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Study says leafy greens top food poisoning source
AP ^ | Jan. 29, 2013 | MIKE STOBBE

Posted on 01/31/2013 7:13:08 AM PST by bgill

Be sure to wash those foods or cook them thoroughly... About 1 in 5 illnesses were linked to leafy green vegetables — more than any other type of food. And nearly half of all food poisonings were attributed to produce in general, when illnesses from other fruits and vegetables were added in... Many of the vegetable-related illnesses come from norovirus, which is often spread by cooks and food handlers. So contamination sometimes has more to do with the kitchen or restaurant it came from then the food itself...

(Excerpt) Read more at shopping.yahoo.com ...


TOPICS: Culture/Society; Government
KEYWORDS: cdc; ecoli; fda; foodpoisoning; greens; leafyvegatables; norovirus; saladgreens
Grow your own. Eat at home.
1 posted on 01/31/2013 7:13:16 AM PST by bgill
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To: bgill
Many of the vegetable-related illnesses come from norovirus, which is often spread by cooks and food handlers

Nonsense. It comes from fecal splashing in the field when illegals do their business in the fields where they work.

/johnny

2 posted on 01/31/2013 7:15:46 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: bgill
The whole world knows that a little kid's basic reaction to alcohol and tobacco is correct; why would anybody think that same little kid's reaction to green veggies was wrong?

When something tastes bad, your body is trying to tell you something. Humans should not be eating green vegetables.

3 posted on 01/31/2013 7:20:08 AM PST by varmintman
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To: bgill

The listeria outbreak a year or more ago was from illegals.


4 posted on 01/31/2013 7:20:16 AM PST by Darksheare (Try my coffee, first one's free.....)
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To: bgill

I am on my third season as an avid home gardener and going the GYO route is extremely difficult.

Most people dont even begin to have the time or willingness to commit to such a venture. I have a small backyard garden and, even with the small number of plants I had, it consumed hours of work each day. Personally I think everyone should at least try to garden once in their life so they understand exactly how difficult it is. I have a greater respect for farming because of my struggles.


5 posted on 01/31/2013 7:25:23 AM PST by drunknsage
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To: bgill

My abstention from salads has proved to be wise after all!


6 posted on 01/31/2013 7:29:54 AM PST by Boogieman
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To: JRandomFreeper

>> It comes from [excrement deleted] in the field when illegals do their business in the fields where they work.

Johnny, I always appreciate your posts and usually find them educational or humorous — frequently both.

So, thanks. I think.

But there’s something about “fecal splashing” and “big sip of morning coffee” that just don’t fit together right...


7 posted on 01/31/2013 7:35:11 AM PST by Nervous Tick (Without GOD, men get what they deserve.)
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To: drunknsage

“...I am on my third season as an avid home gardener and going the GYO route is extremely difficult....”

Yes Sir!!! You are correct. It is no easy task and once you have it grown, you’ve got to put it up to preserve it which is also a lot of work. I’ve not done a garden in a couple of years now, but before that, I’ve done one every year for about 5 years. I found as I gained experience, some tasks became little easier, but it’s still a lot of work. And it does give you a deeper appreciation for the stuff you can just “pick up at the grocery store”. However, my homegrown stuff tasted soooo much better, especially when it’s freshly harvested.


8 posted on 01/31/2013 7:35:26 AM PST by lgjhn23 (It's easy to be liberal when you're dumber than a box of rocks.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

There’s as much, shall we say, “poor hygiene” among the illegals in the restaurants as in the fields. Remember that these are third-world peasants at all levels.

I was at a burger-and-fries joint in fancy-shmancy Palo some years ago. There was a garbage can beside the grill. Maybe that’s ok in the health code, maybe not. But the cook put it there so he could use the edge as a hanger for his tongs.


9 posted on 01/31/2013 7:37:19 AM PST by jiggyboy (Ten percent of poll respondents are either lying or insane)
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To: jiggyboy

Palo Alto


10 posted on 01/31/2013 7:38:46 AM PST by jiggyboy (Ten percent of poll respondents are either lying or insane)
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To: Boogieman

>> My abstention from salads has proved to be wise after all!

