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Friendly flushing: Water-efficient toilets help make sustainable homes
Northwestern.edu ^ | DEC 06, 2012 | MELODY CHANDLERAND, WILL GRUNEWALD

Posted on 12/06/2012 7:20:37 PM PST by ExxonPatrolUs

Commode, can, the Oval Office, and the Super Bowl. Throne, pot, loo, John. The royal flush.

The toilet, in its illustrious career, has earned a variety of affectionate nicknames. But variety extends well beyond just puns when talking about those porcelain perches: Eco- friendly options, from low-flow to entirely waterless toilets, are an important part of bringing water sustainability into homes. Toilet flushes account for about 30 percent of in-home water usage, according to the Environmental Protection Agency. Toilets consume more water in American homes than any other individual type of appliance, such as showers, dishwashers, and washing machines.

And with climate change, drought and demand straining fresh water resources, methods of decreasing water consumption are increasingly important to environmentalists and policy-makers. “It’s easy to think that we have this enormous indispensable water supply, that we do have about 20 percent of the world's supply of surface fresh water right here at the Great Lakes,” said Nancy Tuchman, an aquatic ecology researcher and director of the Institute of Urban Environmental Sustainability at Loyal University.

"We have the biggest supply on the continent, but it doesn’t mean that it’s going to be there forever – and especially with global climate change and all this evaporation and little precipitation that could build the water back up. So we need to conserve.” Studies show that Great Lakes water levels are dropping toward record lows.

Toilet Alternatives

One radical toilet-based solution takes water out of the equation altogether. A so-called “dry toilet” can begin as little more than a bucket filled with a layer of a carbon-rich material such as dry leaves, sawdust or newspaper. “For five bucks, or if I find a bucket and have some carbon material, I can actually build out a solution really fast,” said Nancy Klehm, who founded a Chicago-based eco-solutions company, Social Ecologies, in 2010. “It takes hardly any capital; it just takes some ingenuity and knowing what to do with it.”

After a visit to the dry toilet, users cover their wastes with a new layer of carbon- rich material. Once the bucket is full, the contents can be dumped out and composted.

Klehm organized a dry toilet trial-run for a group of 22 Chicagoans from 2008 to 2010, and she continues to work with dry toilets and composting today. For the aptly dubbed "Humble Pile" program, she collected waste from participants for a three- month period, and then composted it with more carbon-rich material for two years. “People were really surprised by how much they liked dry toilets,” she said. Participants in the aptly dubbed “Humble Pile” program liked the fact that the toilets were quiet and mobile, and that the toilets could be designed ergonomically. Most of all, they were pleasantly surprised that the toilets didn’t smell.

It's important that anyone considering a dry toilet understand how to handle the waste. "People can generally compost anywhere at anytime," Klehm said. "They just need to do it well so not to present a nuisance or attract animals."

When dealing with the dry toilet waste rather than food or landscape waste, it is important to kill pathogens from the human body by composting at high temperature created by heat-generating microbes. "Composting human waste should not be taken on unless someone is a very skilled composter," Klehm said. When done correctly, though, microbial digestion should naturally turn waste to soil and the process should be odor-free.

After the two year "Humble Pile" composting period that Klehm took on for the participants, she returned the compost to its original owners, which she said grew participant’s appreciation for dry toilets even more. “They were really excited that they were building soil," she said. “It’s a larger issue than just how much water we’re using,” explained sustainable water expert Wendy Pabich, who holds a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “When you buy a dry compost toilet, that’s all about recycling the nutrients and carbon in our waste, rather than sending them to rivers where the organic and nutrient load drive putrefaction – algal groves, fish kills and ecosystem changes.”

Dry toilets probably aren’t for everybody. “The ‘yuk’ factor is definitely there,” but that reaction is largely a cultural bias, Pabich said. She added that commercially produced dry toilets have eliminated many of the un- pleasantries consumers might expect. But there are many other, more conventional toilet options for people looking to lessen their lavatory’s environmental impact.

If every American home were to swap out old toilets for new, water efficiency- certified toilets, the EPA estimates that it would collectively save 640 billion gallons of water every year – equivalent to two week’s flow over Niagara Falls.

