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How a Dog Called Obi Changed a Pennsylvania Church and Its Community
The Christian Post ^ | July 5, 2013 | Leonardo Blair

Posted on 07/07/2013 12:20:00 PM PDT by Alex Murphy

Just under two years ago, the Rev. Marion Haynes-Weller of Kreutz Creek Presbyterian Church in Pennsylvania was struggling to connect with the Hellam Township community. When she took her dog Obi to church one day in the summer of 2011 however, everything began to change.

"We knew we had children in the neighborhood and we would see them and wave to them but most of them are unchurched and they were a little uncomfortable approaching me," Haynes-Weller told The Christian Post in a recent interview about the wary relationship she once had with the small community.

"They would be here when there's nobody else at the church but as soon as people showed up they would kind of scatter," she explained.

Kreutz Creek Presbyterian Church is located on a cul-de-sac in Hellam Township, York County, a place with a population of just 6043, almost as big as some megachurches.

"I started bringing him to work with me when he was just a puppy. So the kids just hung out and played with him. And then I brought him to our casual Saturday night services too when he was really little so people knew he was around during the week and would come in to see him," said Haynes-Weller in describing how Obi got involved in her church's ministry.

As Obi grew, The Reverend began noticing little nuances in how he responded to different people he attracted to the church.

"My husband is a psychologist and they have a cat that works in their office so I was already kind of tuned into the benefits of having an animal around and I noticed that he'll snuggle up to people who are having a hard time, not just kids, but he loves children and really does well with children," said Haynes-Weller.

And Obi's presence at the Kreutz Creek Presbyterian Church has been more than intuitive.

"With the dog here and me saying 'yeah come on, come see the puppy' then the conversations started and it really only needed to start and maybe four kids and then all the children in the neighborhood knew," said Haynes-Weller.

"The attitude towards the church in the neighborhood changed. So from zero to basically the other 20 homes that are on the street now in some way being connected. So that's pretty huge," she said of the effect Obi has had on the community around the church.

"It's not just the kids but it's the parents, it's the people that don't have children who now come down and walk their dogs here and engage. It has dramatically increased the traffic in the church, on the church property, because people know that they're welcome here. They were all along, but it was hard to get that message across if they were avoiding the contact," she noted.

The church is now conducting its Vacation Bible School Obi and has been an effective resource in helping children who are learning English as a second language.

"We got a couple kids who English is their second language and they're not real comfortable talking but they can speak dog real easy," said Haynes-Weller.

"Another family has a little boy who has Down Syndrome, he and the dog have just really hit it off and have a great time playing and just snuggling up together so I really didn't have to do very much except make sure he was well behaved," she added.

Despite the excitement over Obi, Haynes-Weller explains that the opportunities the dog has opened up to present Jesus to children between ages 6 and 14 has been the most rewarding part of the church's development.

"It has tremendously increased our opportunities to interact altogether. To share Christ with them. Coming to church programs," said Haynes-Weller.

"One day we were out playing with the dog and I said, 'you know, we could come and plan to meet together and I'll have food for you. We can have lunch and say some prayers and one of the children said 'what's prayer'?'" said the Reverend.

"I said, 'it's when you talk to God' and another child said 'what's God?'"

"So we were starting from zero. And now those children come and pray and know stories from the Bible. We were acting out the story of Moses one day and none of them knew who Moses was. Many of them had heard of Jesus but weren't really sure what that was all about," she noted.

"To have them pray for each other and be prayed for, prayed with, it's just been really a wonderful thing to see God working in that way through whatever tool is in our hand and in this case. It's an 80lb Labrador," Haynes-Weller said with a laugh.


TOPICS: Mainline Protestant; Ministry/Outreach; Religion & Culture; Worship
KEYWORDS: presbyterian
"I started bringing him to work with me when he was just a puppy. So the kids just hung out and played with him. And then I brought him to our casual Saturday night services too when he was really little so people knew he was around during the week and would come in to see him," said Haynes-Weller in describing how Obi got involved in her church's ministry. As Obi grew, The Reverend began noticing little nuances in how he responded to different people he attracted to the church. "My husband is a psychologist and they have a cat that works in their office so I was already kind of tuned into the benefits of having an animal around and I noticed that he'll snuggle up to people who are having a hard time, not just kids, but he loves children and really does well with children," said Haynes-Weller. And Obi's presence at the Kreutz Creek Presbyterian Church has been more than intuitive. "With the dog here and me saying 'yeah come on, come see the puppy' then the conversations started and it really only needed to start and maybe four kids and then all the children in the neighborhood knew," said Haynes-Weller.

