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Catholic Caucus: Daily Mass Readings, 09-17-12, OM, St. Robert Bellarmine, Bishop and Doctor/Church
USCCB.org/RNAB ^ | 09-17-12 | Revised New American Bible

Posted on 09/16/2012 8:28:51 PM PDT by Salvation

September 17, 2012

Monday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time
 
Reading 1 1 Cor 11:17-26, 33
Brothers and sisters:
In giving this instruction, I do not praise the fact
that your meetings are doing more harm than good.
First of all, I hear that when you meet as a Church
there are divisions among you,
and to a degree I believe it;
there have to be factions among you
in order that also those who are approved among you
may become known.
When you meet in one place, then,
it is not to eat the Lord's supper,
for in eating, each one goes ahead with his own supper,
and one goes hungry while another gets drunk.
Do you not have houses in which you can eat and drink?
Or do you show contempt for the Church of God
and make those who have nothing feel ashamed?
What can I say to you? Shall I praise you?
In this matter I do not praise you.

For I received from the Lord what I also handed on to you,
that the Lord Jesus, on the night he was handed over,
took bread and, after he had given thanks,
broke it and said, "This is my Body that is for you.
Do this in remembrance of me."
In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying,
"This cup is the new covenant in my Blood.
Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of me."
For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup,
you proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes.

Therefore, my brothers and sisters,
when you come together to eat, wait for one another.

Responsorial Psalm Ps 40:7-8a, 8b-9, 10, 17

R. (1 Cor 11:26b) Proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes again.
Sacrifice or oblation you wished not,
but ears open to obedience you gave me.
Burnt offerings or sin offerings you sought not;
then said I, "Behold I come."
R. Proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes again.
"In the written scroll it is prescribed for me,
To do your will, O my God, is my delight,
and your law is within my heart!"
R. Proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes again.
I announced your justice in the vast assembly;
I did not restrain my lips, as you, O LORD, know.
R. Proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes again.
May all who seek you
exult and be glad in you
And may those who love your salvation
say ever, "The LORD be glorified."
R. Proclaim the death of the Lord until he comes again.

Gospel Lk 7:1-10

When Jesus had finished all his words to the people,
he entered Capernaum.
A centurion there had a slave who was ill and about to die,
and he was valuable to him.
When he heard about Jesus, he sent elders of the Jews to him,
asking him to come and save the life of his slave.
They approached Jesus and strongly urged him to come, saying,
"He deserves to have you do this for him,
for he loves our nation and he built the synagogue for us."
And Jesus went with them,
but when he was only a short distance from the house,
the centurion sent friends to tell him,
"Lord, do not trouble yourself,
for I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof.
Therefore, I did not consider myself worthy to come to you;
but say the word and let my servant be healed.
For I too am a person subject to authority,
with soldiers subject to me.
And I say to one, 'Go,' and he goes;
and to another, 'Come here,' and he comes;
and to my slave, 'Do this,' and he does it."
When Jesus heard this he was amazed at him
and, turning, said to the crowd following him,
"I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith."
When the messengers returned to the house,
they found the slave in good health.


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer; saints
For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 09/16/2012 8:29:00 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 09/16/2012 8:34:45 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: 1 Corinthians 11:17-26, 33

Abuses


[17] But in the following instructions I do not commend you, because when you
come together it is not for the better but for the worse. [18] For, in the first place,
when you assemble as a church, I hear that there are divisions among you; and
I partly believe it, [19] for there must be factions among you in order that those
who are genuine among you may be recognized. [20] When you meet together,
it is not the Lord’s supper that you eat. [21] For in eating, each one goes ahead
with his own meal, and one is hungry and another is drunk. [22] What! Do you
not have houses to eat and drink in? Or do you despise the church of God and
humiliate those who have nothing? What shall I say to you? Shall I commend
you in this? No, I will not.

The Institution of the Eucharist and its Worthy Reception


[23] For I received from the Lord what I also delivered to you, that the Lord Jesus
on the night when he was betrayed took bread, [24] and when he had given thanks,
he broke it, and said, “This is my body which is for you. Do this in remembrance
of me.” [25] In the same way also the cup, after supper, saying, “This cup is the
new covenant in my blood. Do this, as often as you drink it, in remembrance of
me.” [26] For as often as you eat this bread and drink the cup, you proclaim the
Lord’s death until he comes.

[33] So then, my brethren, when you come together to eat, wait for one another.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

17-22. Here St Paul discusses a much more serious abuse. These Christians
used to combine the celebration of the Eucharist with a meal in common. In
principle, this meal was intended to be a sign of charity and solidarity among
those present: hence the fact that it was sometimes called an agape or frater-
nal banquet; these meals also provided an opportunity to help those most in
need. However, certain abuses had arisen: instead of a meal in which all sha-
red equally, they had been eating in groups, each group eating the food they
had brought, which meant that some ate and drank too much, while others did
not have enough or had nothing at all. The net effect was that this meal — giving
rise as it did to discontent and discord—was in sharp contrast with the Eucharist
the source of charity and unity. Very early on in the Church the Eucharist was
separated from these meals, which then became simple fraternal meals with no
liturgical significance.

23-26. These verses clearly bear witness to the early Christians’ faith in the eu-
charistic mystery. St Paul is writing around the year 57—only twenty-seven years
since the institution of the Eucharist—, reminding the Corinthians of what they
had been taught some years earlier (”c.” the year 51). The words “received” and
“delivered” are technical terms used to indicate that a teaching is part of aposto-
lic Tradition; cf. also 1 Cor 15:3. These two passages highlight the importance
of that apostolic Tradition. The words “I received from the Lord” are a technical
expression which means “I received through that Tradition which goes back to
the Lord himself.”

There are three other New Testament accounts of the institution of the Eucharist
(Mt 26:26-29; Mk 14:22-25; Lk 22:16-20). This account, which is most like St
Luke’s, is the earliest of the four.

The text contains the fundamental elements of Christian faith in the mystery of
the Eucharist: 1) the institution of this sacrament by Jesus Christ and his real
presence in it; 2) the institution of the Christian priesthood; 3) the Eucharist is
the sacrifice of the New Testament (cf. notes on Mt 26:26-29; Mk 14:22-25;
Lk 22: 16-20; 1 Cor 10: 14-22).

“Do this in remembrance of me”: in instituting the Eucharist, our Lord charged
that it be re-enacted until the end of time (cf. Lk 22:19), thereby instituting the
priesthood. The Council of Trent teaches that Jesus Christ our Lord, at the Last
Supper, “offered his body and blood under the species of bread and wine to God
the Father and he gave his body and blood under the same species to the apos-
tles to receive, making them priests of the New Testament at that time. [...] He
ordered the apostles and their successors in the priesthood to offer this sacra-
ment when he said, “Do this in remembrance of me”, as the Catholic Church
has always understood and taught” (”De SS. Missae Sacrificio”, chap. 1; cf.
can. 2). And so, Bl. John Paul II taught, the Eucharist is “the principal and cen-
tral reason-of-being of the sacrament of the priesthood, which effectively came
into being at the moment of the institution of the Eucharist, and together with
it” (”Letter to All Bishops”, 24 February 1980).

The word “remembrance” is charged with the meaning of a Hebrew word which
was used to convey the essence of the feast of the Passover — commemoration
of the exodus from Egypt. For the Israelites the passover rite not only reminded
them of a bygone event: they were conscious of making that event present, re-
viving it, in order to participate in it, in some way, generation after generation (cf.
Ex 12:26-27; Deut 6:20-25). So, when our Lord commands his Apostles to “do
this in remembrance of me”, it is not a matter of merely recalling his supper but
of renewing his own passover sacrifice of Calvary, which already, at the Last
Supper, was present in an anticipated way.

33-34. These precise instructions show how desirous the Apostle is to surround
the mystery of the Eucharist with due adoration, respect and reverence, which
are a logical consequence of the sublimity of this sacrament. The Church is tire-
less in making this point: “when celebrating the Sacrament of the body and blood
of the Lord, the full magnitude of the divine mystery must be respected, as must
the full meaning of this sacramental sign in which Christ is really present and is
received, the soul is filled with grace and the pledge of future glory is given (cf.
Vatican II, Sacrosanctum Concilium, 47).

“This is the source of the duty to carry out rigorously the liturgical rules and every-
thing that is a manifestation of community worship offered to God himself, all the
more so because in this sacramental sign he entrusts himself to us with limitless
trust, as if not taking into consideration our human weakness, our unworthiness,
the force of habit, or even the possibility of insult. Every member of the Church,
especially bishops and priests, must be vigilant in seeing that this Sacrament of
love shall be at the center of the life of the people of God, so that through all the
manifestations of worship due to it Christ shall be given back ‘love for love’ and
truly become ‘the life of our souls’ (cf. Jn 6:51-57; 14:6; Gal 2:20)” (Bl. John Paul
II, “Redemptor Hominis”, 20).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


3 posted on 09/16/2012 8:36:00 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

From: Luke 7:1-10

The Centurion’s Faith


[1] After He (Jesus) had ended all His sayings in the hearing of the people He en-
tered Capernaum. [2] Now a centurion had a slave who was dear to him, who was
sick and at the point of death. [3] When he heard of Jesus, he sent to Him elders
of the Jews, asking Him to come and heal his slave. [4] And when they came to
Jesus, they besought Him earnestly, saying, “He is worthy to have You do this
for him, [5] for he loves our nation, and he built us our synagogue.” [6] And Jesus
went with them. When He was not far from the house, the centurion sent friends
to Him, saying to Him, “Lord, do not trouble yourself, for I am not worthy to have
You come under my roof; [7] therefore I did not presume to come to You. But
say the word, and let my servant be healed. [8] For I am a man set under autho-
rity, with soldiers under me: and I say to one, ‘Go,’ and he goes; and to another,
‘Come,’ and he comes; and to my slave, ‘Do this,’ and he does it.” [9] When Je-
sus heard this He marvelled at him, and turned and said to the multitude that fol-
lowed Him, “I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith.” [10] And when
those who had been sent returned to the house, they found the slave well.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

1-10. “They besought Him earnestly” (verse 4). Here is an example of the effec-
tiveness of the prayer of petition, which induces Almighty God to work a miracle.
In this connection St. Bernard explains what we should ask God for: “As I see it,
the petitions of the heart consists in three things [...]. The first two have to do
with the present, that is, with things for the body and for the soul; the third is the
blessedness of eternal life. Do not be surprised that He says that we should ask
God for things for the body: all things come from Him, physical as well as spiri-
tual things [...]. However, we should pray more often and more fervently for things
our souls need, that is, for God’s grace and for virtues” (”Fifth Lenten Sermon”,
8f). To obtain His grace—of whatever kind—God Himself expects us to ask Him
assiduously, confidently, humbly and persistently.

