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Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 17, April 27, 2012
Friday, April 27, 2012 | JustaDumbBlonde

Posted on 04/27/2012 8:13:43 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde

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Good morning everyone! I'm looking forward to hearing your gardening challenges and successes today. Please check in and let us know how it's going.

This morning I've put together a little pictorial of how Mark and I cut a honey bee hive out of a wall or similar place. This is a medium-sized cutout that we did back in March. The hive was located in an old shed that the owner wanted to tear down, but they were trying to reclaim windows and the old boards and the bees weren't having any of that. So, the owner got her building back and Mark got a beautiful and productive hive of bees! Talk about win-win!

In this first photo, you see the old shed and Mark has begun vacuuming up the bees after
we removed a sheet of siding and a few lap boards.

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A closer look at our first few minutes of the cutout.

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Here we begin to see the brood section of
the hive. These are cells where they are raising new bees.

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You can see how the bees try to
keep the brood covered to protect it and keep
it warm. The brood is continuously tended.

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In the cells that were broken when
we removed the boards, you can see
stored pollen.

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We are continuing to remove
boards, expose the hive and vacuum bees.

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On the left side, you can see pollen
and bee bread being stored. On the right
you begin to see the honey stores.

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Lots of honey stored. We probably
removed 150 lbs. of honey from this hive!

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It was really cool as we exposed
the hive, we found the comb to be in
continuous 8 ft. sheets.

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As Mark is cutting the comb out of the wall,
I am cutting select pieces to size and bracing it in wooden
frames with rubber bands. We are basically
moving the workings of the hive with the bees.

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You can see the empty space where
the hive used to be.

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Three hours later, the bees are in
their new home in Mark's back yard apiary.

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I hope that you found that interesting and informative. Inviting your questions and/or comments.

Have a great week!

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The Weekly Gardening Thread is a weekly gathering of folks that love soil, seeds and plants of all kinds. From complete newbies that are looking to start that first potted plant, to gardeners with some acreage, to Master Gardener level and beyond, we would love to hear from you.

This thread is non-political, although you will find that most here are conservative folks. No matter what, you won’t be flamed and the only dumb question is the one that isn’t asked.

It is impossible to hijack the Weekly Gardening Thread ... there is no telling where it will go and that is part of the fun and interest. Jump in and join us!


TOPICS: Agriculture; Food; Gardening; Hobbies
KEYWORDS: garden; gardening
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
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Previous weeks' threads:

Weekly Gardening Thread (Catalog Fever) Vol. 1 Jan 6, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Seeds) Vol. 2, January 13, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 3, January 20, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (U.S. Hardiness Zones) Supplemental Vol. 1
Weekly Gardening Thread (Soil Types) Vol. 4, January 27, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Vacation) Vol. 5, February 03, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Vacation) Vol. 6, February 10, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Vacation?) Vol. 7, February 17, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Home Sweet Home) Vol. 8, February 24, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Soil Structure Part 1) Vol. 9, March 2, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Transplanting Tomatoes) Vol. 10, March 9, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Useful Links) Vol. 11, March 16, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread -- Vol. 12, March 23, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread -- Vol. 13, March 31, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread (Happy Easter!) Vol. 14, April 6, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 15, April 13, 2012
Weekly Gardening Thread Vol. 16, April 20, 2012

1 posted on 04/27/2012 8:13:54 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde
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To: Diana in Wisconsin; gardengirl; girlangler; SunkenCiv; HungarianGypsy; Gabz; billhilly; Alkhin; ...
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Ping to the Weekly Gardening Thread Member List

Please let me know if you would like to be added to or removed from the ping list.

2 posted on 04/27/2012 8:15:27 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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Detailed State Plant Hardiness Zone Maps

Alabama District of Columbia
Kentucky Montana Ohio Texas ( East )
Alaska Florida Louisiana Nebraska Oklahoma Texas ( West )
Arizona Georgia Maine Nevada Oregon Utah
Arkansas
Hawaii Maryland New Hampshire Pennsylvania Vermont
California ( Northern )
Idaho Massachusetts New Jersey Puerto Rico Virginia
California ( Southern ) Illinois Michigan New Mexico Rhode Island Washington
Colorado Indiana Minnesota New York South Carolina
West Virginia
Connecticut Iowa Mississippi North Carolina South Dakota Wisconsin
Delaware Kansas Missouri North Dakota Tennessee Wyoming

International Plant Hardiness Zone Maps
Australia
Canada
China
Europe
Japan

3 posted on 04/27/2012 8:16:26 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Basil is coming along nicely, as are the tomatoes. Won't be long, and it will be italian food season. ;)

/johnny

4 posted on 04/27/2012 8:19:16 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JRandomFreeper

I love italian food season! Isn’t that ALL year long???


