them by leaving bits of papers under a rock in a field near a farm in western Sicily. The communication method called "pizzini" includes writing the messages in a secret code, according to AFP. Among the men arrested during raids across Sicily on Monday, two were over 70 years old, one of them, Vito...
  • EPA Accused of Misconduct

    08/03/2015 12:05:22 PM PDT · by Mich Patriot · 13 replies
    Michigan Farm News ^ | August 3, 2015 | Unknown
    A cache of internal memos that federal regulators intended to keep private reveals a culture of secrecy, falsehood and dysfunction that permeated the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Waters of the U.S. rulemaking process. - See more at: https://www.michfb.com/MI/Farm_News/Content/Politics/EPA_accused_of_misconduct/?utm_source=Informz&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=Michigan+Farm+Bureau#sthash.17ZGyujv.NNtFRYnn.dpuf
  • Vast hidden 'ocean' found under Chinese desert

    07/31/2015 1:22:24 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 53 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | July 30, 2015 20:30 BST | By Yasmin Kaye
    Workers digging a well for underground water are dwarfed by the sand dunes of the Taklimakan Desert, 13 September 2003, outside of Tazhong, in China's northwest Xinjiang province. ================================================================================================================== Chinese scientists have discovered what could be a huge hidden ocean underneath one of the driest places on earth, the South China Morning Post reported on 30 July. The Tarim basin in northwestern Xinjiang, China, is one of the driest places on Earth, but the vast amount of salt water concealed underneath could equal 10 times the water found in all five of the Great Lakes in the US. "This is...
  • Everglades Python May Be Second-Largest Ever in Florida

    07/31/2015 12:40:39 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 30, 2015 12:25 PM ET | Staff via CBS Miami
    This python, captured in Shark Valley, in Everglades National Park, may be the second-largest python ever caught in Florida. USGS ======================================================================================================================== A python researcher working in Everglades National Park has captured what may be the second-largest Burmese python in the state of Florida, CBS Miami reports. The snake was captured on July 9 in the park's Shark Valley and was documented at 18 feet 3 inches long. It's just 4 inches shy of the state's record 18 foot 7 inch python caught in Miami-Dade, CBS notes. Whether it's indeed the second-largest, officially, remains unclear, due to differences in record-keeping in...
  • Suntory Plans Space-Aged Whisky

    07/31/2015 10:43:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    WSJ ^ | Jul 31, 2015 | By Jun Hongo
    Not content with having the best whisky in the world, Suntory Holdings Ltd. plans to take its whisky out of this world and into space. The Japanese brewing and distilling company said this week it would send a total of six samples of its whiskies and other alcoholic beverages to the International Space Station, where they will be kept for at least a year to study the effect zero gravity has on aging. According to a spokesman at the company, the samples, which will be carried in glass flasks, will include both a 21-year-old single malt and a beverage that...
  • Snail as Big as a Tennis Shoe Running Amok in Florida

    07/31/2015 8:43:50 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 98 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 31, 2015 09:30 AM ET | by Kerry Sheridan
    The giant African land snail is causing problems for Floridians. Wikimedia Commons/Sonel.SA ========================================================================================================================= Florida plant detectives are on the trail of a slippery foe, an invasive African land snail that is wily, potentially infectious, and can grow as big as a tennis shoe. Play Video 8 Animals That Can Regrow Their Body Parts While humans are working on robotic arms and new limb technology, some animals can regrow their limbs on their own. How do they do this? DCI In the four years since Giant African Snails were discovered in Miami, they have slowly but surely spread to new territory,...
  • Salt water for lamp designed to serve people without electricity

