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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 11-04-12, Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 11-04-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 11/03/2012 8:34:58 PM PDT by Salvation

November 4, 2012

 

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Dt 6:2-6

Moses spoke to the people, saying:
"Fear the LORD, your God,
and keep, throughout the days of your lives,
all his statutes and commandments which I enjoin on you,
and thus have long life.
Hear then, Israel, and be careful to observe them,
that you may grow and prosper the more,
in keeping with the promise of the LORD, the God of your fathers,
to give you a land flowing with milk and honey.

"Hear, O Israel! The LORD is our God, the LORD alone!
Therefore, you shall love the LORD, your God,
with all your heart,
and with all your soul,
and with all your strength.
Take to heart these words which I enjoin on you today."

Responsorial Psalm Ps 18:2-3, 3-4, 47, 51

R. (2) I love you, Lord, my strength.
I love you, O LORD, my strength,
O LORD, my rock, my fortress, my deliverer.
R. I love you, Lord, my strength.
My God, my rock of refuge,
my shield, the horn of my salvation, my stronghold!
Praised be the LORD, I exclaim,
and I am safe from my enemies.
R. I love you, Lord, my strength.
The LORD lives! And blessed be my rock!
Extolled be God my savior.
You who gave great victories to your king
and showed kindness to your anointed.
R. I love you, Lord, my strength.

Reading 2 Heb 7:23-28

Brothers and sisters:
The levitical priests were many
because they were prevented by death from remaining in office,
but Jesus, because he remains forever,
has a priesthood that does not pass away.
Therefore, he is always able to save those who approach God through him,
since he lives forever to make intercession for them.

It was fitting that we should have such a high priest:
holy, innocent, undefiled, separated from sinners,
higher than the heavens.
He has no need, as did the high priests,
to offer sacrifice day after day,
first for his own sins and then for those of the people;
he did that once for all when he offered himself.
For the law appoints men subject to weakness to be high priests,
but the word of the oath, which was taken after the law,
appoints a son,
who has been made perfect forever.

Gospel Mk 12:28b-34

One of the scribes came to Jesus and asked him,
"Which is the first of all the commandments?"
Jesus replied, "The first is this:
Hear, O Israel!
The Lord our God is Lord alone!
You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
with all your soul,
with all your mind,
and with all your strength.
The second is this:
You shall love your neighbor as yourself.
There is no other commandment greater than these."
The scribe said to him, "Well said, teacher.
You are right in saying,
'He is One and there is no other than he.'
And 'to love him with all your heart,
with all your understanding,
with all your strength,
and to love your neighbor as yourself'
is worth more than all burnt offerings and sacrifices."
And when Jesus saw that he answered with understanding,
he said to him,
"You are not far from the kingdom of God."
And no one dared to ask him any more questions.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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1 posted on 11/03/2012 8:35:00 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 11/03/2012 8:45:15 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Deuteronomy 6:2-6

The Shema


(Moses said to the people,) [2] ... [F]ear the LORD your God, you and your son
and your son’s son, by keeping all his statutes and his commandments, which
I command you, all the days of your life; and that your days may be prolonged.
[3] Hear therefore, O Israel, and be careful to do them; that it may go well with
you, and that you may multiply greatly, as the LORD, the God of your fathers,
has promised you, in a land flowing with milk and honey. [4] “Hear; O Israel: The
LORD our God is one LORD; [5] and you shall love the LORD your God with all
your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might. [6] And these words
which I command you this day shall be upon your heart.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

6:1-9. This is a very moving text and one of special importance for the faith and
life of the chosen people. The high-point comes at v. 5, which is reminiscent of
other pages of the Old Testament (Deut 10:12; Hos 2:21-22; 6:6). The love which
God seeks from Israel is preceded by God’s love for Israel (cf. Deut 5:32-33).
Here we touch one of the central points of God’s revelation to mankind, both in
the Old and in the New Testament: over and above everything else, God is love
(cf., e.g., 1 Jn 4:8-16).

Verse 4 is a clear, solemn profession of monotheism, which is a distinctive fea-
ture of Israel that marks it out from the nations round about (cf. the note on 5:6-
10). The first Hebrew word of v. 4 (”shema”: “Hear”) has given its name to the fa-
mous prayer which the Israelites recited over the centuries and which is made up
largely of 6:4:9; 11:18-21 Numbers 15:37-41. Pious Jews still say it today, every
morning and evening. In the Catholic Church, vv. 4-7 are said at Compline after
first vespers on Sundays and solemnities in the Liturgy of Hours.

The exhortations in vv. 8-9 were given a literal interpretation by the Jews: this is
the origin of phylacteries and of the “mezuzah”. Phylacteries were short tassels
or tapes which were attached to the forehead and to the left arm, and each tas-
sel held a tiny box containing a biblical text, the two Deuteronomy texts of the
“Shemá” plus Exodus 3:1-10, 11-16; in our Lord’s time the Pharisees wore wider
tassels to give the impression that they were particularly observant of the Law (cf.
Mt 23:5). The “mezuzah” is a small box, attached to the doorposts of houses,
which contains a parchment or piece of paper inscribed with the two texts from
Deuteronomy referred to; Jews touch the “mezuzah” with their fingers, which
they then kiss, on entering or leaving the house.

6:5. God asks Israel for all its love. Yet, is love something that can be made the
subject of a commandment? What God asks of Israel, and of each of us, is not
a mere feeling which man cannot control; it is something that has to do with the
will. It is an affection which can and should be cultivated by taking to heart, ever-
more profoundly, our filial relationship with our Father; as the New Testament (1
Jn 4:10, 19) will later put it: “In this is love, not that we loved God but that he
loved us and sent his Son to be the expiation for our sins.[...] We love, because
he first loved us.” That is why God can indeed promulgate the precept of love; as
he does in this verse of Deuteronomy (6:5) and further on in 10:12-13.

“With all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your might” (v. 5): the wor-
ding shows that love for God should be total. Our Lord will quote these verses (4-
5), which were so familiar to his listeners, when identifying the first and most im-
portant of the commandments (cf. Mt 12:29-30).

“When someone asks him, ‘Which commandment in the Law is the greatest?’
(Mt 22:36), Jesus replies: ‘You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,
and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the greatest and first com-
mandment. And a second is like it: You shall love your neighbour as yourself.
On these two commandments hang all the Law and the prophets’ (Mt 22:37-40;
cf. Deut 6:5; Lev 19:18). The Decalogue must be interpreted in light of this two-
fold yet single commandment of love, the fullness of the Law” (”Catechism of
the Catholic Church”, 2055).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 11/03/2012 8:46:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Hebrews 7:23-28

Jesus Christ Is a Priest After the Order of Melchizedek (Continuation)


[23] The former priests were many in number, because they were prevented by
death from continuing in office; [24] but he holds his priesthood permanently,
because he continues forever. [25] Consequently he (Jesus) is able for all time
to save those who draw near to God through him, since he always lives to make
intercession for them.

[26] For it was fitting that we should have such a high priest, holy, blameless, un-
stained, separated from sinners, exalted above the heavens. [27] He has no need,
like those high priests, to offer sacrifices daily, first for his own sins and then for
those of the people; he did this once for all when he offered up himself. [28] In-
deed, the law appoints men in their weakness as high priests, but the word of the
oath which came later than the law, appoints a Son who has been made perfect
for ever.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

23-25. Christ’s priesthood is everlasting. Just as Melchizedek had no “end of life”,
so too the Son of God holds his priesthood permanently. The Levites are mere
mortal men; Christ, however, has not been instituted as priest by “bodily descent
but by the power of an indestructible life” (v. 16); that is why he can truly be said
to be a priest “for ever”. This makes sense, for death is a consequence of sin,
and Christ has conquered sin and death. Moreover, death makes it necessary for
there to be a succession of human priests in order to provide continuity; whereas
the everlasting character of Christ’s priesthood renders any further priesthood un-
necessary.

St Thomas comments that this shows Christ to be the true and perfect Priest in
the strict sense of the word, for it was impossible for the Jewish priests to be per-
manent mediators because death naturally deprived them of their priesthood. The
case of Christian priests is quite different, because they are not mediators strict-
ly speaking. There is only one Mediator, Jesus Christ; they are simply represen-
tatives of his, who act in his name. Christ is to the Levites as the perfect (which
is necessarily one) is to the imperfect (which is always multiple): “Incorruptible
things have no need to reproduce themselves [...]. Christ is immortal. As the eter-
nal Word of the Father, he abides forever: his divine eternity is passed on to his
body, for ‘being raised from the dead (he) will never die again’ (Rom 6:9). And so
‘because he continues for ever, he holds his priesthood permanently.’ Christ alone
is the true Priest; the others (priests) are his ministers” (”Commentary on Heb.,
ad loc.”).

The eternal character of Christ’s priesthood, St John Chrysostom points out,
gives us reason for great confidence: “It is as if the Apostle were saying, ‘Do not
be afraid or think that (although) he loves us and has the Father’s full confidence
he cannot live forever on the contrary, he does live forever!”’ (”Hom. on Heb.”, 13).
We can put our trust in Christ the Priest because his priesthood is an enduring
expression of his heartfelt love for all mankind: “The living Christ continues to love
us still; he loves us today, now, and he offers us his heart as the fountain of our
redemption: ‘he always lives to make intercession for (us)’ (Heb 7:25). We are al-
ways — ourselves and the entire world — embraced by the love of this heart ‘which
has loved men so much and receives such poor response from them”’ (Bl. John
Paul II, “Hom. in Sacre Coeur”, Montmartre, Paris, 1 June 1980).

Christ’s priesthood is an expression of his Love, from which it cannot be separa-
ted; since his Love is everlasting, so too is his priesthood. In the first place, his
priesthood is everlasting because it is linked to the Incarnation, which is some-
thing permanent; secondly, because Christ’s mission is that of saving all men in
all periods of history and not simply one of helping them by his teaching and his
example; thirdly, because Christ continues to be present — St Ephraem says —
not in the victims of the sacrifices of Mosaic worship, but in the prayer of the
Church (cf. “Com. in Epist. ad Haebreos, ad loc.”), particularly in the permanent
efficacy of the sacrifice of the Cross constantly renewed in the Mass, and in the
praying of the Divine Office. Finally, it is everlasting because Christ’s sacrifice is
perpetuated until the end of time in the Christian ministerial priesthood, for bi-
shops and priests “in virtue of the sacrament of Order, are consecrated as true
priests of the New Testament to preach the Gospel and shepherd the faithful and
celebrate divine worship” (Vatican II, “Lumen Gentium”, 28).

Christ not only interceded for us when he was on earth: he continues to make in-
tercession for us from heaven: “This ‘always’ points to a great mystery,” St John
Chrysostom observes; “he lives not only here but also there, in heaven; not only
here and for a while, but also there, in life eternal” (”Hom. on Heb.”, 13). In sa-
ying that Christ “makes intercession” for us, the inspired text is saying that
Christ “takes the initiative, addresses the Father, presents him with a request or
a demand”, as if Christ were an advocate before the Father, a help, a defender (a
“Paraclete”: cf. 1 Jn 2:1). But in what sense does he continue to make interces-
sion for us, given that he cannot merit any more than he did when he was on this
earth? He intercedes, St Thomas replies, first by again presenting his human na-
ture to the Father, marked with the glorious signs of his passion, and then by ex-
pressing the great love and desire of his soul to bring about our salvation (cf.
“Commentary on Heb.”, 7, 4). Christ, so to speak, continues to offer the Father
the sacrifice of his longsuffering, humility, obedience and love. That is why we
can always approach him to find salvation. “Through Christ and in the Holy Spirit,
a Christian has access to the intimacy of God the Father, and he spends his life
looking for the Kingdom which is not of this world, but which is initiated and pre-
pared in this world. We must seek Christ in the Word and in the Bread, in the
Eucharist and in prayer. And we must treat him as a friend, as the real, living per-
son he is—for he is risen. Christ, we read in the Epistle to the Hebrews [Heb 7:
24-25 follows]” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing By”, 116).

26-28. These last verses form a paean in praise of Christ, summing up and roun-
ding off what has gone before. Christ is proclaimed to be “holy, blameless, un-
stained,” that is, sinless, totally devoted to God the Father, just and faithful. Sa-
cred Scripture uses similar language to describe people of outstanding holiness,
such as Zechariah and Elizabeth (cf. Lk 1:6), Simeon, who was “righteous and
devout”, Joseph of Arimathea (cf. Lk 23:50), the centurion Cornelius (cf. Acts
10:22), etc. The praise given Christ here, however, hints at a perfection which is
more than human. Christ is, at the same time, “separated from sinners”, not in
the sense that he refuses to have any dealings with them or despises them, for,
on the contrary, we know that the Pharisees abused him, saying, “Behold, a
glutton and a drunkard, a friend of tax collectors and sinners” (Mt 11:19) and
“This man receives sinners and eats with them” (Lk 15:2; cf. Mt 9-11:13 and
par.; Lk 7:34); he is “separated from sinners” because he can have no sin in him
since the presence of sin in his human nature is absolutely incompatible with the
holiness of the unique person that Christ is—the divine Word. He is the perfect em-
bodiment of all the ancient prerequisites for a priest of the true God (cf. Lev 21:4,
6, 8, 15). Christ, finally, from the point of view of his human nature also, has been
“exalted above the heavens” not only ethically speaking, by virtue of his sublime
holiness, but also in his very body, through his glorious ascension (cf. Acts 2:33-
26; 10:42); he is therefore the “Son who has been made perfect forever”.

“Who was Jesus Christ?” St Alphonsus asks himself. “He was, St Paul replies,
holy, blameless, unstained or, even better, he was holiness itself, innocence it-
self, purity itself’ (”Christmas Novena”, 4). And St Fulgentius of Ruspe extols
Christ in these beautiful terms: “He is the one who possessed in himself all that
was needed to bring about our redemption, that is, he himself was the priest and
the victim; he himself was God and the temple—the priest by whose actions we
are reconciled; the sacrifice which brings about our reconciliation; the temple
wherein we are reconciled; the God with whom we have been reconciled. There-
fore, be absolutely certain of this and do not doubt it for a moment: the only-
begotten God himself, the Word made flesh, offered himself to God on our behalf
in an odor of sweetness as sacrifice and victim — the very one in whose honor as
well as that of the Father and the Holy Spirit the patriarchs, prophets and priests
used to offer sacrifices of animals in Old Testament times; and to whom now,
that is, in the time of the New Testament, in the unity of the Father and the Holy
Spirit, with whom he shares the same unique divinity, the holy catholic Church
never ceases to offer on behalf of the entire universe the sacrifice of the bread
and wine, with faith and charity” (”De Fide Ad Petrum”, 22).

The sublimity of Christ’s priesthood is a source of encouragement, hope and holy
pride for the priests of the New Testament, given that “every priest in his own way
puts on the person of Christ and is endowed with a special grace. By this grace,
the priest, through his service of the people committed to his care and all the peo-
ple of God, is able the better to pursue the perfection of Christ, whose place he
takes. The human weakness of his flesh is remedied by the holiness of him who
became for us a high priest, ‘holy, blameless, unstained, separated from sinners’
(Heb 7:26)” (Vatican II, “Presbyterorum Ordinis”, 12). For all these reasons St
Pius X, addressing priests, wrote: “We ought, therefore, to represent the person
of Christ and fulfill the mission he has entrusted to us; and thereby attain the end
which he has set out to reach [...]. We are under an obligation, as his friends, to
have the same sentiments as Jesus Christ, who is ‘holy, blameless, unstained’
(Heb 7:26). As his ambassadors we have a duty to win over men’s minds to ac-
cept his law and his teaching, beginning by observing them ourselves; insofar as
we have a share in his power, we are obliged to set souls free from the bonds of
sin, and we must ourselves be very careful to avoid falling into sin” (St Pius X,
“Haerent Animo”, 5).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 11/03/2012 8:47:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Mark 12:28-34

The Greatest Commandment of All


[28] One of the scribes came up and heard them disputing with one another, and
seeing that He (Jesus) answered them well, asked Him, “Which commandment
is the first of all?” [29] Jesus answered, “The first is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord
our God, the Lord is one; [30] and you shall love the Lord your God with all your
heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength.’
[31] The second is this, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no
other commandment greater than these.” [32] And the scribe said to Him, “You
are right, Teacher; You have truly said that He is one, and there is no other than
He; [33] and to love with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all
the strength, and to love one’s neighbor as oneself, is much more than all whole
burnt offerings and sacrifices.” [34] And when Jesus saw that he answered wise-
ly, He said to him, “You are not far from the Kingdom of God.” And after that no
one dared to ask Him any question.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

28-34. The doctor of the law who asks Jesus this question is obviously an upright
man who is sincerely seeking the truth. He was impressed by Jesus’ earlier reply
(verses 18-27) and he wants to learn more from Him. His question is to the point
and Jesus devotes time to instructing him, though he will soon castigate the
scribes, of whom this man is one (cf. Mark 12:38ff).

Jesus sees in this man not just a scribe but a person who is looking for the truth.
And His teaching finds its way into the man’s heart. The scribe repeats what Je-
sus says, savoring it, and our Lord offers him an affectionate word which encou-
rages his definitive conversion: “You are not far from the Kingdom of God.” This
encounter reminds us of His meeting with Nicodemus (cf. John 3:1ff). On the doc-
trinal content of these two commandments cf. note on Matthew 22:34-40.

[Note on Matthew 22:34-40 states:

In reply to the question, our Lord points out that the whole law can be condensed
into two commandments: the first and more important consists in unconditional
love of God; the second is a consequence and result of the first, because when
man is loved, St. Thomas says, God is loved, for man is the image of God (cf.
“Commentary on St. Matthew”, 22:4).

A person who genuinely loves God also loves his fellows because he realizes
that they are his brothers and sisters, children of the same Father, redeemed by
the same blood of our Lord Jesus Christ: “This commandment we have from Him,
that he who loves God should love his brother also” (1 John 4:21). However, if we
love man for man’s sake without reference to God, this love will become an obsta-
cle in the way of keeping the first commandment, and then it is no longer genuine
love of our neighbor. But love of our neighbor for God’s sake is clear proof that we
love God: “If anyone says, ‘I love God’, and hates his brother, he is a liar” (1 John
4:20).

“You shall love your neighbor as yourself”: here our Lord establishes as the guide-
line for our love of neighbor the love each of us has for himself; both love of others
and love of self are based on love of God. Hence, in some cases it can happen
that God requires us to put our neighbor’s need before our own; in others, not: it
depends on what value, in light of God’s love, needs to be put on the spiritual and
material factors involved.

Obviously spiritual goods take absolute precedence over material ones, even over
life itself. Therefore, spiritual goods, be they our own or our neighbor’s, must be
the first to be safeguarded. If the spiritual good in question is the supreme one
for the salvation of the soul, no one is justified in putting his own soul into certain
danger of being condemned in order to save another, because given human free-
dom we can never be absolutely sure what personal choice another person may
make: this is the situation in the parable (cf. Matthew 25:1-13), where the wise
virgins refuse to give oil to the foolish ones; similarly St. Paul says that he would
wish himself to be rejected if that could save his brothers (cf. Romans 9:3)—an
unreal theoretical situation. However, what is quite clear is that we have to do all
we can to save our brothers, conscious that, if someone helps to bring a sinner
back to the way, he will save himself from eternal death and cover a multitude of
his own sins (James 5:20). From all this we can deduce that self-love of the right
kind, based on God’s love for man, necessarily involves forgetting oneself in order
to love God and our neighbor for God.]