5 posted on 04/27/2012 8:21:05 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Nice save of the hive too many would just kill all the bees and clean up even some of the bee people are so afraid of getting Africanized bees from wild populations that they pass.


6 posted on 04/27/2012 8:21:05 AM PDT by scottteng (Tax government employees til they quit and find something useful to do)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Cool post! Good luck on a fully successful relocation. I assume there is still some chance of failure? Or is that a high-percentage operation?


7 posted on 04/27/2012 8:24:19 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Unfortunately, the basil will eventually bolt, and the summer will nuke the tomatoes. But there will be another opportunity in the fall.

I do love it fresh.

/johnny

8 posted on 04/27/2012 8:25:09 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: FreedomPoster

We have a 90% success rate of the hive after a cutout. Really, complete success now because the one hive that we lost was the second one we ever removed and we didn’t get the queen. We’ve learned so much and refined our methods with great results. From the bee forum that I read regularly, most people have about a 50% success rate with hive survival. I don’t know why it would be so low.


9 posted on 04/27/2012 8:37:47 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: scottteng
Oh, no, we never want to kill bees. We do not have an africanized bee problem in Louisiana. I have met some feral bees with a nasty disposition, but re-queening the hive takes care of that quickly.
10 posted on 04/27/2012 8:40:36 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde; All
Does anyone here know anything about Campari tomaotes? I bought some from H.E.B. recently and they taste as good as garden grown! I have seen where people on the internet say they have grown their own from the seed; I suppose that is legal if you don't intend to sell? Campari is a trademarked name.

And has anyone grown any Anasazi beans? I bought some yesterday and found the story behind them to be so interesting! The girl at the fruit stand said her mom made some and they were better than pintos. I just got them because they looked so different.

Hoping to set up a rain barrel and drip system soon so I don't have to hand water everything. I had some squash & cucumbers that were wilting down during the day and so put a milk jug full of water with a tiny hole in one corner next to each and then sprayed each one with Garrett juice and now they are starting to flourish. But a drip system that I could put the compost tea in? THAT would be awesome!
11 posted on 04/27/2012 8:45:01 AM PDT by texas_mrs
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To: JRandomFreeper

Last year I found that by using shade cloth both the tomatoes and basil continued strong and producing well. I lost most of my tomato plants but experimented on six plants with shade cloth and those six plants continued to produce until the first frost. This year I ordered and received a 20 by 32 foot shade cloth and am in the process of covering that much of my garden. I’m near Aiken, SC


12 posted on 04/27/2012 8:45:16 AM PDT by CynicalBear
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To: CynicalBear

What percent density? I’ve dealt with that South Carolina sun...ye gads.


13 posted on 04/27/2012 8:48:20 AM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: CynicalBear
Here in Texas, most folks I know plan on two plantings per year. One in spring, one in fall. Depending on how bad the summer is, the tomatoes may make it, or not. Last year, it was like my yard had been hit by a nuke. Even the weeds died.

/johnny

14 posted on 04/27/2012 8:49:05 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Very cool about the bee hives, interesting and informative. Thanks for the pics.


15 posted on 04/27/2012 8:52:30 AM PDT by gramho12
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

AWESOME pics! I could never do that. Bees and wasps hate me and the feeling is mutual.

The glads started blooming yesterday and there’s more caladiums finally coming up so the flower bed will be looking nice any day. I see that one package of caladiums was a dud.

I did get off my duff this week and attacked some of the weeds, but then I messed up my knee so have been off it for the past three days. If it’s not one thing it’s another. Had a couple seed packets waiting by the door but no can do now without a knee. Didn’t get the weeds done and there’s a week’s work of them still out there.

I noticed some broccoli FINALLY coming up but need to fill in with more of them and cauliflower. I did fill in more in the lettuce and greens area. I moved the stray cuke back where he belonged and it looks like he won’t make it (not that I expected him to but had hoped). Got some old okra seeds soaked and in the ground so who knows if they’ll sprout. Mr. b is still parking his truck by the little side garden so the heat off it is burning everything up so that won’t help the okra either. Here in TX, it’s already in the mid 90s. I had watered yesterday morning and by late afternoon things were starting to wilt.