    07/29/2015 1:49:02 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-27-2015 | by Nancy Owano
    A startup team calls their work a product. They also call it a social movement. Many people in the over-7,000 islands in the Philippines lack access to electricity .The startup would like to make a difference. Their main ingredient is salt. Their product is a lamp that takes two tablespoons of salt and a glass of water in order to work. This is from the Sustainable Alternative Lighting, or SALt Corp. This is a startup focused on delivering a cost effective, environmentally safe lamp that runs on salt water. Their lamp could be an alternative to kerosene/battery powered lamps and...
  • French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

    07/28/2015 12:23:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday. "A large adult tooth—we can't say if it was from a male or female—was found during excavations of soil we know to be between 550,000 and 580,000 years old, because we used different dating methods," paleoanthropologist Amelie Viallet told AFP. "This is a major discovery because we have very few human fossils from this period in Europe," she said. The tooth was found in the Arago cave near the village of Tautavel, one...
  • Hillsborough County FL Sheriff Backs Off Investigating Report Of Alien Grow House In Subdivision?

    07/27/2015 7:39:27 PM PDT · by 4Runner · 20 replies
    07/27/2015 | 4Runner
    I'm not going to keep quiet about this. Last November Florida residents defeated the medical marijuana bill at the polls. A Pyrhhic victory at best. On July 19 I wrote a detailed report and submitted it online at the Hillsborough County Sheriff's Office website. This is the Tampa area of Florida. My report documented the suspected existence of a single family detached residence rental home in our subdivision being used as a marijuana grow house by a drug gang. A tax search disclosed that the property is listed to an Oakland, California real estate management firm known as FETLAR LLC....
  • Mammoths killed by abrupt climate change

    07/24/2015 10:12:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 75 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 23, 2015 | Provided by: University of Adelaide
    This image shows mammoth vertebrae in ice, Yukon Territory, Canada. Credit: Photo Kieren Mitchell, University of Adelaide ******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************* New research has revealed abrupt warming, that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today, has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna, in Earth's past. Using advances in analysing ancient DNA, radiocarbon dating and other geologic records an international team led by researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of New South Wales (Australia) have revealed that short, rapid warming events, known as interstadials, recorded during the last ice age or Pleistocene...
  • Could Your Hamburger be Killing Polar Bears?

    07/21/2015 2:31:06 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 67 replies
    One Green Planet ^ | Lauren Kearney
    The image of a polar bear floating on a single sheet of ice has become synonymous with the discussion of climate change. As the polar bear’s habitat literally melts before our eyes, we are starting to recognize the direct impact that man-made greenhouse gas emissions are having on the other species we share the world with. The polar bear’s Arctic habitat is quickly diminishing, in fact, an estimated 8.6 million acres of ice disappear a year and this rate is only expected to increase along with the temperature of the planet. With this in mind, many conservationists have begun to...
  • CDC: Don't kiss your pet chicken

    07/17/2015 6:34:55 AM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 40 replies
    myfoxny ^ | 7-17-15 | Mac King
    <p>In the backyard of a Tudor home on a leafy street in Queens live four tenants who pay their rent in companionship, pest control, and fresh eggs.</p> <p>"Our 9-year-old daughter wanted a dog for her birthday and we surprised her with chickens instead. She was at first disappointed," said Ruth Harrigan. "They're very independent. It's almost like having a cat."</p>
  • Old Man Kills 3 Wolves to Avenge Sheep (He chased them for hours before shooting them)

    07/17/2015 12:09:33 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 23 replies
    He chased them for hours before shooting themA Saudi farmer in his 70s got into his four-wheel car and chased three wolves for hours before shooting them with his machine gun after they killed his sheep. Mohammed Al Sandali chased the wolves into hills and valleys before spotting them resting after a raid on his sheep and nearby farms in the Western town of Raniyah. “He got out of his car, stalked the wolves and shot them…he then brought them dead to his village to show them to the farmers,” ‘Sabq’ daily said.
  • The USDA Doesn’t Want Us to Eat Lungs [HAGGIS BAN]

