Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $17,222
19%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 19% is in!! Thank you all very much!! God bless.

Agriculture (General/Chat)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Fish and Chirps? Crickets Make Leap in Demand as a Protein

    01/14/2017 5:05:41 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 32 replies
    NBC DFW ^ | Jan 13, 2017
    At Tomorrow's Harvest farm, you won't find acres of land on which animals graze, or rows of corn, or bales of hay. Just stacks of boxes in a basement and the summery song of thousands of chirping crickets. It's one of a growing number of operations raising crickets for human consumption that these farmers say is more ecologically sound than meat but acknowledge is sure to bug some people out. Once consumers get beyond the ick factor, they say, there are a lot of benefits to consuming bugs.
  • Fish and chirps? Crickets make leap in demand as a protein

    01/13/2017 8:28:22 AM PST · by Red Badger · 61 replies
    AP ^ | By LISA RATHKE
    WILLISTON, Vt. (AP) -- At Tomorrow's Harvest farm, you won't find acres of land on which animals graze, or rows of corn, or bales of hay. Just stacks of boxes in a basement and the summery song of thousands of chirping crickets. It's one of a growing number of operations raising crickets for human consumption that these farmers say is more ecologically sound than meat but acknowledge is sure to bug some people out. Once consumers get beyond the ick factor, they say, there are a lot of benefits to consuming bugs. "We don't need everybody to eat insects," said...
  • Cayenne Pepper: King Of The Herbs

    01/08/2017 12:12:52 AM PST · by Sontagged · 99 replies
    Your Cayenne Pepper Guide ^ | 2010 | Glenn Reschke
    If cayenne pepper (Capsicum annuum) is not the king of medicinal herbs, it is certainly a prince among them due to the incredible health benefits it gives. It may have been presumptuous for me to have first coined it "king of herbs" but I feel it is just that -- for there is no other medicinal herb or spice that can do what it can. If you have heard about Capsicum or are interested in its benefits, you've come to the right place. Bold to say yes, but I stand by it. For I am the one who conducted the...
  • Kansas family’s pet deer shot by game warden

    01/07/2017 8:34:29 AM PST · by where's_the_Outrage? · 59 replies
    The Wichita Eagle ^ | January 4, 2017 | Michael Pearce
    On Dec. 19, 2016, Kansas game wardens came to the home of Mark and Kim Mcgaughey regarding a deer they said the family kept illegally as a pet. The mule deer doe, which the family had named Faline and which they had had for about 22 months, was eventually shot and killed by game wardens a few minutes later on the property. (Video courtesy of Taryn Mcgaughey) brader@wichitaeagle.com A western Kansas family is angry that game wardens killed a deer that had been their pet for 22 months and “was like one of the family.” Kim Mcgaughey said the deer...
  • Study: Chickens Might Be as Smart as Dolphins

    01/06/2017 7:18:41 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 101 replies
    Often dismissed as bird-brains, chickens are showing they’ve got some smartsAs we get ready to launch ourselves into the Year of the Rooster, here’s news that could give you new respect for the humble chicken. Researchers have determined that chickens are smarter than we think, have a good measure of self-control, and might even have Machiavellian tendencies. A study published this week in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Animal Cognition, revealed that those bird-brained chickens are actually pretty smart, as most backyard chicken farmers have long maintained. Neuroscientist Lori Marino authored the paper, which compiled the conclusions of several studies showing...
  • Chillies could help beat cancer as research finds capsaicin destroys diseased cells

    01/03/2017 7:16:57 AM PST · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.mirror.co.uk ^ | Updated12:24, 3 JAN 2017 | ByAntonia Paget
    Chillies could help fight breast cancer after scientists revealed the spicy ingredient causes diseased cells to self destruct. Capsaicin, the active component that gives chillies their trademark kick, can switch on specialised channels surrounding cancer cells causing them to die. Other cancers including colon, bone and pancreatic could also be killed off by the compound. However, capsaicin isn't effective if it's eaten, inhaled or injected, and researchers think it will only be effective as a pill attached to another drug that targets cancer cells. Scientists from Ruhr-University in Bochum, Germany, treated human samples of breast cancer cells with the hot...
  • Ban Chinese Food Imports Until Approved by New (Trump) USDA