Toilets from before 1980 can use up to 7 gallons of water per flush, but federal regulations require that new toilets use no more than 1.6 gallons per flush. Simply by replacing old toilets, people can dramatically reduce their water consumption. And new dual-flush toilets (with one setting for wet wastes and one for solids] or low-flow toilets), marked with an EPA WaterSense label, are certified to use at least 20 percent less water than that national baseline.

A water-efficient home

In her recent book, “Taking on Water,” Pabich shared her personal experience renovating her entire home to be more water-efficient. The process involved installing meters on every water-consuming element of the house, analyzing the results, and devising ways to minimize water consumption. She chose the low-flow toilets, for instance.

Improving water sustainability at home need not be so involved for everyone, though. “I don’t think people need to go through all the effort I went through, nor to the level of analysis and understanding,” Pabich said. Instead, they can focus on a few core changes that Pablich shared in the form of a “Water Cheat Sheet” when she spoke at Chicago Ideas Week in October.

Some changes are a matter of updating home hardware. Pabich switched out her hold toilets and self-installed low-flow alternatives. “It’s not very hard, and it’s not very expensive,” she said. Toilets, though, are only a piece of the puzzle. The cheat sheet prescribes other improvements such as water-efficient washing machines and dishwashers.

Other conservation measures

requires behavioral changes, though. From eating less meat (livestock consume an enormous amount of water) to turning off the shower while lathering, small adjustments in daily routines add up. Turn off the sink while you brush your teeth, and don’t run your dishwasher until it’s full. “One thing that’s become really clear to me is the impact of our aggregate decision- making,” Pabich said. If each one of us does something to reduce our direct water use or our larger water footprint, by eating less meat or replacing our toilets, the collective impact is significant.”

The big picture: water pricing

Though individual choices have major impacts on water conservation, achieving long-term sustainability will require top-down policy changes too.

“There are clearly some major structural problems,” Pabich said. “Water is entirely underpriced, and the second that price signal is corrected I think things will dramatically change.”

Bill Christiansen, program planner for the Chicago-based Alliance for Water Efficiency, agreed. “Here in Chicago, the water rates are very reasonable, so that’s probably not going to be a motivator for lots of people.”

The city of Chicago will charge $2.89 per 1,000 gallons of water beginning Jan. 1, 2013, up from $2.51 this year. The rate is scheduled to increase again for 2014 and 2015 in increments of 15 percent. Sewer rates will be at 92 percent of water bills for 2013, but will hit 100 percent in 2015. “I think the public will be most interested in water efficiency when the need is more urgent,” Christiansen said.

People such as Klehm and Pabich promote water-efficiency initiatives, but it will take a concerted effort of people to achieve all the necessary changes.

“It requires another level of involvement in your home,” Klehm said. “So your home is not just this passive space that you retreat into at the end of the night with your carryout Chinese food and pop in a Netflix movie.”

“You have to watch the flows of all the different things that are coming into and out of your house. And there aren’t a lot of people who want to have that level of engagement in their homes.”


TOPICS: Chit/Chat
KEYWORDS: toilet
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1 posted on 12/06/2012 7:20:46 PM PST by ExxonPatrolUs
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

But it takes water to get the big logs to go down. What are we supposed to do, keep a coat hanger handy?


2 posted on 12/06/2012 7:25:28 PM PST by Slump Tester (What if I'm pregnant Teddy? Errr-ahh -Calm down Mary Jo, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

I need an angry aggressive flush that lowers the level of the lake for a few minutes.


3 posted on 12/06/2012 7:25:57 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
Obsessive-Compulsive insanity on parade.
4 posted on 12/06/2012 7:28:33 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

I don’t know why having a toilet that needs to be flushed 3 or 4 times helps the environment ... but if you say so ...


5 posted on 12/06/2012 7:29:20 PM PST by ClearCase_guy (Republicans have made themselves useless, toothless, and clueless.)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

Warning! Agenda 21 Language Stay Away!


6 posted on 12/06/2012 7:30:18 PM PST by KC_Lion (Build the America you want to live in at your address, and keep looking up.-Sarah Palin)
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To: Slump Tester

Funny, just this very morning I found myself wishing that I had a toilet from the 1970s.


7 posted on 12/06/2012 7:32:06 PM PST by CaspersGh0sts
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To: cripplecreek

Warning! Agenda 21 Language Stay Away!