30. This commandment of the Old Law, ratified by Jesus, shows, above all, God’s
great desire to engage in intimate conversation with man: “would it not have suf-
ficed to publish a permission giving us leave to love Him? [...]. He makes a stron-
ger declaration of His passionate love for us, and commands us to love Him with
all our power, lest the consideration of His majesty and our misery, which make
so great a distance and inequality between us, or some other pretext, divert us
from His love. In this He well shows that He did not leave in us for nothing the na-
tural inclination to love Him, for to the end that it may not be idle, He urges us by
His general commandment to employ it, and that this commandment may be ef-
fected, there is no living man He has not furnished him abundantly with all means
requisite thereto” (St. Francis de Sales, “Treatise on the Love of God”, Book 2,
Chapter 8).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


5 posted on 11/03/2012 8:47:57 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading Deuteronomy 6:2-6 ©
Moses said to the people: ‘If you fear the Lord your God all the days of your life and if you keep all his laws and commandments which I lay on you, you will have a long life, you and your son and your grandson. Listen then, Israel, keep and observe what will make you prosper and give you great increase, as the Lord the God of your fathers has promised you, giving you a land where milk and honey flow.
  ‘Listen, Israel: the Lord our God is the one Lord. You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your strength. Let these words I urge on you today be written on your heart.’

Psalm Psalm 17:2-4,47,51 ©
I love you, Lord, my strength.
I love you, Lord, my strength,
  my rock, my fortress, my saviour.
My God is the rock where I take refuge;
  my shield, my mighty help, my stronghold.
The Lord is worthy of all praise,
  when I call I am saved from my foes.
I love you, Lord, my strength.
Long life to the Lord, my rock!
  Praised be the God who saves me,
He has given great victories to his king
  and shown his love for his anointed.
I love you, Lord, my strength.

Second reading Hebrews 7:23-28 ©
There used to be a great number of priests under the former covenant, because death put an end to each one of them; but this one, because he remains for ever, can never lose his priesthood. It follows, then, that his power to save is utterly certain, since he is living for ever to intercede for all who come to God through him.
  To suit us, the ideal high priest would have to be holy, innocent and uncontaminated, beyond the influence of sinners, and raised up above the heavens; one who would not need to offer sacrifices every day, as the other high priests do for their own sins and then for those of the people, because he has done this once and for all by offering himself. The Law appoints high priests who are men subject to weakness; but the promise on oath, which came after the Law, appointed the Son who is made perfect for ever.

Gospel Acclamation cf.Jn6:63,68
Alleluia, alleluia!
Your words are spirit, Lord, and they are life;
you have the message of eternal life.
Alleluia!
Or Jn14:23
Alleluia, alleluia!
Jesus said: ‘If anyone loves me he will keep my word,
and my Father will love him,
and we shall come to him.’
Alleluia!

Gospel Mark 12:28-34 ©
One of the scribes came up to Jesus and put a question to him, ‘Which is the first of all the commandments?’ Jesus replied, ‘This is the first: Listen, Israel, the Lord our God is the one Lord, and you must love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind and with all your strength. The second is this: You must love your neighbour as yourself. There is no commandment greater than these.’ The scribe said to him, ‘Well spoken, Master; what you have said is true: that he is one and there is no other. To love him with all your heart, with all your understanding and strength, and to love your neighbour as yourself, this is far more important than any holocaust or sacrifice.’ Jesus, seeing how wisely he had spoken, said, ‘You are not far from the kingdom of God.’ And after that no one dared to question him any more.

6 posted on 11/03/2012 8:50:51 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Catechism's benefits explained for Year of Faith (Catholic Caucus)
A Life of Faith: Papal Theologian Speaks on the Grace of Faith
ASIA/LAOS - "Year of Faith" amid the persecutions of Christians forced to become "animists"
From no faith to a mountain-top of meaning: Father John Nepil (Catholic Caucus)
Living the Year of Faith: How Pope Benedict Wants You to Begin [Catholic Caucus]
Share Your Faith in This Year of Faith: Two keys to help you do it.
On A New Series of Audiences for The Year of Faith

Pope will deliver year-long teaching series on restoring faith
Pope Benedict XVI Grants Plenary Indulgence to Faithful [Catholic Caucus]
Pope, at Marian shrine, entrusts Year of Faith, synod to Mary (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Church Calls for Public Prayers in Offices on Fridays
Highlights in the Plan for Year of Faith: Traditional Events Will Take on Special Perspective
Catholic Church calls for public prayers in offices on Fridays
Vatican Unveils Logo for Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Miami Prelate Recalls Pope's Visit to Cuba, Looks to Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
The World-Changing Year of Faith [Catholic Caucus]
Vatican to Issue Recommendations for Celebrating Year of Faith

7 posted on 11/03/2012 8:54:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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  PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION

 


Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen

8 posted on 11/03/2012 8:55:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL
9 posted on 11/03/2012 9:06:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Welcome to 40 Days for Life: September 26 - November 4, 2012
10 posted on 11/03/2012 9:07:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
11 posted on 11/03/2012 9:20:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
12 posted on 11/03/2012 9:22:01 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


13 posted on 11/03/2012 9:33:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


14 posted on 11/03/2012 9:35:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

15 posted on 11/03/2012 9:35:57 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL


A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


16 posted on 11/03/2012 9:36:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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St. Teresa of Avila Interceding for the Souls in Purgatory, from the workshop of Peter Paul Reubens, 1577–1640


II Maccabees 12:43-46: "And making a gathering, he [Judas] sent twelve thousand drachms of silver to Jerusalem for sacrifice to be offered for the sins of the dead, thinking well and religiously concerning the resurrection, (For if he had not hoped that they that were slain should rise again, it would have seemed superfluous and vain to pray for the dead,) And because he considered that they who had fallen asleep with godliness, had great grace laid up for them. It is therefore a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from sins."

November Devotion: The Holy Souls in Purgatory

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. As a reminder of our duty to pray for the suffering faithful in Purgatory, the Church has dedicated the month of November to the Holy Souls. The Holy Souls are those who have died in the state of grace but who are not yet free from all punishment due to their unforgiven venial sins and all other sins already forgiven for which satisfaction is still to be made. They are certain of entering Heaven, but first they must suffer in Purgatory. The Holy Souls cannot help themselves because for them the night has come, when no man can work (John 9:4). It is our great privilege of brotherhood that we can shorten their time of separation from God by our prayers, good works, and, especially, the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass.

To Help the Holy Souls in Purgatory:

1. Have the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass offered up for them.

2. Pray the Rosary and or the Chaplet of Divine Marcy for them, or both.

3. Pray the Stations of the Cross.

4. Offer up little sacrifices and fasting.

5. Spread devotion to them, so that others may pray for them.

6. Attend Eucharistic Adoration and pray for them.

7. Gain all the indulgences you can, and apply them to the Holy Souls

8. Visit to a Cemetery

Say here the prayer for the day, click on torch for specific day:

SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY


Litany for the Holy Souls in Purgatory

V. The just shall be in everlasting remembrance; 
R. He shall not fear the evil hearing.
 
V. Absolve, O Lord, the souls of the faithful departed from every bond of sin, 
R. And by the help of Thy grace may they be enabled to escape the avenging judgment, 
and to enjoy the happiness of eternal life.  
V. Because in Thy mercy are deposited the souls that departed in an inferior degree of grace, 
R. Lord, have mercy.
V. Because their present suffering is greatest in the knowledge of the pain that their separation from Thee is causing Thee,
R. Lord, have mercy. 
V. Because of their present inability to add to Thy accidental glory, 
R. Lord, have mercy.
V. Not for our consolation, O Lord; not for their release from purgative pain, O God; 
but for Thy joy and the greater accidental honour of Thy throne, O Christ the King,
R. Lord, have mercy.
 
 
V. For the souls of our departed friends, relations and benefactors, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those of our family who have fallen asleep in Thy bosom, O Jesus, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who have gone to prepare our place,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. (For those who were our brothers [or sisters] in Religion,)
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For priests who were our spiritual directors,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For men or women who were our teachers in school,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who were our employers (or employees),
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who were our associates in daily toil,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For any soul whom we ever offended,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For our enemies now departed,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those souls who have none to pray for them,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those forgotten by their friends and kin,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those now suffering the most,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those who have acquired the most merit,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For the souls next to be released from Purgatory,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
 V. For those who, while on earth, were most devoted to God the Holy Ghost, to Jesus in the Most Blessed Sacrament, 
to the holy Mother of God,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all deceased popes and prelates,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all deceased priests, seminarians and religious, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all our brethren in the Faith everywhere, 
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For all our separated brethren who deeply loved Thee, and would have come into Thy household had they known the truth,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those souls who need, or in life asked, our prayers,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
V. For those, closer to Thee than we are, whose prayers we need,
R. grant light and peace, O Lord.  
 
 
V. That those may be happy with Thee forever, who on earth were true exemplars of the Catholic Faith, 
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.
V. That those may be admitted to Thine unveiled Presence, who as far as we know never committed mortal sin,     
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be housed in glory, who lived always in recollection and prayer,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be given the celestial joy of beholding Thee, who lived lives of mortification and self-denial and penance,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be flooded with Thy love, who denied themselves even Thy favours of indulgence and who made the heroic act for the souls who had gone before them,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
V. That those may be drawn up to the Beatific Vision, who never put obstacles in the way of sanctifying grace and who ever drew closer in mystical union with Thee,
R. grant them eternal rest, O Lord.  
 
 
V. Eternal rest give unto them, O Lord, 
R. And let perpetual light shine upon them. 
 
Let Us Pray 
Be mindful, O Lord, of Thy servants and handmaids, N. and N., who are gone before us with the sign of faith and repose in the sleep of grace.  To these, O Lord, 
and to all who rest in Christ, grant, we beseech Thee, a place of refreshment, light and peace, through the same Christ Our Lord.
 
Amen


All Saints or All Souls? Differences should be black and white
All Souls' Day [Catholic Caucus]
Why I Am Catholic: For Purgatory, Thank Heavens (Ecumenical)
Q and A: Why Pray for the Dead? [Ecumenical]
“….and Death is Gain” – A Meditation on the Christian View of Death [Catholic Caucus]
99 & 1/2 Won’t Do – A Meditation on Purgatory
The Month of November: Thoughts on the "Last Things"
To Trace All Souls Day (Protestants vs Catholics)

November 2 -- All Souls Day
On November: All Souls and the "Permanent Things"
"From the Pastor" ALL SAINTS & ALL SOULS
Praying for the Dead [All Souls Day] (Catholic/Orthodox Caucus)
To Trace All Souls Day [Ecumenical]
All Souls Day [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
The Roots of All Souls Day
The Commemoration of all the Faithful Departed (All Souls)
During Month of Souls, Recall Mystic, St. Gertrude the Great
All Saints and All Souls


17 posted on 11/03/2012 9:37:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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November 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: Ministers of the Gospel. That bishops, priests, and all ministers of the Gospel may bear the courageous witness of fidelity to the crucified and risen Lord.

Missionary Intention: Pilgrim Church. That the pilgrim Church on earth may shine as a light to the nations.


18 posted on 11/03/2012 9:38:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY MK 12:28B-34
The order of love
Fr. Jerome Magat

Perhaps you’ve seen a bumper sticker which reads, “Practice Random Acts of Kindness and Senseless Acts of Beauty.” Many persons who have seen this seemingly innocuous message do not realize that it describes the antithesis of how God acts in the world. God neither acts randomly nor in a senseless manner. Rather, God acts with precision and order. This precision and order is reflected in the manner in which he gave us the Ten Commandments.

When Our Lord states that the first and greatest commandment is to love God above all persons and things, He is referring to the First through Third Commandments. Similarly, when Our Lord states that the second greatest commandment is to love our neighbor as ourselves, He is referring to the Fourth through Tenth Commandments. In other words, the two great commandments are a neat summary of the Ten Commandments.

But what does this ordering of love reveal? The first of the two great commandments seems simple enough. We are commanded to love God with our whole heart, soul, mind and strength. This is the highest priority of love. It further implies that all of our other love (for self or others) find their meaning and context in our love for God. In other words, we ought to love ourselves and others out of love for God. Love for God should animate all of the other loves in our lives. An example might prove helpful: After years in a marriage, two spouses may grow tired of each other and find many reasons not to love each other. However, if the spouses are willing to call upon the graces of their sacrament, they may realize that they remain in the marriage out of love for God, the love of whom should animate their marital love. They recall their marriage vows and recommit themselves to loving each other out of love for God.

The second of the two great commandments offers an interesting dynamic. Note that our blessed Lord directs us to love our neighbor as ourselves. This statement presumes that before we can love others well, we must love ourselves in an ordinate or proper manner. There is a saying in Latin, Nemo quod dat non habet — You cannot give what you do not have. It means that proper love of self must precede love of others. This properly ordered love of self cannot be considered selfish if it is done out of love for God and with the intention of serving others. How often do we observe individuals who spend themselves on others without first properly caring for themselves? They make the mistake of thinking that we must love others before we love ourselves. A simple example demonstrates the flaw in this reasoning: Consider a mother who spends herself out of love for her child but does not bother to care for her own health. She soon finds herself unable to provide for the very child she is trying to love and thus renders herself incapable of loving that child as effectively as she could have. A mother who understands the proper order of love will make provisions for her own care so as to be able to provide for her child. This would not be an act of selfishness. Rather, it would be a case of a thoughtful mother exercising the virtue of prudence in order to love her child more devotedly.

So, it is not enough for us to love randomly and without sense. God Himself gives us the proper ordering for our love. He commands us to love Him, ourselves and others in precisely that order. Thus, our love should never be random or senseless. Instead, it should be wholly directed to God Himself, who is the source and end of all love in the world.

Fr. Magat is parochial vicar of St. William of York Parish in Stafford.


19 posted on 11/03/2012 9:53:56 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

Summarizing the Law and Love, Standing on One Foot – The Gospel of the 31st Sunday of the Year

By: Msgr. Charles Pope

There was an expression common among the Rabbis of Jesus’ time, and perhaps even now, wherein one Rabbi would ask another a question, but request the answer be given, “Standing on one foot.” Which is a Jewish way of saying, “Be brief in your answer.”

And that sort of expression may be behind the question that is raised today by the scholar of law who asks, “Which is the first of all the commandments?”

And in answering, “standing on foot,” Jesus recites the traditional Jewish Shema:

שְׁמַע יִשְׂרָאֵל יְהוָה אֱלֹהֵינוּ יְהוָה אֶחָד.
Šĕmaʿ Yisĕrāʾel Ădōnāy Ĕlōhênû Ădōnāy eḥād.

Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is Lord alone!

The text Jesus cites from Deuteronomy 6 goes on to say:

You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength. (Deut 6:4-6)

And Jesus adds, also in common Rabbinic tradition: The second is this: You shall love your neighbor as yourself.

Do not miss the point that in discussing the greatest “law,” the discussion centers immediately on the word “love.” The fact is, most of us do miss this connection between law and love.

Truth be told, most of us in Western culture put love and law just about as far apart from each other as any two things can be. For us, law is about police officers and courtrooms, it is about forcing people to do things under threat of some penalty. Love, on the other hand is about doing things willingly, because we want to, rather than because we have to.

But the fact is, as Jesus insists, and the ancient Jewish Shema articulates, love and law are in fact together, and law is an articulation of love.

Consider that a man who really loves his wife does not need a law that says “Do not break her arm, do not verbally or physically abuse her, but rather, support, protect, and encourage her.” Nevertheless, though he may not need the law in writing, he is in fact following the law of love when he observes these and other norms. There is a language of love, there is a law of love, there is an out working of love’s works and fruits. In the end, love does what love is, and love is supportive, enthusiastic, even extravagant in keeping its own norms and laws. Love does what love is.

Thus, when asked about the Law the Lord just says “love.” Yes, love God passionately, with your whole heart, soul, and strength. And as you do this, you will love what he loves, and who he loves, for this is the natural fruit of love. The more I love God, the more I begin to love his laws, his vision, what He values. Yes, all the commandments flow from this simple fact, that I love God. Real love has its roots, it has its laws, its methods, its modes.

Here then, is the whole law, standing on one foot: love God. Let His love permeate you wholly and entirely, and every other commandment will implicitly flow from the this love.

When we love God we stop asking unloving questions like:

Do I have to pray? For how long?
Do I have to go to confession? How often?
Do I have to go to mass? how often? What’s the shortest and most convenient one?
Do I have to read God’s word?
Do I have to make his teachings the priority of my life such that they overrule politics, convential thinking etc.?

Love does not ask questions like these, it already knows the answer, it already lives the answer.

Further, love does not ask:

Do I need to honor and care for my parents?
Do I need to respect lawful authority, and contribute to the common good?
Do I need to respect life from conception to natural death?
Do I need to work to cherish and safeguard the lives of others?
Do I need to live chastely and reverence the gift of sexuality that is so much at the heart of human life, and family?

No, love does not ask questions like these, it already knows the answer, it already wants to live the answer.

Love does not ask whether we must respect each other enough to speak the truth in love, to be men and women of our word. It does not wonder whether it is okay to steal from others or to fail to give them what is justly due. It does not wonder if it should be generous to the poor and needy rather than greedy, or whether to be appreciative and satisfied rather than covetous.

No, love does not need to ask these questions, it does not wonder these things. It knows the answer.

Love is the Law, standing on one foot, and all the rest is commentary.

Now God is merciful and does supply the commentary, in His Scriptures and the vast Tradition of the Church. Praise God for it all.

But honestly, listen to the way most of us talk and think. The saints say, “If God wants it, I want it. If God doesn’t want it, I don’t want it.” Is that the way most of us talk? Hmm…most of us are heard to say, “How come I can’t have it? It’s not so bad…..everybody else is doing it.” Doesn’t really sound like lovers talking does it? My, My, My. Somehow the saints knew the Law of God, and could say it standing on one foot. How about us?

All the commentary is nice, and surely needed. But don’t miss the point: You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength, and your neighbor as yourself.

Love is the Law, and the Law is to love.


20 posted on 11/03/2012 10:18:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #21 Removed by Moderator

To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Deuteronomy 6:2-6 II: Hebrews 7:23-28
Gospel
Mark 12:28-34

28 And one of the scribes came up and heard them disputing with one another, and seeing that he answered them well, asked him, "Which commandment is the first of all?"
29 Jesus answered, "The first is, 'Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one;
30 and you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength.'
31 The second is this, 'You shall love your neighbor as yourself.' There is no other commandment greater than these."
32 And the scribe said to him, "You are right, Teacher; you have truly said that he is one, and there is no other but he;
33 and to love him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the strength, and to love one's neighbor as oneself, is much more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices."
34 And when Jesus saw that he answered wisely, he said to him, "You are not far from the kingdom of God." And after that no one dared to ask him any question.


Interesting Details
  • (v.29) The daily Jewish prayer begins with the phrase "Shema Ysrael (Hear O Israel)". It is the reminder of the covenant the Lord had made with his people on the mountain at Sinai where He gave them the commandments (cf. Deut 6:4,5).
  • (v.30) In response to the scribe question, Jesus did not seek to prioritize among the 613 acknowledged commandments of Judaism. Instead, Jesus went to the heart of the matter, the fundamental commandment on which all other commandments are based.
  • (v.31) The second commandment "Love your neighbor as yourself" is a summary of Leviticus 19 where the Lord instructed the Israelites how to conduct their daily lives.
  • (v.34) The scribe's recognition that "love your neighbor… is more important than all the burnt offering and sacrifices" brought him near the Reign of God which Jesus had announced through his words and actions.