    12/16/2016 3:59:34 PM PST · by ExpatCanuck · 6 replies
    Vanity | Vanity
    We keep hearing stories about how Chinese food companies are growing livestock (sea food, pigs, cows, fowl) in deplorable and unhealthy conditions. Animals being fed on their own filth and hormones and who knows what, or other animal's filth, or the ground up body parts of their own species. Then WE happily consume them because they are available cheap at Acme or Costco or Walmart. How about a new Trump FDA rule that states any foreign country that supplies food to the USA is subject to the same rules that apply to USA companies?
  • Trump on Verge of WIIN-ing California Water War Before Taking Office ("There was no drought")

    12/13/2016 8:05:41 PM PST · by WayneLusvardi · 21 replies
    MasterResource.org ^ | December 13, 2016 | Wayne Lusvardi
    “There is no drought….If I win, believe me, we’re going to start opening up the water so that your farmers can survive” – Candidate Donald J. Trump, May 27, 2016, Fresno, California “If we don’t move now, we run the real risk of legislation that opens up the Endangered Species Act in the future, when Congress will again be under Republican control, this time backed by a Trump administration.” Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), “Latest Compromise Drought Relief Bill Receives Praise, Opposition”, Capital Press, December 7, 2016. President-Elect Donald J. Trump is poised to score a win-WIIN deal in the California...
  • My Proposal for Import Duties/Reindustrialization

    12/13/2016 10:04:28 AM PST · by Brian Griffin · 20 replies
    Brian Griffin | 12/13/2016 | Brian Griffin
    The following are my preliminary thoughts on import duties and reindustrialization: I believe we should abandon (officially denounce) trade treaties and go to a generally duty/barter-based system which would be updated from time to time by the Congress. Congress should try to steer global trade into a generally financially balanced system with some exemptions for consumer friendly producers. My proposal allows low-income countries to earn US dollars to pay for American drugs and other necessities. In brief: 1. financially balanced trade in motor vehicles and their parts, with cheap electric car exemptions until January 2024 2. US-only for building supplies,...
  • Bright Idea: Delectable Corn Fungus

    12/03/2016 5:36:39 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    Maclean's ^ | November 21, 2016
    A delicious novelty food with an ugly name Sharon OosthoekGreat minds do not think alike, and thatÂ’s why universities and colleges are the mother of inventions. Click here for the rest of our Bright Ideas series. Click here for the rest of our Campus Food series.Barry Saville: Trent UniversityBarry Saville has spent much of his career figuring out how to stop fungi from infecting food crops. But for the past three years, the Trent University professor has been deliberately infecting corn with a fungus that produces large, whitish-grey kernels he believes have potential as a niche product for market farmers....
  • General Mills Joins $4 Million Pollinator Initiative

    12/02/2016 9:11:10 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 23 replies
    KSTP ^ | December 01, 2016
    Minnesota-based General Mills will be part of a partnership that will plant more than 100,000 acres of pollinator habitat over the next five years, the company announced Thursday. General Mills, the Xerces Society and the U.S. Department of Agriculture are teaming up on the $4 million project to support farmers across the United States by offering technical assistance to plant and protect habitat like native wildflower field edges and flowering hedgerows. The habitats will serve bumble bees, squash bees, honey bees and butterflies as well as the crops they pollinate. The funding will also support six biologists who will offer...
  • GREEN Snow Blankets Russia After Accident at a Chrome Factory Causes it to Change Colour