"The attitude towards the church in the neighborhood changed. So from zero to basically the other 20 homes that are on the street now in some way being connected. So that's pretty huge," she said of the effect Obi has had on the community around the church. "It's not just the kids but it's the parents, it's the people that don't have children who now come down and walk their dogs here and engage. It has dramatically increased the traffic in the church, on the church property, because people know that they're welcome here. They were all along, but it was hard to get that message across if they were avoiding the contact," she noted.... "To have them pray for each other and be prayed for, prayed with, it's just been really a wonderful thing to see God working in that way through whatever tool is in our hand and in this case. It's an 80lb Labrador," Haynes-Weller said with a laugh.

1 posted on 07/07/2013 12:20:00 PM PDT by Alex Murphy
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To: 2nd amendment mama

ping!

Good story!


2 posted on 07/07/2013 12:31:51 PM PDT by basil (2ASisters.org)
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To: Alex Murphy

We brought our Golden Retriever to work for more than 10 years — until the day he died. On days when we didn’t bring him, people would ask for him.

He was so good — never barked, never whined, never whimpered. He sat behind a baby gate that wasn’t even connected in the corner office where he could watch what was ging on. The coffee carrel was outside his door, and employees and visitors could find a small treat jar there for him, if they wanted to give him something. Believe me, he was alert to their comings and goings, just in case one of them would give him a morsel.


3 posted on 07/07/2013 12:36:00 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
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To: Alex Murphy

Many years ago I sometimes would take my beagle to visit my aunt in the nursing home. I always thought I was sneaking her in and probably get kicked out until the day “I got caught”. The head nurse said Sadie was perfectly welcome and bring her anytime. The nurse would take Sadie around to show the people while I visited my aunt.
A strange thing happened when Sadie showed up. People who looked half comatose and never showed any emotion would light up and exclaim “It’s a puppy!”.
Sadie could visit anytime she wanted.


4 posted on 07/07/2013 12:37:12 PM PDT by donhunt (Certified and proud "Son of a Bitch".)
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To: AnAmericanMother; Titan Magroyne; Badeye; SandRat; arbooz; potlatch; afraidfortherepublic; ...
WOOOF!

Computer Hope

The Doggie Ping list is for FReepers who would like to be notified of threads relating to all things canid. If you would like to join the Doggie Ping Pack (or be unleashed from it), FReemail me.

5 posted on 07/07/2013 12:38:45 PM PDT by Joe 6-pack (Qui me amat, amat et canem meum.)
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To: Alex Murphy

Great story, but try that now and you’ll be accused of “grooming” kids with the puppy as a lure.


6 posted on 07/07/2013 12:41:54 PM PDT by JimRed (Excise the cancer before it kills us; feed &water the Tree of Liberty! TERM LIMITS, NOW & FOREVER!)
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To: Alex Murphy

That’s it! A Lab — nothing like them!


7 posted on 07/07/2013 12:54:44 PM PDT by imardmd1 (An armed society is a polite society -- but dangerous for the fool --)
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To: Joe 6-pack

Fangs! I needed that!


8 posted on 07/07/2013 1:22:14 PM PDT by Monkey Face (No guns, no freedom. Know guns, know freedom!)
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To: Alex Murphy

My dog’s brother belongs to a church minister and he sits with him as he gives the sermon.


9 posted on 07/07/2013 1:30:32 PM PDT by freekitty (Give me back my conservative vote; then find me a real conservative to vote for)
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To: afraidfortherepublic

Our Bichon, Jack, was a loyal employee from 3 months to 11 years, when we retired and closed our small business. He was the “Morale Officer” and earned every treat offered. He changed the attitudes of our grumpiest customers. If he wasn’t up front, they’d go looking for him. “Where’s that little white dog?” If he was napping, they’d have to wake him up. Of course, we got him as a pet, but he turned out to be one of our best business investments. He’s still going strong at 14.