    07/16/2015 10:02:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    munchies.vice.com ^ | July 3, 2014 / 10:22 am | By Baylen Linnekin
    Earlier this week, USDA secretary Tom Vilsack met in Washington with representatives from the British government. Atop the list of issues UK environment secretary Owen Paterson was to bring up in his meeting with Vilsack is the continuing US ban on the sale of authentic Scottish haggis. Haggis, Scotland’s national dish, has been unavailable in the United States since 1971, when the USDA issued a succinct rule: “Livestock lungs shall not be saved for use as human food.” But sheep lungs are a key ingredient in haggis. The reasoning behind the USDA’s ban on lungs is generally couched in terms...
  • 10 Rotten Foods You Are Used To Eating

    07/16/2015 8:28:52 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 70 replies
    www.minq.com ^ | 07-15-2015 | Staff
    While we're taught that food that smells rotten should be thrown away, there are actually many foods that you eat whenever they've just started rotting. Of course, it's not pleasant to call these foods rotten, so we refer to them in different ways instead. Cheese Making cheese comes down to your ability to control rot. This is because milk is treated with bacteria and enzymes causing it to curdle. The curdles are then cut, formed and ripened into cheese. Stinkheads Another native Alaskan delicacy is what's known as stinkheads. These are King Salmon heads that have either been buried in...
  • Global Warming Is Wiping Out the Bees

    07/09/2015 12:50:06 PM PDT · by Up Yours Marxists · 44 replies
    US News and World Report ^ | July 9, 2015 18:00 UTC | Alan Neuhauser
    Bumblebees, a linchpin of the global food supply, are vanishing across huge swaths of North America and Europe as a result of climate change, a new study says. The findings, published Thursday in the journal Science, apparently solve a mystery that's alarmed farmers, experts, policymakers and environmental advocates worldwide, as well as bedeviled researchers. While habitat destruction and potent pesticides known as neonicotinoids have destroyed some bumblebee populations, researchers concluded climate change has played the greatest role in the mass disappearance of bumblebee species, which pollinate plants and crops that are part of the food supply for both animals and...
  • Breaking News: Worker Ants Really Lazy

    07/07/2015 6:26:39 PM PDT · by Louis Foxwell · 22 replies
    A Bug’s Life 07.07.156:05 PM ET Breaking News: Worker Ants Really Lazy A new study out of the University of Arizona finds that ants specialize in inactivity. Good news for slackers! Turns out nature’s archetypal busybodies, worker ants, are lazy too.Researchers have actually been aware of ants’ slacker habits for a while, but they didn’t know whether the sluggish members of the Temnothorax rugatulus species of western North America were inactive or rather just taking a break.“It’s just the sort of a thing that anyone who’s ever worked on social insects has noticed: ‘Oh look, half of them are standing around...
  • How to Prepare for a Collapse in 9 Steps – a Case Study with David Holmgren

    06/25/2015 8:58:34 AM PDT · by aMorePerfectUnion · 17 replies
    Walden Labs ^ | 6-26-15 | William Horvath
    How to Prepare for a Collapse in 9 Steps – a Case Study with David Holmgren By William Horvath It’s 2025, the long troubled financial markets have finally crashed the overleveraged banking system and the world is experiencing global depression on a massive scale. Precipitated by environmental destruction, heatwaves are scorching the planet, destroying the monoculture food crops, and there are food riots in every major city. In order to maintain the social order upon panicked and desperate populations governments are forced to introduce a command economy, issuing people supermarket food stamps.But for you and your family nothing has changed,...
  • Undergraduate discovers new firefly species [CA]

    06/25/2015 8:46:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-25-2015 | Iqbal Pittalwala & Provided by University of California - Riverside
    The Entomology Research Museum at the University of California, Riverside today announced the discovery of a new species of firefly from Southern California, collected by an undergraduate student as part of his semester's insect collection. Doug Yanega, senior museum scientist, said the student, Joshua Oliva, obtained one specimen of the new species while collecting near Topanga, Calif. "He wasn't 100 percent certain it was a firefly, and brought it to me for confirmation," Yanega said. "I know the local fauna well enough that within minutes I was able to tell him he had found something entirely new to science. I...
  • Tell Us Something Good About Your Dad