    11/30/2016 12:27:37 PM PST · by brucedickinson · 13 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 11-30-2016 | Will Stewart
    Freakish green snow blanketed the Russian Ural Mountains today - caused by pollution at a chrome factory. The disturbing emerald scene was caused by an 'accident' at a plant in Pervouralsk, in the industrial Chelyabinsk region, said officials. They insisted there was no danger to the health of locals. 'The accident today happened on a pipe between a pump and a cleaning station,' said a spokesman at Russian Chrome company. 'Some of the water pumped from under the ground went on the surface.'
  • Archaeological excavation unearths evidence of turkey domestication 1,500 years ago

    11/23/2016 10:15:55 AM PST · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 21, 2016 | Provided by: Field Museum
    Turkey eggshells and bones from an offering 1,500 years ago in Oaxaca, Mexico. Credit: © Linda Nicholas, The Field Museum. ================================================================================================================================ The turkeys we'll be sitting down to eat on Thursday have a history that goes way back. Archaeologists have unearthed a clutch of domesticated turkey eggs used as a ritual offering 1,500 years ago in Oaxaca, Mexico—some of the earliest evidence of turkey domestication. "Our research tells us that turkeys had been domesticated by 400-500 AD," explains Field Museum archaeologist Gary Feinman, one of the paper's authors. "People have made guesses about turkey domestication based on the presence or...
  • Video: When turkeys explode

    11/23/2016 10:11:03 AM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 21, 2016 | Provided by: American Chemical Societ
    Credit: The American Chemical Society ============================================================================================================================ There are three times more cooking fires—the most common cause of house fires—on Thanksgiving than on any other day of the year. And the thousands of "turkey-fryer explosion" videos on YouTube are a testament to why frozen turkeys and hot oil are an especially dangerous mix. With the holiday coming up, Reactions teamed up with the District of Columbia Fire Department to explain the chemistry behind grease fires, how they happen and how to avoid them this Thanksgiving. Watch the video here: Read more at: http://phys.org/news/2016-11-video-turkeys.html#jCp
  • Researchers talk turkey: Native Americans raised classic holiday bird

    11/23/2016 10:02:51 AM PST · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 21, 2016 | Provided by: Florida State University
    Credit: Yathin S Krishnappa ============================================================================================================================ Hundreds of years before the first Thanksgiving, Native Americans were raising and feasting on America's classic holiday meal. Florida State University Associate Professor of Anthropology Tanya Peres and graduate student Kelly Ledford write in a paper published today in the Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports that Native Americans as early as 1200 - 1400 A.D. were managing and raising turkeys. This is the first time scientists have suggested that turkeys were potentially domesticated by early Native Americans in the southeastern United States. "In the Americas, we have just a few domesticated animals," Peres said. "Researchers...
  • Model predicts elimination of GMO crops would cause hike in greenhouse gas emissions

    11/10/2016 8:36:09 AM PST · by JimSEA · 29 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/8/2016 | Purdue University
    A global ban on genetically modified crops would raise food prices and add the equivalent of nearly a billion tons of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere, a study by researchers from Purdue University shows. Using a model to assess the economic and environmental value of GMO crops, agricultural economists found that replacing GMO corn, soybeans and cotton with conventionally bred varieties worldwide would cause a 0.27 to 2.2 percent increase in food costs, depending on the region, with poorer countries hit hardest. According to the study, published Oct. 27 in the Journal of Environmental Protection, a ban on GMOs would...
  • LenaDunham.ca

    11/09/2016 10:36:30 PM PST · by wille777 · 23 replies
    LenaDunham.ca HAHAHAHAHAHA
  • What will happen to the White House veggie garden?

    11/04/2016 6:30:54 AM PDT · by KeyLargo · 65 replies
    Oregon Live ^ | 2 Nov 2016 | Janet Eastman
    What will happen to the White House veggie garden? (photos) By Janet Eastman | The Oregonian/OregonLive Email the author | Follow on Twitter on November 02, 2016 at 1:00 PM, updated November 02, 2016 at 1:02 PM Everyone who has left behind a beloved garden to move to a new home can feel First lady Michelle Obama's pain. She worries that her vegetable garden on the South Lawn might be altered -- or worse -- when new occupants take over the White House. Her husband, President Barack Obama, voiced his concern during a Wednesday radio interview on the syndicated Tom...
  • Soybean Exports Were Responsible For One-Third Of American Growth In Q3