8 posted on 12/06/2012 7:32:48 PM PST by KC_Lion (Build the America you want to live in at your address, and keep looking up.-Sarah Palin)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

Without reading the entire article, as I assume it’s senseless drivel, I’ll predict the shit won’t be going far in the future.

How many times do we need to flush now, even after ‘light duty’? Twice?

If these idiots have their way, we’ll be flushing 3 or 4 times.....At least until the government implements some sort of controlling device to ration or tax flushes.(It WILL happen)


9 posted on 12/06/2012 7:34:42 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
Yup. Once that water goes down the drain it jumps to another dimension and ceases to exist in our universe.
10 posted on 12/06/2012 7:38:47 PM PST by CrazyIvan (Obama's birth certificate was found stapled to Soros's receipt.)
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To: KoRn

As they pointed out, they already have.... they just artificially raise the price of water, just like they do everything else. Cigs, gas, electricity... all expensive solely due to fake government taxes and price fixing.

And down and down and down we go go go.

Pretty soon to have the quality of life most middle, even lower middle class Americans had in the 80’s you’ll need to make over 600K a year.

We are growing more pathetic by the day.


11 posted on 12/06/2012 7:41:14 PM PST by Individual Rights in NJ (Let's settle somewhere new?~ I'm thinking places people call "blue".)
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To: CaspersGh0sts

After a trip to Skyline Chili the other day, my 1.6 gal American Standard is still mad at me.


12 posted on 12/06/2012 7:41:56 PM PST by digger48
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To: KC_Lion

http://www.great-lakes.net/teach/envt/levels/lev_1.html This instructs us in the cycles of water levels for each of the Great Lakes as well as Lake St. Claire. There are well described cycles ~ easily modeled ~ and it’s not Global Warming controlling this one. There are locks and dams that make sure the Lakes are navigable under a variety of conditions.


13 posted on 12/06/2012 7:42:10 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: Slump Tester

I live at about 9000 feet, way uphill of most of the people on the planet. I have a big old Sir Tomas Crapper copper lined oak tank with a long pull chain on it. I enjoy pulling the chain and knowing that people below our village’s very fine treatment plant will have all that clean water to use!


14 posted on 12/06/2012 7:44:17 PM PST by WellyP (question!)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

I once stayed at a hotel near the ocean near San Diego. In the bathroom was a sign that asked me to conserve water.

What is the “thinking” behind such a request? It implies there is a shortage of water. But this is pitifully specious. Next to the ocean but short of water?

No, short of money or the political will to commit the necessary capital to alleviate any capacity issues with the **government run** water utility.

And so we have the next move by government— that somehow it is more noble and more in harmony with nature to “save” water. But the oceans are just as full as ever. In fact, Al Gore is scolding us for not paying attention to his fretting about how much the oceans might rise as all the ice in Greenland melts.

Given how much in resources building a house and then maintaining it for 20 years consumes, saving a gallon of water with each flush is just a silly concern. It insults the intelligence to claim that such savings make the difference between sustainable and not sustainable.

In my experience, not a single scheme of the left to be sustainable ever really is when fully examined.


15 posted on 12/06/2012 7:45:07 PM PST by theBuckwheat
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
Water is entirely underpriced, and the second that price signal is corrected I think things will dramatically change.”

Aha!

16 posted on 12/06/2012 7:45:42 PM PST by Focault's Pendulum
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

These toilets are the reason that the Mississippi River is too low for barge traffic. Come on everyone! Flush so the corn can get to Mexico!


17 posted on 12/06/2012 7:46:01 PM PST by blueunicorn6 ("A crack shot and a good dancer")
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
The reason we invented plumbing and sewers is so we could get RID of the stuff, now they want us to save it?
You can't have your own compost in most cities.
It's bad enough for food waste but composting your own human excrement is going to create more problems than it could possibly solve.

18 posted on 12/06/2012 7:46:25 PM PST by BitWielder1 (Corporate Profits are better than Government Waste)
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To: KoRn

We replaced a couple of our older flush toilets about 5 years ago ~ and although a second flush seems to be required the advantage is NO OVERFLOW. Kohler seems to have licked ~ no shouldn’t say that ~ fixed that problem!