    06/21/2015 11:13:44 AM PDT · by blueunicorn6 · 101 replies
    blueunicorn6 | 6/21/15 | blueunicorn6
    My Dad taught me how to drive a car with a manual transmission. "Let the clutch out slower next time."
  • Finland: Horse manure plan to heat homes

    06/17/2015 6:33:17 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | June 15, 2015
    Finland's government wants the country to turn away from fossil fuels and look towards horse manure to heat its homes instead, it's reported. The new coalition's manifesto sets out plans for the large-scale use of horse dung as a renewable source of energy, the national broadcaster Yle reports. One energy company is already trying out a biofuel made by mixing horse manure with a wood-based litter, which is then burned to create power. The Fortum group says the annual waste created by three horses would be enough to heat a family home for a year. And with about 77,000 horses...
  • Couple Paints American Flag On Brown Lawn As San Jose Forces Water Cutbacks During Drought

    06/16/2015 7:11:15 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    sanfrancisco.cbslocal.com ^ | June 15, 2015 10:39 PM | Andria Borba
    SAN JOSE (CBS SF) — San Jose is forcing its residents to cut back on water use during the drought, so one couple found a patriotic solution to their ugly brown lawn by painting an American flag on it. Claudia Decker and her husband stopped watering their lawn in January. Tired of looking at the patchy turf and dirt, they wanted to increase their curb appeal. “People are painting their lawns green because of the drought,” Decker told KPIX 5. Instead of green, the couple painted an American flag on the lawn, in honor of Flag Day. The flag even...
  • Rare 15-Foot Agave Plant Blooms in Dallas

    06/11/2015 10:51:20 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    NBC DFW ^ | 6/11
    A 15-foot-tall Agave plant is blooming and drawing crowds to the Dallas Arboretum. The Arboretum says the Agave victoriae-reginae is 20 years old and this will be the only time it blooms in its lifetime. Once it finishes blooming, the plant will die, but not before sowing seeds for the next generation. The plant just started opening up and will bloom in the Garden's Rory Meyers Children's Adventure Garden for two to four weeks. Agave victoriae-reginae plant is endangered in its native Sierra Madre mountain range of Chihuahua, Mexico.
  • Vanity: Who has a good recipe for Garlic / Deli Style pickles?

    06/10/2015 2:19:09 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    My dark and forboding mind................... | 06-10-2015 | Red Badger
    I'm tired of paying good money for soft pickles..................
  • Doctors remove 420 kidney stones 'caused by excessive tofu' from patient in China

    06/09/2015 11:00:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 76 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk/news ^ | 10:48AM BST 09 Jun 2015 | By Charlotte Middlehurst, Shanghai
    The operation to remove hundreds of tiny stones took doctors around two hours Doctors in China have removed 420 kidney stones from a man's body, blaming an excessive amount of tofu in his daily diet. Mr He from Zhejiang Province in eastern China, checked into the Dongyang People's Hospital complaining of intense pain in his abdomen last month. A CT scan revealed that his left kidney was packed full of stones, most of them tiny. Doctors operated on Friday in an agonising procedure that lasted about two hours. Mr He said he had a history of suffering from kidney stones....
  • Yes, that ant does smell like blue cheese

    06/08/2015 10:49:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-08-2015 | Matt Shipman & Provided by North Carolina State University
    If you live in the United States, you've probably seen an odorous house ant (Tapinoma sessile) – one of the most common ants in the country. And for more than 50 years they've been described as smelling like rotten coconut. But Clint Penick thinks they smell like blue cheese. And he can prove he's right. Penick is postdoctoral researcher at NC State. Most of his work revolves around ants, and for years he's been fascinated by the fact that you can identify some ant species by smell – such as T. sessile. In grad school he heard that T. sessile...
  • Search is on for World’s Best Steak

