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WEEKLY GARDEN THREAD VOLUME 13 MARCH 29, 2013
Free Republic | March 29, 2013 | greeneyes

Posted on 03/29/2013 2:17:42 PM PDT by greeneyes

The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you.

This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread ... there is no telling where it will go and that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!

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TOPICS: Gardening
KEYWORDS: agriculture; food; garden; gardening; gardens; hobbies
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Greetings to everyone. Hope all your garden projects are progressing well. Missouri weather has been crazy this spring. Most of this week has been winter-snow and below freezing.

Today we have sunshine and mid-sixties. We have finally started to receive some of the plants we ordered. Blueberries and Blackberry bushes, which Hubby planted today.

I have done a little clean up in the yard and will be doing a few spring cleaning projects in the house. I need to make some space to start some seeds next week too.

Have a great Easter weekend. God Bless.

1 posted on 03/29/2013 2:17:42 PM PDT by greeneyes
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To: greeneyes; miserare; Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; ..

Pinging the List.


2 posted on 03/29/2013 2:20:16 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Hi Greeneyes!

Have a Blessed Easter!


3 posted on 03/29/2013 2:27:08 PM PDT by left that other site (Worry is the darkroom that developes negatives.)
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To: left that other site

You too!


4 posted on 03/29/2013 2:35:41 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: Altariel
Ping, as promised.

/johnny

5 posted on 03/29/2013 2:41:58 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: greeneyes
Have a great Easter. Right after Easter, about 28 tomato plants and 50-odd tobacco plants go in the ground and I can clear out a lot of square feet of my cold frame.

Interesting observation... The cilantro and cumin are taking FOREVER to sprout this year. Don't know why. Seed tested good when I did the germination test in January.

Moved wrong in the front flower bed this morning, not carrying weight or anything and am down in my back so that I wound up not getting to do anything else the whole day except take asprin and groan.

Tomorrow is another day. I hope it's as pretty as today.

/johnny

6 posted on 03/29/2013 2:47:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: greeneyes
The other day I ordered the seeds and stuff to graft tomatoes. The seeds are a hybrid tomatoe plant that has the best root system,but the tomatoes taste terrible. I'm going to be grafting my favorite Heirloom tomatoes to them.

Grafted tomatoes are supposed to produce like twice as many tomatoes and can fight off diseases and fungus-es that damage normal heirloom plants.

7 posted on 03/29/2013 2:53:20 PM PDT by painter (Obamahood,"Steal from the working people and give to the worthless.")
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To: JRandomFreeper

My tomato plants are about 3 inches tall. I bought a $1..48 starter set from Lowes. They are inside under a grow lamp in Virginia.


8 posted on 03/29/2013 2:54:07 PM PDT by DooDahhhh
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To: greeneyes

My goal this year is to become self-sufficient with tomatoes, potatoes, garlic, onions, and broccoli. I also want to work on fall and spring gardening so that we only have to buy lettuce and spinach 3-4 months/year. Early January I went to the doctor for what I thought was a bladder infection and came out with a positive pregnancy test, so we will see how this goes with number three on the way! Actually, that is probably more of a reason than any to work on my gardening goals.

Anybody grow and dry black beans and pinto beans? We go through tons of both. Is it worth it to dedicate space to, or should I stick with purchasing them?


9 posted on 03/29/2013 3:04:54 PM PDT by goodwithagun (My gun has killed fewer people than Ted Kennedy's car.)
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To: greeneyes

After this week’s two nights of freezing temps, I’m on Garden 2013 v3.0. There were new leaves popping out on the mater stems that something had chewed on and now this, grrr. I’ve started yet ANOTHER batch of tomatoes and peppers inside so they’ll be waaaaay late. Squash is coming up in one area but the other nothing so need to do that again. I knew it was early but really wanted to get a jump on those squash bugs this year. I had gotten mad at the Burpee teeny tiny pots I had to buy (nothing else at Home Depot) because I ended up destroying the plants trying to get them out so I just dumped a mess of cukes. It looked like they were quite happy and growning in the pile but think they’re gone now, too. And squirrels are still digging holes everywhere.

Results of this year’s starter containers:

The Burpee teeny tiny starter trays are spawns of the devil so don’t waste your money. It’s impossible to get your plants out of them. Yeah, I know, stupid me. I had wanted larger peat pots but couldn’t find anything but these and they came with a cover so I figured it’d keep the cat out. Never again.

Homemade newspaper pots worked ok inside though they dried out quickly so I had to watch them more closely. When put outside in the garden, they all immediately died. Some I left intact, others I loosened the sides and bottom for the roots but all died just the same. I don’t know if the newspaper attracted the whatever that ate the plants or what, but no more newspaper containers for me.