Started some herbs indoors but the cat keeps sitting on them. I holler at her but she just stares back all innocent, uh huh. If they do manage to come up, they’ll be moved outside into containers.

I really want to dig up the grass (cough, weeds) between the veg garden and the house and put in berries along the garden fence and roses along the house with mainly herbs and a few flowers in between. Mr. b can move one of his fountains over there and a couple of chairs. But that’s not happening any time soon. Maybe next year.


16 posted on 04/27/2012 9:02:56 AM PDT by bgill
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Mornign!!!!!! What great pictures - thank you for sharing.

On that note, I wonder how many here are aware of the following:

Monsanto buys leading bee research firm after being implicated in bee colony collapse

FTA: To translate, it appears as though Monsanto plans to use even more chemical inputs to supposedly solve the bee collapse problem, even though it is these very inputs that are largely the cause of the bee collapse problem. Several recent studies, after all, have definitively linked crop pesticides and herbicides, as well as high fructose corn syrup, to CCD.

The future looks bleak for bees, in other words, as Monsanto appears poised to slowly gobble up all the competing companies and organizations that threaten its own GMO products, while pretending to care about the dwindling bee populations. And unless drastic action is taken to stop Monsanto in its continued quest to dominate global agriculture, the food supply as we know it will soon be a thing of the past.

This is some scary stuff..........

17 posted on 04/27/2012 9:09:14 AM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Thanks for the great beekeeping photo docu.

Our maters are staked and doing great with a few blooms. We have some baby squash and the peppers are growing good. We have a few zuke blooms also. I guess we are off and running on this years garden.

I think that Monday or so, I will till the okra bed and get it going. My county guy said to wait till June for okra, so I still have time to soil test that area.

18 posted on 04/27/2012 9:13:25 AM PDT by rightly_dividing (Newt 2012)
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To: JRandomFreeper
Last year, it was like my yard had been hit by a nuke. Even the weeds died.

Don't I know it. I gave up on the garden about the end of June. Our lawn didn't make it so it's now all weeds. You're right about no weeds last summer but they've more than made up for it this year. Everyone is complaining about so many coming up. I've never seen the weeds like they are now. I'm thinking it's like a prairie or forest fire and the next year sees lots of new little plants popping up.

The hills are still covered with dead cedar and such so we're still in danger of one spark setting everything off.

19 posted on 04/27/2012 9:13:25 AM PDT by bgill
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To: Gabz
There has been absolutely no proven connection between farm chemicals and colony collapse disorder. All of these stories are driven by an anti-chemical agenda and an anti-corn/corn syrup agenda.

Colony collapse disorder can be causes by viruses, mites and other parasites, and just plain bad beekeeping practices that isn't actually colony collapse.

20 posted on 04/27/2012 9:14:12 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

That was a great tutorial! Very interesting and informative. Thanks


21 posted on 04/27/2012 9:16:14 AM PDT by Red_Devil 232 (VietVet - USMC All Ready On The Right? All Ready On The Left? All Ready On The Firing Line!)
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To: bgill

I soaked some okra seed for 3 days before I got a chance to plant them, & planted them in a combination of peat pots (which I normally HATE) and little plastic pots. That was last Sunday & they are already 1/2 high! I have them sitting on a bed of compost inside my greenhouse. It’s perfect right now for seed starting & I’m hoping to plant them at about 6” high. I did this last year with pretty good success. The reason I didn’t direct seed is because I, too, have cats and they like to roll around in the dirt and I didn’t want them to roll on my newly sprouted okra. I water them each day & they stay moist since they are on the compost.


22 posted on 04/27/2012 9:22:01 AM PDT by texas_mrs
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

I have no doubt that you are correct -— I’m more concerned about Monsanto and what they are doing.


23 posted on 04/27/2012 9:32:46 AM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Absolutely fascinating pics of your bee rescue operation!
Thank you so much for sharing. Seeing all that honey had both me and hubby salivating. ;-)

Eventually, I WILL get our hives going...but not this year. This year we have too many projects, including construction of a small green house, an enlarged garden, storage building for the tractor and truck... and a new puppy will soon be a part of this family.


24 posted on 04/27/2012 9:40:13 AM PDT by SumProVita (Cogito, ergo...Sum Pro Vita. (Modified Decartes))
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To: CynicalBear

I might have to try that this year. I haven’t had problems keeping basil going all season here in ATL, but the tomatoes don’t do well.


