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48 million consumers will engage in showrooming during the holidays
Internet Retailer ^ | November 14, 2012 | Bill Siwicki, Managing Editor, Mobile Commerce

Posted on 11/17/2012 1:23:44 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet

This holiday season, 48 million shoppers—about 20% of the U.S. adult population—will use their smartphones to compare prices and research products while shopping in stores, a practice known as “showrooming,” IDC Retail Insights finds in a new survey. This represents a 134% increase from 2011 when 20.5 million shoppers engaged in showrooming. IDC forecasts the number of showrooming shoppers will grow to 59 million next year, 69 million in 2014 and 78 million in 2015. This year, according to the new research, showrooming will influence $700 million to $1.7 billion in holiday retail purchases.

Big-ticket items, in particular those that consumers can easily evaluate by reading descriptions, specifications, ratings and reviews, will be the biggest target of consumers shopping with smartphones, according to the IDC report, “Business Strategy: At Hand Versus In Hand—Will Consumers Have the Upper Hand in the 2012 Holiday Showroom Showdown?” IDC surveyed 1,000 U.S. adults with Internet access.

Between 7% and 13% of consumer electronics shoppers will use their smartphones at least once in stores this season...

(Excerpt) Read more at internetretailer.com ...


TOPICS: Business/Economy; Computers/Internet
KEYWORDS: christmas; holidays; retail; shopping

1 posted on 11/17/2012 1:23:48 PM PST by 2ndDivisionVet
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Not too ethical. I guess more stores will be losing up.


2 posted on 11/17/2012 1:32:18 PM PST by MNDude
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

This consumer only going to stock up on food and other needs to ride out Obama&Co depression that starts in 2013.


3 posted on 11/17/2012 1:34:08 PM PST by Vaduz
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

if you spend 30 minutes with a camera clerk at a busy store and turn around and buy it online to save a few bucks, you are stealing from that store as if you pocketed something and walked out.
i bought an airbrush from my local hobby store so i have no problem, assuming they aren’t swamped, spending 20 minutes or so asking about techniques. we get a 15% discount for model club so, if the same model is on line for $5 less (taxes vs shipping.....) i will still buy it from the LHS. 50% sale online is a whole different matter.


4 posted on 11/17/2012 1:36:44 PM PST by bravo whiskey
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To: bravo whiskey

however given the outcome of the election and the number of takers vs makers now in amerika, ethical concerns are way down on the list for the majority of amerikans.


5 posted on 11/17/2012 1:38:45 PM PST by bravo whiskey
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To: bravo whiskey

How is it stealing?


6 posted on 11/17/2012 2:18:32 PM PST by KevinDavis (And you, be ye fruitful, and multiply; bring forth abundantly in the earth, and multiply therein.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Some dept stores have stopped stocking certain items for this reason. If it isn’t exclusive or different from the online stores in some way, they don’t want it for that reason.


7 posted on 11/17/2012 4:00:49 PM PST by Tanniker Smith (Rome didn't fall in a day, either.)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

Why would you pay up to 30% markup on an identical item that can be found on hundreds of websites? Why would you even bother listening to a sales clerk when you can read hundreds of reviews online? Big box stores are a waste of time and were pros at scamming people (rebates anyone?).


8 posted on 11/17/2012 4:23:48 PM PST by opticks
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
Really? Like, anyone really cares about this dog crap? You people sure forgot the last election in a hurry. Idiots.
9 posted on 11/17/2012 4:52:54 PM PST by hinckley buzzard
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To: bravo whiskey

Maybe since you are too lazy and disrespectful of your readers to try to use the caps key, your word words ring hallow of disrespect as well. Writing like a third grader was never cool, just stupid and lazy.


10 posted on 11/17/2012 5:00:19 PM PST by CodeToad (Liberals are bloodsucking ticks. We need to light the matchstick to burn them off.)
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To: MNDude

What is unethical about anything described here?


11 posted on 11/17/2012 5:43:23 PM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: MNDude

This is our last Christmas to avoid sales tax on Amazon purchases in Indiana. These days the UPS guy knows my dog’s name and brings him treats.


12 posted on 11/17/2012 5:46:08 PM PST by nascarnation (Baraq's bankruptcy: 2016)
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To: KevinDavis

In a way, theft of service. The store paid to provide the customer with the pre-sales work that the online house got the sale from.


13 posted on 11/17/2012 8:41:21 PM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: 5thGenTexan; bravo whiskey
No, it is not theft in any way, shape, or form, and the assertion is completely laughable. The store provides that service in hopes that they'll attain a certain close ratio with people that they talk to. The sales associate talking to you for five minutes or helping you out with a question about a product is not in any way contingent upon the shopper actually making the purchase.

Wow, I'm amazed at the sheer ignorance of some Freepers here who don't even have a basic knowledge of how the sales process works, or the difference between a prospect and a customer. You guys know less than Obama.

14 posted on 11/17/2012 9:31:30 PM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: bravo whiskey

How is it stealing? All the store has to do is agree to meet any lower prices - Wal-Mart does it at the cash registers and our local store even lets you know if something is cheaper at a store down the road and discounts to match.