10 posted on 07/07/2013 1:52:25 PM PDT by peridot
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To: donhunt

This reaction occurs because most people know that pet animals are joy wrapped in fur.


11 posted on 07/07/2013 2:44:55 PM PDT by Secret Agent Man (Gone Galt; Not averse to Going Bronson.)
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To: donhunt
The Director of Nursing where I worked would bring her litter box trained miniature pot bellied pig to work. One day I could not find a patient. I looked everywhere along the three halls. The patient was wheelchair bound and not capable of verbally expressing her needs. I felt panic. Finally, I had to tell the DON that I had lost a patient. When I entered the office, there sat my patient in her wheelchair snuggling the piggy. Both were content with their eyes closed. The office was empty of personnel. I let them nap.
12 posted on 07/07/2013 3:31:22 PM PDT by Bronzy
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To: JimRed
Great story, but try that now and you’ll be accused of “grooming” kids with the puppy as a lure.

This is a female "reverend."

Not that there's anything wrong with that.

13 posted on 07/07/2013 3:32:10 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (This is a sarcasm tag for the retards unable to recognize sarcasm.)
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To: Alex Murphy

My dog is pretty sick right now and at a prayer meeting I asked for prayers for the dog. If anything happened to that dog it would just kill my wife whose health has not been good for years. She is very close the pet and “Maddy” provides her closest companionship while I am away at work. I got a very cool reception to this prayer request - as if I were being out of line. Is there anything wrong with asking for prayers for a sick animal?


14 posted on 07/08/2013 2:56:29 AM PDT by circlecity
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To: circlecity
"Is there anything wrong with asking for prayers for a sick animal?"

When King David (a man after God's own heart) was told that someone had swindled a poor man out of lamb that he treated as a daughter,he said that that 'someone' deserved death. (excuse the terrible looking run on sentence but,hopefully,you get the picture)

No,there's nothing wrong with it at all.

15 posted on 07/08/2013 3:18:15 AM PDT by mitch5501 ("make your calling and election sure: for if ye do these things ye shall never fall")
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To: JimRed
Great story, but try that now and you’ll be accused of “grooming” kids with the puppy as a lure.

Not sure what you're talking about. This IS taking place now. Go to the source and see the photos and read the rest of the story. What a great way to initiate contact and share the Word of God!

16 posted on 07/08/2013 11:27:46 AM PDT by 2nd amendment mama ( www.2asisters.org | Self defense is a basic human right!)
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To: basil

Yes it is. Thanks for the ping.


17 posted on 07/08/2013 11:28:07 AM PDT by 2nd amendment mama ( www.2asisters.org | Self defense is a basic human right!)
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To: circlecity
Is there anything wrong with asking for prayers for a sick animal?

Absolutely not! At my church that would have garnered a huge circle of people around you praying for your furbaby. I love my church family and feel blessed to be a part of them.

18 posted on 07/08/2013 11:31:56 AM PDT by 2nd amendment mama ( www.2asisters.org | Self defense is a basic human right!)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

“This is a female “reverend.”

“Not that there’s anything wrong with that.”

Well, yes there is, if you believe the Apostle Paul’s writings were inspired by God. Even though this is a dog thread, I couldn’t let that comment slip by unnoticed.


19 posted on 07/08/2013 2:40:04 PM PDT by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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To: circlecity

Find another prayer meeting-—and fast.

I’ll say a prayer for Maddy.

.


20 posted on 07/08/2013 2:45:31 PM PDT by Mears
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To: TexasRepublic

Evidently you didn’t notice my tagline, either.


21 posted on 07/08/2013 3:37:52 PM PDT by E. Pluribus Unum (This is a sarcasm tag for the retards unable to recognize sarcasm.)
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To: E. Pluribus Unum

LOL! I did overlook that.


22 posted on 07/08/2013 8:56:34 PM PDT by TexasRepublic (Socialism is the gospel of envy and the religion of thieves)
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