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'Dead' man's recovery shows why prolonged CPR works
NBC News ^ | Aug 23, 2013 | Barbara Mantel

Posted on 08/23/2013 9:46:13 AM PDT by Innovative

Yahle, a diesel mechanic from West Carrollton, Ohio, "coded" - a term meaning emergency -- on the afternoon of Aug. 5, after arriving in the hospital that morning in cardiac arrest. A team of doctors rushed to his hospital bedside and used chest compressions, a bag connected to a breathing tube and medications to force blood and oxygen through his body. After 45 minutes, they gave up and declared him dead.

"He was truly flatlined at the end of that code. He had no electrical motion, no respiration, and no heart beat, and no blood pressure," says Jayne Testa, director of cardiovascular services at Kettering.

But five to seven minutes later, the team noticed a trace of electrical activity on his heart monitor and resumed their efforts to resuscitate him. Yahle is now home recovering, according to Testa.

(Excerpt) Read more at nbcnews.com ...


TOPICS: Health/Medicine
KEYWORDS: health; heartattack; medical; medicine; prolongedcpr; resuscitation
Remarkable.
1 posted on 08/23/2013 9:46:13 AM PDT by Innovative
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To: Innovative

Talk about your gutters and strikes kinda day!


2 posted on 08/23/2013 9:50:00 AM PDT by blackdog (There is no such thing as healing, only a balance between destructive and constructive forces.)
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To: Innovative
So build a machine that can give CPR tirelessly until Rigor Mortis sets in.

3 posted on 08/23/2013 9:50:21 AM PDT by BitWielder1 (Corporate Profits are better than Government Waste)
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To: Innovative

In my 20+ years as an ambulance medic, I probably worked around 100 cardiac arrest cases. I can count on one hand the number of times I saw the patient survive even after extended resuscitation efforts. This case raises some profound questions about what we think we know about cardiac arrest.


4 posted on 08/23/2013 9:53:01 AM PDT by The Great RJ
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To: Innovative

I can attest from personal experience that non-professionally administered CPR can work. I have done it successfully.


5 posted on 08/23/2013 9:54:03 AM PDT by Texas Fossil
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To: BitWielder1

People so willing and quick to pull the plug remind me of gun control dummies, everyone else but me!


6 posted on 08/23/2013 9:56:06 AM PDT by Kartographer ("We mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor.")
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To: Innovative

God is doing something.


7 posted on 08/23/2013 9:56:36 AM PDT by A Formerly Proud Canadian (I once was lost but now I'm found; blind but now I see.)
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To: Innovative

maybe he was only pining for the fjords


8 posted on 08/23/2013 9:58:28 AM PDT by silverleaf (uite a coinky dink)
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To: Innovative
Had one this February. My pager went off as I was dressing for work for a man down just down my street. When I got there took over CPR from wife. I was one of many. AED wouldn't even kick but my fellow firemen, a state trooper, and local ambulance EMTs didn't give up. He came back in the ambulance about 40 minutes after I started.

When I left the scene as the ambulance left I thought he was gone only to learn later in the evening from a fellow fireman that he came to.

Been a ff for 33 years and that was my first of many attemps at CPR. Members who were involved in CPR were acknowledged by the NYS Fire Chiefs Association.

What a rush for this old guy!

9 posted on 08/23/2013 9:59:21 AM PDT by Wilum (Never loaded a nuke I didn't like)
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To: Innovative

Miracles still happen. Maybe he has a wonderful life-after-death story to tell.


10 posted on 08/23/2013 10:00:15 AM PDT by Liberty Wins ( The average lefty is synapse challenged)
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To: The Great RJ
This case raises some profound questions about what we think we know about cardiac arrest.

Not just cardiac arrest but no electrical motion, no respiration, no heart beat, and no blood pressure. Pretty definitive signs that the mortal coil has been shed ... and yet!

Something inside him was still ticking and kicked off a resumption of electrical activity.

11 posted on 08/23/2013 10:01:22 AM PDT by TigersEye ("No man left behind" is more than an Army Ranger credo it's the character of America.)
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To: Innovative

The chest compression is the important part, because it keeps blood with oxygen flowing around the system, and there is a lot of oxygen in the blood.

Years ago, doctors may the extraordinary discovery that a “pulsed” movement of blood around the body was unnecessary, as long as there was oxygenated blood flow.

A recent discovery is of gas-filled microparticles that can be injected directly into the bloodstream to quickly oxygenate the blood. It can only be used for 15 to 30 minutes to keep the blood oxygenated, as long as the blood flows, but that can be a very long time.

http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/06/120627142512.htm

There is also now an automatic chest compression machine, that maximizes blood flow to critical parts of the body like the brain (video).

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sj77L08BHug

So it seems that these two things, combined together, would be just what is needed in emergency circumstances.

If someone could devise a cheap oxygen ventilation system to fill the lungs with oxygen, and maybe integrate a defibrillator into the chest compression machine, they would really be getting somewhere.


12 posted on 08/23/2013 10:10:10 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Be Brave! Fear is just the opposite of Nar!)
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To: Innovative

With our new protocols (pit crew) we are delivering almost half our patients ,to the hospitals, with a pulse.When doing CPR properly a patients SPO2 stays at or near 100%. Along with capnography perfusion can be confirmed.I have seen many saves lately.


13 posted on 08/23/2013 10:27:57 AM PDT by rsobin
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To: BitWielder1

Or a coffin that can keep doing it forever, with a built-in intercom in case the occupant wakes up.