15 posted on 11/18/2012 4:38:11 AM PST by trebb (Allies no longer trust us. Enemies no longer fear us.)
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To: GunRunner
Not criminal theft I agree.

But to the sales person working commission who just missed other sales giving someone the information they needed to make a purchase decision that they did online, it took money out of the pocket of someone working for a living.

Unethical in my mind.

My dad worked in retail sales much of my years at home. Base salary would not have kept us alive. Commissions were needed to make ends meet.

Stop being insulting. Your disregard for that commissioned sales person and only thought being for the store owner is why we are tagged as being only for the rich.

16 posted on 11/18/2012 9:01:32 PM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: 5thGenTexan
I'm not sure what you do for a living, but I can tell that it's not sales. None of what you've said has any grounding in reality.

When I worked at Dell, I used to get beat on price by people within the same company. Not because they were doing anything unethical, but because there were different promotions within different divisions. I'd call a potential customer about a quote I'd sent them and they'd say, "Sorry, bought it cheaper at DHS (Dell Home Services)."

Retail sales is tough, and retailers offer floor salespeople, promotions, financing, and demo units all without any sort of ethical, moral, or legal commitment to buy anything. I'm sorry that it offends your sensibilities that some people shop on price alone, but your feelings are irrelevant when it comes to the reality of the market.

17 posted on 11/19/2012 8:07:09 AM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner
I am grounded in reality. You are changing the subject.

This is not about competition; the article is about the practice of people going to a retail establishment, taking the salesperson's time to collect all information to make a purchase, then popping online on your smartphone and buy it from an online site that can sell it for less since they do not provide the sales support.

Are you ethically OK with that practice?

18 posted on 11/19/2012 8:23:28 AM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: 5thGenTexan
That's not what the article is about, so I suggest you re-read it.

The article is about people who look up products on their smartphone while shopping for them in a retail store. The article says that when help they're helped by a sales associate, they're more likely to buy in-store than online.

Of course I'm "OK" with people browsing in a store, or several stores, talking with salespeople, and buying from the cheapest merchant, whether it's online or brick and mortar. It's called being a smart consumer.

If I go to an electronics store and talk to a sales rep, and then go next door to another store and find it cheaper and buy it, there's also nothing wrong with that.

You seem to be stuck in this stone aged view of retail where brick and mortar are the "real" stores, and online merchants are illegitimately infringing on a market that is not theirs.

It's the merchants job to win the sale, and if they don't, because of price or otherwise, TS.

Your mindset reminds me of the Occupy movement. A salesperson is somehow "owed" the sale just because he talked to a potential customer for five minutes even though his price is higher, and it's "unfair" that he doesn't get the close because an online store is able to offer it cheaper even AFTER shipping costs. This may be the standard narrative at the Barack Obama School of Business, but it has absolutely no grounding in the real world.

19 posted on 11/19/2012 9:36:48 AM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner
So now I am an Occupier because I believe that if someone provides me a service, it is right to compensate them for it? Funny, I thought that was Capitalism.

I find it difficult that you work in sales. You seem to think insulting someone is the way to make your point.

But who am I but just the idiot to you. Thank you for letting me know who you work for; in your own little way you have given me pre-sales information for my future computer purchases.

20 posted on 11/19/2012 10:58:23 AM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

‘Christmas’ is not observed in my home any more...man, does it spare us a lot of grief.


21 posted on 11/19/2012 11:03:58 AM PST by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: 5thGenTexan
The Occupy parallel applies because of the entitlement mentality that you have with regard to brick and mortar merchants. I don't know what universe one must live in to think that I am obligated to purchase something from every single sales rep that I talk to.

I would love it if every time I talked to a prospect I got paid for my time. But in the real world, sales reps are paid on what they close, not how many potential customers they have conversations with. The job of the sales rep is to get the shopper to buy in the store. If they can't do that, they don't get paid; period.

22 posted on 11/19/2012 11:09:56 AM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner
I never said they were entitled. I said if they provided a service, they deserve to be compensated. You are so busy formulating your next insulting analogy to spend time reading what I am saying.

I am not talking about 5 minutes here. I know people who will tie up a sellsperson for up to an hour getting the information they needed to make a purchase then walk off and buy it online from a place that would not provide that service.

I personally make a point to ask a sellsperson if they are commissioned. If they are, and they made the case for the sale on the product, I buy from them even if I could have walked away and got it online cheaper.

I may have spent a little more money, but I can lay my head on my pillow at night knowing I did not take advantage of another person.

Sound like Occupy Wall Street to you? And to answer your question: I am in the computer industry, mainly software development but also hardware development. And you sound like someone who justifies pirating music and software with a lame argument that it only costs a few cents to press the CD anyway.

23 posted on 11/19/2012 11:39:26 AM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: 5thGenTexan
Salesmanship is not a "service". The Congressman doesn't pay the lobbyist who invites him to a cocktail reception, and you don't charge prospects who come to vendor events just because you happened to offer them advice on how and what to purchase.