One Main Point

All commandments are meaningless if the commandment of love is not understood. That is why Jesus' last instruction for his disciples was to love one another (cf. Jn 15:12,17).


Reflections
  1. In the three love relationships (with God, with neighbors, and self) where are your strongest? The weakest?
  2. What have you found that helps you to grow in love of God and of other?

22 posted on 11/03/2012 10:23:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Thirty-first Sunday

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time
November 5th, 2006 Deuteronomy 6:2-6; Hebrews 7:23-28: Psalm 17; Mark 12:28-34
 

Deuteronomy 6:2-6; Hebrews 7:23-28: Psalm 17; Mark 12:28-34

Theme of the Readings
Today’s first reading introduces us to the beginning of the great Shemá ("Hear, o Israel"), the prayer Jews recite three times a day. This prayer contains the most basic tenets of Judaism: belief in one God (v. 4) and obedience to him in love (v. 5). For the Jewish mind, "hear" brings with it the sense of “obey!” Finally, it reminds them of the covenant God made with them (vv. 10-12). In the Old Testament, love for God and for neighbor were separate entities. Christ, however, unites them. For the love active in Christians is not simply human love, but theological charity which has two subjects, the human and the divine.


Doctrinal Message
In the Old Testament, loving obedience as demanded of the sons of Israel and the love expected of them was not universal. It stopped with their enemies. Certainly, Leviticus stipulates love of neighbor (see 19:18) but as has been made clear, it was not always clear who one’s neighbor was (“Who is my neighbor?” Luke 10:29). Christ’s appearance brings a new reality to the fore. The love God expects of us for himself and for others is the same love. Such love is the key and the summit of the New Law. According to the New Law, love for God implies unyielding love for neighbor, and is, indeed, the proof of love’s authenticity, “since a man who does not love the brother he can see he cannot love God, whom he cannot see” (1 John 4:20).


Charity in Christian life becomes the content and the realization of every moral demand (Galatians 4:14; Romans 13:8 ff.; Colossians 3:14). It is the fullness of the Law and God’s commandments (John 15:12; 1 John 5) as well as the multifaceted proof of authentic faith, for “faith without works is a dead faith” (James 2:16), and “what matters is faith that makes its power felt through love” (Galatians 5:6). It couldn’t be clearer. True faith in God results in a flourishing of charity towards him and, subsequently, to everyone else.


Christian love is not philanthropy or “being nice.” It is a theological reality which has two subjects: God who dwells in the person in a state of grace, and man working together in one enterprise. Its model is God, made visible in Jesus Christ. Imitation of Christ’s love is our universal vocation and path to holiness. His love was universal (see Matthew 5:44; Ephesians 5:1ff.; 1 John 4:11 ff.), but it is above all a theological reality in its source: God’s indwelling in our souls, which makes it possible for God to love through us. Only in God’s grace, only in communion of life with God can we realistically expect to fulfill his commandments (not suggestions, by the way) “Be merciful as your heavenly Father is merciful” (Luke 6:36), “Be perfect as your heavenly Father is perfect” (Matthew 5:48), “Love one another as I have loved you” (John 13: 34).


One might ask if love can be “commanded.” It is a valid question answered by our Holy Father: “Love can be ‘commanded’ because it has first been given” (Deus Caritas Est, 14). The link between love for God and love for neighbor is central, therefore, to our following Christ. Just as this concept might be difficult to grasp, so it is just as difficult to put it into practice. Every epoch of Church history has shown us how we run the risk of partially veiling one love as if it were in favor of the other love. We often hear the call to “brotherly love” and sometimes the call of unyielding love – personal love – for God is understood as being included simply in the act of “brotherly love.” But if conscious love for God is not foremost, then the love for our brothers ceases to be divine. And we are capable of little more than well meaning philanthropy.


Divine love unites us to God and makes us abide in him as he abides in us (see 1 John 4:16). It is the created participation in the infinite love with which God loves himself: the love which the Father gives his Son, the love which the Son returns to him, and by which each loves the other in the Holy Spirit. Divine love is our introduction into a Trinitarian existence, inserting us into God’s movement of love within the bosom of the Blessed Trinity. Having been inducted into active participation in Trinitarian life, we are enabled to share in the infinite love of the divine Persons. Friendship with God is not casual but all consuming. Charity towards neighbor is fruit of this divine dynamism within us.



Pastoral Applications
God’s invitation to intimacy demands reciprocal love. He has gone before us and loved us first, infusing his own life into us and thus enabling us to love infinitely. Correspondence with this grace requires purity of heart, mind and body. This purity is not limited to the area of Christian chastity – to which we are all called – but an even more subtle purity of intention. Thomas Aquinas says, “God is the motive for loving one’s neighbor, which proves that the act by which we love God is the same as that by which we love our neighbor,” (S. Th. II-II, q. 25, a. 1). In other words, love purified by grace precludes using people or self-seeking in human relations. Far from seeing others as objects we see them as objects of God’s infinite love who merit nothing less from us. In spite of his faults, in spite of the annoyance and difficulties he may cause us, our vocation calls us to look beyond all that and see the big picture: God in my neighbor.


It’s a good idea to ask ourselves why we do not love the people we should love. But perhaps even more telling is the question of why we love the people we profess to love. If my love for somebody is based on how he treats me, on what he thinks of me, on what he does for me, or whatever human qualities he might have that I especially appreciate, then we can be sure that this is not divine love, but merely human love. “For if you love those who love you, what reward have you? Do not even the tax collectors do the same? And if you greet only your brethren, what more are you doing than others? Do not even the Gentiles do the same? You, therefore, must be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect” (Matthew 5:46-48). Again St. Thomas says “Love of neighbor is not meritorious if the neighbor is not loved because of God” (S. Th. II-II, q. 27, a.8).
It’s easy to deceive ourselves, thinking we have great charity because we are generous to those we naturally love. If we really want our love to be divine, we have to transcend the natural and contemplate our neighbor from the perspective of God’s love, thus loving him in relation to God and because of God. Only in this way will our love be authentically theological charity, the same act with which we love God.


23 posted on 11/03/2012 10:26:55 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Sunday, November 04, 2012
Thirty-First Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Deuteronomy 6:2-6
Psalm 18:2-4, 47, 51
Hebrews 7:23-28
Mark 12:28-34

Do not be suspicious of your brother, for you will lose purity of heart!!

-- St. John of the Cross


24 posted on 11/03/2012 10:27:50 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


25 posted on 11/03/2012 10:29:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Nov 04, Invitatory for Thirty-First Sunday of Ordinary Time

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, chief shepherd of the flock, alleluia.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did
in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah
they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us worship Christ, chief shepherd of the flock, alleluia.

26 posted on 11/04/2012 2:57:19 AM PST by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Nov 04, Office of Readings for Sunday of the 31st week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 615
Proper of Seasons: 468
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, 942

Christian Prayer:
Does not contain Office of Readings.

Office of Readings for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

King of glory, King of peace,
I will love Thee;
And that love may never cease,
I will move Thee.
Thou hast granted my request,
Thou hast heard me;
Thou didst note my working breast,
Thou hast spared me.

Wherefore with my utmost art
I will sing Thee,
And the cream of all my heart
I will bring Thee.
Though my sins against me cried,
Thou alone didst clear me;
And alone, when they replied,
Thou didst hear me.

Seven whole days, not one in seven,
I will praise Thee;
In my heart, though not in Heaven,
I can raise Thee.
Small it is, in this poor sort
To enroll Thee:
E’en eternity’s too short
To extol Thee.

“King Of Glory, King Of Peace” performed by The Jubilate Singers ; Words: George Herbert, 1633; Music: Gwalchmai, General Seminary, Salve cordis gaudium, Jesu, meines Herzens Freud’; Meter: 74 74 D

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Psalm 145
Praise of God’s majesty

Lord, you are the Just One, who was and who is (Revelation 16:5).

I

I will give you glory, O God my King,
I will bless your name forever.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

I will bless you day after day
and praise your name forever.
The Lord is great, highly to be praised,
his greatness cannot be measured.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Age to age shall proclaim your works,
shall declare your mighty deeds,
shall speak of your splendor and glory,
tell the tale of your wonderful works.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

They will speak of your terrible deeds,
recount your greatness and might.
They will recall your abundant goodness;
age to age shall ring out your justice.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion,
slow to anger, abounding in love.
How good is the Lord to all,
compassionate to all his creatures.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Your kingdom, Lord, is an everlasting kingdom, alleluia.

II

All your creatures shall thank you, O Lord,
and your friends shall repeat their blessing.
They shall speak of the glory of your reign
and declare your might, O God,

to make known to men your mighty deeds
and the glorious splendor of your reign.
Yours is an everlasting kingdom;
your rule lasts from age to age.

Ant. Your kingdom, Lord, is an everlasting kingdom, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Your kingdom, Lord, is an everlasting kingdom, alleluia.

Ant. 3 The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

III

The Lord is faithful in all his words
and loving in all his deeds.
The Lord supports all who fall
and raises all who are bowed down.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

The eyes of all creatures look to you
and you give them their food in due time.
You open wide your hand,
grant the desires of all who live.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

The Lord is just in all his ways
and loving in all his deeds.
He is close to all who call him,
who call on him from their hearts.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

He grants the desires of those who fear him,
he hears their cry and he saves them.
The Lord protects all who love him;
but the wicked he will utterly destroy.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

Let me speak the praise of the Lord,
let all mankind bless his holy name
for ever, for ages unending.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord, be near to all who call upon you in truth and increase the dedication of those who revere you. Hear their prayers and save them, that they may always love you and praise your holy name.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Listen to my words.
Give ear to my precepts.

READINGS

First reading
From the beginning of the first book of Maccabees
1:1-24
The victory and arrogance of the Greeks

After Alexander the Macedonian, Philip’s son, who came from the land of Kittim, had defeated Darius, king of the Persians and Medes, he became king in his place, having first ruled in Greece. He fought many campaigns, captured fortresses, and put kings to death. He advanced to the ends of the earth, gathering plunder from many nations; the earth fell silent before him, and his heart became proud and arrogant. He collected a very strong army and conquered provinces, nations, and rulers, and they became his tributaries. But after all this he took to his bed, realizing that he was going to die. He therefore summoned his officers, the nobles, who had been brought up with him from his youth, to divide his kingdom among them while he was still alive. Alexander had reigned twelve years when he died.

So his officers took over his kingdom, each in his own territory, and after his death they all put on royal crowns, and so did their sons after them for many years, causing much distress over the earth.

There sprang from these a sinful offshoot, Antiochus Epiphanes, son of King Antiochus, once a hostage at Rome. He became king in the year one hundred and thirty-seven of the kingdom of the Greeks.

In those days there appeared in Israel men who were breakers of the law, and they seduced many people, saying: “Let us go and make an alliance with the Gentiles all around us; since we separated from them, many evils have come upon us.” The proposal was agreeable; some from among the people promptly went to the king, and he authorized them to introduce the way of living of the Gentiles. Thereupon they built a gymnasium in Jerusalem according to the Gentile custom. They covered over the mark of their circumcision and abandoned the holy covenant; they allied themselves with the Gentiles and sold themselves to wrongdoing.

When his kingdom seemed secure, Antiochus proposed to become king of Egypt, so as to rule over both kingdoms. He invaded Egypt with a strong force, with chariots and elephants, and with a large fleet, to make war on Ptolemy, king of Egypt. Ptolemy was frightened at his presence and fled, leaving many casualties. The fortified cities in the land of Egypt were captured, and Antiochus plundered the land of Egypt. After Antiochus had defeated Egypt in the year one hundred and forty-three, he returned and went up to Israel and to Jerusalem with a strong force. He insolently invaded the sanctuary and took away the golden altar, the lampstand for the light with all its fixtures, the offering table, the cups and the bowls, the golden censers, the curtain, the crowns, and the golden ornament on the facade of the temple. He stripped off everything, and took away the gold and silver and the precious vessels; he also took all the hidden treasures he could find. Taking all this, he went back to his own country, after he had spoken with great arrogance and shed much blood.

RESPONSORY 2 Maccabees 7:33; Hebrews 12:11

If for a little while our God is angry with us, to punish and discipline us,
he will again be at peace with his servants.

All discipline seems harsh at the time it is administered; afterward it yields the peaceful fruit of an honest life.
He will again be at peace with his servants.

Second reading
From the pastoral constitution on the Church in the modern world of the Second Vatican Council
The promotion of peace

Peace is not the mere absence of war or the simple maintenance of a balance of power between forces, nor can it be imposed at the dictate of absolute power. It is called, rightly and properly, a work of justice.

It is the product of order, the order implanted in human society by its divine founder, to be realized in practice as men hunger and thirst for ever more perfect justice.

The common good of the human race is subject to the eternal law as its primary principle, but its requirements in practice keep changing with the passage of time. The result is that peace is never established finally and for ever; the building up of peace has to go on all the time. Again, the human will is weak and wounded by sin; the search for peace therefore demands from each individual constant control of the passions, and from legitimate authority untiring vigilance.

Even this is not enough. Peace here on earth cannot be maintained unless the good of the human person is safeguarded, and men are willing to trust each other and share their riches of spirit and talent. If peace is to be established it is absolutely necessary to have a firm determination to respect other persons and peoples and their dignity, and to be zealous in the practice of brotherhood. Peace is therefore the fruit also of love; love goes beyond what justice can achieve. Peace on earth, born of love for one’s neighbor, is the sign and the effect of the peace of Christ that flows from God the Father. In his own person the incarnate Son, the Prince of Peace, reconciled all men to God through his death on the cross. In his human nature he destroyed hatred and restored unity to all mankind in one people and one body. Raised on high by the resurrection, he sent the Spirit of love into the hearts of men.

All Christians are thus urgently summoned to live the truth in love, and to join all true peacemakers in prayer and work for peace. Moved by the same spirit, we cannot but praise those who renounce violence in defense of rights, and have recourse to means of defense otherwise available to the less powerful as well, provided that this can be done without injury to the rights and obligations of others or of the community.

RESPONSORY See 1 Chronicles 29:11-12; 2 Maccabees 1:24

Yours, O Lord, is the grandeur and the power; you are exalted as ruler over all.
Bring us peace, O Lord, in our time.

O God, Creator of all things, you are awesome and strong, just and merciful.
Bring us peace, O Lord, in our time.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

Save your people, Lord, and bless your inheritance.
Govern and uphold them now and always.

Day by day we bless you.
We praise your name for ever.

Keep us today, Lord, from all sin.
Have mercy on us, Lord, have mercy.

Lord, show us your love and mercy,
for we have put our trust in you.

In you, Lord, is our hope:
And we shall never hope in vain.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Almighty and merciful God,
by whose gift your faithful offer you
right and praiseworthy service,
grant, we pray, that we may hasten
without stumbling to receive the things you have promised.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

27 posted on 11/04/2012 2:57:33 AM PST by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Nov 04, Morning Prayer for Sunday of the 31st week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 621
Proper of Seasons: 472
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, 945

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 689
Proper of Seasons: 637
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, 845

Morning Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

On this day, the first of days,
God the Father’s Name we praise;
Who, creation’s Lord and Spring
Did the world from darkness bring.

On this day the eternal Son
Over death His triumph won;
On this day the Spirit came
With His gifts of living flame.

O that fervent love today
May in every heart have sway,
Teaching us to praise aright
God, the Source of life and light.

Father, who didst fashion me
Image of Thyself to be,
Fill me with Thy love divine,
Let my every thought be Thine.

Holy Jesus, may I be
Dead and buried here with Thee;
And, by love inflamed, arise
Unto Thee a sacrifice.

Thou, who dost all gifts impart,
Shine, sweet Spirit, in my heart;
Best of gifts Thyself bestow;
Make me burn Thy love to know.

God, the blessèd Three in One,
Dwell within my heart alone;
Thou dost give Thyself to me;
May I give myself to Thee.

The audio lyrics are not an exact match. We welcome members of our community to contribute the matching lyrics.
“On this day, the first of days” by Keble College Choir; Words: From the Breviary of the Diocese of LeMans, 1748; translated by Henry W. Baker in 1861.; Music: Gott Sei Dank, Neues geistreiches Gesangbuch, by Johann A. Freylinghausen (Halle, Germany: 1704);

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

Psalm 93
Splendor of God the Creator

The Lord our mighty God now reigns supreme; let us rejoice and be glad and give him praise (Revelation 19:6-7).

The Lord is king, with majesty enrobed;
the Lord has robed himself with might,
he has girded himself with power.

Ant. Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

The world you made firm, not to be moved;
your throne has stood firm from of old.
From all eternity, O Lord, you are.

Ant. Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

The waters have lifted up, O Lord,
the waters have lifted up their voice,
the waters have lifted up their thunder.

Ant. Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

Greater than the roar of mighty waters
more glorious than the surgings of the sea,
the Lord is glorious on high.

Ant. Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

Truly your decrees are to be trusted.
Holiness is fitting to your house,
O Lord, until the end of time.

Ant. Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

All power and all authority in heaven and on earth have been given to you, Lord Jesus; you rule with decrees that are firm and trustworthy. Be with us always so that we may make disciples whose holiness will be worthy of your house.

Ant. Glorious is the Lord on high, alleluia.

Ant. 2 To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

Canticle Daniel 3:57-88, 56
Let all creatures praise the Lord

All you servants of the Lord, sing praise to him (Revelation 19:5).

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.
You heavens, bless the Lord,
All you waters above the heavens, bless the Lord.
All you hosts of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Sun and moon, bless the Lord.
Stars of heaven, bless the Lord.

Ant. To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

Every shower and dew, bless the Lord.
All you winds, bless the Lord.
Fire and heat, bless the Lord.
Cold and chill, bless the Lord.
Dew and rain, bless the Lord.
Frost and chill, bless the Lord.
Ice and snow, bless the Lord.
Nights and days, bless the Lord.
Light and darkness, bless the Lord.
Lightnings and clouds, bless the Lord.

Ant. To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

Let the earth bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Mountains and hills, bless the Lord.
Everything growing from the earth, bless the Lord.
You springs, bless the Lord.
Seas and rivers, bless the Lord.
You dolphins and all water creatures, bless the Lord.
All you birds of the air, bless the Lord.
All you beasts, wild and tame, bless the Lord.
You sons of men, bless the Lord.

Ant. To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

O Israel, bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Priests of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Servants of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Spirits and souls of the just, bless the Lord.
Holy men of humble heart, bless the Lord.
Hananiah, Azariah, Mishael, bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.

Ant. To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

Let us bless the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
Let us praise and exalt him above all for ever.
Blessed are you, Lord, in the firmament of heaven.
Praiseworthy and glorious and exalted above all for ever.

Ant. To you, Lord, be highest glory and praise for ever, alleluia.

Ant. 3 Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

Psalm 148
Praise to the Lord, the Creator

Praise and honor, glory and power for ever to him who sits upon the throne and to the Lamb (Revelation 5:13).

Praise the Lord from the heavens,
praise him in the heights.
Praise him, all his angels,
praise him, all his host.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

Praise him, sun and moon,
praise him, shining stars.
Praise him, highest heavens
and the waters above the heavens.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

Let them praise the name of the Lord.
He commanded: they were made.
He fixed them for ever,
gave a law which shall not pass away.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

Praise the Lord from the earth,
sea creatures and all oceans,
fire and hail, snow and mist,
stormy winds that obey his word;

all mountains and hills,
all fruit trees and cedars,
beasts, wild and tame,
reptiles and birds on the wing;

all earth’s kings and peoples,
earth’s princes and rulers,
young men and maidens,
old men together with children.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

Let them praise the name of the Lord
for he alone is exalted.
The splendor of his name
reaches beyond heaven and earth.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

He exalts the strength of his people.
He is the praise of all his saints,
of the sons of Israel,
of the people to whom he comes close.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord, extolled in the heights by angelic powers, you are also praised by all earth’s creatures, each in its own way. With all the splendor of heavenly worship, you still delight in such tokens of love as earth can offer. May heaven and earth together acclaim you as King; may the praise that is sung in heaven resound in the heart of every creature on earth.