Plastic Meow Mix cat food containers with holes punched (ice pick) in the bottoms worked the best. They are large enough to stay moist and the plants grew better. The plants came out very easily - position fingers around plant, turn upside down, give the bottom a whop and everything comes out intact. Reuse for next year.


10 posted on 03/29/2013 3:17:16 PM PDT by bgill
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To: JRandomFreeper

If I didn’t have a heating pad to use in the mornings, I couldn’t make it out of bed. You have made good progress with your early starts.

This year I am going to try planting some of the lettuce and spinach in a bag of mushroom compost. I read that they love to grow in it. We’ll see.


11 posted on 03/29/2013 3:18:44 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: painter

Hope you have great success with this. I do well just to grow some heirlooms and save the seeds.LOL


12 posted on 03/29/2013 3:20:24 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: goodwithagun

Congrats! My third was also a surprise. I didn’t get much gardening done that summer but I was 7m pregnant in MS in August. The inventor of A/C needs to be sainted.

If you have a smallish yard you might just buy the beans. Unless you’re willing to terraform your front lawn too. Not saying this is a bad thing, I plan to do this somewhat this summer. Depends on your neighbors. I plant beans as a second crop in the summer behind corn or something else that really pulls nutrients out of the soil.


13 posted on 03/29/2013 3:23:45 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: greeneyes

ping for later.


14 posted on 03/29/2013 3:28:46 PM PDT by Parmy
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To: goodwithagun

Beans are one of the cheapest foods to buy, and last a long time. One question is do you think you will always have enough money to buy beans? Also, will non-GMO beans always be availabe to buy?

It is a decision only you can make. For me, I try to grow just a small heirloom patch of everything including peanuts and beans, so that I have viable seed stock on hand, and knowledge/skills to grow what I need. In order to have a full protein, beans need to be paired with something like rice.

I made sure to stock up on long-term storage of rice, because I can’t grow that, and food prices are bound to go up. So I figure I am saving future dollars by buying stores now while things are cheaper and plentiful.

I try to keep at least enough beans and other dried foods on hand to get me through till the next harvest.


15 posted on 03/29/2013 3:31:17 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: bgill

Your results are exactly why I am so lazy when it comes to starting seeds indoors. This year I am going to start some stuff in various small and mid-size flower pots and when the weather is nice, just set them on the retaining wall to grow. I may or may not transplant them once all danger of frost is past.


16 posted on 03/29/2013 3:38:08 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: bgill

“The Burpee teeny tiny starter trays are spawns of the devil so don’t waste your money...Homemade newspaper pots worked ok inside though they dried out quickly so I had to watch them more closely...”

I haven’t put them outside yet, but so far my method of using the cut-up cardboard egg crates seems to be working well.

I cut up one of those nice and cushiony cardboard egg cartons into individual cups. We have a bunch of those plastic apple sauce cups saved up. I put an egg carton section into an apple sauce cup.

Then I place the soil into the egg carton cup. I’ve been using a half of a soil pellet as my soil, and moisten it.(But compost or whatever you use as potting soil would be appropriate.) Then, I put the seed into the soil and water.

If there is too much water, the apple sauce cup catches it and I can either drain it off or let it sit to evaporate or keep the soil moistened. In either case, because the plastic cups are transparent/translucent, I can see what’s going on and adjust accordingly.

I will generally keep the soil moist with a tablespoon or so of water each day per cup.

When it is time to set out, I plan to take the egg crate cup out of the applesauce cup and plant that.

We shall see how happy my seedlings are with that experiment. They may turn out like your newspaper pot experiment.

I love your idea about the meow mix cans....but we don’t have catz...perhaps tuna cans might work. However if we don’t rinse them off real well, we might find ourselves with some catz!


17 posted on 03/29/2013 3:54:21 PM PDT by TEXOKIE (We must surrender only to our Holy God and never to the evil that has befallen us.)
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To: greeneyes; goodwithagun; All

Greetings, greeneyes and all!

Congrats on the 3rd Sprout, goodwithagun! How exciting!

We are enjoying the early spring weather. I have been growing in my interest in gardening - much to the loving amusement of my darlin’.

I am hoping to sprout some more seeds in the next several days for a variety of goodies and just see how it all works. Of course, we plan to do a few sunflowers again. Our rose and blackberry bushes have survived that last bout of cold/snowy weather and are budding out like crazy!