    10/28/2016 8:55:57 AM PDT · by mrsmith · 5 replies
    Zerohedge ^ | Oct 28, 2016 | Tyler Durden
    "... the spike in exports - which curiously came a time of a stronger dollar - was the highest seen in over two years, and amounted to $49 billion in chainged dollars, or roughly 41% of the nominal $119 billion annualized increase in Q3 GDP. Where it gets even more surprising is looking into just what the exported commodity was. The answer: soybeans... So according to the US government Bureau of Economic Analysis, in the quarter, goods exports amounted to $41 billion of the $119 billion chained dollar increase, while Soybeans accounted for some $38 billion of this number. Or,...
  • Deep South drought kills crops, threatens herds, dries lakes

    10/28/2016 6:57:05 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 30 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 28, 2016 9:24 AM EDT | Jeff Martin and Janet McConnaughey
    Six months into a deepening drought, the weather is killing crops, threatening cattle and sinking lakes to their lowest levels in years across much of the South. The very worst conditions — what forecasters call “exceptional drought” — are in the mountains of northeast Alabama and northwest Georgia, a region known for its thick green forests, waterfalls and red clay soil. […] The drought has spread from these mountains onto the Piedmont plateau, down to the plains and across 13 southern states, from Oklahoma and Texas to Florida and Virginia, putting about 33 million people in drought conditions, according to...
  • Ghost pepper burns hole in man's esophagus

    10/19/2016 7:41:10 AM PDT · by dware · 46 replies
    Chicago Tribune ^ | 10.19.2016 | Ben Guarino
    A ghost pepper's heat is described in terms normally reserved for carpet bombings. Its heat is measured at 1 million units on the Scoville scale, a per-mass measure of capsaicin - the chemical compound that imbues peppers with heat - that until recently was a world record. Peppers that pass the 1 million mark are called superhot; as a rule they are reddish and puckered, as though one of Satan's internal organs had prolapsed. To daredevil eaters of a certain stripe, the superhot peppers exist only to challenge. When consumed, ghost peppers and other superhots provoke extreme reactions. "Your body...
  • The Poachers turned Gamekeepers: Kenyan Tribesmen Swap their Spears for GPS Trackers to help ....

    09/28/2016 4:39:11 PM PDT · by Cecily · 2 replies
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | September 28, 2016
    Their ancestors would hunt lions on the African plains in revenge attacks for killing their livestock. But now young men from the Maasai heartland in southern Kenya are swapping their spears for GPS equipment in a bid to protect the endangered big cats as part of a conservation scheme. The tribesmen, dressed in traditional clothing, set out most days to track the lions, giving the co-ordinates of their locations to conservation charities.
  • Clinton's Water Plan Runs Up Hill(ary) Towards Money

    09/26/2016 6:57:17 AM PDT · by WLusvardi · 1 replies
    Masterresource.org ^ | September 26, 2016 | Wayne Lusvardi
    “In California, they say: ‘water runs uphill toward money.’ To that, now should be added the adage: ‘Water runs up-Hillary to money’.” News flash: Hillary’s Western Water Plan would trickle up to elites. “The Clinton plan states that: ‘the United States has 17 national labs that work on energy, but not one that is focused exclusively on water’.” However, the Federal EPA already runs four water and environmental technology laboratories in Research Park, North Carolina (health effects); Cincinnati, Ohio (engineering); Corvallis, Oregon (ecology); and Las Vegas, Nevada (monitoring). This is not to mention that in California Fresno State University runs...
  • Class action against FEMA over nationwide arbitary flood zones (Vanity)