Ant. Praise the Lord from the heavens, alleluia.

READING Ezekiel 37:12b-14

Thus says the Lord God: O my people, I will open your graves and have you rise from them, and bring you back to the land of Israel. Then you shall know that I am the Lord, when I open your graves and have you rise from them, O my people! I will put my spirit in you that you may live, and I will settle you upon your land; thus you shall know that I am the Lord. I have promised, and I will do it, says the Lord.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell)
A moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.
Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.

You are seated at the right hand of the Father,
have mercy on us.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
Christ, Son of the living God, have mercy on us.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and love your neighbor as yourself. There is no greater commandment than these.

Luke 1:68-79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.

He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.

He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight
all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Love the Lord your God with all your heart and love your neighbor as yourself. There is no greater commandment than these.

INTERCESSIONS

Father, you sent the Holy Spirit to enlighten the hearts of men; hear us as we pray:
Enlighten your people, Lord.

Blessed are you, O God, our light,
you have given us a new day resplendent with your glory.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

You enlightened the world through the resurrection of your Son,
through your Church shed this light on all men.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

You gave the disciples of your only-begotten Son the Spirit’s gift of understanding,
through the same Spirit keep the Church faithful to you.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

Light of nations, remember those who remain in darkness,
open their eyes and let them recognize you, the only true God.
Enlighten your people, Lord.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Almighty and merciful God,
by whose gift your faithful offer you
right and praiseworthy service,
grant, we pray, that we may hasten
without stumbling to receive the things you have promised.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

28 posted on 11/04/2012 2:57:33 AM PST by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Nov 04, Midday Prayer for Sunday of the 31st week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 623
Proper of Seasons: 472 (concluding prayer)
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, 952 (Midday)

Midday Prayer for Sunday in Ordinary Time, using Current Psalmody

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

O Lord my God! when I in awesome wonder
Consider all the worlds Thy hands have made,
I see the stars, I hear the mighty thunder,
Thy power throughout the universe displayed:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

When through the woods and forest glades I wander
And hear the birds sing sweetly in the trees;
When I look down from lofty mountain grandeur
And hear the brook and feel the gentle breeze:

Then sings my soul, my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!
Then sings my soul! my Savior God, to Thee:
How great Thou art, how great Thou art!

”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss; Originally this was a Swedish folk melody, “O Store Gud” by Carl Boberg (1859-1940) and was translated by Stuart K. Hine in 1899.
”How Great Thou Art” by Melinda Kirigin-Voss is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 In my distress I called on the Lord, and he heard my cry, alleluia.

Psalm 118
Song of joy for salvation

This Jesus is the stone which, rejected by you builders, has become the chief stone supporting all the rest (Acts 4:11).

I

Give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love endures for ever.

Let the sons of Israel say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let the sons of Aaron say:
“His love endures for ever.”
Let those who fear the Lord say:
“His love endures for ever.”

I called to the Lord in my distress;
he answered and freed me.
The Lord is at my side; I do not fear.
What can man do against me?
The Lord is at my side as my helper:
I shall look down on my foes.

It is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in men:
it is better to take refuge in the Lord
than to trust in princes.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. In my distress I called on the Lord, and he heard my cry, alleluia.

Ant. 2 The Lord’s right hand has raised me up, alleluia.

II

The nations all encompassed me;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me, compassed me about;
in the Lord’s name I crushed them.
They compassed me about like bees;
they blazed like a fire among thorns.
In the Lord’s name I crushed them.

I was hard-pressed and was falling
but the Lord came to help me.
The Lord is my strength and my song;
he is my savior.
There are shouts of joy and victory
in the tents of the just.

The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
his right hand raised me.
The Lord’s right hand has triumphed;
I shall not die, I shall live
and recount his deeds.
I was punished, I was punished by the Lord,
but not doomed to die.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord’s right hand has raised me up, alleluia.

Ant. 3 The Lord our God has let his light shine upon us, alleluia.

III

Open to me the gates of holiness:
I will enter and give thanks.
This is the Lord’s own gate
where the just may enter.
I will thank you for you have answered
and you are my savior.

The stone which the builders rejected
has become the corner stone.
This is the work of the Lord,
a marvel in our eyes.
This day was made by the Lord;
we rejoice and are glad.

O Lord, grant us salvation;
O Lord, grant success.
Blessed in the name of the Lord
is he who comes.
We bless you from the house of the Lord;
the Lord God is our light.

Go forward in procession with branches
even to the altar.
You are my God, I thank you.
My God, I praise you.
Give thanks to the Lord for he is good;
for his love endures for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord God, you have given us the great day of rejoicing: Jesus Christ, the stone rejected by the builders, has become the cornerstone of the Church, our spiritual home. Shed upon your Church the rays of your glory, that it may be seen as the gate of salvation open to all nations. Let cries of joy and exultation ring out from its tents to celebrate the wonder of Christ’s resurrection.

Ant. The Lord our God has let his light shine upon us, alleluia.

READING Romans 8:22-23

We know that all creation groans and is in agony even until now. Not only that, but we ourselves, although we have the Spirit as first fruits, groan inwardly while we await the redemption of our bodies.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Bless the Lord, my soul.
He has rescued your life from destruction.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Almighty and merciful God,
by whose gift your faithful offer you
right and praiseworthy service,
grant, we pray, that we may hasten
without stumbling to receive the things you have promised.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

29 posted on 11/04/2012 2:57:44 AM PST by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Nov 04, Evening Prayer for Sunday of the 31st week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 632
Proper of Seasons: 472
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, 956

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 694
Proper of Seasons: 638
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, 861

Evening Prayer II for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

O God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Our shelter from the stormy blast,
And our eternal home.

Under the shadow of Thy throne
Thy saints have dwelt secure;
Sufficient is Thine arm alone,
And our defense is sure.

Before the hills in order stood,
Or earth received her frame,
From everlasting Thou art God,
To endless years the same.

A thousand ages in Thy sight
Are like an evening gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
Before the rising sun.

Time, like an ever rolling stream,
Bears all its sons away;
They fly, forgotten, as a dream
Dies at the opening day.

O God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Be Thou our guard while troubles last,
And our eternal home.

O God, Our Help in Ages Past by Sheffield Cathedral Choir; Words: Isaac Watts, 1719. Music: William Croft, 1708
“O God, Our Help in Ages Past” by Sheffield Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

Psalm 110
The Messiah, king and priest

Christ’s reign will last until all his enemies are made subject to him (1 Corinthians 15:25).

The Lord’s revelation to my Master:
“Sit on my right:
your foes I will put beneath your feet.”

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

The Lord will wield from Zion
your scepter of power:
rule in the midst of all your foes.

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

A prince from the day of your birth
on the holy mountains;
from the womb before the dawn I begot you.

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

The Lord has sworn an oath he will not change.
“You are a priest for ever,
a priest like Melchizedek of old.”

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

The Master standing at your right hand
will shatter kings in the day of his great wrath.

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

He shall drink from the stream by the wayside
and therefore he shall lift up his head.

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, we ask you to give us victory and peace. In Jesus Christ, our Lord and King, we are already seated at your right hand. We look forward to praising you in the fellowship of all your saints in our heavenly homeland.

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Psalm 111
God’s marvelous works

We are lost in wonder at all that you have done for us, our Lord and mighty God (Revelation 15:3).

I will thank the Lord with all my heart
in the meeting of the just and their assembly.
Great are the works of the Lord;
to be pondered by all who love them.

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Majestic and glorious his work,
his justice stands firm for ever.
He makes us remember his wonders.
The Lord is compassion and love.

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

He gives food to those who fear him;
keeps his covenant ever in mind.
He has shown his might to his people
by giving them the lands of the nations.

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

His works are justice and truth:
his precepts are all of them sure,
standing firm for ever and ever:
they are made in uprightness and truth.

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

He has sent deliverance to his people
and established his covenant for ever.
Holy his name, to be feared.

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

To fear the Lord is the first stage of wisdom;
all who do so prove themselves wise.
His praise shall last for ever!

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Merciful and gentle Lord, you are the crowning glory of all the saints. Give us, your children, the gift of obedience which is the beginning of wisdom, so that we may do what you command and be filled with your mercy.

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Ant. 3 All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Canticle – See Revelation 19:1-7
The wedding of the Lamb

Alleluia.
Salvation, glory, and power to our God:
Alleluia.
his judgments are honest and true.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Alleluia.
Sing praise to our God, all you his servants,
Alleluia.
all who worship him reverently, great and small.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The Lord our all-powerful God is King,
Alleluia.
let us rejoice, sing praise, and give him glory.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Alleluia.
The wedding feast of the Lamb has begun,
Alleluia.
and his bride is prepared to welcome him.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

READING 1 Peter 1:3-5

Praised be the God and Father
of our Lord Jesus Christ,
he who in his great mercy
gave us new birth;
a birth unto hope which draws its life
from the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead;
a birth to an imperishable inheritance,
incapable of fading or defilement,
which is kept in heaven for you
who are guarded with God’s power through faith;
a birth to a salvation which stands ready
to be revealed in the last days.
There is cause for rejoicing here. You may for a time have to suffer the distress of many trials; but this is so that your faith, which is more precious than the passing splendor of fire-tried gold, may by its genuineness lead to praise, glory, and honor when Jesus Christ appears.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.
The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

Eternal ages praise
the greatness of your glory.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. The son of Man came to seek out and save those who were lost.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The son of Man came to seek out and save those who were lost.

INTERCESSIONS

The world was created by the Word of God, re-created by his redemption, and it is continually renewed by his love. Rejoicing in him we call out:
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

We give thanks to God whose power is revealed in nature,
and whose providence is revealed in history.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Through your Son, the herald of reconciliation, the victor of the cross,
free us from empty fear and hopelessness.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

May all those who love and pursue justice,
work together without deceit to build a world of true peace.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Be with the oppressed, free the captives, console the sorrowing, feed the hungry, strengthen the weak,
in all people reveal the victory of your cross.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

After your Son’s death and burial you raised him up again in glory,
grant that the faithful departed may live with him.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Almighty and merciful God,
by whose gift your faithful offer you
right and praiseworthy service,
grant, we pray, that we may hasten
without stumbling to receive the things you have promised.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

30 posted on 11/04/2012 2:57:54 AM PST by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Nov 04, Night Prayer for Sunday of the 31st week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, Page 1172
Vol II, Page 1628
Vol III, Page 1272
Vol IV, Page 1236

Christian Prayer:
Page 1037

Night Prayer after Evening Prayer II on Sundays and Solemnities

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:

We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

Christé, eléison
Christé, eléison

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

HYMN

O radiant Light, O Son divine
Of God the Father’s deathless face
O image of the light sublime
That fills the heavenly dwelling-place

Lord Jesus Christ, as daylight fades
As shine the lights of eventide
We praise the Father with the Son
The spirit blest and with them one.

O Son of God, the source of life
Praise is your due by night and day
Unsullied lips must raise the strain
Of your proclaimed and splendid name.

O Radiant Light by Choir of The Cathedral of the Madeleine & The Madeleine Choir School; Lyrics copyright 1973, Fides Publishers, Inc. Notre Dame, Indiana from “Morning Praise and Evensong”. Used by permission of the publisher for non-profit or devotional purposes.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

Psalm 91
Safe in God’s sheltering care

I have given you the power to tread upon serpents and scorpions (Luke 10:19).

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
and abides in the shade of the Almighty
says to the Lord: “My refuge,
my stronghold, my God in whom I trust!”

It is he who will free you from the snare
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night
nor the arrow that flies by day,
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon.

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach;
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.

Your eyes have only to look
to see how the wicked are repaid,
you who have said: “Lord, my refuge!”
and have made the Most High your dwelling.

Upon you no evil shall fall,
no plague approach where you dwell.
For you has he commanded his angels,
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you upon their hands
lest you strike your foot against a stone.
On the lion and the viper you will tread
and trample the young lion and the dragon.

Since he clings to me in love, I will free him;
protect him for he knows my name.
When he calls I shall answer: “I am with you,”
I will save him in distress and give him glory.

With length of life I will content him;
I shall let him see my saving power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

READING Revelation 22:4-5

They shall see the Lord face to face and bear his name on their foreheads. The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

GOSPEL CANTICLE

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
we have celebrated today
the mystery of the rising of Christ to new life.
May we now rest in your peace,
safe from all that could harm us,
and rise again refreshed and joyful,
to praise you throughout another day.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Blessing

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

31 posted on 11/04/2012 2:58:02 AM PST by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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To: Salvation
Mark
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Mark 12
28 And there came one of the scribes that had heard them reasoning together, and seeing that he had answered them well, asked him which was the first commandment of all. Et accessit unus de scribis, qui audierat illos conquirentes, et videns quoniam bene illis responderit, interrogavit eum quod esset primum omnium mandatum. και προσελθων εις των γραμματεων ακουσας αυτων συζητουντων ειδως οτι καλως αυτοις απεκριθη επηρωτησεν αυτον ποια εστιν πρωτη παντων εντολη
29 And Jesus answered him: The first commandment of all is, Hear, O Israel: the Lord thy God is one God. Jesus autem respondit ei : Quia primum omnium mandatum est : Audi Israël, Dominus Deus tuus, Deus unus est : ο δε ιησους απεκριθη αυτω οτι πρωτη παντων των εντολων ακουε ισραηλ κυριος ο θεος ημων κυριος εις εστιν
30 And thou shalt love the Lord thy God, with thy whole heart, and with thy whole soul, and with thy whole mind, and with thy whole strength. This is the first commandment. et diliges Dominum Deum tuum ex tota corde tuo, et ex tota anima tua, et ex tota mente tua, et ex tota virtute tua. Hoc est primum mandatum. και αγαπησεις κυριον τον θεον σου εξ ολης της καρδιας σου και εξ ολης της ψυχης σου και εξ ολης της διανοιας σου και εξ ολης της ισχυος σου αυτη πρωτη εντολη
31 And the second is like to it: Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. There is no other commandment greater than these. Secundum autem simile est illi : Diliges proximum tuum tamquam teipsum. Majus horum aliud mandatum non est. και δευτερα ομοια αυτη αγαπησεις τον πλησιον σου ως σεαυτον μειζων τουτων αλλη εντολη ουκ εστιν
32 And the scribe said to him: Well, Master, thou hast said in truth, that there is one God, and there is no other besides him. Et ait illi scriba : Bene, Magister, in veritate dixisti, quia unus est Deus, et non est alius præter eum. και ειπεν αυτω ο γραμματευς καλως διδασκαλε επ αληθειας ειπας οτι εις εστιν και ουκ εστιν αλλος πλην αυτου
33 And that he should be loved with the whole heart, and with the whole understanding, and with the whole soul, and with the whole strength; and to love one's neighbour as one's self, is a greater thing than all holocausts and sacrifices. Et ut diligatur ex toto corde, et ex toto intellectu, et ex tota anima, et ex tota fortitudine, et diligere proximum tamquam seipsum, majus est omnibus holocautomatibus, et sacrificiis. και το αγαπαν αυτον εξ ολης της καρδιας και εξ ολης της συνεσεως και εξ ολης της ψυχης και εξ ολης της ισχυος και το αγαπαν τον πλησιον ως εαυτον πλειον εστιν παντων των ολοκαυτωματων και θυσιων
34 And Jesus seeing that he had answered wisely, said to him: Thou art not far from the kingdom of God. And no man after that durst ask him any question. Jesus autem videns quod sapienter respondisset, dixit illi : Non es longe a regno Dei. Et nemo jam audebat eum interrogare. και ο ιησους ιδων αυτον οτι νουνεχως απεκριθη ειπεν αυτω ου μακραν ει απο της βασιλειας του θεου και ουδεις ουκετι ετολμα αυτον επερωτησαι

32 posted on 11/04/2012 7:34:26 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
28. And one of the scribes came, and having heard them reasoning together, and perceiving that he had answered them well, asked him, Which is the first commandment of all?
29. And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; The Lord our God is one Lord:
30. And you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength: this is the first commandment.
31. And the second is like, namely this, You shall love your neighbor as yourself. There is none other commandment greater than these.
32. And the scribe said to him, Well, Master, you have said the truth: for there is one God; and there is none other but he:
33. And to love him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the soul, and with all the strength, and to hove his neighbor as himself, is more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.
34. And when Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, he said to him, You are not far from the kingdom of God. And no man after that dare ask him any question.

GLOSS. After that the Lord confuted the Pharisees, and the Sadducees, who tempted Him, it is here shown how He satisfied the Scribe who questioned Him; wherefore it is said, And one of the scribes came, and having heard them reasoning together, and perceiving that he had answered them well, asked him, Which is the first commandment of all?

PSEUDO-JEROME; This question is only that which is a problem common to all skilled in the law, namely, that the commandments are differently set forth in Exodus, Leviticus, and Deuteronomy. Wherefore He brought forward not one but two commandments, by which, as by two paps rising on the breast of the bride, our infancy is nourished. And therefore there is added, And Jesus answered him, The first of all the commandments is, Hear, O Israel; the Lord your God is one God.

He mentions the first and greatest commandment of all; this is that to which each of us must give the first place in his heart, as the only foundation of piety, that is, the knowledge and confession of the Divine Unity, with the practice of good works, which is perfected in the love of God and our neighbor; wherefore there is added, You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your mind, and with all your soul, and with all your strength: this is the first commandment.

THEOPHYL. See how He has enumerated all the powers of the soul; for there is a living power in tire soul, which He explains, when He says, With all your soul, and to this belong anger and desire, all of which He will have us give to Divine love. There is also another power, which is called natural, to which belong nutriment and growth, and this also is all to be given to God, for which reason He says, With all your heart. There is also another power, the rational which He calls the mind, and that too is to be given whole to God.

GLOSS. The words which are added, And with all your strength, may be referred to the bodily powers it goes on: And the second is like, namely this, You shall love your neighbor as yourself.

THEOPHYL. He says, that it is like because these two commandments are harmonious one with the other, and mutually contain the other. For he who loves God, loves also His creature; but the chief of His creatures is man, wherefore he who loves God ought to love all men. But he who loves his neighbor, who so often offends him, ought much more to hove Him, who is ever giving him benefits. And therefore on account of the connection between these commandments, He adds, There is none other commandment greater than these.

It goes on, And the Scribe said to him, Well, Master, you have said the truth: for there is one God, and there is none other but he: and to love him with all the heart, and with all the soul, and with all the understanding, and with all the strength, cried to love his neighbor as himself, is more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.

BEDE; He shows when He says, this is greater than all sacrifices, that a grave question was often debated between the scribes and Pharisees, which was the first commandment, or the greatest of the Divine law; that is, some praised offering and sacrifices, others preferred acts of faith and love, because many of the fathers before the law pleased God by that faith only, which works by love. This scribe shows that he was of the latter opinion. But it continues, And when Jesus saw that he answered discreetly, he said to him, You are not far from the kingdom of God.

THEOPHYL. By which He shows that he was not perfect, for He did not say, You are within the kingdom of heaven, but, You are not far from the kingdom of God.