My darlin’ helped me fertilize our pecan trees which were in our back yard when we moved in here. We have not been impressed with them over the years and recently in my reading, I learned that they need, in addition to the regular fertilizer, a source of zinc. So off we went earlier this week for a bag of fertilizer containing the zinc. After distributing it and then looking CLOSELY at the instructions (pays to read, doesnt it??) we realized we only had bought about 1/5 of what would really be required. So I guess we have another trip to the nursery in our future!


18 posted on 03/29/2013 4:06:40 PM PDT by TEXOKIE (We must surrender only to our Holy God and never to the evil that has befallen us.)
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To: TEXOKIE

We have been blessed with black walnut trees and a butternut tree. These have really great yields every one or two years. We also have a persimmon tree, some elderberries, and wild blackberry bushes.

I am still learning how to tell when a persimmon is ripe. They tasted great then, but awful when not ripe. For now, I just eat them straight off the tree and let the birds and possums have at the rest.

If I ever get really good at it, I’ll make some jam, but I read that even 1 unripe persimmon could spoil a whole batch of jam, so I won’t waste the time, effort, and other ingredients until I am confident in this ability.

I only got 6 jars of blackberries last year, due to the drought. With the swimming pool this year, I hope to be able to provide more water. However, the apple/fruit tree orchard, and the blueberries, strawberries, and thornless black berries will get the priority.

The best purchase last year turned out to be the Goji berry. It’s drought tolerant. Some of the other stuff just wilted and died, but the Goji hung in there. Hope to get some fruit this year.


19 posted on 03/29/2013 4:22:47 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Hmmmm wonder if gojis would grow in our area? That sounds so cool!

I’m impressed with your 6 jars! I was tickled to get a few handfuls of blackberries from my one berry bush. They were really good, and somehow the birds had mercy and let me have them. We planted two more bushes, so we’ll see.

You are in another universe when it comes to persimmons. I have no experience with them at all. I do wish you well with them!


20 posted on 03/29/2013 4:43:54 PM PDT by TEXOKIE (We must surrender only to our Holy God and never to the evil that has befallen us.)
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To: greeneyes

Sun & mid 60s here, too. TEMPTATION! TEMPTATION! TEMPTATION!

Put 6 rabbits in the freezer today.

Yesterday, finished the tilling for the sunflowers; pea-tilling got done a few days prior. Still don’t dare plant, though.

This year I have to dig out the Everlasting Onions*, (Allium cepa perutile), reinvigorate the beds, then separate & replant them...with a major batch headed for kitchen duty. ;-’)

Started making paper pots yesterday. Today is Day 14 for the incubating eggs. They’re all brown eggs , which can take 2 or 3 extra days to hatch, so no peep-report until friday after next.

*A non-flowering Evergreen Perennial onion that produces profuse clumps of bulblets which are pulled off the sides as needed for cooking, Very Hardy & stands well through the winter & for many years after. (Rare) Rare enough that it’s even hard to find info on them on the Net.


21 posted on 03/29/2013 4:44:26 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: TEXOKIE

Well, I also made a couple of wild blackberry cobblers. Missouri has some good native/wild plants. My Granny used to make wild black berry/grape jelly every year.

We Placed Huge Hoops around the bushes and covered with nets. Birds still got lots of the produce before the drought ruined them.

Wrens like to eat ensects, and are territorial. They will drive the fruit - loving birds away(at least that is what I read). So we have put up some wren houses around the grapes and blackberries for this year as an additional preventative.


22 posted on 03/29/2013 5:03:28 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: ApplegateRanch

I haven’t had rabbit or squirrel since I was a kid. Squirrels abound in our neighborhood, because we have lots of hickory nuts (hubby says they are not the edible type).

I think that if push came to shove we could probably raise some rabbits to eat with out violating any of our sub-division restrictions.


23 posted on 03/29/2013 5:11:37 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes

Never gardened where we could have persimmons, but as a kid we hunted every year on a friends ranch in Northern California that had some persimmon trees on it. Grandpa had a tree or two, also.

Bottom line, I learned that persimmons are not ripe for eating, or jam making, until they hit the soft & gooey stage AFTER a hard frost or two. Frost doesn’t ripen them, but they take so long to ripen that they are not ripe before the frosts hit.


24 posted on 03/29/2013 5:16:01 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: greeneyes

Easy to keep in a garage, if necessary; and can’t beat the manure for the garden: even fresh doesn’t ‘burn’.


25 posted on 03/29/2013 5:18:15 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: ApplegateRanch

We are doomed then, the persimmons here are long gone before frost usually.


26 posted on 03/29/2013 5:28:17 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: ApplegateRanch

Yes, I was even thinking that it might be good to have them for the manure even if we didn’t eat them.LOL.

I still like the idea turning chickens out into the garden once the plants are going strong. Seems like a good insect control and fertilization project.