19 posted on 12/06/2012 7:48:43 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: BitWielder1

If we’re going to compost human waste, it would be far better for the city to collect the sludge and do it, rather than expect every single individual to do it.

With the city, they can burn it and turn it to ash, and then use it for city purposes, like flowers.


20 posted on 12/06/2012 7:51:47 PM PST by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults.)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

ALL water is recycled. It gets taken from the environment, used, returned to the environment, evaporated, and returned as rain. It’s been doing this for billions of years. No amount of toilet conservation will ever change this. It is the ultimate in “sustainability”. These people are absolutely nuts.


21 posted on 12/06/2012 7:51:53 PM PST by norwaypinesavage (Galileo: In science, the authority of a thousand is not worth the humble reasoning of one individual)
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To: hinckley buzzard

“After a visit to the dry toilet, users cover their wastes with a new layer of carbon- rich material. Once the bucket is full, the contents can be dumped out and composted.”

Hopefully they can recycle their OCD meds properly by growing their own “organic” zucchini.


22 posted on 12/06/2012 7:53:20 PM PST by Rodamala
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
I have the original 1930s toilet here in the house. I could flush a small government functionary down it in one flush. When I mash the handle, the house shakes, and conversations can't be heard.

It's ugly as heck, and hard to keep clean and working. I make parts to keep it working.

I'll die before I give it up.

/johnny

23 posted on 12/06/2012 7:53:20 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: theBuckwheat
San Diego is a DESERT ~ they have a severe fresh water shortage and have to pump it in from hundreds of miles away.

True enough you can run a sewer system with just salt water, but you need special equipment to handle it ~

24 posted on 12/06/2012 7:53:33 PM PST by muawiyah
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

“cover their wastes with a new layer of carbon- rich material. Once the bucket is full, the contents can be dumped out and composted.”

This is ridiculous. All this is is re-hashing the old days.

Which proves beyond doubt all these EnviroNAZIs want is to punt us back to the stone age. Or Moslem society, whichever.


25 posted on 12/06/2012 7:53:46 PM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

"BAAAAA-WOOOOOSH.....now that's a MAN'S flush, Bud."

26 posted on 12/06/2012 7:57:38 PM PST by dfwgator
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
Humans had to design and improve sanitary systems for 6000 years to achieve a decent level of sanitary safety by transporting sewage safely to locations where trained professionals could properly treat that sewage for public health.

Now we will require every resident to treat his own sewage in his back yard (or front yard if he doesn't have a back yard), without using water.

What could possibly go wrong?

27 posted on 12/06/2012 8:02:18 PM PST by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it, and the Constitution and law mean what WE say.)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

Theoretically they save water. Realistically I have to flush mine sometimes as many as four times to get just one square of toilet paper to go down the drain.


28 posted on 12/06/2012 8:03:26 PM PST by al_c (http://www.blowoutcongress.com)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

I was speaking of the low flow variety. Forgot to mention that. I wouldn’t even think of using a no flow dry one.


29 posted on 12/06/2012 8:05:16 PM PST by al_c (http://www.blowoutcongress.com)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

Toilets from before 1980 can use up to 7 gallons of water per flush, but federal regulations require that new toilets use no more than 1.6 gallons per flush. Simply by replacing old toilets, people can dramatically reduce their water consumption”

Barbra Streisand. Swaying the fools out there saying “7 gal” which is OLD toilets. My parents have 3-gal toilets, and lo and behold to this day 40 years later they STILL flush even gigantic loads of (x) and toilet paper in 1 flush.

Meanwhile we have to constantly have our plunger at the ready for all 4 of our “eco” toilets (3 brands, 2 types). Even when we don’t use that we need to flush almost always 2x for just a bit of TP.

That’s 3 gal vs. 3.2 gal per “visit”.


30 posted on 12/06/2012 8:06:58 PM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: the OlLine Rebel
Which proves beyond doubt all these EnviroNAZIs want is to punt us back to the stone age. Or Moslem society, whichever.

Looks that way. They won't be happy until everyone else is living in the 7th century. I suspect that this is an aspect of outcome-based education... that these folks are convinced that it's a zero-sum world. Therefore, in order for these elitists to live in their accustomed and deserved luxury (because they care), the rest of the planet must squat over a hole and wipe with leaves and rocks.