BEDE; But the reason why He was not far from the kingdom of God was, that he proved himself to be a favorer of that opinion, which is proper to the New Testament and to Gospel perfection.

AUG. Nor let it trouble us that Matthew says, that He who addressed this question to the Lord tempted Him; for it may be that though he came as a tempter, yet he was corrected by the answer of the Lord. Or at all events, We must not look upon the temptation as evil, and done with the intention of deceiving an enemy, but rather as the caution of a man who wished to try a thing unknown to him.

PSEUDO-JEROME; Or else, he is not far who comes with, knowledge; for ignorance is farther from the kingdom of God than knowledge; wherefore He says above to the Sadducees, you err, not knowing the Scriptures, or the power of God. it goes on: And no man after that dare ask him any questions.

BEDE; For since they were confuted in argument, they ask Him no farther questions, but take Him without any disguise, and give Him up to the Roman power. From which we understand that the venom of envy may be overcome, but can hardly lie quiet

Catena Aurea Mark 12
33 posted on 11/04/2012 7:35:33 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Savior in the Powers

From the iconostasis of the Savior-Transfiguration cathedral
Early-middle 16c.
Savior (Spassky) monastery, Yaroslavl, Russia

34 posted on 11/04/2012 7:36:28 AM PST by annalex (fear them not)
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To: All
Saint Charles Borromeo, Bishop

Saint Charles Borromeo, Bishop
Memorial
November 4th


Giovanni Battista Crespi
St. Charles Borromeo Erecting Crosses at the Gates of Milan
1602 - Oil on Canvas
Cathedral, Milan

 

(1538-1584). St. Charles was born in Italy. In 1559, he obtained a doctorate in civil and canon law; the next year--at the age of twenty-one--he was made a cardinal and was appointed Archbishop of Milan by his uncle, Pope Pius IV. He was one of the chief agents of the successful conclusion of the Council, establishing Sunday schools, house for orphans and the poor, and renewing the moral life of the clergy and religious. He established diocesan seminaries and was instrumental in their organization. He is the patron saint of seminarians.

Source: Daily Roman Missal, Edited by Rev. James Socías, Midwest Theological Forum, Chicago, Illinois ©2003

 

Collect:
Preserve in the midst of your people,
we ask, O Lord, the spirit with which you filled
the Bishop Saint Charles Borromeo,
that your Church may be constantly renewed
and, by conforming herself to the likeness of Christ,
may show his face to the world.
Who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. +Amen.

First Reading: Romans 12:3-13
For by the grace given to me I bid every one among you not to think of himself more highly than he ought to think, but to think with sober judgment, each according to the measure of faith which God has assigned him. For as in one body we have many members, and all the members do not have the same function, so we, though many, are one body in Christ, and individually members one of another. Having gifts that differ according to the grace given to us, let us use them: if prophecy, in proportion to our faith; if service, in our serving; he who teaches, in his teaching; he who exhorts, in his exhortation; he who contributes, in liberality; he who gives aid, with zeal; he who does acts of mercy, with cheerfulness. Let love be genuine; hate what is evil, hold fast to what is good; love one another with brotherly affection; outdo one another in showing honor. Never flag in zeal, be aglow with the Spirit, serve the Lord. Rejoice in your hope, be patient in tribulation, be constant in prayer. Contribute to the needs of the saints, practice hospitality.

Gospel Reading: John 10:11-16
I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep. He who is a hireling and not a shepherd, whose own the sheep are not, sees the wolf coming and leaves the sheep and flees; and the wolf snatches them and scatters them. He flees because he is a hireling and cares nothing for the sheep. I am the good shepherd; I know my own and my own know me, as the Father knows me and I know the Father; and I lay down my life for the sheep. And I have other sheep, that are not of this fold; I must bring them also, and they will heed my voice. So there shall be one flock, one shepherd.


EDITAE SAEPE
ENCYCLICAL OF POPE PIUS X
ON ST. CHARLES BORROMEO
TO THE PATRIARCHS, PRIMATES, ARCHBISHOPS,
BISHOPS, AND OTHER ORDINARIES
IN PEACE AND COMMUNION WITH THE APOSTOLIC SEE.

Venerable Brethren,

Health and the Apostolic Blessing.

1. Sacred Scripture records the divine word saying that men will remember the just man forever, for even though he is dead, he yet speaks.[1] Both in word and deed the Church has for a long time verified the truth of that saying. She is the mother and the nurse of holiness, ever renewed and enlivened by the breath of the Spirit Who dwells in us.[2] She alone conceives, nourishes, and educates the noble family of the just. Like a loving mother, she carefully preserves the memory of and affection for the saints. This remembrance is, as it were, a divine comfort which lifts her eyes above the miseries of this earthly pilgrimage so that she finds in the saints "her joy and her crown." Thus she sees in them the sublime image of her heavenly Spouse. Thus she shows her children in each age the timeliness of the old truth: "For those who love God all things work together unto good, for those who, according to his purpose, are saints through his call."[3] The glorious deeds of the saints, however, do more than afford us comfort. In order that we may imitate and be encouraged by them, one and all the saints echo in their own lives the saying of Saint Paul, "I beg you, be imitators of me, as I am of Christ."[4]

2. For that reason, Venerable Brethren, immediately after Our elevation to the Supreme Pontificate We stated in Our first encyclical that We would labor without ceasing "to restore all things in Christ."[5] We begged everyone to turn their eyes with Us to Jesus, "the apostle and high priest of our confession...the author and finisher of faith."[6] Since the majesty of that Model may be too much for fallen human nature, God mercifully gave Us another model to propose for your imitation, the glorious Virgin Mother of God. While being as close to Christ as human nature permits, she is better suited to the needs of our weak nature.[7] Over and above that, We made use of several other occasions to recall the memory of the saints. We emulated these faithful servants and ministers of God's household (each in his own way enjoying the friendship of God), "who by faith conquered kingdoms, wrought justice, obtained promises."[8] Thus encouraged by their example, we would be "now no longer children, tossed to and fro and carried about by every wind of doctrine devised in the wickedness of men, in craftiness, according to the wiles of error. Rather are we to practice the truth in love, and so grow up in all things in him who is the head, Christ."[9]

3. We have already pointed to how Divine Providence was perfectly realized in the lives of those three great doctors and pastors of the Church, Gregory the Great, John Chrysostom and Anselm of Aosta. Although they were separated by centuries, the Church was beset by many serious dangers in each of their respective ages. In recent years We celebrated all of their solemn centenaries. In a very special way, however, we commemorated Saint Gregory the Great in the encyclical of March 12, 1904, and Saint Anselm in the encyclical of April 21, 1909. In these documents We treated those points of Christian doctrine and morals found in the example and teaching of these saints which We thought were best suited to our times.

4. As We have already mentioned, [10] We are of the opinion that the shining example of Christ's soldiers has far greater value in the winning and sanctifying of souls than the words of profound treatises. We therefore gladly take this present opportunity to teach some very useful lessons from the consideration of the life of another holy pastor whom God raised up in more recent times and in the midst of trials very similar to those We are experiencing today. We refer to Saint Charles Borromeo, Cardinal of the Holy Roman Church and Archbishop of Milan, whom Paul V, of holy memory, raised to the altar of the saints less than thirty years after his death. The words of Our Predecessor are to the point: "The Lord alone performs great wonders and in recent times He has accomplished marvelous things among Us. In His wonderful dispensation He has set a great light on the Apostolic rock when He singled Charles out of the heart of the Roman Church as the faithful priest and good servant to be a model for the pastors and their flock. He enlightened the whole Church from the light diffused by his holy works. He shone forth before priests and people as innocent as Abel, pure as Enoch, tireless as Jacob, meek as Moses, and zealous as Elias. Surrounded by luxury, he exhibited the austerity of Jerome, the humility of Martin, the pastoral zeal of Gregory, the liberty of Ambrose, and the charity of Paulinus. In a word, he was a man we could see with our eyes and touch with our hands. He trampled earthly things underfoot and lived the life of the spirit. Although the world tried to entice him he lived crucified to the world. He constantly sought after heavenly things, not only because he held the office of an angel but all because even on earth he tried to think and act as an angel."[11]

5. Such are the words of praise Our Predecessor wrote after Charles' death. Now, three centuries after his canonization, "we can rightly rejoice on this day when We solemnly confer, in the name of the Lord, the sacred honors on Charles, Cardinal Priest, thereby crowning his own Spouse with a diadem of every precious stone." We agree with Our Predecessor that the contemplation of the glory (and even more, the example and teaching of the saints) will humiliate the enemy and throw into confusion all those who "glory in their specious errors."[12] Saint Charles is a model for both clergy and people in these days. He was the unwearied advocate and defender of the true Catholic reformation, opposing those innovators whose purpose was not the restoration, but the effacement and destruction of faith and morals. This celebration of the third centenary of his canonization should prove to be not only a consolation and lesson for every Catholic but also a noble incentive for everyone to cooperate wholeheartedly in that work so dear to Our heart of restoring all things in Christ.

6. You know very well, Venerable Brethren, that even when surrounded by tribulation the Church still enjoys some consolation from God. "Christ also loved the Church, and delivered himself up for her, that he might sanctify her...in order that he might present to himself the Church in all her glory, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that she might be holy and without blemish."[13] When vice runs wild, when persecution hangs heavy, when error is so cunning that it threatens her destruction by snatching many children from her bosom (and plunges them into the whirlpool of sin and impiety) - then, more than ever, the Church is strengthened from above. Whether the wicked will it or not, God makes even error aid in the triumph of Truth whose guardian and defender is the Church. He puts corruption in the service of sanctity, whose mother and nurse is the Church. Out of persecution He brings a more wondrous "freedom from our enemies." For these reasons, when worldly men think they see the Church buffeted and almost capsized in the raging storm, then she really comes forth fairer, stronger, purer, and brighter with the lustre of distinguished virtues.

7. In such a way God's goodness bears witness to the divinity of the Church. He makes her victorious in that painful battle against the errors and sins that creep into her ranks. Through this victory He verifies the words of Christ: "The gates of hell shall not prevail against it."[14] In her day-to-day living He fulfills the promise, "Behold, I am with you all days, even unto the consummation of the world."[15] Finally, He is the witness of that mysterious power of the other Paraclete (Who Christ promised would come immediately after His ascension into heaven), who continually lavishes His gifts upon her and serves as her defender and consoler in all her sorrows. This is the Spirit Who will "dwell with you forever, the Spirit of truth whom the world cannot receive, because it neither sees him nor knows him...he will dwell with you and be in you."[16] The life and strength of the Church flows forth from this font. As the ecumenical Vatican Council teaches, this divine power sets the Church above every other society by those obvious notes which mark her "as a banner raised up among the nations."[17]

8. In fact, only a miracle of that divine power could preserve the Church, the Mystical Body of Christ, from blemish in the holiness of Her doctrine, law, and end in the midst of the flood of corruption and lapses of her members. Her doctrine, law and end have produced an abundant harvest. The faith and holiness of her children have brought forth the most salutary fruits. Here is another proof of her divine life: in spite of a great number of pernicious opinions and great variety of errors (as well as the vast army of rebels) the Church remains immutable and constant, "as the pillar and foundation of truth," in professing one identical doctrine, in receiving the same Sacraments, in her divine constitution, government, and morality. This is all the more marvelous when one considers that the Church not only resists evil but even "conquers evil by doing good." She is constantly blessing friends and enemies alike. She is continually striving and ardently desiring to bring about the social and individual Christian restoration which is her particular mission in the world. Moreover, even her enemies benefit from it.

9. This wonderful working of Divine Providence in the Church's program of restoration was seen with the greatest clarity and was given as a consolation for the good especially in the century of Saint Charles Borromeo. In those days passions ran riot and knowledge of the truth was almost completely twisted and confused. A continual battle was being waged against errors. Human society, going from bad to worse, was rushing headlong into the abyss. Then those proud and rebellious men came on the scene who are "enemies of the cross of Christ . . .Their god is the belly...they mind the things of earth."[18] These men were not concerned with correcting morals, but only with denying dogmas. Thus they increased the chaos. They dropped the reins of law, and unbridled licentiousness ran wild. They despised the authoritative guidance of the church and pandered to the whims of the dissolute princes and people. They tried to destroy the Church's doctrine, constitution and discipline. they were similar to those sinners who were warned long ago: "Woe to you that call evil good, and good evil."[19] They called this rebellious riot and perversion of faith and morals a reformation, and themselves reformers. In reality, they were corrupters. In undermining the strength of Europe through wars and dissensions, they paved the way for those modern rebellions and apostasy. This modern warfare has united and renewed in one attack the three kinds of attack which have up until now been separated; namely, the bloody conflicts of the first ages, the internal pests of heresies, and finally, in the name of evangelical liberty, the vicious corruption and perversion of discipline such as was unknown, perhaps, even in medieval times. Yet in each of these combats the Church has always emerged victorious.

10. God, however, brought forth real reformers and holy men to arrest the onrushing current, to extinguish the conflagration, and to repair the harm caused by this crowd of seducers. Their many-sided zealous work of reforming discipline was especially consoling to the Church since the tribulation afflicting her was so great. Their work also proves the truth that "God is faithful and . . . with the temptation will also give you a way out ...."[20] In these circumstances God provided a pleasing consolation for the Church in the outstanding zeal and sanctity of Charles Borromeo.

11. God ordained that his ministry would be the effective and special means of checking the rebels' boldness and teaching and inspiring the Church's children. He restrained the former's mad extravagances by the example of his life and labor, and met their empty charges with the most powerful eloquence. He fanned the latter's hopes and kindled their zeal. Even from his youth he cultivated in a remarkable manner all the virtues of the true reformer which others possessed only in varying degrees. These virtues are fortitude, counsel, doctrine, authority, ability, and alacrity. He put them all in the service of Catholic truth against the attacks of error (which is precisely the mission of the Church). He revived the faith that had either become dormant or almost extinct in many by strengthening it with many wise laws and practices. He restored that discipline which had been overthrown by bringing the morals of clergy and people alike back to the ideals of Christian living. In executing all the duties of a reformer he also fulfilled the functions of the "good and faithful servant." Later he performed the works of the high priest who "pleased God in his days and was found just." He is, therefore, a worthy example for both clergy and laity, rich and poor. He can be numbered among those whose excellence as a bishop and prelate is eulogized by the Apostle Peter when he says that he became "from the heart a pattern to the flock."[21] Even before the age of twenty- three and although elevated to the highest honors and entrusted with very important and difficult ecclesiastical matters, Charles made truly wonderful daily progress in the practice of virtue through the contemplation of divine things. This sacred retirement perfected him, prepared him for later days, and caused him to shine forth as "a spectacle to the world, and angels, and men."

12. Then (again borrowing the words of Our Predecessor, Paul V), the Lord began to work His wonders in Charles. He filled him with a wisdom, justice, and burning zeal for promoting His glory and the Catholic cause. Above all, the Lord filled him with a great concern for restoring the faith in the Church universal according to the decrees of the renowned Council of Trent. That Pontiff himself, as well as all future generations, attributed the success of the Council to Charles, since even before carrying its decrees into action he was its most ardent promoter. In fact, his many vigils, trials, and labors brought its work to its ultimate completion.

13. All these things, however, were only a preparation or sort of novitiate where he trained his heart in piety, his mind in study, and his body in work (always remaining a modest and humble youth) for that life in which he would be as clay in the hands of God and His Vicar on earth. The innovators of that time despised just that kind of life of preparation. The same folly leads the modern innovators also to spurn it. They fail to see that God's wondrous works are matured in the obscurity and silence of a soul dedicated to obedience and contemplation. They cannot see that just as the hope of the harvest lies in the sowing, so this preparation is the germ of future progress.

14. As We have already hinted, this sanctity and industry prepared under such conditions in due time came to produce a truly marvelous fruit. When Charles, "good laborer that he was left the convenience and splendor of the city for the field (Milan) he was to cultivate, he discharged his duties better and better from day to day. Although the wickedness of the time had caused that field to become overrun with weeds and rank growths, he restored it to its pristine beauty. In time the Milanese Church became an example of ecclesiastical discipline."[22] He effected all these outstanding results in his work of reformation by adopting the rules the Council of Trent had only recently promulgated.

15. The Church knows very well that "the imagination and thought of man's heart are prone to evil."[23] Therefore she wages continual battle against vice and error "in order that the body of sin may be destroyed, that we may no longer be slaves to sin."[24] Since she is her own mistress and is guided by the grace which "is poured forth in our hearts by the Holy Spirit," she is directed in this conflict in thought and action by the Doctor of the Gentiles, who says, "Be renewed in the spirit of your mind...And be not conformed to this world, but be transformed in the newness of your mind, that you may discern what is the good and acceptable and perfect will of God."[25] The true son of the Church and reformer never thinks he has attained his goal. Rather, with the Apostle, he acknowledges that he is only striving for it: "Forgetting what is behind, I strain forward to what is before, I press on towards the goal, to the prize of God's heavenly call in Christ Jesus."[26]

16. Through our union with Christ in the Church we grow up "in all things in him who is the head, Christ. For from him the whole body...derives its increase to the building up for itself in love...."[27] For that reason Mother Church daily fulfills the mystery of the Divine Will which is "to be dispensed in the fullness of the times: to re-establish all things in Christ."[28]

17. The reformers that Borromeo opposed did not even think of this. They tried to reform faith and discipline according to their own whims. Venerable Brethren, it is no better understood by those whom We must withstand today. These moderns, forever prattling about culture and civilization, are undermining the Church's doctrine, laws, and practices. They are not concerned very much about culture and civilization. By using such high-sounding words they think they can conceal the wickedness of their schemes.

18. All of you know their purpose, subterfuges, and methods. On Our part We have denounced and condemned their scheming. They are proposing a universal apostasy even worse than the one that threatened the age of Charles. It is worse, We say, because it stealthily creeps into the very veins of the Church, hides there, and cunningly pushes erroneous principles to their ultimate conclusions.

19. Both these heresies are fathered by the "enemy" who "sowed weeds among the wheat"[29] in order to bring about the downfall of mankind. Both revolts go about in the hidden ways of darkness, develop along the same line, and come to an end in the same fatal way. In the past the first apostasy turned where fortune seemed to smile. It set rulers against people or people against rulers only to lead both classes to destruction. Today this modern apostasy stirs up hatred between the poor and the rich until, dissatisfied with their station, they gradually fall into such wretched ways that they must pay the fine imposed on those who, absorbed in worldly, temporal things, forget "the kingdom of God and His justice." As a matter of fact, this present conflict is even more serious than the others. Although the wild innovators of former times generally preserved some fragments of the treasury of revealed doctrine, these moderns act as if they will not rest until they completely destroy it. When the foundations of religion are overthrown, the restraints of civil society are also necessarily shattered. Behold the sad spectacle of our times! Behold the impending danger of the future! However, it is no danger to the Church, for the divine promise leaves no room for doubt. Rather, this revolution threatens the family and nations, especially those who actively stir up or indifferently tolerate this unhealthy atmosphere of irreligion.

20. This impious and foolish war is waged and sometimes supported by those who should be the first to come to Our aid. The errors appear in many forms and the enticements of vice wear different dresses. Both cause many even among our own ranks to be ensnared, seducing them by the appearance of novelty and doctrine, or the illusion that the Church will accept the maxims of the age. Venerable Brethren, you are well aware that we must vigorously resist and repel the enemy's attacks with the very weapons Borromeo used in his day.