27 posted on 03/29/2013 5:31:40 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: painter

Please keep us posted on the success of your grafted tomatoes.

The heirloom varieties that I’ve been using haven’t had any problems, and they always yield more than we can use, but I’m very interested in how this goes for you.

If I could cut back from forty tomato plants to thirty or even twenty that would free up a lot of space in the garden for other stuff.


28 posted on 03/29/2013 5:50:05 PM PDT by Augie
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To: greeneyes; Marcella
I wound up dealing with some kids this evening that I wasn't expecting to deal with. Not my grand-kids, but close enough. I'll be back after I get rid of them. Tall tales and heroic adventures (which actually aren't that happy in real life) are the order of the evening until other adults return.

I pushed Antz(tm), the DVD, into the mix, so there's a conservative meme going on.

Gak... life is so simple without anyone around... but children have to be taught and watched...

/johnny

29 posted on 03/29/2013 6:26:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Augie; painter

I got the little grafting clips earlier this spring and ordered some ‘Big Beef’ and ‘Tropic’ seeds to plant and practice with. The hybrid grafting rootstock is pricey for my level of gardening competence just now. Big Beef seeds are comparitively cheap and Tropic is open pollinated.

The reason to graft in these parts is to get a rootstock that’s resistant to nematodes and/or fusarium and verticillium. I’m not aware of too many heirlooms with resistance to all those. The resulting grafted plant is still susceptible to foliar diseases. They’re also supposed to be higher bearing.

I found a seed place online that sells seeds to the original wild type tomato plants of various types that I think were involved in the hybrid rootstock development. Maybe later this summer, if we have the funds, I’ll buy a few packs of those and do a little project.


30 posted on 03/29/2013 6:35:13 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: JRandomFreeper

LOL. Yes, the little dears have got to be carefully watched, and carefully taught.LOL

People out here in flyover country/rural areas still believe in the constitution, rule of law, self sufficiency, and living within a budget. Need to fortify all youngsters with examples of same, so they know better when the propaganda blares.


31 posted on 03/29/2013 6:45:36 PM PDT by greeneyes (Moderation in defense of your country is NO virtue. Let Freedom Ring.)
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To: greeneyes
I MADE GREAT PROGRESS THIS PAST WEEK!

I BOUGHT A PELLET HANDGUN TO KILL SQUIRRELS AND BIRDS THAT EAT TOMATOES! (See, I said great progress.)

(Tomato plants still living.)

32 posted on 03/29/2013 7:07:48 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: ApplegateRanch

“Evergreen Perennial onion”

Did you start them by using seed or plants? And they keep growing year after year? Now, that’s my kind of plant.


33 posted on 03/29/2013 7:12:19 PM PDT by Marcella (Prepping can save your life today. Going Galt is freedom.)
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To: greeneyes

Happy Easter and God Bless you and yours!


34 posted on 03/29/2013 7:18:40 PM PDT by Silentgypsy (I must b e all here, because everyone keeps telling me I'm not all there.)
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To: JRandomFreeper

Oh, drat! Hope you feel better soon. Have you ever tried ibuprofen as an antiinflammatory? For me, it works a lot better than aspirin for severe muscle pain.


35 posted on 03/29/2013 7:22:56 PM PDT by Silentgypsy (I must b e all here, because everyone keeps telling me I'm not all there.)
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To: greeneyes
Holy carp, it's hard to get away from the little monsters dears.

And you have to be careful of using NCO type language around them.

They are good kids. Boychild helped with my closing up the property chores since bending over really, really hurts. He's closer to the ground than I am, anyway.

When I left, they were self-correcting on 'yes ma'am, no ma'am, yes sir, no sir'... And that's a lot for almost teenagers in today's world.

/johnny

36 posted on 03/29/2013 7:34:26 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Silentgypsy
I did get some ibuprofen, and have been taking asprin since lunchtime. And now that I'm mostly home for the evening and not around bratlings, I enlisted Mr. Daniels to help me not care if it hurts. I should be fine by midnight, or not know the difference, anyway.

/johnny

37 posted on 03/29/2013 7:38:05 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Augie; painter
that would free up a lot of space in the garden for other stuff.

And then you'd take your free time and wind up down at the pool hall dancing and stuff. Best to keep you busy. Can you tell I've been dealing with kids? ;)

I also am interested in how Painter's grafts work out.

Let us know.

/johnny

38 posted on 03/29/2013 7:44:05 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: greeneyes; All

Hi freeper gardeners, I should really check this thread more often, but I do have a question today.

We got really socked by Hurricane Sandy, had a foot of water in our house and 4 feet all around.