25 posted on 04/27/2012 9:51:30 AM PDT by FreedomPoster (Islam delenda est)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Help!!!
Looks like I over watered the 15’ honey locust trees I planted last fall.
Has anyone had any success or tips on how to revive suffering trees?
We’re in eastern New Mexico. My soil is powdery clay. When the trees started to die back, I put a shovel in the ground. The soil on top was dry,but quite wet about 10” down. The last time I watered was 8 days ago.
What to do? Wait another week to water, or sprinkle a little water on the surface (gal or less).
Can they get really, dry dry and recover?
The trees are green under the bark, and I don’t see any sign of rot around the base.
Any help or encouragement would be deeply appreciated.


26 posted on 04/27/2012 9:58:58 AM PDT by WestwardHo
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To: Gabz
I really apologize for my comments coming off like I was fussing ... was reading back through the thread and I am not happy with the tone that came across (to me at least).

It is so frustrating that some anti-whatever zealots take advantage of a situation -- colony collapse disorder in this case -- to further a somewhat hidden agenda that they are pushing.

The tabacco-derived pesticides they are referencing can be found with several different brand labels in our equipment shed. All pesticides will kill bees if they come into direct contact with them ... DUH! they are designed to kill insects! I have used them around the property for years, and I have seven hives and two nuclear hives in my yard, that are exploding in population and healthy as all get-out. I practice totally "organic" beekeeping, which means that I do not medicate my bees at all, or use mite or beetle baits. There are actually insecticides that are placed INSIDE hives to control beetles. They look like a black plastic roach hotel. Because the bees don't come into contact with insecticide, they are not harmed.

While I have not yet read the article about Monsanto purchasing a bee research group, my first thoughts are that it is in Monsanto's best interest to do extensive research and testing on bees because they do produce agricultural chemicals. Rather than starting a 'bee department' from scratch, why not buy an existing and established research group. I may be totally wrong, but that is my first impression.

Monsanto may be many things, but they are not the monster that certain groups make them out to be. Without many of the chemicals developed and produced by Monsanto, including worm-resistant corn and weevil-proof cotton varieties, the world would be a hungrier and less-dressed place to live. Certain herbicides have advanced farming practices beyond imagination. Many don't realize how much time, equipment and fuel is saved by proper and effective use of herbicides. That makes food cheaper and more available for everyone.

Sorry, rant over.

27 posted on 04/27/2012 10:00:19 AM PDT by JustaDumbBlonde (Don't wish doom on your enemies ... plan it.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Posh - there was absolutely nothing at all wrong with your comments.

I do realize that Monsanto has done much good, but I am also aware of problems they have caused and like to cause - they are involved in the labor dept rules about kids for example -

You are far more knowledgeable than I will ever be, it just so happened that I was reading the article at the same time your bee pictures were loading here and I had been on a rant about corporate farming yesterday! call it the perfect storm for me to go off on!


28 posted on 04/27/2012 10:10:40 AM PDT by Gabz (Democrats for Voldemort.)
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To: Gabz

IMHO, Monsanto = satan.


29 posted on 04/27/2012 10:14:08 AM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Thanks for those pictures & explanation.

We are FINALLY getting some Spring rain. The gauge has just over 1.25” of soaking-in, not running off, rain in it so far, and still slowly falling.

300’ of potatoes planted; 250’ or so to go. After reading some articles, I decided to space at 15” instead of 12” this year.

3 weeks to go to “last frost”; I may risk some things, but not the really tender stuff.


30 posted on 04/27/2012 10:19:09 AM PDT by ApplegateRanch (Love me, love my guns!©)
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To: who knows what evil?; JRandomFreeper; FreedomPoster
The shade cloth I used last year was a small 50% shade cloth that my wife had purchased to shade her dogs at dog shows. The tomatoes I covered thrived and looked perfectly healthy and produced well until the first frost. I garden in buried pots because of the totally sand “ground” around here so I also moved several tomato plants to where they received shade from a tree about 60% of the time. Those plants did keep producing but didn’t look nearly as healthy as the plants that had full cover of the shade cloth for the full day. It was a dramatic lesson for me.

This year I ordered a 60% shade cloth and am currently building the frame to put it over. I used 8’ landscape timbers that we had here and set them 1 ½’ into the ground and am putting 2x3s at the top from pole to pole to drape the shade cloth over. The poles are set 8’ apart both ways. So that puts the shade cloth about 6 ½’ above the ground.