21. Since they attack the very root of faith either by openly denying, hypocritically undermining, or misrepresenting revealed doctrine, we should above all recall the truth Charles often taught. "The primary and most important duty of pastors is to guard everything pertaining to the integral and inviolate maintenance of the Catholic Faith, the faith which the Holy Roman Church professes and teaches, without which it is impossible to please God."[30] Again: "In this matter no diligence can be too great to fulfill the certain demands of our office."[31] We must therefore use sound doctrine to withstand "the leaven of heretical depravity," which if not repressed, will corrupt the whole. That is to say, we must oppose these erroneous opinions now deceitfully being scattered abroad, which, when taken all together, are called Modernism. With Charles we must be mindful "of the supreme zeal and excelling diligence which the bishop must exercise in combating the crime of heresy."[32]

22. We need not mention the Saint's other words (echoing the sanctions and penalties decreed by the Roman Pontiffs) against those prelates who are negligent or remiss in purging the evil heresy out of their dioceses. It is fitting, however, to meditate on the conclusions he draws from these papal decrees. "Above everything else," he says, "the Bishop must be eternally on guard and continually vigilant in preventing the contagious disease of heresy from entering among his flock and removing even the faintest suspicion of it from the fold. If it should happen to enter (the Lord forbid!), he must use every means at his command to expel it immediately. Moreover, he must see to it that those infected or suspected be treated according to the pontifical canons and sanctions."[33]

23. Liberation or immunity from this disease of heresy is possible only when the clergy are properly instructed, since "faith. . . depends on hearing, and hearing on the word of Christ."[34] Today we must heed the words of truth. We see this poison penetrating through all the veins of the State (from sources where it would be the least expected) to such an extent that the causes are the same as those Charles records in the following words: "If those who associate with heretics are not firmly rooted in the Faith there is reason to fear that they will easily be seduced by the heretics into the trap of impiety and false doctrine."[35] Nowadays facility in travel and communication has proven just as advantageous for error as for other things. We are living in a perverse society of unbridled license of passions in which "there is no truth...and there is no knowledge of God,"[36] in "all the land made desolate, because there is none that considereth in the heart."[37] For that reason, borrowing the words of Charles, "we have already emphasized the importance of having all the faithful of Christ well instructed in the rudiments of Christian doctrine"[38] and have written a special encyclical letter on that extremely important subject.[39] However, We do not wish to repeat the lamentation Borromeo was moved to utter because of his burning zeal, namely, that "up until now We have received very little success in a matter of such importance." Rather, moved like him "by the enormity and danger of the task," We would once again urge everyone to make Charles his model of zeal so that he will contribute in this work of Christian restoration according to his position and ability. Fathers and employers should recall how the holy Bishop frequently and fervently taught that they should not only afford the opportunity but even consider it their duty to see that their children, servants, and employees study Christian doctrine. Clerics should remember that they must assist the parish priests in the teaching of Christian doctrine. Parish priests should erect as many schools for this same purpose as the number and needs of the people demand. They should further take care that they have upright teachers, who will be assisted by men and women of good morals according to the manner the holy Archbishop Milan prescribed.[40]

24. Obviously the need of this Christian instruction is accentuated by the decline of our times and morals. It is even more demanded by the existence of those public schools, lacking all religion, where everything holy is ridiculed and scorned. There both teachers' lips and students' ears are inclined to godlessness. We are referring to those schools which are unjustly called neutral or lay. In reality, they are nothing more than the stronghold of the powers of darkness. You have already, Venerable Brethren, fearlessly condemned this new trick of mocking liberty especially in those countries where the rights of religion and the family have been disgracefully ignored and the voice of nature (which demands respect for the faith and innocence of youth) has been stifled. Firmly resolved to spare no effort in remedying this evil caused by those who expect others to obey them (although they refuse to obey the Supreme Master of all things themselves), We have recommended that schools of Christian doctrine be erected in those cities where it is possible. Thanks to your efforts, this work has already made good progress. It is, however, very much to be desired that this work spread even more widely, with many such religious schools established everywhere and teachers of sound doctrine and good morals provided.

25. The preacher (whose duty is closely allied to the teacher of the fundamentals of religion) should also have the same qualities of sound doctrine and good morals. For that reason, when drawing up the statutes of the provincial and diocesan synods, Charles was most careful to provide preachers full of zeal and holiness to exercise "the ministry of the word." We are convinced that this care is even more urgent in our times when so many men are wavering in the Faith and some vain-glorious men, filled with the spirit of the age, "adulterate the word of God" and deprive the faithful of the food of life.

26. We must spare no pains, Venerable Brethren, in seeing that the flock does not feed on this air of foolish empty-headed men. Rather, it should be nourished with the life-giving food of "the ministers of the word." These can truly say, "On behalf of Christ...we are acting as ambassadors, God, as it were, appealing through us...be reconciled to God...we avoid unscrupulous conduct, we do not corrupt the word of God; but making known the truth, we commend ourselves to every man's conscience in the sight of God..." We are workmen "that cannot be ashamed, rightly handling the word of truth."[41] Those very holy and fruitful rules the Bishop of Milan frequently laid down for his people have a similar value for us. They can best be summarized in these words of Saint Paul: "When you heard and received from us the word of God, you welcomed it not as the word of man, but, as it truly is, the word of God, who works in you who have believed."[42]

27. "The word of God is living and efficient and keener than any two-edged sword."[43] It will not only preserve and defend the faith but also effectively motivate us to do good works since "faith...without works is dead."[44] "For it is not they who hear the Law that are just in the sight of God; but it is they who follow the Law that will be justified."[45]

28. Now in this also we see the immense difference between true and false reform. The advocates of false reform, imitating the fickleness of the foolish, generally rush into extremes. They either emphasize faith to such an extent that they neglect good works or they canonize nature with the excellence of virtue while overlooking the assistance of faith and divine grace. As a matter of fact, however, merely naturally good acts are only a counterfeit of virtue since they are neither permanent nor sufficient for salvation. The work of this kind of a reformer cannot restore discipline. On the contrary, it ruins faith and morals.

29. On the other hand, the sincere and zealous reformer will; like Charles, avoid extremes and never overstep the bounds of true reform. He will always be united in the closest bonds with the Church and Christ, her Head. There he will find not only strength for his interior life but also the directives he needs in order to carry out his work of healing human society. The function of this divine mission, which has from time immemorial been handed down to the ambassadors of Christ, is to "make disciples of all nations" both the things they are to believe as well as the things they are to do since Christ Himself said, "Observe all that I have commanded you."[46] He is "the way, and the truth, and the life,"[47] coming into the world that man "may have life, and have it more abundantly."[48] The fulfillment of these duties, however, far surpasses man's natural powers. The Church alone possesses together with her magisterium the power of governing and sanctifying human society. Through her ministers and servants (each in his own station and office), she confers on mankind suitable and necessary means of salvation.

True reformers understand this very clearly. They do not kill the blossom in saving the root. That is to say, they do not divorce faith from holiness. They rather cultivate both of them, enkindling them with the fire of charity, "which is the bond of perfection."[49] In obedience to the Apostle, they "keep the deposit."[50] They neither obscure nor dim its light before the nations, but spread far and wide the most saving waters of truth and life welling up from that spring. They combine theory and practice. By the former they are prepared to withstand the "masquerading of error" and by the latter they apply the commandments to moral activity. In such a way they employ all the suitable and necessary means for attaining the end, namely, the wiping out of sin and the perfecting "the saints for a work of ministry, for building up the body of Christ."[51] This is the purpose of every kind of instruction, government, and munificence. In a word, this is the ultimate purpose of every discipline and action of the Church. When the true son of the church sets out to reform himself and others, he fixes his eyes and heart on matters of faith and morals. On just such matters Borromeo based his reformation of ecclesiastical discipline. Thus he often referred to them in his writings, as, for example, when he says, "Following the ancient custom of the holy Fathers and sacred Councils, especially the ecumenical Synod of Trent, we have decreed many regulations on these very matters in our preceding provincial Councils."[52] In the same way, when providing for the suppression of public scandals, he declares that he is following "both the law and sacred sanctions of the sacred canons, and especially the decrees of the Council of Trent."[53]

30. However, he did not stop at that. In order to assure as much as possible that he would never depart from this rule, he customarily concluded the statutes of his provincial Synods with the following words: "We are always prepared to submit everything we have done and decreed in this provincial Synod to the authority and judgment of the Roman Church, the Mother and Mistress of all the churches."[54] The more quickly he advanced in the perfection of the active ministry the more firmly was he rooted in this resolve, not only when the Chair of Peter was occupied by his uncle, but also during the Pontificates of his successors, Pius V and Gregory XIII. He wielded his influence in having these latter elected; he was tireless in supporting their great endeavors; and he fulfilled in a perfect manner whatever they expected of him.

31. Moreover, he seconded every one of their acts with the practical means needed to realize the end in view, namely, the real reform of sacred discipline. In this respect also he proved that in no wise he resembled those false reformers who concealed their obstinate disobedience under the cloak of zeal. He began "the judgment...with the household of God."[55] He first of all restored discipline among the clergy by making them conform to certain definite laws. With this same end in view he built seminaries, founded a congregation of priests known as the Oblates, unified both the ancient and modern religious families, and convoked Councils. By these and other provisions he assured and developed the work of reform. Then he immediately set a vigorous hand to the work of reforming the morals of the people. He considered the words spoken to the Prophet as addressed to himself; "Lo, I have set thee this day...to root up and to pull down, and to waste and to destroy, and to build and to plant."[56] Good shepherd that he was, he personally set out on wearisome visitation of the churches of the province. Like the Divine Master "he went about doing good and healing." He spared no efforts in suppressing and uprooting the abuses he met everywhere either because of ignorance or neglect of the laws. He checked the rampant perversion of ideas and corruption of morals by founding schools for the children and colleges for youth. After seeing their early beginnings in Rome, he promoted the Marian societies. He founded orphanages for the fatherless, shelters for girls in danger, widows, mendicants, and men and women made destitute by sickness or old age. He opened institutions to protect the poor against tyrannical masters, usurers, and the enslavement of children. He accomplished all these things by completely ignoring the methods of those who think human society can be restored only by utter destruction, revolution, and noisy slogans. Such persons have forgotten the divine words: "The Lord is not in the earthquake."[57]

32. Here is another difference between true and false reformers which you, Venerable Brethren, have often encountered. The latter "seek their own interests, not those of Jesus Christ."[58] They listen to the deceitful invitation once addressed to the Divine Master, "Manifest thyself to the world."[59] They repeat the ambitious words, "Let us also get us a name" and in their rashness (which We unfortunately have to deplore in these days) "some priests fell in battle, while desiring to do manfully, they went out unadvisedly to fight."[60]

33. On the other hand, the true reformer "seeks not his own glory, but the glory of the one who sent him."[61] Like Christ, his Model, "he will not wrangle, nor cry aloud, neither will anyone hear his voice in the streets...He shall not be sad nor troublesome"[62] but he shall be "meek and humble of heart."[63] For that reason he will please the Lord and bring forth abundant fruit for salvation.

34. They are distinguished one from the other in yet another way. The false reformer "trusteth in man and maketh flesh his arm."[64] The true reformer places his trust in God and seeks His supernatural aid for all his strength and virtue, making his own the Apostle's words: "I can do all things in him who strengthens me."[65]

35. Christ lavishly communicates these aids, among which are especially prayer, sacrifice and the Sacraments, which "become...a fountain of water, springing up into life everlasting."[66] Since the Church has been endowed with them for the salvation of all men, the faithful man will look for them in her. False reformers, however, despise these means. They make the road crooked and, so wrapped up in reforming that they forget God, they are always trying to make these crystal springs so cloudy or arid that the flock of Christ will be deprived of their waters. In this respect the false reformers of former days are even surpassed by their modern followers. These latter, wearing the mask of religiosity, discredit and despise these means of salvation, especially the two Sacraments which cleanse the penitent soul from sin and feed it with celestial food. Let every faithful pastor, therefore, employ the utmost zeal in seeing that the benefits of such great value be held in the highest esteem. Let them never permit these two works of divine love to grow cold in the hearts of men.

36. Borromeo conducted himself in precisely that way. Thus we read in his writings: "Since the fruit of the Sacraments is so abundantly effective, its value can be explained with no little difficulty. They should, therefore, be treated and received with the greatest preparation, deepest reverence, and external pomp and ceremony."[67] His exhortations (which We have also made in Our decree, Tridentina Synodus[68]) to pastors and preachers concerning the ancient practice of frequent Holy Communion is most worthy of notice. "Pastors and preachers," the holy Bishop writes, "should take every possible opportunity to urge the people to cultivate the practice of frequently receiving Holy Communion. In this they are following the example of the early Church, the recommendations of the most authoritative Fathers, the doctrine of the Roman Catechism (which treats this matter in detail), and, finally the teaching of the Council of Trent. The last mentioned would have the faithful receive Communion in every Mass, not only spiritually but sacramentally."[69] He describes the intention and affection one should have in approaching the Sacred Banquet in the following words: "The people should not only be urged to receive Holy Communion frequently, but also how dangerous and fatal it would be to approach the Sacred Table of Divine Food unworthily."[70] It would seem that our days of wavering faith and coldness need this same fervor in a special way so that frequent reception of Holy Communion will not be accompanied by a decrease in reverence toward this great mystery. On the contrary, by this frequency a man should "prove himself, and so let him eat of that bread and drink of the cup."[71]

37. An abundant stream of grace will flow from these fonts, strengthening and nourishing even natural and human means. By no means will a Christian neglect those useful and comforting things of this life, for these also come from the hands of God, the Author of grace and nature. In seeking and enjoying these material and physical things, however, he will be careful not to make them the end and quasi-beatitude of this life. He will use them rightly and temperately when he subordinates them to the salvation of souls, according to Christ's words: "Seek first the kingdom of God and His justice, and all these things shall be given you besides."[72]

38. This wise evaluation and use of means is not in the least opposed to the happiness of that inferior ordering of means in civil society. On the contrary, the former promotes the latter's welfare - not, of course, by the foolish prattle of quarrelsome reformers, but by acts and heroic efforts, even to the extent of sacrificing property, power, and life itself. We have many examples of this fortitude during the Church's worst days in the lives of many bishops who, equaling Charles' zeal, put into practice the Divine Master's words: "The good shepherd lays down his life for his sheep."[73] Neither vainglory, party spirit, nor private interest is their motive. They are moved to spend themselves for the common good by that charity "which never fails." This flame of love cannot be seen by the eyes of the world. It so enkindled Borromeo, however, that, after endangering his own life in caring for the victims of the plague, he did not rest with merely warding off present evils but began to provide for the dangers the future might have in store. "It is no more than right that a good and loving father will provide for his children's future as well as their present by setting aside the necessities of life for them. In virtue of our duty of paternal love, we are also prudently providing for the faithful of our province by setting aside those aids for the future which the experience of the plague has taught us are most effective."[74]

39. These same loving plans and considerations can be put into practice, Venerable Brethren, in that Catholic Action We have so often recommended. The leaders of the people are called to engage in this very noble apostolate which includes all the works of mercy[75] which will be prepared and ready to sacrifice all they have and are for the cause. They must bear envy, contradiction, and even the hatred of many who will repay their labors with ingratitude. They must conduct themselves as "good soldiers of Jesus Christ."[76] They must "run with patience to the fight set before us; looking towards the author and finisher of faith, Jesus Christ."[77] Without a doubt, this is a very difficult contest. Nevertheless, even though a total victory will be slow in coming, it is a contest that serves the welfare of civil society in a most worthy manner.

40. In this work we have the splendid example of Saint Charles. From his example each one of us can find much for imitation and consolation. Even though his outstanding virtue, his marvelous activity, his never failing charity commanded much respect, he was nonetheless subject to that law which reads, "All who want to live piously in Christ Jesus will suffer persecution."[78] His austere life, his defense of righteousness and honesty, his protection of law and justice only led to his being hated by rulers and tricked by diplomats and, later, distrusted by the nobility, clergy and people until he was eventually so hated by wicked men that they sought his very life. In spite of his mild and gentle disposition he withstood all these attacks with unflinching courage.

41. He yielded no ground on any matter that would endanger faith and morals. He admitted no claim (even if it was made by a powerful monarch who was always a Catholic) that was either contrary to discipline or burdensome to the faithful. He was always mindful of Christ's words: "Render...to Caesar the things that are Caesar's, and to God the things that are God's."[79] He never forgot the Apostles' declaration: "We must obey God rather than men."[80] Thus he was religion's and society's chief benefactor. In his time civil society was paying the price of almost certain destruction because of its worldly prudence. It was practically shipwrecked in the seditious storms it had stirred up.

42. The Catholics of our days, together with their leaders, the Bishops, will deserve the same praise and gratitude as Charles as long as they are faithful to their duties of good citizenship. They must be as faithful in their loyalty and respect to "wicked rulers" when their commands are just, as they are adamant in resisting their commands when unjust. They must remain as far from the impious rebellion of those who advocate sedition and revolt as they are from the subservience of those who accept as sacred the obviously wicked laws of perverse men. These last mentioned wicked men uproot everything in the name of a deceitful liberty, and then oppress their subjects with the most abject tyranny.

43. This is precisely what is happening today in the sight of the whole world and in the broad light of modern civilization. Especially is this the case in some countries where "the powers of darkness" seem to have made their headquarters. This domineering tyranny has suppressed all the rights of the Church's children. These rulers' hearts have been closed to all feelings of generosity, courtesy, and faith which their ancestors, who gloried in the name of Christians, manifested for so long a time. It is obvious that everything quickly lapses back into the ancient barbarism of license whenever God and the Church are hated. It would be more correct to say that everything falls under that most cruel yoke from which only the family of Christ and the education it introduced has freed us. Borromeo expressed the same thought in the following words: "It is a certain, well- established fact that no other crime so seriously offends God and provokes His greatest wrath as the vice of heresy. Nothing contributes more to the down fall of provinces and kingdoms than this frightful pest."[81] Although the enemies of the Church completely disagree among themselves in thought and action (which is a sure indication of error), they are nevertheless united in their obstinate attacks against truth and justice. Since the Church is the guardian and defender of both these virtues, they close their ranks in a unified attack against her. Of course, they loudly proclaim (as is the custom) their impartiality and firmly maintain they are only promoting the cause of peace. In reality, however, their soft words and avowed intentions are only the traps they are laying, thus adding insult to injury, treason to violence. From this it should be evident that a new kind of warfare is now being waged against Christianity. Without a doubt it is far more dangerous than those former conflicts which crowned Borromeo with such glory.

44. His example and teaching will do much to help us wage a valiant battle on behalf of the noble cause which will save the individual and society, faith, religion, and the inviolability of public order. Our combat, it is true, will be spurred on by bitter necessity. At the same time, however, we will be encouraged by the hope that the omnipotent God will hasten the victory for the sake of those who wage so glorious a contest. This hope increases through the fruitfulness of the work of Saint Charles even down to our own times. His work humbles the proud and strengthens us in the holy resolve to restore all things in Christ.

45. We can now conclude, Venerable Brethren, with the same words with which Our Predecessor, Paul V (whom We already mentioned several times), concluded the letter conferring the highest honors on Charles. "In the meantime," he wrote, "it is only right that we return honor, glory, and benediction to Him Who lives for all ages, for He blessed Our fellow servant with every spiritual gift in order to make him holy and spotless in His sight. The Lord gave him to us as a star shining in the darkness of these sins which are Our affliction. Let us beseech the Divine Goodness both in word and deed to let Charles now assist by his patronage the Church he loved so ardently and aided so greatly by his merits and example, thus making peace for us in the day of wrath, through Christ Our Lord."[82]

46. May the fulfillment of our mutual hope be granted through this prayer. As a token of that fulfillment, Venerable Brethren, from the depth of Our heart We impart to you and the clergy and people committed to your care, the Apostolic Blessing.