    06/06/2015 9:55:26 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    Global Meat News ^ | Friday, Jun 5, 2015 | Georgi Gyton
    A new international competition, from the team behind GlobalMeatNews, launches today (5 June) - the World Steak Challenge.
  • So ... Cattle Rustlin' Is Still A Thing

    06/05/2015 3:41:18 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    San Antonio Current ^ | Fri, Jun 5, 2015 | Mark Reagan
    A 56-year-old man from North Texas is accused of stealing 144 head of cattle from two ranchers, including one who is elderly. The Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association announced in a press release that Jerry Dean Kulow, who is accused of third degree felony theft of livestock and second degree felony theft of livestock from the elderly on May 4 was arrested Thursday. Kulow was a ranch foreman for one of the victims. All of the cattle stolen were worth nearly $100,000. According to the TSCRA, Kulow confessed to the crime, but didn't tell authorities where the money went....
  • The Quest to Engineer the Perfect Potato

    06/05/2015 12:25:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    MIT Technology Review ^ | June 5, 2015 | By Mike Orcutt
    Researchers in the U.K. aim for a new commercial potato that resists many of the worst vulnerabilities of potato crops around the world. Super spuds are coming. A genetically modified potato that could resist destructive blight, defend itself against parasitic worms, avoid bruising, and cut down on the accumulation of a suspected carcinogen during cooking would be worth many billions of dollars per year to potato producers across the world. It could also serve as a model technology for addressing issues that affect many different crops and are increasingly likely to cause concerns about global food security as the population...
  • Millions of Flies Invade Dozens of Isanti (MN) County Homes for Weeks

    06/04/2015 8:34:07 PM PDT · by ButThreeLeftsDo · 15 replies
    KSTP.com ^ | 6/4/15 | Brett Hoffland
    Millions of flies are invading one Minnesota neighborhood, and nothing his being done. Officials say one farmer is responsible for the infestation. "We've been getting these flies like this. They're all over the car, they're all over the house, they're in our full barn, they're in our patio by the billions," Tom Hanson said. Hanson says it started thanks to their neighbor across the street who owns the property, but doesn't normally live there. "The gentleman across the road has been dumping this stuff since last winter and he has no intention of cleaning it up. He doesn't care what...
  • World Grain Markets: Record Supplies Support Growing Global Consumption

    06/03/2015 7:50:59 AM PDT · by jjotto · 4 replies
    AGFAX ^ | May 13, 2015 | USDA
    Global corn production in 2015/16 is projected down from last year’s record, with lower forecasts for the United States, EU, Brazil, and Ukraine. Global corn consumption is expected to climb slightly above production for the first time in 5 years. Global ending stocks are forecast mostly unchanged, with growth in China nearly offsetting stocks declines in the United States and other foreign countries. World corn import demand is expected higher, led by the EU and Saudi Arabia. Wheat production is forecast down from last year’s record, but still above consumption for the third straight year. Global consumption is projected up...
  • Is Grass-Fed Really Better?

    06/02/2015 8:08:34 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 86 replies
    New York Post ^ | 6.2 | Jane Black
    For you? For anyone?While cows are four-stomached ruminants designed to eat grass, not grain, burgers made from them aren’t exactly health food and won’t reverse climate change. The meat might be leaner (a pro or con, depending on who’s eating it) and contain higher levels of heart-healthy omega-3 fatty acids and a lower ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids. But only very marginally: An eight-ounce grass-fed burger has between 45 and 68 milligrams of omega-3s. The equivalent portion of sockeye salmon serves up 65 times that much. “The omega-3s come from eating greens — grass if you’re a cow,...
  • Feds Inspect Fla. Monkey Farm at PETA's Behest