    09/19/2016 4:30:17 PM PDT · by LambSlave · 36 replies
    LambSlave
    I found that in 2009 Douglas County Nevada tried to sue FEMA because their flood models were grossly incorrect, which resulted in many properties being incorrectly classified as requiring flood insurance that were not in flood zones. Reading around the net, it seems this is an endemic problem, and from speaking to surveyors online, they claim that 75 -85% of all these claims that they have worked are overturned-- the properties are in fact not in flood zones. Worse, the banks take advantage of this and buy insurance for the mortgage holder at outrageous rates. Both of these things happened...
  • Oldest textile dyed indigo blue found [6200 yrs]

    09/14/2016 8:25:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 09/13/2016 | Staff
    George Washington University researcher has identified a 6,200-year-old indigo-blue fabric from Huaca, Peru, making it one of the oldest-known cotton textiles in the world and the oldest known textile decorated with indigo blue. Credit: Lauren Urana The discovery marks the earliest use of indigo as a dye, a technically challenging color to produce. According to Jeffrey Splitstoser, lead author of a paper on the discovery and assistant research professor of anthropology at the George Washington University, the finding speaks to the sophisticated textile technology ancient Andean people developed 6,200 years ago. "Some of the world's most significant technological achievements were...
  • Michelle Obama And Ellen DeGeneres Get Into All Kinds Of Trouble Shopping At CVS Together

    09/14/2016 9:40:06 AM PDT · by Timpanagos1 · 28 replies
    Huff Post ^ | 8/14/16
    Michelle Obama spoke about what she’ll miss the most when she and her family leave the White House during appearance on “Ellen” Tuesday. To help the first lady get used to normal life again, DeGeneres decided to take Obama down to a CVS in a clip aired Wednesday to make sure she still knows how to use coupons, turn coins into cash with Coinstar and, of course, push a shopping cart around. “You push the basket because nobody’s going to push it for you,” the comedian says before the pair begin their shopping adventure.
  • Bacon-filled tractor-trailer burns for hours in Cumberland

    09/06/2016 7:21:06 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 30 replies
    times-news.com ^ | 9/5/15 | staff
    CUMBERLAND — A tractor-trailer carrying bacon caught fire and burned on Interstate 68 in Cumberland Monday, shutting down eastbound traffic from 6 p.m. to midnight, according to Cumberland Fire Department Capt. Steve Grogg. Grogg said the truck was loaded with a variety of pork products including ribs. "We'd rather have something like that than a hazardous material," Grogg said.
  • Coastal Watches/Warnings and 5-Day Forecast Cone for Storm Center [TD9 in Gulf]

    08/30/2016 1:39:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    NOAA ^ | 08-30-2016 | Government
  • Agriculture closes offices in 5 states after threats

    08/30/2016 8:46:24 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 25 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 30, 2016 11:37 AM EDT | Mary Clare Jalonick
    The Agriculture Department has closed offices in five states after receiving anonymous threats. USDA spokesman Matthew Herrick says in a statement on Tuesday that the department had received “several anonymous messages” that raised concerns about the safety of USDA personnel and facilities. He said six offices are closed until further notice. …
  • The Trump Gnome

    08/29/2016 10:09:41 PM PDT · by sdpatriot · 26 replies
    GardenGnomeWorld.com ^ | 8/29/2016 | gardengnomeworld.com
    We're please to announce our newest and most exciting garden gnome to date -- The Trump Gnome. Standing at an impressive 10" -- this gnome is sure to make your garden greater than it has ever been before.
  • Feds Holding Summits for Lesbian Farmers

    08/16/2016 12:37:08 PM PDT · by PROCON · 109 replies
    freebeacon.com ^ | Aug. 16, 2016 | Elizabeth Harrington
    The U.S. Department of Agriculture is holding summits to promote the role of lesbian farmers as a part of its “Rural Pride” campaign. The agency is working with singer and LGBT activist Cyndi Lauper for a “day of conversation” about the struggles of gay and transgender individuals in rural America. The agency says its wants to change the perception of what it means to be a farmer in America away from the “white, rich male.” The latest summit, first reported by the College Fix, will be held on August 18 at Drake University in Iowa. “The Office of the Assistant...
  • Scientists Modified This $40 Cotton Candy Machine To Spin Artificial Organs