What stands out here is the centurion’s humility: he did not belong to the chosen
people, he was a pagan; but he makes his request through friends, with deep hu-
mility. Humility is the route to faith, whether to receive faith for the first time or to
revive it. Speaking of his own conversion experience, St. Augustine says that be-
cause he was not humble, he could not understand how Jesus, who was such a
humble person, could be God, nor how God could teach anyone by lowering Him-
self to the point of taking on our human condition. This was precisely why the
Word, eternal Truth, became man—to demolish our pride, to encourage our love,
to subdue all things and thereby be able to raise us up (cf. “Confessions”, VII,
18, 24).

6-7. Such is the faith and humility of the centurion that the Church, in its eucha-
ristic liturgy, gives us his very words to express our own sentiments just before
receiving Holy Communion; we too should strive to have this interior disposition
when Jesus enters our roof, our soul.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.

Published by Four Courts Press, Kill Lane, Blackrock, Co. Dublin, Ireland, and
by Scepter Publishers in the United States.


4 posted on 09/16/2012 8:37:47 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Readings at Mass


First reading 1 Corinthians 11:17-26,33 ©
On the subject of instructions, I cannot say that you have done well in holding meetings that do you more harm than good. In the first place, I hear that when you all come together as a community, there are separate factions among you, and I half believe it – since there must no doubt be separate groups among you, to distinguish those who are to be trusted. The point is, when you hold these meetings, it is not the Lord’s Supper that you are eating, since when the time comes to eat, everyone is in such a hurry to start his own supper that one person goes hungry while another is getting drunk. Surely you have homes for eating and drinking in? Surely you have enough respect for the community of God not to make poor people embarrassed? What am I to say to you? Congratulate you? I cannot congratulate you on this.
  For this is what I received from the Lord, and in turn passed on to you: that on the same night that he was betrayed, the Lord Jesus took some bread, and thanked God for it and broke it, and he said, ‘This is my body, which is for you; do this as a memorial of me.’ In the same way he took the cup after supper, and said, ‘This cup is the new covenant in my blood. Whenever you drink it, do this as a memorial of me.’ Until the Lord comes, therefore, every time you eat this bread and drink this cup, you are proclaiming his death, So to sum up, my dear brothers, when you meet for the Meal, wait for one another.

Psalm Psalm 39:7-10,17 ©
Proclaim the death of the Lord, until he comes.
You do not ask for sacrifice and offerings,
  but an open ear.
You do not ask for holocaust and victim.
  Instead, here am I.
Proclaim the death of the Lord, until he comes.
In the scroll of the book it stands written
  that I should do your will.
My God, I delight in your law
  in the depth of my heart.
Proclaim the death of the Lord, until he comes.
Your justice I have proclaimed
  in the great assembly.
My lips I have not sealed;
  you know it, O Lord.
Proclaim the death of the Lord, until he comes.
O let there be rejoicing and gladness
  for all who seek you.
Let them ever say: ‘The Lord is great’,
  who love your saving help.
Proclaim the death of the Lord, until he comes.

Gospel Acclamation Ps118:27
Alleluia, alleluia!
Make me grasp the way of your precepts,
and I will muse on your wonders.
Alleluia!
Or Jn3:16
Alleluia, alleluia!
God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son:
everyone who believes in him has eternal life.
Alleluia!

Gospel Luke 7:1-10 ©
When Jesus had come to the end of all he wanted the people to hear, he went into Capernaum. A centurion there had a servant, a favourite of his, who was sick and near death. Having heard about Jesus he sent some Jewish elders to him to ask him to come and heal his servant. When they came to Jesus they pleaded earnestly with him. ‘He deserves this of you’ they said ‘because he is friendly towards our people; in fact, he is the one who built the synagogue.’ So Jesus went with them, and was not very far from the house when the centurion sent word to him by some friends: ‘Sir,’ he said ‘do not put yourself to trouble; because I am not worthy to have you under my roof; and for this same reason I did not presume to come to you myself; but give the word and let my servant be cured. For I am under authority myself, and have soldiers under me; and I say to one man: Go, and he goes; to another: Come here, and he comes; to my servant: Do this, and he does it.’ When Jesus heard these words he was astonished at him and, turning round, said to the crowd following him, ‘I tell you, not even in Israel have I found faith like this.’ And when the messengers got back to the house they found the servant in perfect health.

5 posted on 09/16/2012 8:46:07 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


 

PRAYERS AFTER
HOLY MASS AND COMMUNION



Leonine Prayers
    Following are the Prayers after Low Mass which were prescribed by Pope Leo XIII who composed the Prayer to Saint Michael the Archangel, and were reinforced by Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII to pray for the conversion of Russia. These prayers were in effect until after Vatican II. A decade later Paul VI said, "satan has entered the sanctuary." Could the elimination of these powerful prayers with a ten year indulgence have played a huge part in allowing the devil such easy access? The answer is obvious. Below the normal Leonine Prayers is the longer version of the Prayer to St. Michael, composed by His Excellency Pope Leo XIII to defend against The Great Apostasy.
Latin

Ave Maria, gratia plena, Dominus tecum, benedicta tu in mulieribus et benedictus fructis ventris tui, Jesus. Sancta Maria, Mater Dei, ora pro nobis peccatoribus, nunc et in hora mortis nostrae. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

    Salve Regina, Mater misericordiae, vita, dulcedo, et spes nostra, salve. Ad te clamamus, exsules filii Evae. Ad te suspiramus gementes et fientes in hac lacrymarum valle. Eia ergo, Advocata nostra, illos tuos misericordes oculos ad nos converte. Et Jesum, benedictum fructum ventris tui, nobis, post hoc exilium, ostende. O clemens, o pia, o dulcis Virgo Maria. Ora pro nobis, sancta Dei Genitrix. Ut digni efficiamur promissionibus Christi.

    Oremus. Deus, refugium nostrum et virtus, populum ad te clamantem propitius respice; et intercedente gloriosa, et immaculata Virgine Dei Genitrice Maria, cum beato Joseph, ejus Sponso, ac beatis Apostolis tuis Petro et Paulo, et omnibus Sanctis, quas pro conversione peccatorum, pro libertate et exaltatione sanctae Matris Ecclesiae, preces effundimus, misericors et benignus exaudi. Per eundum Christum Dominum nostrum. Amen.

Sancte Michael Archangele, defende nos in proelio; contra nequitiam et insidias diaboli esto praesidium. Imperet illi Deus, supplices deprecamur: tuque, Princeps militiae Caelestis, satanam aliosque spiritus malignos, qui ad perditionem animarum pervagantur in mundo, divina virtute in infernum detrude. Amen.

Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.
Cor Jesu sacratissimum. Miserere nobis.

Vernacular

   Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.
(Said 3 times)

   Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness, and our hope. To thee to we cry, poor banished children of Eve. To thee do we send up our sighs, mouring and weeping in this valley of tears. Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy toward us, and after this exile, show unto us the blessed Fruit of thy womb, Jesus. O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary.

Pray for us, O holy Mother of God. That we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

   Let us pray.
O God, our refuge and our strength, look down with mercy upon the people who cry to Thee; and by the intercession of the glorious and immaculate Virgin Mary, Mother of God, of Saint Joseph her spouse, of the blessed Apostles Peter and Paul, and of all the saints, in Thy mercy and goodness hear our prayers for the conversion of sinners, and for the liberty and exaltation of the Holy Mother the Church. Through the same Christ Our Lord. Amen.

   Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle; be our protection against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him, we humbly pray: and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world seeking the ruin of souls. Amen.

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.
Most Sacred Heart of Jesus, Have mercy on us.


Complete Prayer to Saint Michael
    The following is the longer version of the vital prayer composed by Pope Leo XIII in 1888 after his startling vision as to the future of the Church. This prayer was dedicated for the Feast of St. Michael 1448 years from the date of the election of the first Leo - Pope Saint Leo the Great. Everyone is familiar with the first prayer below which was mandated by His Holiness as part of the Leonine Prayers after Low Mass. After Vatican II, in legion with the devil Giovanni Montini outlawed this necessary prayer and then one wonders how "the smoke of satan" got into the sanctuary? The conciliarists wanted to make sure the words in bold below would never see the light of day again for in it Leo foretold what would happen: The shepherd would be struck, the sheep scattered. Below are both the short and longer versions of this poignant prayer which should never be forgotten.

    Saint Michael the Archangel, defend us in battle, be our defense against the wickedness and snares of the devil. May God rebuke him we humbly pray, and do thou, O heavenly hosts, by the power of God, thrust into hell satan and all the evil spirits who prowl about the world for the ruin of souls. Amen.

O glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Prince of the heavenly host, be our defense in the terrible warfare which we carry on against principalities and powers, against the rulers of this world of darkness, spirits of evil. Come to the aid of man, whom God created immortal, made in His own image and likeness, and redeemed at a great price from the tyranny of the devil. Fight this day the battle of our Lord, together with the holy angels, as already thou hast fought the leader of the proud angels, Lucifer, and his apostate host, who were powerless to resist thee, nor was there place for them any longer in heaven. That cruel, that ancient serpent, who is called the devil or Satan who seduces the whole world, was cast into the abyss with his angels. Behold this primeval enemy and slayer of men has taken courage. Transformed into an angel of light, he wanders about with all the multitude of wicked spirits, invading the earth in order to blot out the Name of God and of His Christ, to seize upon, slay, and cast into eternal perdition, souls destined for the crown of eternal glory. That wicked dragon pours out. as a most impure flood, the venom of his malice on men of depraved mind and corrupt heart, the spirit of lying, of impiety, of blasphemy, and the pestilent breath of impurity, and of every vice and iniquity. These most crafty enemies have filled and inebriated with gall and bitterness the Church, the spouse of the Immaculate Lamb, and have laid impious hands on Her most sacred possessions. In the Holy Place itself, where has been set up the See of the most holy Peter and the Chair of Truth for the light of the world, they have raised the throne of their abominable impiety with the iniquitous design that when the Pastor has been struck the sheep may be scattered. Arise then, O invincible Prince, bring help against the attacks of the lost spirits to the people of God, and give them the victory. They venerate thee as their protector and patron; in thee holy Church glories as her defense against the malicious powers of hell; to thee has God entrusted the souls of men to be established in heavenly beatitude. Oh, pray to the God of peace that He may put Satan under our feet, so far conquered that he may no longer be able to hold men in captivity and harm the Church. Offer our prayers in the sight of the Most High, so that they may quickly conciliate the mercies of the Lord; and beating down the dragon, the ancient serpent, who is the devil and Satan, do thou again make him captive in the abyss, that he may no longer seduce the nations. Amen.