14 posted on 08/23/2013 10:35:34 AM PDT by Boogieman
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To: The Great RJ
My parents, had roughly the same experience as you. One save of an adult between them, and Dad attributed it to being right there (literally, the guy fell on top of him) when it happened.

Kids, on the other hand, were a whole other matter.

The person in this article likely doesn't have a clue how lucky they are, I think.

15 posted on 08/23/2013 10:49:42 AM PDT by wbill
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To: The Great RJ

One other thought....the article doesn’t mention anything at all about brain damage. Starts occurring in 4-6 minutes - at least that’s what I was taught about a million years ago.


16 posted on 08/23/2013 10:53:22 AM PDT by wbill
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To: yefragetuwrabrumuy

“If someone could devise a cheap...”

I did try to a devise cheap emergency respirator system once. I had good opinions about the devise from doctors and medical providers. The army even said nice things about it but their developement funds were allocated elsewhere. I stopped developement due to my costs.

Medical devises developement costs are not as bad as drugs but it’s still a cost versus return process.


17 posted on 08/23/2013 10:57:41 AM PDT by Cold Heart
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To: Innovative

bookmark


18 posted on 08/23/2013 10:59:53 AM PDT by GOP Poet
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To: Innovative

The big jaw drop is the statement that x-rays taken later showed no fractured ribs after the CPR


19 posted on 08/23/2013 11:15:19 AM PDT by Cyman
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To: Cold Heart

I do wish you had continued. American hospitals work on a push supply system, and in total I believe that of about 102,000 respirators in the US, 100,000 are needed and used during a typical flu season. A surplus of just 2,000 units would cost many lives in just a “bad” flu season.

In a killer flu epidemic, with tens or hundreds of thousands of Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) cases caused by cytokine storm, it would be a huge disaster.

H5N1 still maintains its 60% mortality rate with treatment. Without respirators, I have no guess how high that figure would be.

Even that H1N1 epidemic that turned vicious in Ukraine had many of their doctors convinced it could not be influenza, because on autopsy the lungs looked burned black. They had never seen anything like it. But those were just the fatalities. In the future I imagine Ukraine will be tormented by lung disease from the lungs damaged by the epidemic.

America desperately needs at least the plans to quickly fabricate tens of thousands of respirators.


20 posted on 08/23/2013 11:59:24 AM PDT by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Be Brave! Fear is just the opposite of Nar!)
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To: Texas Fossil
Texas Fossil said: "I can attest from personal experience that non-professionally administered CPR can work."

I monitor my pulse rate while using a treadmill.

During my four minute cool down period, with the belt traveling the equivalent of 3 mph, when my pulse dropped to about 115, I could step off the belt and my pulse would rise to about 123.

I believe that this is telling me that the motion of my legs is contributing to circulation of the blood and reducing the burden on the heart.

Thus, I believe that CPR efforts could be improved perhaps dramatically by having bystanders to the CPR effort flexing the leg muscles or massaging the leg muscles. A device to compress the larger muscles using air pressure, like a blood pressure cuff, might also be beneficial. I'd bet that such a device could circulate quite a bit of blood without any heart activity at all.

21 posted on 08/23/2013 4:54:47 PM PDT by William Tell
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To: William Tell

That is interesting. Had never thought about that.

Do you work in the medical field?


22 posted on 08/23/2013 5:08:13 PM PDT by Texas Fossil
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To: Texas Fossil

Nope. Retired engineer.


23 posted on 08/23/2013 5:14:42 PM PDT by William Tell
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To: William Tell

Observant.

I’m not an engineer, but a pretty good tech.

My father-in-law was an EE, he worked in the weapons industry for 40 years.


24 posted on 08/23/2013 5:28:50 PM PDT by Texas Fossil
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To: William Tell

Maybe they should start using those “pants” they put on you in the hospital to increase circulation- not sure what they call that.


25 posted on 08/23/2013 5:44:19 PM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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To: Tammy8
Tammy8 said: "... not sure what they call that."

You're right. Just weeks ago my wife had an appendectomy and she had such a device on her legs which would inflate and deflate periodically.

I'm not so observant that I made any connection with my idea regarding an improved CPR technique.

The device used on my wife was plugged into the wall. It operated on a relatively slow cycle; perhaps every two to five minutes. I vaguely recall some inflated device used to stabilize accident victims. I don't recall whether it was intended to affect blood circulation or not. It might have been intended to reduce internal bleeding.

Portable emergency defibrillators are getting more common due to the improvements in computer and communication technology. A device virtually identical to the device used on my wife, with a more rapid cycle, could accompany every defibrillator. The cycle time of the device could even be used to set the pace for the chest compressions.

I expect that in ten years we will see this become quite common. As one of the older Baby-Boomers, I'm in favor of such improvements.

26 posted on 08/24/2013 9:16:52 AM PDT by William Tell
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To: William Tell

They used one of those circulation “pants” thingies on hubby after they removed his kidney and said it had something to do with circulation/blood clots that type of thing. What you described is exactly what I was referring to. I don’t know why I thought of that machine right away when you were talking about an improved CPR enhanced by circulation but it just popped in my head that that might work.


27 posted on 08/24/2013 12:39:50 PM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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To: William Tell

I just asked my daughter (nurse) what they are called, they are pneumatic compression devices.


28 posted on 08/24/2013 12:43:16 PM PDT by Tammy8 (~Secure the border and deport all illegals- do it now! ~ Support our Troops!~)
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