    06/01/2015 8:26:51 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 13 replies
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is investigating a monkey breeding facility in southwest Florida after an animal welfare group said an undercover worker found sick and injured monkeys living in inhumane and unsanitary conditions. People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals released a video Monday purporting to show conditions at Primate Products Inc. in Hendry County. PETA spokesman Dan Paden said the video was taken by a PETA employee who was hired to work undercover at the facility. PETA first gave the video exclusively to The Associated Press. After meeting with PETA, inspectors from the USDA's Animal and Plant Health...
  • California’s largest lake is slipping away amid an epic drought

    05/29/2015 11:06:23 AM PDT · by CedarDave · 49 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | May 28, 2015 | Todd C. Frankel
    The Salton Sea is the largest lake in California, 360 square miles of unlikely liquid pooled in the middle of the Sonoran Desert. Now the sea is slipping away. The Salton Sea needs more water — but so does just about every other place in California. And what is happening here perfectly illustrates the fight over water in the West, where epic drought has revived decades-old battles and the simple solutions have all been tried. Allowing the Salton Sea to shrink unabated would be catastrophic, experts say. Dried lake bed, called playa, is lighter and flies farther than ordinary soil....
  • Volunteers Fight Brazilian Pepper Tree in Flagler County

    05/28/2015 1:36:18 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    MyNews13 ^ | 5/28
    There's something in the trees of Betty Steflik Memorial Preserve in Flagler Beach. It is not the elusive Florida Skunk Ape though. It's something much more real and dangerous: pepper pickers -- a group of volunteers trying to remove invasive Brazilian pepper trees from the park. Mike Lagasse is the Flagler County Land Management Coordinator. “Even if we knock it out of this park, you know, it's in people's yards," He said. "And birds don't know boundaries, you know.” That's because birds like the bright red berries the trees produce in the winter and have helped spread the plant. The...
  • A century on, experts crack mystery of holes in Swiss cheese

    05/28/2015 10:05:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-28-2015 | Staff
    Eureka! After about a century of research, Swiss scientists have finally cracked the mystery of the holes in Swiss cheese. Despite what you may have been told as a child, they are not caused by mice nibbling away inside cheese wheels. Experts from Agroscope, a state centre for agricultural research, said the phenomenon—which marks famous Swiss cheeses such as Emmental and Appenzell—was caused by tiny bits of hay present in the milk and not bacteria as previously thought. They found that the mystery holes in such cheeses became smaller or disappeared when milk used for cheese-making was extracted using modern...
  • Fewer students study botany, more plant collections closing

    05/25/2015 9:39:52 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 38 replies
    Associated Press ^ | May 25, 2015 12:36 PM EDT | Claudia Lauer
    The teeming plant world could become a virtual mystery in the coming decades as college students increasingly shy away from studying botany and universities across the U.S. shutter their long-standing herbaria. Since 1988, the number of research universities offering botany degrees has dropped by half, according to National Science Foundation research funding statistics. And the National Center for Education Statistics reports that fewer than 400 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral botany degrees were awarded in 2012. Educators say that’s because students are being pushed into more modern, technology-related majors. Current botanists fear that will lead to a dearth of people able...
  • German government to boost organic farming

    05/22/2015 12:58:14 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 1 replies
    EurActiv ^ | 22/05/2015 - 08:16 | Nicole Sagener | translated from German by Erika Körner
    Between 2010 and 2013, Germany’s market for organic foods increased by one-fourth to almost €8 billion. Still, switching to organic cultivation remains a difficult process for farmers. While revenue from organic products has enjoyed an annual increase of 5-9% since 2011, the parallel increase in surface area over the past four years has only been 1-3%. Agriculture Minister Christian Schmidt hopes to change this. “We want a timetable for growth that allows domestic producers to benefit more from the boom,” he said on Tuesday (19 May) in Berlin. Organic must be strengthened, he said, with the help of the Future...