    V: Behold the Cross of the Lord; be scattered ye hostile powers.
    R: The Lion of the Tribe of Juda has conquered the root of David.
    V: Let Thy mercies be upon us, O Lord.
    R: As we have hoped in Thee.
    V: O Lord hear my prayer.
    R: And let my cry come unto Thee.

    V: Let us pray. O God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, we call upon Thy holy Name, and as suppliants, we implore Thy clemency, that by the intercession of Mary, ever Virgin, immaculate and our Mother, and of the glorious Archangel Saint Michael, Thou wouldst deign to help us against Satan and all other unclean spirits, who wander about the world for the injury of the human race and the ruin of our souls. Amen.


Prayer Before the Crucifix

   Look down upon me, O good and gentle Jesus, while before Thy face I humbly kneel, and with burning soul pray and beseech Thee to fix deep in my heart lively sentiments of faith, hope and charity, true contrition for my sins, and a firm purpose of amendment; the while I contemplate with great love and tender pity Thy five most precious wounds, pondering over them within me, calling to mind the words which David Thy prophet said of Thee, my good Jesus: "They have pierced My hands and My feet; they have numbered all My bones."

Indulgence of ten years; a plenary indulgence if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, Raccolta 201)

Anima Christi - Soul of Christ

Soul of Christ, sanctify me.
Body of Christ, save me.
Blood of Christ, inebriate me.
Water from the side of Christ, wash me.
Passion of Christ, strengthen me.
O Good Jesus, hear me.
Within Thy wounds, hide me.
Suffer me not to be separated from Thee.
From the malignant enemy, defend me.
In the hour of my death, call me.
And bid me come to Thee, that with
Thy saints I may praise Thee for ever and ever. Amen.

Indulgence of 300 days; if recited after devout reception of Holy Communion, seven years Raccolta 131)

Prayer for Vocations

   O Lord Jesus Christ, Who didst take to Thyself a body and soul like ours, to teach us the glory of self-sacrifice and service, mercifully deign to instill in other hearts the desire to dedicate their lives to Thee. Give us PRIESTS to stand before Thine Altar and to preach the words of Thy Gospel; BROTHERS to assist the priests and to reproduce in themselves Thy humility; SISTERS to teach the young and nurse the sick and to minister Thy charity to all; LAY PEOPLE to imitate Thee in their homes and families. Amen.


6 posted on 09/16/2012 8:49:55 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
NOVENA for the ELECTION -- 54 or 56 days (you choose!) ECUMENICAL
7 posted on 09/16/2012 8:50:32 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
8 posted on 09/16/2012 8:52:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
9 posted on 09/16/2012 8:52:44 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.


10 posted on 09/16/2012 8:53:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)

1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

11 posted on 09/16/2012 8:54:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

12 posted on 09/16/2012 8:56:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Prayer for our Free Nation Under God
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

   

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


13 posted on 09/16/2012 8:56:41 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Our Blessed Lady's Sorrows

Sea of Sorrow

Oh! on what a sea of sorrow
Was the Virgin-Mother cast,
When her eyes with tears o'erflowing
Gazed upon her Son aghast,
From the bloodstained gibbet taken,
Dying in her arms at last.

In her bitter desolation,
His sweet mouth, His bosom too,
Then His riven side beloved,
Then each hand, both wounded through,
Then His feet, with blood encrimsoned,
Her maternal tears bedew.

She, a hundred times and over,
Strains Him closely to her breast
Heart to Heart, arms arms enfolding,
Are His wounds on her impressed:
Thus, in sorrow's very kisses,
Melts her anguished soul to rest.

Oh, dear Mother! we beseech thee,
By the tears thine eyes have shed,
By the cruel death of Jesus
And His wounds' right royal red,
Make our hearts o'erflow with sorrow
From thy heart's deep fountainhead.

To the Father, Son, and Spirit,
Now we bend on equal knee:
Glory, sempiternal glory,
To the Most High Trinity;
Yea! perpetual praise and honor
Now and through all ages be.

Novena Prayer To Our Sorrowful Mother

Most Blessed and afflicted Virgin, Queen of Martyrs, who didst stand generously beneath the cross, beholding the agony of thy dying Son; by the sword of sorrow which then pierced thy soul, by the sufferings of thy sorrowful life, by the unutterable joy which now more than repays thee for them; look down with a mother's pity and tenderness, as I kneel before thee to compassionate thy sorrows, and to lay my petition with childlike confidence in thy wounded heart. I beg of thee, O my Mother, to plead continually for me with thy Son, since He can refuse thee nothing, and through the merits of His most sacred Passion and Death, together with thy own sufferings at the foot of the cross, so to touch His Sacred Heart, that I may obtain my request,
For to whom shall I fly in my wants and miseries, if not to thee, O Mother of mercy, who, having so deeply drunk the chalice of thy Son, canst most pity us poor exiles, still doomed to sigh in this vale of tears? Offer to Jesus but one drop of His Precious Blood, but one pang of His adorable Heart; remind Him that thou art our life, our sweetness, and our hope, and thou wilt obtain what I ask, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Hail Mary
Virgin Most Sorrowful, pray for us
(Seven times each)

Mary, most holy Virgin and Queen of Martyrs, accept the sincere homage of my filial affection. Into thy Heart, pierced by so many swords, do thou welcome my poor soul. Receive it as the companion of thy sorrows at the foot of the Cross, on which Jesus died for the redemption of the world. With thee, O sorrowful Virgin, I will gladly suffer all the trials, contradictions, and infirmities which it shall please Our Lord to send me. I offer them all to thee in memory of thy sorrows, so that: every thought of my mind and every beat of my heart may be an act of compassion and of love for thee. And do thou, sweet Mother, have pity on me, reconcile me to thy Divine Son, Jesus; keep me in His grace and assist me in my last agony, so that I may be able to meet thee in Heaven and sing thy glories.

Most holy Virgin and Mother, whose soul was pierced by a sword of sorrow in the Passion of thy Divine Son, and who in His glorious Resurrection wast filled with never ending joy at His triumph, obtain for us who call upon thee, so to be partakers in the adversities of Holy Church and the Sorrows of the Sovereign Pontiff, as to be found worthy to rejoice with them in the consolations for which we pray, in the charity and peace of the same Christ our Lord. Amen.

Litany of the Seven Sorrows

For private use only.

Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, have mercy on us.
Lord, have mercy on us.
Christ, hear us.
Christ, graciously hear us.

God the Father of Heaven,
Have mercy on us.
God the Son, Redeemer of the world,
Have mercy on us.
God the Holy Spirit,
Have mercy on us.
Holy Trinity, One God,
Have mercy on us.

Holy Mary,
Pray for us.
Holy Mother of God,
Pray for us.
Holy Virgin of virgins, etc.
Mother crucified,
Mother sorrowful,
Mother tearful,
Mother afflicted,
Mother forsaken,
Mother desolate,
Mother bereft of thy Child,
Mother transfixed with the sword,
Mother consumed with grief,
Mother filled with anguish,
Mother crucified in heart,
Mother most sad,
Fountain of tears,
Abyss of suffering,
Mirror of patience,
Rock of constancy,
Anchor of confidence,
Refuge of the forsaken,
Shield of the oppressed,
Subduer of the unbelieving,
Comfort of the afflicted,
Medicine of the sick,
Strength of the weak,
Harbor of the wrecked,
Allayer of tempests,
Resource of mourners,
Terror of the treacherous,
Treasure of the faithful,
Eye of the Prophets,
Staff of the Apostles,
Crown of Martyrs,
Light of confessors,
Pearl of virgins,
Consolation of widows,
Joy of all Saints,

Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Spare us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Graciously hear us, O Lord.
Lamb of God, Who takest away the sins of the world,
Have mercy on us.

Look down upon us, deliver us, and save us from all trouble,
in the power of Jesus Christ. Amen.

Let Us Pray.
Imprint, O Lady, thy wounds upon my heart, that I may read therein sorrow and love
--- sorrow to endure every sorrow for thee, love to despise every love for thee. Amen.

Conclude with the Apostles Creed, Hail Holy Queen, and three Hail Marys,
in honor of the Most Holy Heart of Mary.

Stabat Mater Dolorosa

Stabat mater dolorosa
iuxta Crucem lacrimosa,
dum pendebat Filius.

Cuius animam gementem,
contristatam et dolentem
pertransivit gladius.

O quam tristis et afflicta
fuit illa benedicta,
mater Unigeniti!

Quae maerebat et dolebat,
pia Mater, dum videbat
nati poenas inclyti.

Quis est homo qui non fleret,
matrem Christi si videret
in tanto supplicio?

Quis non posset contristari
Christi Matrem contemplari
dolentem cum Filio?

Pro peccatis suae gentis
vidit Iesum in tormentis,
et flagellis subditum.

Vidit suum dulcem Natum
moriendo desolatum,
dum emisit spiritum.

Eia, Mater, fons amoris
me sentire vim doloris
fac, ut tecum lugeam.

Fac, ut ardeat cor meum
in amando Christum Deum
ut sibi complaceam.

Sancta Mater, istud agas,
crucifixi fige plagas
cordi meo valide.

Tui Nati vulnerati,
tam dignati pro me pati,
poenas mecum divide.

Fac me tecum pie flere,
crucifixo condolere,
donec ego vixero.

Iuxta Crucem tecum stare,
et me tibi sociare
in planctu desidero.

Virgo virginum praeclara,
mihi iam non sis amara,
fac me tecum plangere.

Fac, ut portem Christi mortem,
passionis fac consortem,
et plagas recolere.

Fac me plagis vulnerari,
fac me Cruce inebriari,
et cruore Filii.

Flammis ne urar succensus,
per te, Virgo, sim defensus
in die iudicii.

Christe, cum sit hinc exire,
da per Matrem me venire
ad palmam victoriae.