31 posted on 12/06/2012 8:06:58 PM PST by Ezekiel (The Obama-nation began with the Inauguration of Desolation.)
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To: Slump Tester

How absolutely fitting that something churned out by Medill would pertain to the crapper.


32 posted on 12/06/2012 8:09:35 PM PST by PacesPaines (NU Mom)
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To: al_c

The irony is that trains and planes have “no-water” toilets which are VERY powerful. However, I don’t know just how much “energy” we “waste” making that work OK. Kind of like the damnable asshats who say all we need to do for our lo-flows of 1.6 is get an electric assist!

You can’t have it both ways.


33 posted on 12/06/2012 8:11:25 PM PST by the OlLine Rebel (Common sense is an uncommon virtue./Technological progress cannot be legislated.)
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To: JRandomFreeper
When I mash the handle, the house shakes, and conversations can't be heard.

And I will flush down upon thee with great vengeance and furious anger those who would attempt to poison and destroy My brothers.
34 posted on 12/06/2012 8:13:01 PM PST by cripplecreek (REMEMBER THE RIVER RAISIN!)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

Screw them!!!

I still use 30 year old toilets that work with the first flush, no matter what!!!


35 posted on 12/06/2012 8:13:30 PM PST by dalereed
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To: Jonty30
If we’re going to compost human waste, it would be far better for the city to collect the sludge and do it, rather than expect every single individual to do it.

Exactly. And rather than having dump trucks collecting the solid waste from every building, why not use the existing sewer system.
It uses water for transportation, a resource that can be recycled indefinitely.
I bet a sewer system is more energy efficient and less polluting than thousands of sewer dump trucks.

Leftist and environmentalists just don't care how much their solution COSTS, in money, resources and unintended consequences.

36 posted on 12/06/2012 8:14:07 PM PST by BitWielder1 (Corporate Profits are better than Government Waste)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
“Water-efficent terlets help make smellier homes that attract more flies and other vermin” . . .

Where can you find a high-tank terlet with a loud flush anymore?
37 posted on 12/06/2012 8:15:39 PM PST by Olog-hai
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
Dry toilets probably aren’t for everybody. “The ‘yuk’ factor is definitely there,” but that reaction is largely a cultural bias, Pabich said.

What sort of culture is this woman espousing?

I rather like the culture that gave me a flush toilet and reliable potable water.

This woman wants "dry toilets" for everybody and expects that all users will assiduously compost their waste in such a way that all microbes will be destroyed. Not a chance. People can't even be expected to stay off the phone or keep from reading a term paper when driving (yeah, I saw this on my way home this evening!) so how can they be expected to take care of their own waste in such a way that it doesn't jeopardize local health? People can't see beyond the backlit screen of the smartphone in front of their noses, you think they care about an amoebic menace lurking in local topsoil courtesy of the human body?

There was a nice paper published about 20 years ago about SF Bay Area groundwater. Think about how groundwater is a real resource. Don't jeopardize it.

38 posted on 12/06/2012 8:16:56 PM PST by thecodont
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

Just dig a hole for an outhouse in the back yard!
when full move it over to a new hole a few feet away! No water involved.

I started life using one of those and was afraid I would fall in the big hole. My uncle got bit on his thingydo by a spider in one.


39 posted on 12/06/2012 8:18:48 PM PST by Ruy Dias de Bivar (The parasites now outnumber the producers.)
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To: cripplecreek
I was channelling more my mom's side of the family, but yeah, dad's side of the family with the fire and brimstone preachers is valid.

I was rather Texas with that... wasn't I?

/johnny

40 posted on 12/06/2012 8:20:38 PM PST by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

Toto. Great band. Great dog. Amazing toilet.


41 posted on 12/06/2012 8:21:33 PM PST by Adams (Fight on!)
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To: Navy Patriot
Now we will require every resident to treat his own sewage in his back yard (or front yard if he doesn't have a back yard)

Funny you should say that. Our town is in the process of installing septic tanks in every yard right now. All hooked into the system to take away liquid waste, yes, but nonetheless we will henceforth be treating our sewage in our back or front yards. All prompted by EPA regulations, and funded primarily with fedgov grants and loans, of course.