Yup, nothing but steak and french fries for ME from now on. I was ALMOST on the wagon before, but this cinches it.


11 posted on 01/31/2013 7:39:07 AM PST by Nervous Tick (Without GOD, men get what they deserve.)
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To: drunknsage

>> going the GYO route is extremely difficult.

GYO? “Get Yourself Off”?

C’mon... it’s not THAT difficult.


12 posted on 01/31/2013 7:41:11 AM PST by Nervous Tick (Without GOD, men get what they deserve.)
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To: jiggyboy
You do have to stay on top of the help in the kitchen. I learned to speak kitchen spanish for that very reason.

There's generally no problem with having a trash can beside the grill. There's a big darn problem with him hanging the tongs on it, even though in a normal restaurant, the liner in the trash can will be changed 3 or 4 times a day.

/johnny

13 posted on 01/31/2013 7:44:44 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Nervous Tick
Sorry. I used to teach food handling safety to young airmen, and I can be rather blunt sometimes. ;)

/johnny

14 posted on 01/31/2013 7:47:11 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: drunknsage

.

Lettuces, onions, carrots, turnips grow themselves LOL!
..

Little weeding or fertilizing or bug killing, soil prep or watering needed.
I just plant the seeds in my poor clay untilled soil and give them an hour a week of work and harvest twice what I can eat from about a 12 x 12 garden.

I began gardening with these easy species and thought I’d move on to more difficult plants but these have made me such a lazy gardener..


15 posted on 01/31/2013 7:48:09 AM PST by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
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To: Nervous Tick
My first job ever, I was maybe 15 or so, was peeling potatoes at an outfit that made and distributed salads to institutional kitchens. I was so shocked by the misadventures that could be concealed by an extra spoonful of mustard or mayonaise that for the next 50 years I would not eat potatoes unless they had been deep fried in lard.
16 posted on 01/31/2013 7:57:58 AM PST by Mr. Lucky
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To: varmintman

Jay Leno always jokes about not eating anything green.


17 posted on 01/31/2013 8:16:56 AM PST by Phil
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To: drunknsage

You are correct-take a bit of time to grow your own greens, safe from any picker/processors’ unwashed hands, or ditch water used for washing. I grow spring greens in this thin, rocky soil, peppers and tomatoes, too-it does take a game fence to keep the deer out, though...


18 posted on 01/31/2013 8:17:48 AM PST by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line...")
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To: mrsmith

Your post gives me a bit of hope and motivation. I really don’t feel safe buying salad greens from the store anymore, but my thumb is all black——there isn’t a plant I can’t kill, lol.

Maybe I’ll try something in a container.


19 posted on 01/31/2013 8:28:24 AM PST by CatherineofAragon (Support Christian white males---the architects of the jewel known as Western Civilization)
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To: Nervous Tick

bears sh!t in the woods. migrant workers sh!t in the meadow. buy them portapotties. problem solved!


20 posted on 01/31/2013 8:29:47 AM PST by Gasshog (Welcome to the United States of Stupidos!)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Look for more of that activity to happen, thank-you Barrack Hussein Obama!


21 posted on 01/31/2013 8:32:59 AM PST by Biggirl ("Jesus talked to us as individuals"-Jim Vicevich/Thanks JimV!)
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To: drunknsage
I have a small backyard garden and, even with the small number of plants I had, it consumed hours of work each day.

Really? Really....?

Then I think you may need to take a gardeners class or something. I have a really large garden: Raised Beds-6 2'x12'; 5 4'x12'; 2 4'x8' and 2 2'x8'...AND a tilled area that is 30'x35'....

And even with all of that, I do not spend "hours of work each day" even during peak harvest time. I currently have over 100 broccoli plants growing, dozens of garlic plants; spinach and lettuce/greens/kale...carrots and leeks...and I MAY spend 2-3 hours a WEEK. I also have 432 seedlings started.

In the summer I will have over 50 tomato plants and a whole plot of purple hull peas...not to mention all the other stuff...