Quando corpus morietur,
fac, ut animae donetur
paradisi gloria. Amen.

Prayer To Our Lady of Sorrows, by St. Bridget

O Blessed Virgin Mary, Immaculate Mother of God, who didst endure a martyrdom of love and grief beholding the sufferings and sorrows of Jesus! Thou didst cooperate in the benefit of my redemption by thine innumerable afflictions and by offering to the Eternal Father His only begotten Son as a holocaust and victim of propitiation for my sins. I thank thee for the unspeakable love which led thee to deprive thyself of the Fruit of thy womb, Jesus, true God and true Man, to save me, a sinner. Oh, make use of the unfailing intercession of thy sorrows with the Father and the Son, that I may steadfastly amend my life and never again crucify my loving Redeemer by new sins, and that, persevering till death in His grace. I may obtain eternal life through the merits of His Cross and Passion. Amen.

Mother of love, of sorrow and of mercy, pray for us.

Saint Alphonsus Liguori's Prayer To The Mother Of Sorrows

O, my Blessed Mother, it is not one sword only with which I have pierced thy heart, but I have done so with as many as are the sins which I have committed. O, Lady, it is not to thee, who art innocent, that sufferings are due, but to me, who am guilty of so many crimes. But since thou hast been pleased to suffer so much for me, by thy merits, obtain me great sorrow for my sins, and patience under the trials of this life, which will always be light in comparison with my demerits; for I have often deserved Hell.
Amen.


 

Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: The 7 Sorrows (Dolours) and 7 Joys of Our Lady
The Seven Dolors (Sorrows) of Mary [Catholic/Orthodox Devotional]
Apparition in Africa: Our Lady of Sorrows [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
Feast of the Seven Sorrows of the Blessed Virgin Mary [Catholic Caucus Devotional]
Feast of Our Lady/Mother of Sorrows
Homilies on Our Lady of Sorrows
Starkenburg:Pilgrimage to Our Lady of Sorrows Shrine
Our Mother of Sorrows
ST. ALPHONSUS LIGUORI, OF THE DOLOURS OF MARY, The Glories [Sorrows] of Mary
Our Lady of Sorrows - Sep 15



14 posted on 09/16/2012 8:57:30 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

September 2012

Pope's intentions

General Intention: That politicians may always act with honesty, integrity, and love for the truth.

Missionary Intention: Help for the Poorest Churches. That Christian communities may have a growing willingness to send missionaries, priests, and lay people, along with concrete resources, to the poorest Churches.


15 posted on 09/16/2012 8:58:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Monday, September 17, 2012
The Sacred Stigmata of Saint Francis of Assisi (Feast)
First Reading:
Psalm:
Gospel:
Galatians 6:14-18
Galatians 2:16, 20; Philippians 1:20-21
Luke 9:23-26

Simon Peter replied, "You are the Christ, the Son of the living God." And Jesus answered him, "Blessed are you, Simon Bar-Jona! For flesh and blood has not revealed this to you, but my Father who is in heaven. And I tell you, you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church, and the gates of hell shall not prevail against it. I will give you the keys of the kingdom of heaven, and whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.

-- Matt. 16:16-19


16 posted on 09/16/2012 9:01:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


17 posted on 09/16/2012 9:07:48 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sep 17, Invitatory for Monday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Psalm 24

The Lord’s is the earth and its fullness,
the world and all its peoples.
It is he who set it on the seas;
on the waters he made it firm.

Ant.

Who shall climb the mountain of the Lord?
Who shall stand in his holy place?
The man with clean hands and pure heart,
who desires not worthless things,
who has not sworn so as to deceive his neighbor.

Ant.

He shall receive blessings from the Lord
and reward from the God who saves him.
Such are the men who seek him,
seek the face of the God of Jacob.

Ant.

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant.

Who is the king of glory?
The Lord, the mighty, the valiant,
the Lord, the valiant in war.

Ant.

O gates, lift high your heads;
grow higher, ancient doors.
Let him enter, the king of glory!

Ant.

Who is he, the king of glory?
He, the Lord of armies,
he is the king of glory.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us sing joyful songs to the Lord.

18 posted on 09/17/2012 1:48:04 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 17, Office of Readings for Monday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 615
Proper of Seasons: 256
Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 1107

Christian Prayer:
Does not contain Office of Readings.

Office of Readings for Monday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Sing praise to God who reigns above,
The God of all creation,
The God of power, the God of love,
The God of our salvation;
With healing balm my soul he fills,
And every faithless murmur stills:
To God all praise and glory.

What God’s almighty power hath made,
His gracious mercy keepeth;
By morning glow or evening shade
His watchful eye never sleepeth;
Within the kingdom of his might,
Lo! all is just and all is right:
To God all praise and glory.

Then all my gladsome way along,
I sing aloud thy praises,
That men may hear the grateful song
My voice unwearied raises;
Be joyful in the Lord, my heart,
Both soul and body, bear your part:
To God all praise and glory.

O ye who name Christ’s holy name,
Give God all praise and glory;
All ye who own this power, proclaim
Aloud the wondrous story!
Cast each false idol from his throne.
The Lord is God, and he alone:
To God all praise and glory.

“Sing praise to God who reigns above” by The Choir of King’s School; Melody: Mit Freuden Zart 87.87.887; Music: Bohemian Brethren’s Hymnbook, 1566; Text: Johan J. Schutz, 1640-1690; Translator: Frances E. Cox, 1812-1897
“Sing praise to God who reigns above” performed by The Choir of King’s School is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 How good is the God of Israel to the pure of heart!

Psalm 73
Why is it that the good have many troubles?

Blessed is the man who does not lose faith in me (Matthew 11:6).

I

How good God is to Israel,
to those who are pure of heart.
Yet my feet came close to stumbling,
my steps had almost slipped
for I was filled with envy of the proud
when I saw how the wicked prosper.

For them there are no pains;
their bodies are sound and sleek.
They do not share in men’s sorrows;
they are not stricken like others.

So they wear their pride like a necklace,
they clothe themselves with violence.
Their hearts overflow with malice,
their minds seethe with plots.

They scoff; they speak with malice;
from on high they plan oppression.
They have set their mouths in the heavens
and their tongues dictate to the earth.

So the people turn to follow them
and drink in all their words.
They say: How can God know?
Does the Most High take any notice?”
Look at them, such are the wicked,
but untroubled, they grow in wealth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. How good is the God of Israel to the pure of heart!

Ant. 2 Their laughter will turn to weeping, their merriment to grief.

II

How useless to keep my heart pure
and wash my hands in innocence,
when I was stricken all day long,
suffered punishment day after day.

Then I said: If I should speak like that,
I should betray the race of your sons.”

I strove to fathom this problem,
too hard for my mind to understand,
until I pierced the mysteries of God
and understood what becomes of the wicked.

How slippery the paths on which you set them;
you make them slide to destruction.
How suddenly they come to their ruin,
wiped out, destroyed by terrors.
Like a dream one wakes from, O Lord,
when you wake you dismiss them as phantoms.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Their laughter will turn to weeping, their merriment to grief.

Ant. 3 Those who depart from you will perish; my joy is to remain with you, my God.

III

And so when my heart grew embittered
and when I was cut to the quick,
I was stupid and did not understand,
no better than a beast in your sight.

Yet I was always in your presence;
you were holding me by my right hand.
You will guide me by your counsel
and so you will lead me to glory.

What else have I in heaven but you?
Apart from you I want nothing on earth.
My body and my heart faint for joy;
God is my possession for ever.

All those who abandon you shall perish;
you will destroy all those who are faithless.
To be near God is my happiness.
I have made the Lord God my refuge.
I will tell of your works
at the gates of the city of Zion.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

It is good to be with you, Father; in you is fullness of life for your faithful people; in you all hope resides. May you lead us to everlasting happiness.

Ant. Those who depart from you will perish; my joy is to remain with you, my God.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

To savor your words is my delight, O Lord,
Honey itself is not sweeter.

READINGS

First reading
From the book of the prophet Ezekiel
2:8-3:11,17-21
The Shepherds who feed themselves

The Lord spoke to me and said: As for you, son of man, obey me when I speak to you: be not rebellious like this house of rebellion, but open your mouth and eat what I shall give you.

It was then I saw a hand stretched out to me, in which was a written scroll which he unrolled before me. It was covered with writing front and back, and written on it was: Lamentation and wailing and woe!

He said to me: Son of man, eat what is before you; eat this scroll, then go, speak to the house of Israel. So I opened my mouth and he gave me the scroll to eat. Son of man, he then said to me, feed your belly and fill your stomach with this scroll I am giving you. I ate it, and it was as sweet as honey in my mouth. He said: Son of man, go now to the house of Israel, and speak my words to them.

Not to a people with difficult speech and barbarous language am I sending you, nor to the many peoples (with difficult speech and barbarous language) whose words you cannot understand. If I were to send you to these, they would listen to you; but the house of Israel will refuse to listen to you, since they will not listen to me. For the whole house of Israel is stubborn of brow and obstinate in heart. But I will make your face as hard as theirs, and your brow as stubborn as theirs, like diamond, harder than flint. Fear them not, nor be dismayed at their looks, for they are a rebellious house.

Son of man, he said to me, take into your heart all my words that I speak to you; hear them well. Now go to the exiles, to your countrymen, and say to them: Thus says the Lord God!–whether they heed or resist!

Thus the word of the Lord came to me: Son of man, I have appointed you a watchman for the house of Israel. When you hear a word from my mouth, you shall warn them for me.

If I say to the wicked man, You shall surely die; and you do not warn him or speak out to dissuade him from his wicked conduct so that he may live: that wicked man shall die for his sin, but I will hold you responsible for his death. If, on the other hand, you have warned the wicked man, yet he has not turned away from his evil nor from his wicked conduct, then he shall die for his sin, but you shall save your life.

If a virtuous man turns away from virtue and does wrong when I place a stumbling block before him, he shall die. He shall die for his sin, and his virtuous deeds shall not be remembered; but I will hold you responsible for his death if you did not warn him. When, on the other hand, you have warned a virtuous man not to sin, and he has in fact not sinned, he shall surely live because of the warning, and you shall save your own life.

RESPONSORY Ezekiel 3:17; 2:6,8;3:8

I have appointed you a watchman for the house of Israel.
Listen to what I say to you
and speak to them in my name.
Neither be afraid of them nor rebellious like them.