What's ironic is that when they were digging the hole to put in the new tank, they had to first dig up the perfectly good septic tank that was still in the ground, disconnected a couple of decades ago by government edict.

42 posted on 12/06/2012 8:22:27 PM PST by EternalVigilance (America's creed: Our rights come from God, not men. Governments exist to secure those rights.)
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To: cripplecreek

Ever watch married with children?

Remember when Al got the new toilet and when he flushed it the fountain stopped?

Now that’s what I am talking about!


43 posted on 12/06/2012 8:26:36 PM PST by cableguymn (The founding fathers would be shooting by now..)
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To: Ruy Dias de Bivar

Instead of Chinese solar panels we should be building desalinization plants. This will fix the problem of the coming floods due to global warming.

We could run these plants from the energy that would be produced by burning garbage at very high temperatures. Plus because it would be burned at a high temperature, it wouldn’t affect the environment.

However, in saying that, should global warming strike, we could lower the temps a bit, let the emissions go into the atmosphere creating smog which would lower the temperature.

Wow. I just fixed the worlds energy and water problems and in the process gave us back our 7 gallon behemoth toilets. Butt seriously, I miss the days when I would wake up, go to the bathroom and the first thing I would hear is, “Take your best shot.”


44 posted on 12/06/2012 8:26:43 PM PST by EQAndyBuzz (George W. Bush is the Emmanuel Goldstein of the modern era.)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
"We have the biggest supply on the continent, but it doesn’t mean that it’s going to be there forever – and especially with global climate change and all this evaporation and little precipitation that could build the water back up. So we need to conserve.” Studies show that Great Lakes water levels are dropping toward record lows.

Yes, because as everyone knows, once water is flushed down a toilet, it's gone! *sheesh*

45 posted on 12/06/2012 8:26:43 PM PST by Flick Lives (We're going to be just like the old Soviet Union, but with free cell phones!)
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To: EternalVigilance
...by government edict.

We will move bravely forward to a stone age civilization.

46 posted on 12/06/2012 8:28:23 PM PST by Navy Patriot (Join the Democrats, it's not Fascism when WE do it, and the Constitution and law mean what WE say.)
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To: ExxonPatrolUs
she collected waste from participants for a three- month period

Nan Klehm would be a hit on one of those Euro fetish websites.
47 posted on 12/06/2012 8:30:02 PM PST by Thrownatbirth (.....Iraq Invasion fan since '91.)
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To: Individual Rights in NJ
"Pretty soon to have the quality of life most middle, even lower middle class Americans had in the 80’s you’ll need to make over 600K a year."

Yeah..... Back when $50k per year USED to be GOOD money..... Now days that salary will have you living paycheck to paycheck with near zero savings, as much as it costs just to live, unless you have a spouse earning similar money(or sadly shacking up with a gal with 8 kids and getting government handouts). Sucks to be 'middle classed' in the year of 2012. All the while .gov(at ALL LEVELS) and its tyrannical policies/regulations make upward mobility increasingly difficult.

I've done ok working in IT for most of the past 10 years, and my wife working in healthcare. Lately, more than once, I've contemplated moving to the dark side and writing spyware/adware or something. I suppose that would beat running a Still, or growing a pot-field on the side.... lol

48 posted on 12/06/2012 8:33:06 PM PST by KoRn (Department of Homeland Security, Certified - "Right Wing Extremist")
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

I picked up 2 big old 1970s 5 gallon flushers at the local old parts place & put some new guts in them & they flush anything. They are in excellent shape. I will never replace them.


49 posted on 12/06/2012 8:35:09 PM PST by LongWayHome
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To: ExxonPatrolUs

My one toilet is over 60 years old, uses 3 gallons per flush and the only thing I’ve ever had to do is replace the rubber seals every 10 or 15 years or so when they harden up. I like it and it will handle anything that gets into the bowl from Mr. Stinky to the occasional diaper. I also have one of those water efficient ones in my other bathroom and I fail to see the economy of flushing 3 or 4 times to clear the bowl.


50 posted on 12/06/2012 8:42:44 PM PST by BuffaloJack (Children, pets, and slaves get taken care of. Free Men take care of themselves.)
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