    08/12/2016 9:07:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    www.fastcodesign.com ^ | 02-10-2016 | John Brownlee via Vanderbilt News
    An off-the-shelf cotton candy machine from Target spins together gelatinous cubes of living capillaries. Go to your local fair and watch a carny spin you a cone of candy floss. You might not know it, but that's how your body is put together: the structure of cotton candy is remarkably similar to the fibrous tissue that knits together our organs and our bones. Now, a team of researchers are showing how a souped-up cotton candy machine could be the key to 3-D printing artificial organs on demand. In a new article published in the Advanced Healthcare Materials journal, an assistant...
  • Dairy groups blast methane reductions: ‘Cows expel gas so they don’t explode’

    08/11/2016 8:59:35 AM PDT · by PROCON · 47 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | Aug. 10, 2016 | Oliver Milman
    California’s attempt to curb emissions of methane, a powerful greenhouse gas, is facing vocal opposition from a dairy industry that fears government meddling in the flatulence of its cows. The California Air Resources Board (ARB) has set a goal of slashing methane emissions by 40% by 2030, from 2013 levels, and has targeted the belching and farting – known as “enteric fermentation” – of California’s 5.5 million beef and dairy cows, as well as the manure they create. A strategy document produced by the regulator states that improved manure management practices, new diets for cattle and “gut microbial interventions”...
  • Enlightened black man supports Donald Trump, totally destroys Demo-rats & BLM hypocrites

    08/03/2016 7:30:44 PM PDT · by Osage Orange · 6 replies
    FreedomPost.org ^ | Jul 24, 2016 | FreedomPost.org
    Enlightened black man supports Donald Trump, totally destroys Demo-rats & BLM hypocrites
  • New York Post Prints Nude Photos of Melania Trump https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOt6A_yWT0E

    07/31/2016 3:48:23 PM PDT · by KMG365 · 54 replies
    Melania Trump picture on the cover of the New York Post draws questions of professionalism and censorship in regards to journalism during a Presidential campaign. Donald Trump's wife under criticism for controversial modeling pics from the 1990's. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOt6A_yWT0E
  • Pair Rescued From Soberanes Fire Were Tending to Marijuana Crop: Sheriff's Office

    Two people who were found Monday inside the lines of the Soberanes fire in Monterey County were tending to a marijuana crop, according to the Monterey County Sheriff's Office. In the early morning hours Monday, deputies responded to a call for assistance from Cal Fire in the Bouchers Gap area. The responding officers came upon two people who had been overtaken by the fire and walked out of the brush requesting help getting out. The pair had been looking after a 900-plant marijuana grow, sheriff's officials said. The grow was destroyed by the fire. It was not known whether the...
  • Shetland pony broke into pub, got drunk and had to be coaxed out with bar snacks

    07/28/2016 6:17:36 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 16 replies
    UK Metro ^ | Thursday 28 Jul 2016 | Simon Rob
    A Shetland pony went into a bar, did a bit of a minesweep, got drunk, and had to be coaxed out using pub snacks. A four-legged opportunist named Mocha, snuck inside The Ascot Arms in Gravesend, Kent for a triple before the pub opened for business on Monday. Pub owner, Mihaly Herczeg, had to use crisps, pork scratchings and carrots to coax the pony back into the garden after finding him guzzling a few pints. The 53-year-old said although the pony usually drinks water, it would probably develop a taste for beer and apple cider given the chance. He said:...
  • Study: Common pesticide appears to reduce live bee sperm

    07/26/2016 10:02:09 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 30 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jul 26, 2016 8:10 PM EDT | Seth Borenstein
    A new study finds that a commonly used insecticide kills much of the sperm created by male drone honey bees, one reason why the bees are dwindling. The class of insecticide called neonicotinoids didn’t kill the drones. But bees that ate treated pollen produced 39 percent less live sperm than those that didn’t, according to a controlled experiment by Swiss researchers published Wednesday in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. It essentially acted as an accidental contraceptive on the drones, whose main job is to mate with the queen — but not one that prevented complete reproduction, just...
  • Queen Hillary Chooses Joy Behar To Be King