I will make your face as hard as theirs
and your forehead as stubborn and as obstinate.
Neither be afraid of them nor rebellious like them.

Second reading
From a sermon On Pastors by Saint Augustine, bishop
The shepherds who feed themselves

Let us consider the unflattering words of God which Scripture addresses to shepherds who feed themselves and not the sheep. You consume their milk and cover yourselves with their wool; you kill the fatlings, but my sheep you do not pasture. You have failed to strengthen what was weak, to heal what was sick, and to bind up what was injured. You did not call back what went astray, nor seek out what was lost. What was strong you have destroyed, and my sheep have been scattered because there is no shepherd.

This is spoken to the shepherds who feed themselves and not the sheep; it speaks of their concern and their neglect. What is their concern? You consume their milk and cover yourselves with their wool. And so the Apostle asks: Who plants a vineyard and does not eat from its fruit? Who pastures a flock and does not drink from the milk of the flock? Thus we learn that the milk of the flock is whatever temporal support and sustenance God’s people give to those who are placed over them. It is of this that the Apostle was speaking in the passage just quoted.

Although he chose to support himself by the labor of his own hands and not to ask for milk from the sheep, the Apostle did say that he had the right to receive the milk, for the Lord had established that they who preach the Gospel should live from the Gospel. Paul also says that other of his fellow apostles made use of this right, a right granted them, and not unlawfully usurped. But Paul went further by not taking what was rightfully his. He forgave the debt, whereas the others did not demand what was not due them. Therefore Paul went further. Perhaps his action was foreshadowed by the Good Samaritan who, when he brought the sick man to the inn, said: If you spend any more, I will repay you on my way back.

What more can I say concerning those shepherds who do not need the milk of the flock? They are more merciful; or rather, they carry out a more abundant ministry of mercy. They are able to do so, and they do it. Let them receive praise, but do not condemn the others. The Apostle himself did not seek what was given. However, he wanted the sheep to be fruitful, not sterile and unable to give milk.

RESPONSORY Ezekiel 34:15-16

I myself shall pasture my sheep
and I myself shall give them rest, says the Lord God.
I shall look for the lost sheep and bring back the stray.

I shall strengthen the weak
and protect the healthy and strong.
I shall look for the lost sheep and bring back the stray.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Look upon us,
O God, Creator and ruler of all things,
and, that we may feel the working of your mercy,
grant that we may serve you with all our heart.
Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

19 posted on 09/17/2012 1:48:13 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 17, Morning Prayer for Monday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. III:
Ordinary: 689
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 1147

Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 618
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 1111

Christian Prayer (single volume)
Ordinary: 689
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 937

Morning Prayer for Monday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

I sing the mighty power of God, that made the mountains rise,
That spread the flowing seas abroad, and built the lofty skies.
I sing the wisdom that ordained the sun to rule the day;
The moon shines full at His command, and all the stars obey.

I sing the goodness of the Lord, who filled the earth with food,
He formed the creatures through the Word, and then pronounced them good.
Lord, how Thy wonders are displayed, where e’er I turn my eye,
If I survey the ground I tread, or gaze upon the sky.

There’s not a plant or flower below, but makes thy glories known;
And clouds arise and tempests blow, by order from thy throne;
While all that borrows life from thee is ever in thy care,
And everywhere that man can be, thou, God, art present there.

“I Sing The Mighty Power” by Steven Anderson; Words: Isaac Watts, Divine and Moral Songs for Children, 1715. Music: Forest Green, traditional English melody, arranged by Ralph Vaughan Williams, 1906

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Each morning, Lord, you fill us with your kindness.

Psalm 90
May we live in the radiance of God

There is no time with God: a thousand years, a single day, it is all one (2 Peter 3:8).

O Lord, you have been our refuge
from one generation to the next.
Before the mountains were born
or the earth or the world brought forth,
you are God, without beginning or end.

You turn men back to dust
and say: “Go back, sons of men.”
To your eyes a thousand years
are like yesterday, come and gone,
no more than a watch in the night.

You sweep men away like a dream,
like grass which springs up in the morning.
In the morning it springs up and flowers:
by evening it withers and fades.

So we are destroyed in your anger,
struck with terror in your fury.
Our guilt lies open before you;
our secrets in the light of your face.

All our days pass away in your anger.
Our life is over like a sigh.
Our span is seventy years
or eighty for those who are strong.

And most of these are emptiness and pain.
They pass swiftly and we are gone.
Who understands the power of your anger
and fears the strength of your fury?

Make us know the shortness of our life
that we may gain wisdom of heart.
Lord, relent! Is your anger for ever?
Show pity to your servants.

In the morning, fill us with your love;
we shall exult and rejoice all our days.
Give us joy to balance our affliction
for the years when we knew misfortune.

Show forth your work to your servants;
let your glory shine on their children.
Let the favor of the Lord be upon us:
give success to the work of our hands,
give success to the work of our hands.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord, send your mercy and your truth to rescue us from the snares of the devil, and, happy to be known as companions of your Son, we will praise you among the peoples and proclaim you to the nations.

Ant. Each morning, Lord, you fill us with your kindness.

Ant. 2 From the farthest bounds of earth, may God be praised!

Canticle – Isaiah 42:10-16
God victor and savior

They were singing a new hymn before the throne of God (Revelation 14:3)..

Sing to the Lord a new song,
his praise from the end of the earth:

Let the sea and what fills it resound,
the coastlands, and those who dwell in them.
Let the steppe and its cities cry out,
the villages where Kedar dwells;

Let the inhabitants of Sela exult,
and shout from the top of the mountains.
Let them give glory to the Lord,
and utter his praise in the coastlands.

The Lord goes forth like a hero,
like a warrior he stirs up his ardor;
he shouts out his battle cry,
against his enemies he shows his might:

I have looked away, and kept silence,
I have said nothing, holding myself in;
but now, I cry out as a woman in labor,
gasping and panting.

I will lay waste mountains and hills,
all their herbage I will dry up;
I will turn the rivers into marshes,
and the marshes I will dry up.

I will lead the blind on their journey;
by paths unknown I will guide them.
I will turn darkness into light before them,
and make crooked ways straight.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. From the farthest bounds of earth, may God be praised!

Ant. 3 You who stand in his sanctuary, praise the name of the Lord.

Psalm 135
Praise for the wonderful things God does for us

He has won you for himself… and you must proclaim what he has done for you: he has called you out of darkness into his own wonderful light (1 Peter 2:9).

Praise the name of the Lord,
praise him, servants of the Lord,
who stand in the house of the Lord,
in the courts of the house of our God.

Praise the Lord for the Lord is good.
Sing a psalm to his name for he is loving.
For the Lord has chosen Jacob for himself
and Israel for his own possession.

For I know the Lord is great,
that our Lord is high above all gods.
The Lord does whatever he wills,
in heaven, on earth, in the seas.

He summons clouds from the ends of the earth;
makes lightning produce the rain;
from his treasuries he sends forth the wind.

The first-born of the Egyptians he smote,
of man and beast alike.
Signs and wonders he worked
in the midst of your land, O Egypt,
against Pharaoh and all his servants.

Nations in their greatness he struck
and kings in their splendor he slew.
Sihon, king of the Amorites,
Og, the king of Bashan,
and all the kingdoms of Canaan.
He let Israel inherit their land;
on his people their land he bestowed.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Where two or three gather in your name, Lord, you promised to be with them and share their fellowship. Look down upon your family gathered here in your name, and graciously pour out your blessing upon us.

Ant. You who stand in his sanctuary, praise the name of the Lord.

READING Judith 8:25-27

We should be grateful to the Lord our God, for putting us to the test, as he did our forefathers. Recall how he dealt with Abraham, and how he tried Isaac, and all that happened to Jacob in Syrian Mesopotamia while he was tending the flocks of Laban, his mother’s brother. Not for vengeance did the Lord put them in the crucible to try their hearts, nor has he done so with us. It is by way of admonition that he chastises those who are close to him.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

Sing for joy, God’s chosen ones, give him the praise that is due.
Sing for joy, God’s chosen ones, give him the praise that is due.

Sing a new song to the Lord,
give him the praise that is due.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Sing for joy, God’s chosen ones, give him the praise that is due.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. Blessed be the Lord, for he has come to his people and set them free.

Luke 1:68 – 79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Blessed be the Lord, for he has come to his people and set them free.

INTERCESSIONS

Because Christ hears and saves those who hope in him, let us pray:
We praise you, Lord, we hope in you.

We thank you because you are rich in mercy,
and for the abundant love with which you have loved us.
We praise you, Lord, we hope in you.

With the Father you are always at work in the world,
make all things new through the power of your Holy Spirit.
We praise you, Lord, we hope in you.

Open our eyes and the eyes of our brothers,
to see your wonders this day.
We praise you, Lord, we hope in you.

You call us today to your service,
make us stewards of your many gifts.
We praise you, Lord, we hope in you.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth, as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

God our creator,
you gave us the earth to cultivate
and the sun to serve our needs.
Help us to spend this day
for your glory and our neighbor’s good.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

20 posted on 09/17/2012 1:48:19 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 17, Midday Prayer for Monday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. III:
Ordinary: 659
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 1154 (Midday)

Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 623
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 1118 (Midday)

Midday Prayer for Monday in Ordinary Time using Current Psalmody

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

Help us, O Lord, to learn
the truths thy word imparts:
to study that thy laws may be
inscribed upon our hearts.

Help us, O Lord, to live
the faith which we proclaim,
that all our thoughts and words and deeds
may glorify thy name.

Help us, O Lord, to teach
the beauty of thy ways,
that yearning souls may find the Christ,
and sing aloud his praise.

Words: William Watkins Reid, Jr. © 1959; Music: Sandys, Dominica, St. Ethelwald, St. Michael, Day of Praise, Falcon Street; Meter: SM
“Help us, O Lord, to learn” performed by Choir of the Abbey School Tewkesbury is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Lord, guide my steps according to your promise.

Psalm 119:129-136
XVII (Pe)
A meditation on God’s law

The whole law is summed up in love (Romans 13:10).

Your will is wonderful indeed;
therefore I obey it.
The unfolding of your word gives light
and teaches the simple.

I open my mouth and I sigh
as I yearn for your commands.
Turn and show me your mercy;
show justice to your friends.

Let my steps be guided by your promise;
let no evil rule me.
Redeem me from man’s oppression
and I will keep your precepts.