BTW I lost most of the rest of my garden which wasn’t shaded as well last year. Bottom line is, what I shaded kept producing and what I didn’t died.

31 posted on 04/27/2012 10:44:34 AM PDT by CynicalBear
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To: CynicalBear
That may extend my growing season somewhat. If money is available, I may try it.

My daughter's father-in-law (old cambodian f@rt) uses the same technique in his garden, but last year in this part of Texas.... I don't think anything helped.

/johnny

32 posted on 04/27/2012 10:49:28 AM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Our predicted April chill is at hand! The forcast keeps changing, but I’m anticipating an actual freeze, not just frost, this weekend. I’m most worried about the strawberries. I know the plants themselves are really cold-hardy, but I’m not sure about the blossoms and the undeveloped fruit, so last night I covered what I could. Today they all looked fine, although some of the other plants in Dad’s flower garden were looking worse for wear. I’ll keep covereing the berries at night until the weather warms up again. There are just so many blossoms on those plants, it’s ridiculous, we’re going to need help picking this summer!


33 posted on 04/27/2012 11:25:42 AM PDT by Ellendra ("It's astounding how often people mistake their own stupidity for a lack of fairness." --Thunt)
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To: CynicalBear

Appreciate the info...I was looking at 60-70% myself...


34 posted on 04/27/2012 11:28:37 AM PDT by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Very cool moving the bee hive. I’ve long been interested in beekeeping but never seem to have time to get started. Maybe after I retire from the rat race?

Cabbage, broccoli, cauliflower and brussels sprouts are thriving in the garden. Tomatoes and peppers are thriving in pots - is still too early to set them out - couple more weeks. Sweet corn is pegged, stand looks a bit thin but I used year-old seed so can’t complain too much. Potatoes are up and looking good.


35 posted on 04/27/2012 11:57:01 AM PDT by Augie
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Sweet potatoes finally arrived and were planted last week. A vine type Centennial along the back of one of the raised beds which is up against a fence. Bush Porto Rico along the front. Never grown them, but sounds like they grow well in a hot, wet climate like Florida was until this year.

Started pruning my palm trees this morning. One down, nine to go.

Training the limbs on my Dorsett apple tree in the front yard is coming along. Was able to remove a few of the restraints, so I no longer refer to it as the Harrison Bergeron apple.

The Anna apple in the back yard, which had such a bad year last year that I've put serious thought into yanking it out and starting over, put out blossoms everywhere. I assume that I should remove the blossoms or young fruit, since I would kind of like to see some growth this year. Or maybe I'll let it go and fall over like Charlie Brown's Christmas tree.

Man vs squirrel is pretty much a stalemate at this point. Pepper spray on the tomatoes seems to have worked, I found one bitten and dropped right at the plant, and nothing since, as compared to finding a half eaten tomato in the yard every day. However, given the number of times I have been hit by the motion detecting sprinkler, it might be advantage vermin. Habeneros are doing a good job protecting the hydroponic tomatoes.

The okra vs weed whacker contest, is, well was, decidedly one sided.

36 posted on 04/27/2012 12:15:40 PM PDT by Darth Reardon (No offense to drunken sailors)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Fantastic pictures. How do you know which pieces to select when moving the hives? What do you do with the rest?


37 posted on 04/27/2012 1:00:31 PM PDT by Sarajevo ( Alcohol does not solve any problems, but then again, neither does milk.)
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To: Sarajevo

All the vining plants (cukes, melons, squash) as well as the zucchini are coming along fine. Except for a volunteer tomato plant and one we purchased at a nursery, tomato’s seem to be struggling this year, as are the okra. Corn is coming along. About 50% of the seeds germinated and most of the plants are 18in tall. Peppers are still producing in the greenhouse. In fact, we refer to the tabasco plant as a tree. It’s 5ft tall.


38 posted on 04/27/2012 1:06:10 PM PDT by Sarajevo ( Alcohol does not solve any problems, but then again, neither does milk.)
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To: CynicalBear; JRandomFreeper

Are you all growing tomato in pots? My Julienne tomato’s produced throughout last summers’ heat with a weekly deep watering, no shade. They are in a deep bed of composted horse manure.


39 posted on 04/27/2012 1:09:19 PM PDT by Sarajevo ( Alcohol does not solve any problems, but then again, neither does milk.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Your post is absolutely fascinating! I guess you can’t get any fresher honey! Good job!