Your point would have been valid if it were simply being courteous of a sales professional's time and thinking about whether or not you're taking away business from him, but you and the other guy went overboard by calling it "theft of service", or comparing it to software piracy. It's not theft at all.

Is it wrong to go to five car dealerships and test drive their top of line cars when you have no intention of buying? It's certainly not a very nice thing to do, but along with tying "up a sellsperson for up to an hour" with no intention of buying, these are extreme examples. It sounds like you need to get some new friends; I certainly don't know anyone who would do such a thing. But I don't call them thieves or insinuate that "you are stealing from that store as if you pocketed something and walked out." That's insane, and simply incorrect.

I buy from brick and mortar stores on big purchases because the value proposition is better. The online price might be cheaper, but shipping costs usually equal out, and I prefer the convenience, return policy, and warranties at the physical retailers. However, I don't think it gives me any moral or ethical high ground.

To people like you, what really goes on in the sales process might be a lot like seeing sausage made.

I racked up $700 in expenses in one night during a trade show taking a prospect and her assistants to drinks, dinner, and a show. I had clearance to offer her a better price against a competitor who offered a parallel service. I found out later that she was shopping for a better offer simply to take back to my competitor as leverage to get them to lower their cost too. She had no intention of going with my company from the get go. Was she "stealing" from me, or guilty of "theft of service" because I advised her on the different tools and bought them a boatload of hospitality that night? No, of course not. It's all part of the game.

24 posted on 11/20/2012 9:36:24 AM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner
Yes, I believe she acted unethically. I limit my behavior not just by what I am legally allowed to, but also by what is ethically appropriate to.

Abortion is legal. Does that make it ethical?

25 posted on 11/20/2012 9:43:34 AM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: 5thGenTexan
The bottom line is that brick and mortar stores are fully aware of the online price points that they're competing against. It's their job to offer a superior customer experience through salespeople, warranty and installation options, return policy, and convenience than what the customer will experience with buying something online.

If the brick and mortar stores expend their sales resources with time and energy, and they still fail to convert the sale, it is their fault. The customer is guilty of nothing other than looking out for their own interests. Is it mean and inconsiderate? Perhaps, but retail is a cutthroat business, and it's about numbers, not feelings.

26 posted on 11/20/2012 9:44:18 AM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: 5thGenTexan
I was ticked off at her tactics, but I always wear my Big Boy pants. It's nothing personal.

If you can compare where one shops and buys to theft, piracy, and ABORTION(!), then I can't imagine what you'd think about what goes on in the real estate industry.

Nothing personal, but you are the reason that salespeople rarely, if ever, bring developers or engineers on sales calls. It's a disaster waiting to happen because you don't understand how the sales process works and can often torpedo the deal because you don't understand the minds of buyers.

27 posted on 11/20/2012 9:48:58 AM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

You’d be an idiot not to do this. Of course, you shouldn’t take up sales people’s time if you’re not planning on buying, but using a mobile device to help comparison shop? Absolutely!

If I see something interesting at Sam’s Club, I check it out on Amazon right then and there — reviews and pricing. If the price difference is significant and I want to get it, I’ll go with the cheaper option. if it’s only $1 or $2 difference, I’ll get it locally and have it that day.


28 posted on 11/20/2012 9:53:36 AM PST by kevkrom (If a wise man has an argument with a foolish man, the fool only rages or laughs...)
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To: GunRunner
Good grief. The abortion analogy was simply an extreme to make the point that legal is not always ethical.

I guess you prefer to deal with people with values like your example over people with values like mine. To each is own I guess.

29 posted on 11/20/2012 9:54:10 AM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: GunRunner
Actually I was regularly involved in pre-sales work at my former employer. Since enterprise servers are bought only directly and with service agreements, the issue of buying our product elsewhere was not there. They could choose a competitor, but our stuff only came from us.

Our sales staff's biggest fear was that we would tell the customer the unvarnshed truth about the server's capabilities, or shortcomings. Engineers are trained to, and tend to be naturally inclined to be critical.

Funny thing is, most of the customers in that segment were techies and got that their were issues and nothing was perfect. If something did come out, they mainly wanted to understand what was being done to address it. They seemed most bothered by not being told, not the defect itself.

So the dance may have been counter productive in that it damaged trust.

30 posted on 11/20/2012 11:21:10 AM PST by 5thGenTexan
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To: 5thGenTexan
Our sales staff's biggest fear was that we would tell the customer the unvarnshed truth...

Bingo.

That's why I've loved having Sales Engineers in the past. You take the sales guy who has huge technical knowledge, or the technical guy who is good with women, and stick them in the in-between role where you can dial them in or take them to the meeting with you. They get comped on the team's quota and can help out with all of the stuff that is over the sales rep's head.

Those guys are worth their weight in gold.

31 posted on 11/20/2012 11:56:36 AM PST by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner

Nice that yours got comp’d. We were just doing it for the team...


32 posted on 11/20/2012 12:08:20 PM PST by 5thGenTexan
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