And even THEN I won't spend (averaged) over an hour per day...and we are still eating the peas, tomatoes and carrots I canned LAST year...and the pickles.

I think you may need to recalculate or get a little more efficient.

22 posted on 01/31/2013 8:43:12 AM PST by NELSON111
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To: bgill
I've been going to the local farmer's market for several months. The quality is great, as are the prices.

There's a local grocery chain in DFW called Sproutt's, and their produce is superior to that of the big supermarkets.

23 posted on 01/31/2013 8:48:13 AM PST by Night Hides Not (The Tea Party was the earthquake, and Chick Fil A the tsunami...100's of aftershocks to come.)
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To: NELSON111

Wow! I’m very impressed with your garden description.


24 posted on 01/31/2013 8:57:17 AM PST by NoExpectations
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To: lgjhn23

***However, my homegrown stuff tasted soooo much better,***

Agreed! Unfortunately a garden product does not get ripe when YOU want it, and often too much gets ripe at once.

Maintaining a garden does take quite a lot of time especially with weeding and watering during a drought.

Last year I let half of my garden die as it was so dry here. I kept the tomatoes going, a couple of hills of squash. The squash soon died and finally the tomatoes.


25 posted on 01/31/2013 9:01:20 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Click my name! See new paintings!)
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To: bgill
Watch out.

Stories like these are intended to expand Obama's agricultural regs along with EPA.

More excuses for drones to circle overhead to inspect water sources.

26 posted on 01/31/2013 9:04:46 AM PST by what's up
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To: Nervous Tick

***Yup, nothing but steak and french fries for ME from now on.***

Boiling anything in 350-450 hot oil will kill anything that will give you the runs. It also makes the food taste so much better!

Must take a low dose aspirin and an anti-coagulant now.


27 posted on 01/31/2013 9:04:46 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Click my name! See new paintings!)
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To: JRandomFreeper

***Sorry. I used to teach food handling safety to young airmen,***

USAF I presume? The worst case of runs I ever saw was at Walker AFB in Roswell NM back in 1967.

We had two chow lines. One for the main dinner and one for fast food. One day I went in and the main dinner line was packed! I went to the fast food hamburger line.

The next day everyone who ate the main dinner had the runs bad! Those who went through the fast food line missed it.

The cause was traced to bad pork steaks in the main dinner line.

It was funny while working on a B-52 to see a top Sgt suddenly run like h#!! behind the blast fence, then beg one of the airmen to run and get him some toilet paper.


28 posted on 01/31/2013 9:10:35 AM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (Click my name! See new paintings!)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

I might also add when you buy greens wash the sh!t out of them. literally.


29 posted on 01/31/2013 9:11:50 AM PST by Gasshog (Welcome to the United States of Stupidos!)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar
We try to avoid that kind of thing today. ;)

Yep. I was USAF active the first time, reserve after 9/11. Services was the only job I could get after 9/11 because of hearing loss. Turns out I loved the kitchen.

I'm harsh on sanitation and dates/temps for foods. You can't fight a war sitting on a toilet.

/johnny

30 posted on 01/31/2013 9:26:23 AM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Texan5

in Texas you need to keep the feral hogs out...they can mess up water pretty fast


31 posted on 01/31/2013 9:42:54 AM PST by freedommom
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To: freedommom

We have plenty of feral hogs here in the hill country-so far, the food in the woods, fields, etc keeps them happy-they don’t bother gardens as long as there is a fence. If they try getting into my yard, they are on the menu-yummy lean, fresh pork...


32 posted on 01/31/2013 9:52:36 AM PST by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line...")
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To: CatherineofAragon

Throw turnip, onion or lettuce seeds out every couple weeks and you’ll have a good crop nearly all year- unless you mow them!

You can just tear off the greens of the turnips and lettuce (well, the ‘open’ lettuce like romaine) whenever you want, onions don’t much care when they’re picked either.

It’s the ease and convenience of gardening that appeals to me.

On the subject of this post- I wash them outside under the spigot to keep from bringing bugs into the house. I learned that quick.