Let your face shine on your servant
and teach me your decrees.
Tears stream from my eyes
because your law is disobeyed.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

You are just, Lord God, and righteous are your judgments. Deliver those who cry to you in their affliction; give them peace and calm to reflect on your commands.

Ant. Lord, guide my steps according to your promise.

Ant. 2 There is but one lawgiver and judge; who are you to judge your neighbor?

Psalm 82
Denunciation of evil judges

Do not attempt to judge another now; the Lord’s coming will reveal all (1 Corinthians 4:5).

God stands in the divine assembly.
In the midst of the gods he gives judgment.

“How long will you judge unjustly
and favor the cause of the wicked?
Do justice for the weak and the orphan,
defend the afflicted and the needy.
Rescue the weak and the poor;
set them free from the hand of the wicked.

Unperceiving, they grope in the darkness
and the order of the world is shaken.
I have said to you: ‘You are gods,
and all of you, sons of the Most High.’
And yet, you shall die like men,
you shall fall like any of the princes.”

Arise, O God, judge the earth,
for you rule all the nations.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

You are always true to your word, Father. Look down from heaven and put an end to our foolishness. Save us from groundless fears and help us to please you with undivided heart.

Ant. There is but one lawgiver and judge; who are you to judge your neighbor?

Ant. 3 I cried out to the Lord, and he heard me.

Psalm 120
Longing for peace

Be patient in suffering; persevere in prayer (Romans 12:12).

To the Lord in the hour of my distress
I call and he answers me.
“O Lord, save my soul from lying lips,
from the tongue of the deceitful.”

What shall he pay you in return,
O treacherous tongue?
The warrior’s arrows sharpened
and coals, red-hot, blazing.

Alas, that I abide a stranger in Meshech,
dwell among the tents of Kedar!
Long enough have I been dwelling
with those who hate peace.
I am for peace, but when I speak,
they are for fighting.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

You declared peacemakers happy, Lord Jesus, since they will be called sons of God. Give us that peace which the world cannot give so that your Church may be freed from the schemes of arrogant men, and, devoted to works of peace, go forward joyfully to meet you, the King of Peace.

Ant. I cried out to the Lord, and he heard me.

READING Wisdom 15:1, 3

You, our God, are good and true,
slow to anger, and governing all with mercy.
To know you well is complete justice,
and to know your might is the root of immortality.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell)
A moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Lord our God, you are tender and compassionate.
You are patient, most merciful, and true to your word.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Father,
yours is the harvest
and yours is the vineyard:
you assign the task
and pay a wage that is just.
Help us to meet this day’s responsibilities,
and let nothing separate us from your love.
Grant this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

21 posted on 09/17/2012 1:48:28 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 17, Evening Prayer for Monday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. III:
Ordinary: 668
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 1159

Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: 632
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 1123

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 694
All from the Psalter: Monday, Week IV, 942

Evening Prayer for Monday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

HYMN

In the Lord I’ll be ever thankful,
In the Lord I will rejoice!
Look to God, do not be afraid.
Lift up your voices, the Lord is near.
Lift up your voices, the Lord is near.

“In the Lord I’ll be ever thankful” performed by Taizé; Music: J. Berthier; Ateliers et Presses de Taize, F-71250 Taize-Communaute

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Give thanks to the Lord, for his great love is without end.

Psalm 136
Easter Hymn

We praise God by recalling his marvelous deeds (Cassiodorus).

I

O give thanks to the Lord for he is good,
for his love endures for ever.
Give thanks to the God of gods
for his love endures for ever.
Give thanks to the Lord of lords,
for his love endures for ever;

who alone has wrought marvelous works,
for his love endures for ever;
whose wisdom it was made the skies,
for his love endures for ever;
who fixed the earth firmly on the seas,
for his love endures for ever.

It was he who made the great lights,
for his love endures for ever;
the sun to rule in the day,
for his love endures for ever;
the moon and the stars in the night,
for his love endures for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Give thanks to the Lord, for his great love is without end.

Ant. 2 Great and wonderful are your deeds, Lord God the Almighty.

II

The first-born of the Egyptians he smote,
for his love endures for ever.
He brought Israel out from their midst,
for his love endures for ever;
arm outstretched, with power in his hand,
for his love endures for ever.

He divided the Red Sea in two,
for his love endures for ever;
he made Israel pass through the midst,
for his love endures for ever;
he flung Pharaoh and his force in the sea,
for his love endures for ever.

Through the desert his people he led,
for his love endures for ever.
Nations in their greatness he struck,
for his love endures for ever.
Kings in their splendor he slew,
for his love endures for ever.

Sihon, king of the Amorites,
for his love endures for ever;
and Og, the king of Bashan,
for his love endures for ever.

He let Israel inherit their land,
for his love endures for ever.
On his servant their land he bestowed,
for his love endures for ever.
He remembered us in our distress,
for his love endures for ever.

And he snatched us away from our foes,
for his love endures for ever.
He gives food to all living things,
for his love endures for ever.
To the God of heaven give thanks,
for his love endures for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Almighty God, remember our lowliness and have mercy. Once you gave our fathers a foreign land to inherit. Free us today from sin and give us a share in your inheritance.

Ant. Great and wonderful are your deeds, Lord God the Almighty.

Ant. 3 God planned in the fullness of time to restore all things in Christ.

Canticle – Ephesians 1:3-10
God our Savior

Praised be the God and Father
of our Lord Jesus Christ,
who has bestowed on us in Christ
every spiritual blessing in the heavens.

God chose us in him
before the world began
to be holy
and blameless in his sight.

He predestined us
to be his adopted sons through Jesus Christ,
such was his will and pleasure,
that all might praise the glorious favor
he has bestowed on us in his beloved.

In him and through his blood, we have been redeemed,
and our sins forgiven,
so immeasurably generous
is God’s favor to us.

God has given us the wisdom
to understand fully the mystery,
the plan he was pleased
to decree in Christ.

A plan to be carried out
in Christ, in the fulness of time,
to bring all things into one in him,
in the heavens and on earth.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. God planned in the fullness of time to restore all things in Christ.

READING 1 Thessalonians 3:12-13

May the Lord increase you and make you overflow with love for one another and for all, even as our love does for you. May he strengthen your hearts, making them blameless and holy before our God and Father at the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ with all his holy ones.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

Accept my prayer, O Lord, which rises up to you.
Accept my prayer, O Lord, which rises up to you.

Like burning incense in your sight,
which rises up to you.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Accept my prayer, O Lord, which rises up to you.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. For ever will my soul proclaim the greatness of the Lord.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. For ever will my soul proclaim the greatness of the Lord.

INTERCESSIONS

Jesus does not abandon those who hope in him; therefore, let us humbly ask him:
Our Lord and our God, hear us.

Christ our light, brighten your Church with your splendor,
so that it may be for the nations the great sacrament of your love.
Our Lord and our God, hear us.

Watch over the priests and ministers of your Church,
so that after they have preached to others, they themselves may remain faithful in your service.
Our Lord and our God, hear us.

Through your blood you gave peace to the world,
turn away the sin of strife, the scourge of war.
Our Lord and our God, hear us.

O Lord, help married couples with an abundance of your grace,
so that they may better symbolize the mystery of your Church.
Our Lord and our God, hear us.

In your mercy forgive the sins of all the dead,
that they may live with your saints.
Our Lord and our God, hear us.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Stay with us, Lord Jesus,
for evening draws near,
and be our companion on our way
to set our hearts on fire with new hope.
Help us to recognize your presence among us in the Scriptures we read,
and in the breaking of bread,
for you live and reign with the Father and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

22 posted on 09/17/2012 1:48:39 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Sep 17, Night Prayer for Monday of the 24th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, page 1175
Vol II, Page 1632
Vol III, Page 1275
Vol IV, Page 1239

Christian Prayer:
Page 1041

General instruction:
Please pray with us actively, especially by joining with us in saying antiphons and responses, most of which are indicated in this highlight.

Consider an examination of your own conscience before beginning to best make use of our time together in prayer.

Night Prayer for Monday

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:
We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Lord Jesus,
you came to reconcile us to one another and to the Father:
Lord, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

Lord Jesus,
you heal the wounds of sin and division:
Christ, have mercy.
Christ, have mercy.

Lord Jesus,
you intercede for us with your Father:
Lord, have mercy.
Lord, have mercy.

HYMN

The day Thou gavest, Lord, is ended,
The darkness falls at Thy behest;
To Thee our morning hymns ascended,
Thy praise shall sanctify our rest.

We thank Thee that Thy church, unsleeping,
While earth rolls onward into light,
Through all the world her watch is keeping,
And rests not now by day or night.

As o’er each continent and island
The dawn leads on another day,
The voice of prayer is never silent,
Nor dies the strain of praise away.

The sun that bids us rest is waking
Our brethren ’neath the western sky,
And hour by hour fresh lips are making
Thy wondrous doings heard on high.

So be it, Lord; Thy throne shall never,
Like earth’s proud empires, pass away:
Thy kingdom stands, and grows forever,
Till all Thy creatures own Thy sway.

“The Day Thou Gavest” by The Choir of St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral; Words: John Ellerton, 1870; Music: Clement Scholefield, 1874
“The Day Thou Gavest” by The Choir of St. Mary’s Episcopal Cathedral is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 O Lord, our God, unwearied is your love for us.

Psalm 86
Poor man’s prayer in trouble

Blessed be God who comforts us in all our trials (2 Corinthians 1:3, 4).

Turn your ear, O Lord, and give answer
for I am poor and needy.
Preserve my life, for I am faithful;
save the servant who trusts in you.

You are my God, have mercy on me, Lord,
for I cry to you all day long.
Give joy to your servant, O Lord,
for to you I lift up my soul.

O Lord, you are good and forgiving,
full of love to all who call.
Give heed, O Lord, to my prayer
and attend to the sound of my voice.

In the day of distress I will call
and surely you will reply.
Among the gods there is none like you, O Lord;
nor work to compare with yours.

All the nations shall come to adore you
and glorify your name, O Lord:
for you are great and do marvelous deeds,
you who alone are God.

Show me, Lord, your way
so that I may walk in your truth.
Guide my heart to fear your name.

I will praise you, Lord my God, with all my heart
and glorify your name for ever;
for your love to me has been great:
you have saved me from the depths of the grave.

The proud have risen against me;
ruthless men seek my life;
to you they pay no heed.

But you, God of mercy and compassion,
slow to anger, O Lord,
abounding in love and truth,
turn and take pity on me.