Just in the last few days I’ve come to realize that a lot of my trees and shrubs seem to be D.E.A.D.

These are evergreen trees and shrubs.

Maybe you think I’m quite obtuse that I did not realize this before, but it’s a been a rough few months, and it’s been winter and I just didn’t realize until now.

I think it must have been the salt/polluted water that killed them as nothing else has happened.

Does anyone else have any experience with this?

I’m in New Jersey, about 10 miles from Sandy Hook. We were flooded by the water in the Raritan Bay, even though we are about a mile from the shore front.

Any comments will be appreciated!

Thanks!


39 posted on 03/29/2013 7:48:33 PM PDT by jocon307
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To: jocon307

I’d give them another month or so to see if they’re just insulted. Try to bend a few twigs or scratch the bark and see if there’s green underneath.

If they ARE dead, dig them up and replant. Maybe someone from the Gulf Coast could give more information? Maybe try a gardening forum online and see if they have a Gulf states section.


40 posted on 03/29/2013 7:50:45 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: Marcella; JustaDumbBlonde

I bought some about 40 years ago at a small feed store, in Southern California; they were locally fairly common there/then, so thought nothing of leaving them behind when we moved to Oregon.

Never saw any again, until we bought our ‘temporary’ house in SD, where we lived on visits & then moved into full time, until the ranch house was ready to move into.

That house had 2 patches—one reds, and one yellows— of them in the yard, and having learned my lesson, we dug a couple of hundred, and planted them here.

Now a couple of neighbors have some started; and I sent a batch to Justadumbblonde a couple of years ago. She thought she had killed them, but I doubt she’s capable of that, unless she has a nuke squirreled away in a barn.

From (other) forum posts, they seem to be slightly more common in Britain. They do not flower, so do not produce seed; they only propagate by division.


41 posted on 03/29/2013 7:53:22 PM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: greeneyes

I just noticed that I’ve got a Trinidad Moruga Scorpion pepper (Sandhill) just breaking the surface of its little planting section. And a couple ‘Lightening Mix’ peppers (Baker Creek) just peeping over the edge as well. Behind them is a ‘Pepperdew’ (sic) I got from RefiningFireChiles.

It’s all good tonight.


42 posted on 03/29/2013 7:55:00 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: JRandomFreeper

I think maybe you should take either aspirin or ibuprofen but not both of them together. If you’re not already Jacked, you might look it up. If you are already Jacked, I’ll look it up and remit.


43 posted on 03/29/2013 7:55:44 PM PDT by Silentgypsy (I must b e all here, because everyone keeps telling me I'm not all there.)
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To: DooDahhhh
Mine aren't much taller. But they are thick little trees. This is the first year I didn't wind up with leggy tomato plants. Stingy on the water, and lots of exposure to cool weather (45F and up) did that.

I learn something every year.

/johnny

44 posted on 03/29/2013 7:55:51 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: ApplegateRanch

Are those the kind Territorial has?


45 posted on 03/29/2013 7:55:58 PM PDT by Black Agnes
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To: goodwithagun
I grow my own pintos here, but I do it in a 3 sisters kind of way (point your search engine at 3 sisters). Corn, beans, and squash. Some old crones that didn't speak English taught me how to do that, and it works, and I don't mess with it.

Homegrown is better, and I know how old the beans are.

johnny

46 posted on 03/29/2013 7:58:40 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: greeneyes
Squirrels abound in our neighborhood, because we have lots of hickory nuts (hubby says they are not the edible type).

The squirrels or the nuts? As far s I'm concerned, no squirrel is edible! When I was pregnant with my first child, my father-in-law used to cook squirrels with my late mother-in-law's lemon chicken (Sicilian) sauce. One taste of it would cause me to lose my supper. It was pregnancy related morning sickness, but I can't bear to smell it, or look at it, to this day! That daughter is now 50+ years old. And eating around all those little pellets left from shooting the squirrel -- no thanks. Ugh!

47 posted on 03/29/2013 8:00:33 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Silentgypsy
Just started, but I'm getting there. I did space all the doses out as per the data-sheets and my self-aid/buddy care training.

I'm hurt and somewhat mean, I'm not completely stupid. ;)

/johnny

48 posted on 03/29/2013 8:01:18 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: Silentgypsy
Oh... and thank you. I am cranky tonight if standard polite gets missed first go-around.

/johnny

49 posted on 03/29/2013 8:02:14 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: afraidfortherepublic
Squirrel is a good meal. I ate quite a bit of it and feral pig until about 2 years ago.

I still eat feral pig, but did drop the squirrel when I got the chance.

/johnny

50 posted on 03/29/2013 8:04:56 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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