    07/14/2016 11:45:38 AM PDT · by blueunicorn6 · 6 replies
    blueunicorn6 | 7/14/2016 | blueunicorn6
    It's official! Sources from inside the Queen Hillary camp leaked today! After they were done relieving themselves, they also let a secret slip out. But then, isn't Queen Hillary known for letting secrets slip out? Queen Hillary has selected Joy Behar to be our King! Queen Hillary said, "I wanted a man who is a loud-mouthed idiot with a moustache and that narrowed it down to Joy Behar though I did look at Ruth Ginsburg, too." Queen Hillary also announced drug king Joaquin Guzman as her selection for Attorney General. "He understands my way of doing business", the Queen said....
  • Horse herpes outbreak forces rodeo queens to ride stick ponies

    07/02/2016 10:48:37 AM PDT · by sparklite2 · 54 replies
    ksl.com ^ | May 26th, 2011 | Nadine Wimmer and Wendy Leonard.
    FARMINGTON -- While the state has yet to officially cancel any events involving horses that might have been exposed to a local recent equine herpes outbreak, owners and arenas are taking precautions. Because of the outbreak, contestants at the Davis County Sheriff's Mounted Posse Junior Queen Contest had to cowgirl up Thursday night without their mares. Instead of competing on horses, as is typically the case, contestants were asked to trot around the arena with stick horses as their show ponies.
  • Interior Secretary: ‘If We Did Not Have Immigration to This Country We Would Not Eat’

    06/28/2016 9:14:03 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 91 replies
    Cybercast News Service ^ | June 28, 2016 | 2:32 PM EDT | Penny Starr
    Interior Secretary Sally Jewell told attendees at an event on Hispanic-American entrepreneurship on Tuesday that if it were not for legal and illegal immigration into the United States “we would not eat.” Jewell said that the country is still trying to address the rights of farm workers, including the role immigration plays. “I’d say the challenges of immigration reform are a good example,” she said. “If we did not have immigration to this country we would not eat. Whether it’s documented or undocumented, we would not eat,” Jewell said at the United States Institute of Peace in Washington, D.C. …
  • If Fruit Heaven Exists, It’s in Colombia

    06/25/2016 10:09:24 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 47 replies
    Munchies ^ | 6/2016 | Aaron Kase
    Colombia is the finest nation on Earth when it comes to eating fruit. The country boasts mountains, jungles, deserts, and coasts, providing an environment conducive to growing any fruit you can imagine and plenty more you can’t, from sweet to sour to savory, and everything in between. Adventurous travelers quickly find their diets full of diverse flavors and their stool full of fiber in this gastronomic and gastrointestinal paradise. Of course, the tropical standards like mango, papaya, banana, avocado, and pineapple are available in multitudes, for a fraction of the price that they cost imported. That alone would be enough...
  • Diabetes patients could benefit from Kamut-khorasan wheat finds study

    06/20/2016 10:55:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 19 replies
    www.bakeryandsnacks.com ^ | 15 Feb 2016 | Vince Bamford
    Replacing modern wheat with ancient grain khorasan can benefit consumers with type 2 diabetes, according to a new study.
  • Clemson's first harvest of ancient Southern wheat exceeds expectations

    06/20/2016 10:37:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    phys.org ^ | 06-20-2016 | by Jim Melvin & Provided by: Clemson University
    Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Credit: Scott Miller / Clemson University ================================================================================================= The first step of an ongoing-process designed to bring a valuable heirloom wheat back from the brink of extinction has been completed with flying colors. Last month, Clemson University scientist Brian Ward and his team harvested about 145 pounds of Purple Straw seed, which was grown from less than half a pound. Purple Straw is the only heirloom wheat to have been cultivated continually in the South from...
  • Dairy farmers say safety net on milk prices is not helping