O give your strength to your servant
and save your handmaid’s son.
Show me the sign of your favor
that my foes may see to their shame
that you console me and give me your help.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. O Lord, our God, unwearied is your love for us.

READING 1 Thessalonians 5:9-10

God has destined us for acquiring salvation through our Lord Jesus Christ. He died for us, that all of us, whether awake or asleep, together might live with him.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

CANTICLE OF SIMEON

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
give our bodies restful sleep
and let the work we have done today
bear fruit in eternal life.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

BLESSING

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

23 posted on 09/17/2012 1:48:46 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good -- Leo XIII)
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Comment #24 Removed by Moderator

To: All
Blessed Hildegard of Bingen

Voices Online Edition
Vol. XXVII, No. 1
Lent - Eastertide 2012

September 17th

Blessed Hildegard of Bingen: Voice of the Living Light
Mysterious, talented, colorful, and enigmatic woman, saint, and mystic.
And Doctor?


Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard receiving a vision, inscribing what she sees on a wax tablet, and dictating to her scribe and secretary


Hildegard’s alphabet, Litterae ignotae.

by Sandra Miesel

Next October, Hildegard of Bingen (1098-1179) will join a most select company of saints if she is proclaimed a Doctor of the Church, as reports indicate. To date, there are only 33 of these saints, whose exceptional holiness and wisdom have made significant contributions to our Faith. Hildegard would be only the fourth woman so honored, joining Teresa of Avila, Catherine of Siena, and Thérèse of Lisieux.

Among those luminaries, Hildegard blazes in colors all her own. Medievalist Peter Dronke describes her as “an overpowering, electrifying presence — and in many ways an enigmatic one”. The breadth and variety of Hildegard’s accomplishments are unique. Her voluminous writings encompass theology, prophecy, poetry, hagiography, medicine, and natural science as well as extensive correspondence with major figures of the twelfth century including Bernard of Clairvaux, Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine, and the Emperor Frederick Barbarossa.

Hildegard is also the first known female composer in the Western world and wrote Europe’s first morality play — with accompanying music. She invented her own artificial language as well as an alphabet in which to write it. An ardent supporter of Church reform, she made four long preaching tours along the river valleys of southwestern Germany. There she addressed admiring audiences of clerics, monks and laity, an unprecedented privilege for a medieval woman. She achieved all this despite chronic ill health and while serving as a Benedictine abbess for more than forty years.

Hildegard was born near Mainz in 1098, tenth child of an ancient noble family. Her parents offered her as a living “tithe” to God by placing her in the care of a holy recluse named Jutta attached to the male Benedictine abbey of Disibodenberg. Hildegard learned to read from the Psalter and immersed herself in the Bible, her lifelong font of knowledge. At fifteen, she made her profession as a nun in the community that coalesced around Jutta. In 1136, after Jutta died, Hildegard was chosen as superior.   

By 1150, the convent had become overcrowded. Despite grumbling from the local monks — as well as her own nuns — Hildegard built a new home for her community beside the Rhine at Rupertsberg near Bingen. A second foundation across the river at Eibingen followed fifteen years later. The later cloister still functions as the Abbey of Saint Hildegard and enshrines her relics. 

Nothing would have seemed extraordinary about Hildegard for the first half of her long life. She did not wish to publicize the visionary experiences she had been having since the age of three when a blaze of dazzling brightness burst into her sight. A diffuse radiance, which she called her visio, filled her field of vision for the rest of her life without interfering with ordinary sight. Hildegard came to understand this phenomenon as “the reflection of the living Light”, which conferred the gift of prophecy and gave her an intuitive knowledge of the Divine.

Hildegard’s visions were not apparitions or dreams. She scarcely ever fell into ecstasy but rather perceived sights and messages with the “inner” eyes and ears of her soul. She dictated what she “saw” and “heard” to secretaries while fully lucid. Because the astonishing images she described and directed artists to illustrate feature sparkling gems, shimmering orbs, pulsating stars, curious towers, and crenellated walls, modern psychologists have suggested that Hildegard suffered from a form of migraine called “scintillating scotomata”. The debilitating illnesses that preceded or accompanied her visionary episodes might have been migraine attacks. Because supernatural communications are received according to the capacity of the receiver, neurology can offer insights on Hildegard’s particular repertory of forms. But it cannot explain away her experiences or the religious meanings she assigns to them. These were genuine occasions of contact between Hildegard and God.  

In 1141 — on a date she was careful to record exactly — heaven opened upon Hildegard as “a fiery light of exceeding brilliance” and a mighty voice commanding her to “tell and write” what she sees of God’s marvels. Like Jeremiah and several other prophets, Hildegard quailed at her call. Pleading her sickly female constitution and lack of formal education, she fell ill. But she confided in the convent’s provost, who shared the matter with his abbot at Disibodenberg who urged Hildegard to accept her call. She rose from her bed and set to work on her first book, Scivias.

Hildegard also asked advice from Bernard of Clairvaux, who encouraged her. Meanwhile, her local abbot notified the archbishop of Mainz who mentioned Hildegard to Pope Eugenius III, then visiting Germany. After a papal commission reviewed chapters of Scivias, the pope approved Hildegard’s writings and read portions to a regional synod at Trier in 1147.

Now certified by the highest authorities, Hildegard became a celebrity seer whose counsel was treasured by rulers, clerics, and laypeople from England to Byzantium. Visitors streamed to her convent seeking advice and cures from the “Sibyl of the Rhine”. (This fame was one reason why the Disibodenberg monks opposed Hildegard’s move to a new location.) Hildegard always distinguished between her own opinions and God’s. When she had no answer she would say so and claimed no heavenly authority for her medical and scientific writings.

Hildegard’s steady humility kept her on the straight way and protected her from censure. She clung to the Old Testament role of prophet, presenting herself as a feeble instrument of the Almighty, pressed into service because sinful churchmen had failed to act. Similar “modesty” strategies have been used by other holy women and female leaders in male-dominated societies who invoke the Biblical theme of weakness overturning strength.

Despite the startling quality of Hildegard’s messages, her theology was orthodox. Unlike the Cathar heretics, whom she denounced, she was no threat to the existence, authority or organization of the Church. She accepted traditional teaching on male headship, the complementary character of masculine and feminine, and social hierarchies. She condemned offenses against life — contraception, abortion, infanticide, suicide, and homosexuality. But any sin could be forgiven. Penance and the cultivation of opposite virtues remedied vices. These conventional views temper some feminists’ enthusiasm for Hildegard. They would prefer her as a bold rebel against patriarchy. In contrast, during an address in 2010, Pope Benedict XVI called Hildegard’s humble deference to ecclesiastical authority “the seal of an authentic experience of the Holy Spirit”.

Hildegard’s one clash with Church rules hinged on a point of fact, not doctrine. In 1178, she and her nuns were placed under interdict for burying an excommunicated benefactor in their graveyard. Knowing that he had been reconciled before his death, they endured months without the sacraments or music until cleared by the archbishop of Cologne. Hildegard died peacefully the following year.

Hildegard’s three major theological books are: Scivias [Know the Ways], Liber vitae meritorum [The Book of the Rewards of Life], and Liber divinorum operum [The Book of Divine Works]. They range across time and timelessness, microcosm and macrocosm, the Trinity, Fall, Incarnation, and Redemption; vices and virtues, sacraments, angels, and Satan; Genesis and the Gospel of John, Antichrist, the End of the World, and the joys of Heaven. Hildegard’s keyword, viriditas, communicates the burgeoning, fertile, green freshness of unspoiled Paradise. Her matchless visions reveal the luminous presence of God permeating all creation, calling forth life so that matter and spirit will unite in a chorale of eternal glory.

Hildegard’s works record visions plus inspired commentary, followed by her interpretations. Her allegorical imagery is so novel, explication is essential. For instance, it is not immediately obvious that a four-winged glowing woman balancing a bearded gray head on her own, holding a lamb and trampling monsters represents Caritas (Love) as well as the Holy Spirit with emblems of the Father and the Son. Caritas proclaims: “I am the supreme and fiery force who kindled every living spark”. Each of the Four Elements reveal the life that God has bestowed through her.

In Hildegard’s writings, titanic feminine forms personify Caritas, Sapientia (Wisdom), Ecclesia (Church), Synagoga, and sundry Virtues. Their unique vividness and vitality invite readers to contemplate the universe with fresh eyes. For instance, Sapientia “of the whirling wings” is the “encompassing energy of God” who quickens the world in her clasp. Not every sight, however, is lovely. In one instance, Ecclesia is battered and besmirched by corrupt clergy. In another image a powerful female figure representing the Church is shown giving birth to the huge and hideous head of the Antichrist.

Hildegard’s allegorical ladies have more personality, as it were, than her sublime yet oddly abstract Mary, predestined since “the morn of the universe”. But that does not blemish the eighteen free-verse liturgical lyrics Hildegard wrote to praise the fruitful Virgin courted by God. Here is a sample from “Ave generosa” in Barbara Newman’s fine translation:

And your womb held joy when heaven’s
harmonies rang from you,
a maiden with child by God,
for in God your chastity blazed.

Yes your flesh held joy like the grass
when the dew falls, when heaven
freshens its green: O mother
of gladness, verdure of spring.

Hildegard’s Mary, like her overall spirituality, is monastic. The holy abbess was untouched by the new affective style of piety that friars will popularize across Europe. Untutored in philosophy, she thought in Biblical, not scholastic, categories. As the dates of her lifespan (1098-1179) suggest, Hildegard belongs more to the Romanesque than the Gothic spirit.

These factors affected Hildegard’s rank in the pageant of sainthood. Despite remarkable originality and wide fame in her own day, Hildegard was quickly forgotten. Her curious writings were seldom copied. She was never formally canonized because her cause was poorly documented and records disappeared. In modern times, some scholars even doubted her authorship and ascribed her work to her male secretaries.

Nevertheless, Hildegard’s reputation for holiness survived in the Rhineland. In the twentieth century, learned nuns from the refounded monastery of Eibingen produced landmark scholarship that confirmed Hildegard’s authorship and made her most important writings available. In 1940, Rome acknowledged her sanctity on the basis of “persistent cult”. Saint Hildegard was assigned a feast day in Benedictine and German calendars on 17 September, the anniversary of her death. (The Church of England and the Episcopal Church in America also count her as a saint.)