Given at Saint Peter's, Rome, on May 26, 1910, in the seventh year of Our Pontificate.

PIUS X

1. Cf. Ps. 111:7; Prov. 10:7, Heb. 11:4.
2. Rom. 8: 11.
3. Rom. 8:28.
4. I Cor. 4:16.
5. Cf. E Supremi.
6. Heb. 3:1; 12:2.
7. Cf. Ad diem illum.
8. Heb. 11:33.
9. Eph. 4:11 ff
10. Cf. encyclical E Supremi Apostolatus.
11. Paul V, Papal bull of November 15, 1610, Unigenitus.
12. Ibid.
13. Eph. 5:25 ff.
14. Matt. 16:18.
15. Matt. 28:20.
16. John 14:16 ff., 26, 59; 16:7 ff.
17. Sessio III, c. 3.
18. Phil. 3:18-19.
19. Is. 5:20.
20. I Cor. 10:13.
21. I Pet. 5:3.
22. Paul V, Papal bull Unigenitus.
23. Gen. 8:21.
24. Rom. 6:6.
25. Eph. 4:23; Rom. 12:2.
26. Phil. 3:13-14.
27. Eph. 4:15-16.
28. Eph. 1:10.
29. Matt. 13:25.
30. Conc. Prov. I, sub initium.
31. Conc. Prov. V, Pars I.
32. Ibid.
33. Conc. Prov. V, Pars I.
34. Rom. 10:17.
35. Conc. Prov. V, Pars I.
36. Osee 4:1.
37. Jer. 12:11.
38. Conc. Prov. V, Pars I.
39. Cf. Acerbo nimis.
40. Conc. Prov. V, Pars I.
41. II Cor. 5:20; 4:2; II Tim. 2:15.
42. I Thess. 2:13.
43. Heb. 4:12.
44. James 2:26.
45. Rom. 2:13.
46. Matt. 28:18, 20.
47. John 14:6.
48. John 10:10.
49. Col. 3:14.
50. I Tim. 4:20.
51. Eph. 4:12.
52. Conc. Prov. V, Pars I.
53. Ibid.
54. Conc. Prov. VI, sub finem.
55. I Pet. 4:17.
56. Jer. 1:10.
57. III Kings 19:11.
58. Phil. 2:21.
59. John 7:4.
60. I Mac. 5:57, 67.
61. Cf. John 7:18.
62. Matt. 12:19; Is. 42:2 ff.
63. Matt. 11:29.
64. Jer. 17:5.
65. Phil. 4:13.
66. John 4:14.
67. Conc. Prov. I, Pars II.
68. December 20, 1905.
69. Conc. Prov. III, Pars I.
70. Conc. Prov. IV, Pars II.
71 . I Cor. 11:28.
72. Matt. 6:33; Luke 12:31.
73. John 10:11.
74. Conc. Prov. V, Pars II.
75. Cf. Matt. 25:34 ff.
76. II Tim. 2:3.
77. Heb. 12:1-2.
78. II Tim . 3:12.
79. Matt. 22:21.
80. Acts 5:29.
81. Conc. Prov. V, Pars I.
82. Paul V, Papal bull Unigenitus.

SOURCE: Vatican Website


35 posted on 11/04/2012 7:51:55 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Sunday liturgy supersedes a saint's day.

SAINT CHARLES BORROMEO ARCHBISHOP, CARDINAL 1538-1584 [Catholic Caucus]
Charles Borromeo and Catholic Tradition, re: Catholic Architecture [Catholic Caucus]
St. Charles Borromeo – November 4
[Saint]Charles Borromeo B.Cardinal(RM)

36 posted on 11/04/2012 8:41:28 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
St. Charles Borromeo
Feast Day: November 4
Born: October 2, 1538, Aron
Died: November 3, 1584, Milan
Canonized: 1 November 1610 by Paul V
Major Shrine: Milan
Patron of: against ulcers; apple orchards; bishops; catechists; catechumens; colic; intestinal disorders; seminarians; spiritual directors; spiritual leaders; starch makers; stomach diseases



37 posted on 11/04/2012 8:42:54 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Charles Borromeo

St. Charles Borromeo
Feast Day: November 4
Born: 1538 :: Died: 1584

Charles was born at Aron in Italy. He was the son of a rich Italian count and the nephew of Pope Pius IV.

Like other wealthy young men, he went to the University of Pavia. But he was different from most of the students there and refused to take part in sinful activities.

He seemed to be a slow student because he was not a good speaker, but he really made good progress and became a lawyer at the age of twenty-one.

He was only twenty-three when his uncle, Pope Pius IV, gave him many important duties, which Charles managed to handle well. He was afraid that he might stray from God because of the many temptations around him so he denied himself many pleasures. He also made a great effort to be humble and patient.

As a priest and later the cardinal archbishop of Milan, St. Charles was a model for his people. He gave away great amounts of money to the poor. He had only one shabby cassock (long black habit) of his own.

But in public, he dressed grandly as a cardinal should and took great care to give dignity and respect to Church ceremonies.

In Milan, the people followed many bad practices and superstitions (wrong beliefs). By wise laws, gentle kindness and his own wonderful example, St. Charles made his diocese (the Churches under his care) a model for the whole Catholic Church.

He was never a good speaker - people could barely hear him but his words reached the hearts of the people.

When a terrible disease caused many deaths in Milan, Cardinal Borromeo spent all his time caring for his people. He prayed and did penance. He organized crews of attendants and borrowed money to feed the hungry. He even had altars set up in the streets so that the sick could assist at Mass from their windows.

This great man was never too busy to help simple people. He once stayed with a little shepherd boy until he had taught him the Our Father and the Hail Mary.

As he lay dying at the age of forty-six, St. Charles said peacefully, "Behold, I come!" He died on November 3, 1584.


38 posted on 11/04/2012 8:54:47 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:
Sunday, November 4
Liturgical Color: White

Today is the Memorial of St. Charles Borromeo, archbishop and confessor. St. Charles was a great believer in the healing power of the confessional. He required all his priests to confess weekly, while he confessed daily. St. Charles died in 1584.

39 posted on 11/04/2012 3:14:21 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: November 04, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: Almighty and merciful God, by whose gift your faithful offer you right and praiseworthy service, grant, we pray, that we may hasten without stumbling to receive the things you have promised. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: November 4th

Thirty-First Sunday of Ordinary Time

Old Calendar: Twenty-Third Sunday after Pentecost

One of the scribes came to Jesus and asked him, "Which is the first of all the commandments?" Jesus replied, "The first is this: Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is Lord alone! You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.

The second is this: You shall love your neighbor as yourself. There is no other commandment greater than these (Mk 12:28-31)."

Don't forget to pray for the Poor Souls in Purgatory from November 1 to the 8th.

Click here for commentary on the readings in the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite.


Sunday Readings
The first reading is taken from Deuteronomy 6:2-6. Moses, having received the Ten Commandments from God on Mount Sinai, set about teaching them to the Israelites.

The second reading is from the first Letter of St. Paul to the Hebrews 7:23-28 where he continues to show the superiority of Jesus over the high priests of the Old Testament.

The Gospel is from Mark 12:28-34. The personal lesson which comes over loud and clear for every sincere Christian from today's gospel, is that the solid foundation of our Christian religion is love of God and neighbor. As our Lord says: "there is no other commandment greater than these." All the other commandments are expansions of these two and indications of how we are to put these two commandments into daily practice. For example: why am I forbidden to murder my neighbor? Simply because he belongs to God; it was God who gave him his life, and God has commanded me to love and respect him. Taking his life is interfering with God's rights, and disobeying him as well. Likewise, the prohibition of idolatry, refraining from insulting God's name, keeping the Sabbath day holy are the principal ways of indicating how we should love God.

One may ask: how can I love God? He is infinitely perfect, he needs nothing from me, what therefore can I do for him? I can understand loving my neighbor—for a neighbor can need help, advice, encouragement and consolation. I can prove my love by giving these to my neighbor, but God has no such needs. It is quite true that true love is not theoretical but pragmatic, it means doing some good for somebody. While the infinite God has no needs that I can supply, he has claims on my service, on my respect, on my gratitude—claims so basic and so great that I must be ready to suffer persecution and even death rather than deny or dishonor him (Mt. 5: 10; Lk. 6: 23). It was God who gave me existence and every gift that I have. It was God, through the incarnation of his own divine Son, who made me his adopted child and heir to heaven. Everything that I am and have and hope to be, I owe to God's generosity; therefore, he has an unquestionable right to my gratitude, my reverence, my respect—these are the ways in which I can show my love for him.

The keeping of God's commandments, the prayers of thanksgiving, praise and petition which daily we offer, the attendance at Mass and other liturgical functions, these are the means God gives us of showing our love, our recognition of total dependence on him and our gratitude for all he has done and is doing for us. God does not need any of these signs of our submission and reverence and respect, but we need them absolutely, for they are the means he has given us of fulfilling his purpose in creating us—to share his eternal glory with him. To love God then, is not an obligation imposed on us by some demanding superior but a privilege granted us so that we can become worthy of the greater gifts he has in store for us.

Loving our neighbor—and in the Christian code this means all men no matter what may be their color, race or religion—is, according to our divine Lord, another most effective way of proving to God that we love him. Because of our common humanity we should be inclined to help our fellowmen, our neighbors, but the Christian law spiritualizes this natural inclination, by commanding us to help our neighbor because he is God's child. We are all fellow-children of God, members of the one family. Our heavenly Father loves each one of us and wants our salvation. If we love our common Father we will do all we can to help his other children also to attain salvation. It will earn for us God's favor.

If we observe these two commandments we are "fulfilling the whole law and the prophets,"; we are serving God and showing our gratitude to him for all his goodness to us. The Christian who is following Christ in love is already active in the earthly kingdom of God and traveling safely toward God's eternal kingdom of peace and happiness.

Excerpted from The Sunday Readings by Fr. Kevin O'Sullivan, O.F.M.


40 posted on 11/04/2012 3:29:18 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Mark 12:28-34

31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

“Which is the first of all the com­mandments?” Jesus replied, “The first is this… . The second is this.” (Mark 12:28-31)

Love God and love your neigh­bor. The wisdom of these words may not strike us with the freshness that they would have conveyed to Jesus’ audience. The idea that the first and greatest command is to love God with all our hearts and souls wasn’t a new thought. It’s recorded in a much older reading in the Hebrew Scriptures (Deuteronomy 6:5). But the idea that loving one another is just as important was much more groundbreaking.

Jesus considered these two com­mands bound so closely together that he taught that if someone is offering a gift at the altar—loving God— and remembers that his brother has something against him, he must leave his gift and go love his brother first (Matthew 5:23-24). And John could write: “Whoever does not love a brother and sister, whom he has seen, cannot love God, whom he has not seen” (1 John 4:20).

There’s something about loving God with our whole hearts that nat­urally flows into loving other people. Perhaps it is because God has cre­ated us in his own image. There’s a picture of him, a treasure from him, in each of us. So when we see each other, we are seeing a reflection of the Lord. Or maybe it’s because God loves each of us with such fierce devotion that for us not to share that love with each other would be an offense to him. Or maybe it’s both!

In the end, it doesn’t matter which approach is best. What mat­ters is that you do something about it! God has called us to love each other just as fully as we love him. That’s not always an easy task, and some people seem determined to make it even harder for us. But our Father is ready to help. He is wait­ing for us to take the first step. Then he will respond with divine grace to soften our hearts.

“Lord, show me the treasures you have placed in all the people around me—especially those I find hardest to love!”

Deuteronomy 6:2-6; Psalm 18:1-4, 47, 51; Hebrews 7:23-28

Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

1. In the First Reading, the Great Commandment to “love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength” is first spoken to the people by Moses. He then tells them to “Take to heart these words which I enjoin on you today” (Deuteronomy 6:6). How well do you “take to heart” these words?

2. The Responsorial Psalm continues the theme of the First Reading, “I love you, O Lord, my strength.” The psalmist goes on to proclaim some of the reasons for his great love for the Lord. What are some of them? How would you proclaim your reasons for loving the Lord?

3. How would you describe the difference between Jesus’ priesthood and the Levitical priesthood, as presented in the Second Reading? Why is Jesus’ priesthood so much more powerful than theirs, especially in its impact on our lives through the sacrifice of the Mass?

4. In the Gospel, Jesus repeats the words of Moses from the First Reading and adds the commandment to “love your neighbor as yourself.” He then says, “There is no other commandment greater than these.” Why is this so? What are the obstacles you encounter during the day that keeps you from obeying these commandments more faithfully in your everyday life? What steps can you take to remove some of these obstacles?

5. The meditation describes two reasons why we are called to love others: 1) “loving God with our whole hearts” so that it “naturally flows into loving other people” and 2) “because God loves each of us with such fierce devotion that for us not to share that love with each other would be an offense to him.” Which of these reasons resonates most with you? Why? Are there some steps you need to take to love God more wholeheartedly or to open yourself more to a greater experience of his love for you?

6. Take some time now to pray and ask for the grace to see the Lord’s presence in others, no matter what kind of relationship you have with them right now. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.

 


41 posted on 11/04/2012 3:45:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
A Christian Pilgrim

LOVE IS GOD’S MOST IMPORTANT COMMANDMENT

(A biblical refection on THE 31st SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 4 NOVEMBER, 2012) 

Gospel Reading: Mark 12:28-34 

First Reading: Deut 6:2-6; Psalms: Ps 18:2-4,47,51; Second Reading: Heb 7:23-28 

The Scripture Text

And one of the scribes came up and heard them disputing with one another, and seeing that He answered them well, asked Him, “Which commandment is the first of all?” Jesus answered, “The first is, ‘Hear, O Israel: The Lord our God, the Lord is one; and you shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind, and with all your strength.’ The second is this, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.” And the scribe said to Him, “You are right, Teacher; You have truly said that He is one, and there is no other but He; and to love Him with all the heart, and with all the understanding, and with all the strength, and to love one’s neighbor as oneself, is much more than all whole burnt offerings and sacrifices.” And when Jesus saw that He answered wisely, He said to him, “You are not far from the Kingdom of God.” And after that no one dared to ask Him any question. (Mk 12:28-34 RSV) 

Jesus praised the scribe for understanding that love is God’s most important commandment. Love of God and love of neighbor – these were the great commandments, Jesus told him. And the man agreed wholeheartedly.

But it is not as easy as it sounds. Real love is a great challenge to us – modern women and men – greater than ever before. We – especially people of big cities – have too many material comforts, and that tends to make people selfish. In the old days people had to struggle hard and give up much for the basic family and community needs. Children had to work hard on farms to help keep the family alive; families had to give generously of their own time and materials to build churches and community centers. This had its drawbacks, but it was a genuine gift of self, a human response, cooperation for the common needs. And it developed a sense of responsibility.

Today we do not automatically feel this great for each other. And how many people are lonely and starved for true love! An increasing flood of false literature gives a wrong picture of what human love is. If you do not have shiny teeth and soft hair and rosebud perfume, nobody will love you. We laugh at these ridiculous TV commercials, but they seep into our thinking. They make us want to get instead of give. Love then becomes a mere surface attraction which has nothing to do with real love.

What a tragedy if a beautiful home with color TV, two fine cars and all the rest, is an unhappy home, because true love is missing. There is no real love which is not open and generous and sacrificing and well-disciplined. God is love, and only those who live in real love can live in God. True love goes out of self to others. If genuine love does not actively grow and flourish in the family, how can it go out to others? Here is the parents’ first responsibility: to teach real love to their children, by having it themselves. They must learn love in order to learn of God, for God is love. 

Short Prayer: Jesus, teach me to love because God is love, and only those who live in real love can live in God. Amen. 


42 posted on 11/04/2012 5:13:53 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

WHY CHARLIE CHAPLIN GOT IT RIGHT

(A biblical refection on THE 31st SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME – 4 November, 2012) 

First Reading: Deut 6:2-6; Psalms: Ps 18:2-4,47,51; Second Reading: Heb 7:23-28; Gospel Reading: Mk 12:28-34 

On Christmas Day 1977, the world’s most celebrated and controversial comedian died. A genius of the silent films, Charlie Chaplin left behind him miles of film featuring the pathetic and lovable little tramp. He also wrote a brilliant autobiography, detailing his life of trials, triumphs and disappointments. At the time of his birth, his mother was a singer on the variety stage; a year later, his parents separated and his mother was left to support the two children. Everything went reasonably well until his mother’s voice grew progressively worse through laryngitis. Engagements fell to nothing; their savings soon vanished; his mother’s belongings were sold to supplement a tiny income from her dressmaking.

Chaplin recalled that they lived in a world of cheerless twilight, but that the love they shared sustained them. He wrote: “I remember an evening in our own room in the basement of Oakley Street. I lay in bed recovering from a fever. Mother and I were alone. It was late afternoon, and she sat with her back to the window reading, acting and explaining the New Testament and Christ’s love and pity for the poor and for little children. She read into the dusk, stopping only to light the lamp, then told of the faith Jesus inspired in the sick. She described Jesus and His arrest and His calm dignity before Pontius Pilate. And in His last dying agony crying out: ‘My God, why hast Thou forsaken Me?’

“Mother had me so carried away that I wanted to die that very night to meet Jesus. But Mother was not so enthusiastic. ‘Jesus wants you to live first and fulfil your destiny here,’ she said. In that dark room in the basement of Oakley Street, Mother illuminated to me the kindliest light this world has ever known, which has endowed literature and the theatre with their greatest and richest themes: love, pity and humanity.”

Charlie Chaplin summed up Jesus’ life in terms of the kindliest light in the world, one which showed love, pity and humanity. We all have our own way of summing up the importance of Jesus, and in the process we say as much about our own values as we do about the person of Jesus. That practice of summing up what really counts is one we all engage in. And in today’s Gospel we see how Jesus is invited to give His summary of the essence of the Law.

The practice of focusing the mind by summarizing the Law was a popular tradition among rabbis and their pupils. Perhaps the most famous example in Jewish tradition is the student who asked to be taught the essence of the Law while he stood on one leg. His teacher, Hillel, replied: “what you hat for yourself, do not to your neighbour.  This is the whole Law, the rest is commentary; go and learn.”

Jesus gathers up the traditional wisdom of Israel in one statement. The first part of His statement quotes the creed of Judaism, to love the one God who is Lord with your whole person and everything in your power. This creed was contained inside a tiny case called the mezuzah, which was fixed to the doorpost of every Jewish house and to the door of every room inside. No pious Jew could disagree with this part of Jesus’ summary. But alongside this, Jesus places another scriptural passage, to love your neighbour as yourself. For Jesus, it is a combination of these separated texts that makes for the essence of the Law. And it is that combination that has given Christianity its basic commandment for life.

In His reply to the scribe Jesus makes it clear that you cannot compose summaries of the Law while forgetting love of neighbour. The scribe is pleased with Jesus’ reply and adds his own point, that the love of God and neighbour is far more important than any ritual worship. In supporting the scribe’s addition, Jesus places the demands of liturgy far below the demands of active love. This we see clearly developed in the parable of the Good Samaritan, where the priest and the levite hurry past the demand for love to attend to the demand for liturgy. As Jesus combines love of God and love of neighbour, so these religious officials disconnect them.