    06/19/2016 1:19:16 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 21 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 19, 2016 1:37 PM EDT | Lisa Rathke
    Northeast dairy farmers who have been strapped for months by low milk prices say a voluntary insurance program that was supposed to be a safety net isn’t helping. The margin protection program provides financial assistance to enrolled farmers when the gap between the price of milk and national average feed costs falls below the coverage levels picked by individual farmers. […] Farmers say the margin protection program is not based on Northeast farmers’ feed costs but on the national average feed cost, which is less. The chairman of the National Milk Producers Federation testified in Washington last month that the...
  • Ancient, still-edible chunk of butter unearthed in Irish bog

    06/14/2016 10:22:57 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 39 replies
    Fox News ^ | Published June 14, 2016 | By James Rogers
    The 2,000 year-old bog butter found in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1 (Cavan County Museum/Copper Tree Photography). ============================================================================================ Would you eat ancient butter? A 2,000-year-old 20-pound chunk of butter has been unearthed from a peat bog in Ireland, which is said to still be edible. The large lump of butter was discovered by farmer Jack Conway while cutting turf for fuel in Emlagh Bog, County Meath on June 1. The strange rugby-ball shaped object was buried about 16 feet down in the bog. Conway quickly realized that he had found what is known as ‘bog butter’ and contacted...
  • Goat Herd Helps Trump Lower Tax Bite with New Jersey farmland law

    06/10/2016 11:45:46 AM PDT · by dennisw · 41 replies
    WS Journal ^ | April 20, 2016 | By
    New Jersey farmland law lets presidential candidate save tens of thousands property taxes on golf courses The Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., has goats that are continually moved around the property for the removal of invasive, non-native vegetation. The Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., has been the home for goats, under the care and supervision of the course-and-grounds department, that are continually moved around the property for the removal of invasive, non-native vegetation. Donald Trump has found a solution that cuts both his grass and his tax bill: Goats. The Republican presidential front-runner’s small goat herd,...
  • I saw the baby bison that tourists tried to rescue. Here’s what you don’t know...

    06/08/2016 2:55:09 AM PDT · by raybbr · 63 replies
    WashingtonPost.com ^ | 6/7/2016 | Deby Dixon
    GARDINER, Mont. — I met the bison calf that took a ride in an SUV early one evening as I drove west in Yellowstone National Park’s Lamar Valley, past the pullout known as “Picnic.” The late afternoon sun on a stormy landscape provided the light that we photographers dream of for shooting gorgeous mountains in the distance and wild animals on the horizon. I spotted the calf near the road and all alone. It was crying out and seemed to be looking for its mother, but no other bison was anywhere close by. Instantly, I knew three things: The calf...
  • Researchers develop method to produce sweeter, well-growing tomatoes

    06/07/2016 11:47:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    6-7-2016 | Provided by: Tohoku University Japan
    The researchers think it is likely that most flowering plants, or angiosperms, contain similar sucrose-susceptible genes, making their “sweetening technology” widely applicable. Credit: Cienpies Design ================================================================================================= Previous research has shown that the sugar sucrose plays a role in controlling key fruit genes involved in sugar metabolism. Efforts to control these genes succeeded in increasing the sugar content in fruit but also resulted in stunted growth. Researchers from Tohoku University in Japan used a bioinformatics search tool to find nucleotide sequences in the tomato genome similar to a known tobacco gene sequence that can be repressed by sucrose. When a special...
  • FDA issues new guidelines on salt, pressuring food industry

    06/01/2016 6:43:16 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 1, 2016 9:15 AM EDT | Mary Clare Jalonick
    The Obama administration is pressuring the food industry to make foods from breads to sliced turkey less salty, proposing long-awaited sodium guidelines in an effort to prevent thousands of deaths each year from heart disease and stroke. The proposed guidelines released Wednesday are voluntary, so food companies won’t be required to comply. But the idea is to persuade companies and restaurants — many of which have already lowered sodium levels in their products — to take a more consistent approach. […] Some companies have worried that though the limits will be voluntary, the FDA is at heart a regulatory agency,...