40 posted on 04/27/2012 1:12:37 PM PDT by momtothree
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

How exciting. You were able to retreve the whole hive. How much of the honey were you able to “save”? We painted a house about 10 years ago, 2 stories. It was built in the country about early 1900s. The west end of the house had a hive. We “dressed” a couple of men so they could remove the slats and expose the hive. The Menenite fellow we called was able to get the hive and the honey. It was something to see. The men then scraped the wax and residue, then lightly torched the wood to get as much resideu as we could from the frame of the house, then painted the inside frame and put the west end back in place. The two fellows who removed and replaced the slats were paid extra. It was a looong day.


41 posted on 04/27/2012 1:14:32 PM PDT by tillacum
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To: Sarajevo
No pots. If the heat isn't too bad, the tomatoes do well. Last year was a killer, though.

/johnny

42 posted on 04/27/2012 1:28:46 PM PDT by JRandomFreeper (Gone Galt)
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To: bgill

My lawn is weeds. Dallas grass, some other green stuff, some bermuda, and some St Augustine. I just mow it and hope the St Augustine takes over. During our annual BBQ the cooks do a job out there, the food is so good, I just keep the weeds, cause they always come back. Shoot, it’s green all year long.

YIPPEE, we have planted the first 3 rows of veggies and some watermelon in the Community Garden!! Now to disk more ground, and get ready for the fall/winter crops. Get more people involved. We’ve had some school kids over doing some of the ground work. I’ve been at this for 4 years, 1 year knowing where it will be, 5 months waiting for the trees and scrub brush to be removed, NOW..it’s becoming a place for everyone who wants to....plant something.


43 posted on 04/27/2012 1:32:31 PM PDT by tillacum
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

Nice pictures of a cool process! I’ve been keeping bees for most of the last 37 years and I’ve hived a few swarms but I never was willing to go quite that far. Right now I have some colonies that moved up into their winter feed boxes and I haven’t had the time or inclination to cut the comb out and plug it into the frames but it’s something that needs to be done. You’re energy is an inspiration!


44 posted on 04/27/2012 2:34:15 PM PDT by WorkingClassFilth (I'm for Churchill in 1940!)
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To: texas_mrs

Campari Tomatoes sustain me through the off season here in Benderville. I buy mine at Costco...


45 posted on 04/27/2012 4:59:16 PM PDT by tubebender (I always wanted to be somebody, but now I realize I should have been more specific.)
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To: JustaDumbBlonde

I get tired just reading and viewing your exploits!!! Oh to to be younger and blonde again...


46 posted on 04/27/2012 5:16:48 PM PDT by tubebender (I always wanted to be somebody, but now I realize I should have been more specific.)
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To: JRandomFreeper
>>but last year in this part of Texas.... I don't think anything helped.<<

Yeah, we don’t get those 100 plus days one after the other so it may have been the heat. I lived in Texas for about 5 years and remember quite well.

The shade cloth I got wasn’t all that expensive. The total for the 20x32 was only $98.85 shipped to my door. It came from http://www.greenhousemegastore.com/product/60-percent-black-bulk-shade-cloth/shade-cloth which was much cheaper than others. I didn’t get the one with the grommets already put in because I am going to staple to the frame.

47 posted on 04/27/2012 5:20:35 PM PDT by CynicalBear
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To: who knows what evil?

See post 47. I should have read your post before I posted that and included you in my response.


48 posted on 04/27/2012 5:23:29 PM PDT by CynicalBear
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To: Sarajevo

I have everything in buried pots. My tomatoes are in 4 gal pots buried to the neck with the bottom cut out. Each year I simply pull the pot up and dump the dirt into a wheelbarrow and change the dirt in the pot to keep from growing tomatoes in the same dirt. New dirt comes from my compost pile now that I have it going and the old dirt goes into the compost pile or into pots that I’m growing something else in. My way of rotating crops but their always in the same spot in my garden! LOL


49 posted on 04/27/2012 5:27:38 PM PDT by CynicalBear
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To: JustaDumbBlonde
Interesting pics of the bees. We have thirsty bees visiting our bird bath sometimes. There must be a hive around here somewhere.

Our Dutch Irises bloomed this week. The deer don't eat these so they don't need a fence!

Photobucket

I planted a few mounds of winter squash and a bit more lettuce today. These absolutely have to be in the fenced area.

50 posted on 04/27/2012 6:26:23 PM PDT by MulberryDraw (He who is the Glory of Israel does not lie or change his mind;)
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