Jesus’ summary of the Law is not an academic pastime, it is a personal challenge to love God wholeheartedly and have tender regard for our neighbour in actively promoting His good, just as we should want to do in our own case. That is not only Jesus’ digest of the Law, it is also the Gospel portrait of Jesus. That is why Charlie Chaplin’s concise summing up of Jesus is right. The man whose pants were too baggy, whose coat was too tight, whose hat was too small, whose shoes were too big summed up Jesus with Gospel accuracy: “Love, pity, compassion.” All the rest is commentary.

Note: Taken from Fr. Denis McBride CSsR, SEASONS OF THE WORD – Reflections on the Sunday Readings, Chawton, Alton, Hants.: Redemptorist Publications, 1993 (Third Printing), pages 354-355. 


43 posted on 11/04/2012 5:22:31 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for November 4, 2012:

“You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” (Mk 12:31) This presumes that you do indeed have a humble but honest self-love. Keep yourself healthy as a gift to your spouse. This includes exercising and not smoking or drinking excessively.


44 posted on 11/04/2012 5:44:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Scrpture Study

Thirty-first Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle B

November 4, 2012

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Deuteronomy 6:2-6

Psalm: 18:2-4,47,51

Second Reading: Hebrews 7:23-28

Gospel Reading: Mark 12:28b-34

  • Last week we heard about blind Bartimaeus in Jericho (Mark 10:45-52). We now fast-forward two chapters later. Jesus is now in Jerusalem and in the midst of his opponents, the scribes, Pharisees, and Saducees; it is after his triumphal entry (on Palm Sunday, Mark 11:1-10) and before his Passion (Holy Thursday, Mark 14:12ff).
  • The scribes were the scholars and intellectuals of Judaism. Their scholarship was the knowledge of the Jewish Law, which they regarded as the sum of wisdom and the only true learning. Their position in the Jewish community was a respected position of leadership.
  • Jesus was a threat to their influence which is why most New Testament references show them hostile to him. This Sunday’s story is unique in that it portrays a friendly, rather than a controversial, discussion between Jesus and a scribe.
  • This particular scribe has been impressed with Jesus’ earlier reply to the Saducees, another religious group that opposed Jesus (Mark 12:18-27). This scribe wants to learn more.

 

QUESTIONS:

  • In the 2nd Reading, we are told that Christ, our High Priest, is sinless and perfectly holy.What does it mean to be “holy”?  In what respect can you call all priests holy? In what does their holiness consist?
  • In the Gospel Reading, why are these two commandments (verses 29-31) the greatest? How do the Ten Commandments relate to these two?
  • Why do you think Jesus emphasized loving God with our heart, soul, and mind? How is loving God related to loving other people?
  • What do you think Jesus meant by telling the scribe that he was “not far” from the kingdom of God? Was Jesus commenting on his understanding of theology, or his faith?
  • In the three possibilities of love relationships (with God, neighbors, and self), where are you the strongest? The weakest?
  • What does it mean to love your neighbor as you do yourself? How do you love yourself? How does that apply to the way you love your neighbor?

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 202, 228, 2196, 2816-2821

 

‘Whoever does not love does not know God.’ Why? Because ‘God is Love.’ (1 John 4:7) What more can be said, my Brothers? If one did not find one word in praise of love through this epistle, nor the least word throughout all the other pages of Scripture, and we heard only this one word from the voice of the Spirit of God: Because 'God is Love,' we should seek for nothing more.   -St. Augustine


45 posted on 11/04/2012 5:50:05 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Hear O Israel, and Remember!
Pastor’s Column
31st Sunday Ordinary Time
November 4, 2012
 
“Hear O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone!
You shall love the Lord your God
with all your soul, with all your mind, with all your heart, with all your strength.
The second is this:
You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”
                                                          Mark 12:28-30
 
 
          What are the guiding principles of my life? Christ makes it clear that if we put what is important to God first, God will guide everything else and we will be prepared for eternal life! If my life is not pleasing to God, on the other hand, I will be like a shopping cart with a bent wheel—that wants to go its own way, or a pen that skips and doesn’t write as it was meant to.
 
          The Jews call the first part of this passage the great shema, which is Hebrew for hear. To this day pious Jews can sometimes be seen placing this text over a doorframe of their house (a mezuzah) or wearing it on their wrists or foreheads in little boxes (phylacteries).   How differently we might live if we had this scripture as the first thing we read when opening our cell phone or when leaving the house! And what a great way to end the day: a brief review of how I loved God, and how I loved my neighbor.
 
          Blessed Mother Theresa of Calcutta once pointed out that it is much easier for us to love our neighbor who is far away than the one who is close by. It is wonderful to donate to charities that help the poor or distressed that we will never meet, but what about my “neighbors” around me? This can be a bit more problematic at times.
 
          Prayer and Mass attendance are essential in the life of an active Catholic, but the only way we can know for sure that we love God is when we come out of church or prayer and are driving home! My “neighbors” are all the people God has given me in my life: work, family, extended relatives, friends, people at church, acquaintances, and people we meet by chance each day (especially the problematic ones). When you think about it, these people and the interactions we have with them are the primary vehicles by which we will demonstrate our love for God in this world. In fact, our entire future in heaven depends precisely on how we treat others.  We have heard once again what is most important to God, but will we remember?
                                                                                              
                                                                             Father Gary

46 posted on 11/04/2012 5:59:56 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
St. Paul Center Blog

The Law of Love: Scott Hahn Reflects on the 31st Sunday in Ordinary Time

Posted by Dr. Scott Hahn on 10.31.12 |


Sacred Heart 3

Love is the only law we are to live by. And love is the fulfillment of the Law that God reveals through Moses in today’s First Reading (see Romans 13:8-10; Matthew 5:43-48).

The unity of God—the truth that He is one God, Father, Son, and Spirit—means that we must love Him with one love, a love that serves Him with all our hearts and minds, souls and strength.

We love Him because He has loved us first. We love our neighbor because we can’t love the God we haven’t seen unless we love those made in His image and likeness, whom we have seen (see 1 John 4:19-21).

And we are called imitate the love that Christ showed us in laying His life down on the cross (see 1 John 3:16). As we hear in today’s Epistle, by His perfect sacrifice on the cross, He once and for all makes it possible for us to approach God.

Readings:
Deuteronomy 6:2-6
Psalm 18:2-4,47,57
Hebrews 7:23-28
Mark 12:28-34

There is no greater love than to lay down your life (see John 15:13). This is perhaps why Jesus tells the scribe in today’s Gospel that he is not far from the kingdom of God.

The scribe recognizes that the burnt offerings and sacrifices of the old Law were meant to teach Israel that it is love that He desires (see Hosea 6:6). The animals offered in sacrifice were symbols of the self-sacrifice, the total gift of our selves that God truly desires.

We are called today to examine our hearts. Do we have other loves that get in the way of our love for God? Do we love others as Jesus has loved us (see John 13:34-35)? Do we love our enemies and pray for those who oppose and persecute us (see Matthew 5:44)?

Let us tell the Lord we love Him, as we do in today’s Psalm. And let us take His Word to heart, that we might prosper and have life eternal in His kingdom, the heavenly homeland flowing with milk and honey.


47 posted on 11/04/2012 6:43:11 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
31st Sunday: What's most important?

 
"You are not far from the kingdom of God"

The Word: http://usccb.org/bible/readings/110412.cfm
 
Deut 6: 2-6
Hb 7: 23-2
Mk 12: 28-34


“What is our reason for loving God? God himself is the reason we love him; we love him because he is the supreme and infinite goodness. What is our reason for loving ourselves? Surely because we are the image and likeness of God. And since all men and women possess this same dignity we love them as ourselves, that is, as holy and living images of the Godhead.
It must always be understood, however, that we love our neighbors for this reason, that they are made in the image and likeness of God, created to communicate in his goodness, share in his grace, and rejoice in his glory.
To have a Christian love for our neighbors is to love God in them, or them in God; it is to cherish God alone for his own sake, and his creatures for love of him.”
St. Francis de Sales
Francis de Sales, the 17th century Bishop of Geneva, Switzerland, known for his gentleness and charity, wrote these words above.  He has become known as the “Gentleman Saint.” That surely implies a way in which he presented himself to others and the way in which he would deal with people on a day to day basis.  A gentleman or lady implies respectful behavior, good example, politeness, a proper composure, appropriate dress, acceptability, and other such sort of social qualities. The above quote reflects our readings this Sunday on the love of God and neighbor.

Yet, some may view the polite and respectful as those who really are just a stuffed shirt and unwilling to break loose and take chances or live on the edge. But, what God asks of us in our readings this week casts itself back thousands of years – to that moment when God revealed himself to the ancient Hebrew people on Mt. Sinai through Moses, his chosen messenger. We're not called to be stuffed shirts but to relate with the living and true God.

As the Book of Deuteronomy proclaims today, what is referred to as the great Shema: “Hear , O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone! Therefore, you shall love the Lord, your God, with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength.  Take to heart these words which I enjoin on you today.”

God speaks to the people of Israel to resist compromise with foreign false gods and to turn their entire being, heart, mind, soul, and strength, to the living and loving God who has called them to be his people.  Through them, salvation will come to all humankind.

As St. Francis de Sales reminds us, “God himself is the reason we love him; we love him because he is the supreme and infinite goodness.”

We love God because he is God and ourselves and our neighbor because we are made in the image of God.  What could be more fundamental than that?  It implies that we behave in ways that reflect this belief – this command really from God.  It is a command that is pointed not only to a nation – “Hear O Israel” – but also to individuals as well in which God wants faithful individuals to form a faithful community.

This love of God and neighbor, as the two greatest commandments, was somewhat of a test by Jesus of a local scribe.  At the heart of Jewish law, was this fundamental principle based upon the Ten Commandments.  The first Commandment to love God above all other gods (Commandments 1 – 3) and our Neighbor – (Commandments 4 – 10) in Ex 20: 1 – 17, is indeed the summary of all Jewish legal structure.  This was a revelation of the Covenant made between God and humanity.  Certainly not a covenant between equal parties but an desire of the overwhelming love of the creator to relate on a personal level with his creatures at the top of the created order – man and woman. The Scribe was attempting to verify if Jesus knew that for at times his teaching may have sounded a bit more lax or liberal in pushing the edge of literal understanding.

For our Lord clearly expanded the notion of neighbor beyond our fellow Jew.  His reaching out to those considered “unclean” (leper, blind, lame, crippled, tax collectors, adulterers, gentile, etc) raised the legalistic eyebrows of those considered to be experts in the law. Certainly, Jesus’ treatment of women was unprecedented for an honored rabbi. Yet, even in Jewish law charity could be extended to the alien but only love offered to one’s fellow Jew.

Our Catholic tradition should take great pride in what our Church has done to assist the poor and unfortunate; to bring compassion to those who are forgotten and helpless; to educate the ignorant and form them in Gospel values.  Our Catholic sponsored Schools and Universities, our charitable institutions, hospitals and health care facilities all reflect the great mission of the Church. They are charity in action based upon what is always first for us – to orient our life priorities beginning with our faithfulness to God alone. No small task! There is a hierarchy of importance here.  Love God first above all things and then love for your neighbor will follow in kind. Your neighbor begins at home by the way.

Doesn’t love for neighbor begin with a love of God first?  In the case of Christians, it begins with faith in Jesus Christ.  As one follows the other we have the basic structure around which to live our lives. And, as one a seeks out the Spirit’s guidance in our lives, we can live out this great Shema with faithfulness.

At the top of our life pyramid as it were, what (who) do we find? Do I see my neighbor as God sees them?  No, Christian charity is not always easy or comfortable.  But if God is not my most important value, I will naturally find something else to fill that void – and it may not always be of God. Our gatherings at Eucharist are intended to be an illustration of this “faithful community.” What can we learn as a take home lesson from those sacred times?

Fr. Tim

48 posted on 11/04/2012 8:44:35 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Insight Scoop

Faith-filled love and the greatest commandment

A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, November 4, 2012 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Dt 6:2-6
• Ps 18:2-3, 3-4, 47, 51
• Heb 7:23-28
• Mk 12:28-34

What is the most common subject of popular music? Answer: love.

The Beatles claimed “All We Need Is Love.” Robert Palmer confessed he was “Addicted to Love.” “I Want To Know What Love Is” admitted the rock group Foreigner. Mariah Carey had a “Vision of Love.” Queen pondered that “Crazy Little Thing Called Love.” A full listing would require a book.

But how many Top Forty songs have been about love for God? You don’t need to be a music critic to recognize that the love referred to in most pop and rock songs is either romantic love or something mistaken for love: infatuation, sexual attraction, or simply lust. What so often passes for love in our culture is actually the complete opposite of authentic love. Instead of being sacrificial, it is self-seeking; rather than giving, it takes; instead of long-suffering, it is short-term. As Pope Benedict XVI remarked in his encyclical, “God Is Love” (Deus Caritas Est), “Eros, reduced to pure ‘sex’, has become a commodity, a mere ‘thing’ to be bought and sold, or rather, man himself becomes a commodity” (par. 5).

The love spoken of by Jesus in today’s Gospel is agape, that is, the Holy Father states, a “love grounded in and shaped by faith” (par. 7). When human love—whether love for a spouse, a child, a friend, or one’s country—is informed, shaped, and filled with God’s love it becomes whole and authentic. Put another way, it is rightly ordered to its proper end, which is God.

The scribe who asked the question, “Which is the first of all the commandments?” apparently did so out of sincere curiosity. He posed the question after overhearing the dispute between Jesus and the Sadducees over the general resurrection of the dead, a belief the Sadducees denied (Mk 12:18-27). This scribe, like all scribes, was an expert in the many technical details of applying the Mosaic Law in specific cases. There were 613 commandments in the Law, so the answer to his question was not  simple or obvious. In responding, Jesus referred immediately and directly to the First Commandment: “Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is Lord alone! You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength” (Mk 12:29-30; cf. Dt 6:5).

It was this commandment, more than any other, which marked the Hebrews as a unique, chosen people.

“Jesus united into a single precept this commandment of love for God,” writes Pope Benedict, “and the commandment of love for neighbour found in the Book of Leviticus: ‘You shall love your neighbour as yourself’ (19:18; cf. Mk 12:29-31). Since God has first loved us (cf. 1 Jn 4:10), love is now no longer a mere ‘command’; it is the response to the gift of love with which God draws near to us” (par. 1). How we treat neighbors and strangers alike reveals something essential about our love, or lack of love, for God. As the book of Deuteronomy states, "Cursed be he who perverts the justice due to the sojourner, the fatherless, and the widow", and, "Cursed be he who does not confirm the words of this law by doing them" (Dt 27:19, 26).

In speaking of Jesus’ response, the Holy Father emphasizes that this love “is not simply a matter of morality.” After all, atheists can give money to the poor and agnostics can build homeless shelters. “Being Christian,” Benedict explains, “is not the result of an ethical choice or a lofty idea, but the encounter with an event, a person, which gives life a new horizon and a decisive direction” (par. 1).

Our love is really love when it flows from the heart transformed by the One who first loved us, who created us, and who gave His life for us. This love is not abstract or academic but concrete and personal.

Love is so powerful because it God is love and He made us to be loved and to love others. “God is love, and the one who abides in love abides in God, and God abides in him” (1 Jn 4:16). Sadly, we live in a world that is out of tune when it comes to real love. It is our joyful duty to sing, with the Psalmist, “I love you, Lord, my strength!”

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in a slightly different form in the October 26, 2008, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


49 posted on 11/04/2012 8:46:15 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Vultus Christi

He went in, and took her by the hand

 on November 4, 2012 8:53 AM | 
 

figlia-di-giairo-giotto-1305.jpg

The 23rd Sunday After Pentecost


Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Matthew 9,18-26.

As he was speaking these things unto them, behold a certain ruler came up, and adored him, saying: Lord, my daughter is even now dead; but come, lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live. And Jesus rising up followed him, with his disciples. And behold a woman who was troubled with an issue of blood twelve years, came behind him, and touched the hem of his garment. For she said within herself: If I shall touch only his garment, I shall be healed. But Jesus turning and seeing her, said: Be of good heart, daughter, thy faith hath made thee whole. And the woman was made whole from that hour. And when Jesus was come into the house of the ruler, and saw the minstrels and the multitude making a rout, He said: Give place, for the girl is not dead, but sleepeth. And they laughed him to scorn. And when the multitude was put forth, he went in, and took her by the hand. And the maid arose. And the fame hereof went abroad into all that country.

The Prayer of a Father

Jesus is in the midst of speaking. He allows this certain ruler, called Jairus, to interrupt his discourse. Jairus enters the scene suddenly, almost breathlessly. He adores Jesus, that is to say that he falls down before Him. His prayer goes straight to the point. It is simple and artless: "Lord, my daughter is even now dead; but come, lay thy hand upon her, and she shall live." It strikes me that Jairus must have blurted out his prayer after having prepared it in his heart on the way to Jesus. He has even devised a little "sacramental rite" that includes the laying on of Jesus' hand.

God Arises, His Enemies Are Scattered

Jesus, rising up, follows him. The little phrase "rising up" prepares us for a manifestation of Our Lord's divinity. It tells us that He is about to act in a wonderful way. At the same time, Our Lord acts humbly in that, together with His disciples, he follows Jairus. Faith opens the way for Our Lord to act. Faith opens the procession. God in Christ makes Himself obedient to the faith of a man.

The Touch of Faith

There follows an interruption, a delay. Rather inconveniently, a woman long in distress approaches Jesus stealthily on His way. The procession could not have been going very quickly for this sick woman to steal in behind Jesus and touch His garment. It would seem that after obtaining Jesus' consent, there is no need to rush off to the house where Jairus' daughter lies dead.

Thy Faith Hath Made Thee Whole

The woman, having already decided how to obtain her healing -- another kind of "sacramental rite" -- tries to be discreet, to go unobserved. Her prayer is silent. She repeats within her heart what she has determined to do, saying, "If I shall touch only his garment, I shall be healed." Jesus, touched by her faith more than by her hand, addresses her, saying, "Be of good heart, daughter, thy faith hath made thee whole." The woman's healing, after twelve years of chronic suffering, is instantaneous. Such is the power of faith.

Restored to Life

When Our Lord arrives at the house of Jairus, He sees that, already, the pomp and din of mourning as the world mourns, are in full swing. He calls for silence and calm, announcing that the girl is not dead, but sleeping. And in saying this, he exposes Himself to the mockery and scorn of those who deal in the business of death. The flute-players, wailers, and professional mourners were not there purely out of sympathy for the bereaved; they were there to make some profit out of the girl's death. "An unpleasant business," they reason, "but someone must do it." They resent the arrival of Jesus. Death is threatened in the presence of Life.

When the profiteers of death have been exorcised -- put out of the house -- Jesus enters the girl's room. Rather than touch her, as Jairus asked, Jesus takes her by the hand, thereby giving her life, and breath. She rises from her bed, restored to health. The gesture is the very one seen in the icons of the Harrowing of Hell, where Christ seizes the hands of Adam and Eve to pull them out of death into the radiance of His life.

She Rose

Note the second use of the verb "to rise" in this account. Where Christ rises to act, others rise to life with Him. The devil, on the other hand, forever the fallen angel, causes others to fall into death with him.

Glory to the Prince of Life

What Jesus has done does not remain secret. The news is noised abroad. Like Lazarus, this girl, brought back from the icy grip of death, must have become a sign of contradiction, the subject of whisperings and curiosity. As for her father, what must his gratitude have been to Jesus, the Prince of Life?


50 posted on 11/04/2012 8:47:45 PM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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