33 posted on 01/31/2013 10:25:47 AM PST by mrsmith (Dumb sluts: Lifeblood of the Media, Backbone of the Democrat Party!)
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To: Gasshog

How do you keep the bears out of the port-a-potties?

(Just kidding!)


34 posted on 01/31/2013 10:56:32 AM PST by SatinDoll (NATURAL BORN CITZEN: BORN IN THE USA OF CITIZEN PARENTS.)
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To: drunknsage

There’s a book called “Weedless Gardening” that might help a lot.

I cut down on weeding by putting down heavy-duty landscape fabric, and planting in holes cut in it. There are a lot fewer weeds, and they’re usually small. By about mid-summer the garden shades out new weeds pretty well.

Starting around June, most of my time in the garden is spent harvesting and hilling up. My strawberry patch is pretty small, but it still produces more than I can keep up with.

Growing your own is never as easy as buying it from the store, but it shouldn’t be quite as hard as you describe.


35 posted on 01/31/2013 11:05:13 AM PST by Ellendra (http://www.ustrendy.com/ellendra-nauriel/portfolio/18423/concealed-couture/)
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To: Ellendra

The landscape fabric works very well for tomato and herb plants, as it holds much needed moisture in near the plant roots while the are just seedlings and prone to dry out.


36 posted on 01/31/2013 12:56:06 PM PST by Texan5 ("You've got to saddle up your boys, you've got to draw a hard line"...)
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To: drunknsage; Ellendra

I do much the same thing as Ellendra except I use newspaper, cereal boxes and other compostables covered with leaves, grass clippings, straw and hay.

I cover the area around the plants completely including walk paths with the newspapers/cardboard stuff to a depth of about 6 or 8 sheets of newspaper. Overlapping generously. Then cover and fill with about 4-6” of leaves/clippings/hay. I occasionally have a weed break through but it’s a simple matter of pulling it, and covering that spot with some more paper/hay.

At the end of season it’s all broken down and tills in to the garden to provide organic matter for next years garden.

It’s a do it once and then just water and pick the produce. It’s almost like free food. Be sure to do it as soon as you till though to eliminate any extra work. We don’t even hill the garden anymore. It’s like walking through landscaping. It holds water much more efficiently too which is a help in the swelter we have here in the SE lately. Just save your papers and flat your cereal boxes and rake your leaves to store in black garbage bags. Sometimes I spread extra mulching material on the walk paths toward the end of the season as it’s already started to break down by the end of September.

Trust me. I do NOT weed my garden. That’s for the birds.

I do the same with my strawberry patch only I use exclusively cardboard boxes there and cover them with pinestraw. It looks like a landscaping bed filled with groundcover. Which it is. Except I got 25G of strawberries out of that landscaping bed last spring and summer.

Newspaper, mulch, soaker hoses, timers. It’s like the garden of ‘eatin’. We pick bucket fulls of stuff every morning and the picking and putting up is pretty much the only ‘work’ we do after the middle of April.

YMMV


37 posted on 01/31/2013 1:09:07 PM PST by Black Agnes
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To: NoExpectations
Thanks. I love it. First, I feel I can feed my family if anything ever happened. We wouldn't thrive...but we wouldn't starve to death. I have it all surrounded by an 8' fence that you can't see through.

I also like to give stuff away...especially the extra seedlings. I have a big give-away (the ones I don't use) in early April and all my friends and family get to take some plants home. I usually give away at least 100 tomato and pepper plants...so...I can indirectly provide food for many people.

AND I plant all heirloom...so I seed save. I've got a years worth of seeds saved and another 4 years of selected varieties vacuume sealed.

38 posted on 01/31/2013 1:11:36 PM PST by NELSON111
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To: Texan5

Anything that predates my kids food become food for the kids... (or chickens)

Just sayin’...


39 posted on 01/31/2013 1:12:33 PM PST by Black Agnes
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To: mrsmith

Thanks for the advice.

And I’m with you on no bugs in the house (shudder).


40 posted on 01/31/2013 6:18:12 PM PST by CatherineofAragon (Support Christian white males---the architects of the jewel known as Western Civilization)
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