As academic interest in saints — especially female ones — grew in the later twentieth century, Hildegard was rediscovered. New Agers publicized her — inaccurately — but solid research also multiplied. Her unique music was performed again to great acclaim. Even her herbal remedies found users. The nine-hundredth anniversary of Hildegard’s birth was celebrated with a comprehensive exhibition, “Hildegard von Bingen 1098-1179”, at the Cathedral and Diocesan Museum of Mainz. German director Margarethe von Trotta’s well-received film Vision: From the Life of Hildegard of Bingen was released in 2010.   

Hildegard’s elevation to Doctor of the Church, perhaps preceded by a formal canonization ceremony, is the capstone on her revival for Catholics. Regardless of what honors are bestowed on Hildegard, Voice of the Living Light, an old pilgrim’s prayer captures the essence of her heavenly service: “Through thy great intercession, everyone obtains from God mercy and consolation in all sorrows, in Time and Eternity”.

Suggested Reading

• Sabina Flanagan, Hildegard of Bingen: A Visionary Life. 2nd ed. New York: Routledge, 1998.  

• Hildegard of Bingen, The Book of the Rewards of Life. Trans. Bruce W. Hozeski. New York: Oxford University Press, 1994.

• ___,  Scivias. Trans. Columba Hart and Jane Bishop. Mahwah, NJ: Paulist Press, 1990.

• ___,  Symphonia. Trans. Barbara Newman. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 1988.

• Barbara Newman, Sister of Wisdom: St. Hildegard’s Theology of the Feminine. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1987.

Voice of the Living Light: Hildegard of Bingen and Her World. Ed. Barbara Newman. Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998.

Early music groups including Sequentia and Anonymous Four have recorded many of Hildegard’s songs.

Illustrations:

1. Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard receiving a vision, inscribing what she sees on a wax tablet, and dictating to her scribe and secretary

2. Hildegard’s alphabet, Litterae ignotae.


Sandra Miesel, who holds a master’s degree in medieval history from the University of Illinois, is the co-editor with Paul E. Kerry of Light Beyond All Shadow: Religious Experience in Tolkien’s Work, co-author with Carl E. Olson of The Da Vinci Hoax, and the author of essays and articles on history, art, and hagiography. Mrs. Miesel lives in Indianapolis. This article first appeared January 25, 2012 in Catholic World Report online (catholicworldreport.com). It appears here with the author’s kind permission.


25 posted on 09/17/2012 8:31:56 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
On St. Robert Bellarmine
Robert Bellarmine, A Valid Authority For Ecclesiology
The 15 Marks of The Church [St. Robert Bellarmine]
Mary: Mediatrix in the Theology of Bellarmine
Saint Robert Bellarmine [Patron of Catechists]
26 posted on 09/17/2012 8:45:57 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
St. Robert Bellarmine
Feast Day: September 17
Born: October 4, 1542, Montepulciano, Italy
Died: September 17, 1621, Rome, Italy
Canonized: June 29, 1930, Rome by Pope Pius XI
Major Shrine: Chiesa di Sant'Ignazio, Rome, Italy
Patron of: Preparatory; canonists; canon lawyers; catechists; catechumens



27 posted on 09/17/2012 8:52:38 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All


Information:
The Sacred Stigmata of Saint Francis of Assisi

Feast Day: September 17

28 posted on 09/17/2012 8:53:50 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Stigmata of St. Francis of Assisi
St. Francis of Assisi -- The Wounds of Christ

29 posted on 09/17/2012 8:54:44 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Interactive Saints for Kids

St. Robert Bellarmine

St. Robert Bellarmine
Feast Day: September 17
Born: 1542 :: Died: 1621

Robert was born in Italy. As a boy, he was not interested in playing games, like most children his age were. He liked to spend his time repeating to his younger brothers and sisters the sermons he had heard.

He also liked to explain the lessons of the catechism to the little farm children of the neighborhood. Once he had made his first Holy Communion, he used to receive Jesus every Sunday.

His father wanted to make Robert famous, so he got his son to study many subjects including music and art. Whenever a song had words that were not nice, Robert would replace them with good ones of his own.

It was Robert's great desire to become a Jesuit priest, but his father had other plans for him. For a whole year, Robert pleaded with his father. At last, when he was eighteen, his father allowed him to join the Jesuits.

As a young Jesuit, he did very well in his studies and was sent to preach even before he became a priest. When one good woman first saw such a young man, not even a priest yet, going up into the pulpit to preach, she knelt down to pray.

She asked the Lord to help him not become frightened and stop in the middle. When he finished his sermon, she stayed kneeling. This time, however, she was thanking God for the wonderful sermon he gave.

St. Robert Bellarmine became a famous writer, preacher and teacher. He wrote thirty-one important books. He spent three hours every day in prayer and had a deep knowledge of sacred matters.

Yet even when he became a cardinal, he believed that catechism was so important, that he himself taught it to his household and to the people.

He said: "If you are wise, then know that you have been created for the glory of God and your own eternal salvation. This is your goal; this is the center of your life; this is the treasure of your heart."

Cardinal Bellarmine died on September 17, 1621.


30 posted on 09/17/2012 8:57:32 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Catholic
Almanac:

Monday, September 17

Liturgical Color: Green


Today is the optional memorial of St. Robert Bellarmine, bishop and doctor of the Church. A member of the Society of Jesus, he was a passionate defender of the Church during the Reformation. St. Robert died in 1621.


31 posted on 09/17/2012 3:22:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Catholic Culture

Daily Readings for: September 17, 2012
(Readings on USCCB website)

Collect: O God, who adorned the Bishop Saint Robert Bellarmine with wonderful learning and virtue to vindicate the faith of your Church, grant, through his intercession, that in the integrity of that same faith your people may always find joy. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns with you in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever.

Ordinary Time: September 17th

Optional Memorial of St. Robert Bellarmine, bishop and doctor

Old Calendar: Impression of the Stigmata of St. Francis; St. Hildegarde. abbess (Hist)

St. Robert Bellarmine (1542-1621) was born in Montepulciano, Italy, and died in Rome. The son of noble parents, he entered the Society of Jesus, finishing his theological studies at Louvain, Belgium. His services to the Church were outstanding and many. He occupied the chair of controversial theology in Rome. He defended the Holy See against anti-clericals. He wrote books against the prevailing heresies of the day. His catechism, translated into many languages, spread the knowledge of Christian doctrine to all parts of the world. He was the Counsellor of Popes and spiritual director of St. Aloysius Gonzaga. He helped St. Francis de Sales obtain approval of the Visitation Order. As a religious he was a model of purity, humility and obedience; as a bishop and Cardinal, an example of great love for his flock.

According to the 1962 Missal of Bl. John XXIII the Extraordinary Form of the Roman Rite, today is the feast of the Commemoratioin of the Imprinting of the Holy Stigmata on the Body of St. Francis and St. Robert Bellarmine's feast is celebrated on May 13. Two years before his death St. Francis retired to Mt. Alverno where he began a forty days' fast in honor of St. Michael the Archangel. There, while in a state of continual prayer and unceasing watching, he saw in a vision a seraph with burning, dazzling wings whose feet and hands were nailed to a cross; at the same time five wounds, like those of our Lord, appeared on Francis' feet, hands and side; from the wound in his side blood flowed. These stigmata were so fully verified subsequently that the Franciscans since the fourteenth century have celebrated a feast in honor of the event.


St. Robert Bellarmine
He was born at Montepulciano in Tuscany on October 4, 1542, the feast of the Poverello of Assisi toward whom he always cherished a special devotion. The day on which he died, September 17, is now the feast in honor of the stigmata of St. Francis.

In 1560 Robert Bellarmine entered the Society of Jesus. He easily ranks among its greatest men, illustrious for learning as well as for piety, humility, and simplicity of heart. If it were possible to summarize his life in a single sentence, one that would resolve all the varied activities and accomplishments of his long career, a verse from the psalm might serve: "If I forget you, Jerusalem, may my right hand be forgotten." His most important work was controversial in nature but the impact of his presentation "resembled the final chord in a mighty cantata, a chord that resounded through all the vice and scandal resulting from the internal corruption of the Church of that day, and that chord heralded Mother Church as one, holy, and Catholic" (E. Birminghaus).

Bellarmine also acted as confessor to the youthful Aloysius and John Berchmans. It might be asked why three hundred years passed before the beatification and canonization of Bellarmine. Long ago Bishop Hefele pointed to the reason when he wrote: "Bellarmine deserves the highest degree of respect from Catholics, even though he has not been canonized. Those who labored to besmirch him have only erected a monument of shame for themselves!" Finally in 1923, he was beatified; canonization followed in 1930, and on September 17, 1931, Pope Pius XI declared him a doctor of the Church.

Excerpted from The Church's Year of Grace, Pius Parsch

Patron: canon lawyers; canonists; catechists; catechumens; archdiocese of Cincinnati, Ohio.

Symbols: red hat of cardinal; book denoting doctor of the Church; pictured in the red garments of a Cardinal.

Things to Do:


Stigmata of St. Francis
Saint Bonaventure, biographer of Saint Francis of Assisi, wrote that two years before his holy death he had been praying on Mount Alverno in a solitary retreat, where he had gone to fast for forty days in honor of the Archangel Michael. No one ever meditated more than Francis on the Passion of his Lord. During his retreat he beheld in vision a six-winged Seraph attached to a cross, and received at the same time a painful wound of the heart, which seemed to transpierce it. When the vision ended his own hands and feet bore the marks of the angelic crucifixion which he had seen in the vision. He understood by his vision that the soul must come to resemble Christ by the ardors of its interior fire, rather than by any physical, exterior means. We reproduce here a meditation of the saintly 19th century Abbot, Dom Guéranger of Solemnes in France

The Feast of the Stigmata of Saint Francis, whom we will soon honor again on his feast of October 4th, is not only to glorify a Saint; it commemorates and signifies something which goes beyond the life of any single man, even one of the greatest of the Church. The God-Man never ceases to live on in His Church, and the reproduction of His own mysteries in this Spouse whom He wants to be similar to Himself, is the explanation of history.

In the thirteenth century it seemed that charity, whose divine precept many no longer heeded, concentrated in a few souls the fires which had once sufficed to inflame multitudes. Sanctity shone as brilliantly as ever, but the hour for the cooling of the brazier had struck for the peoples. The Church itself says so today in its liturgy, at the Collect: ‘Lord Jesus Christ, when the world was growing cold, You reproduced the sacred marks of Your passion in the body of the most blessed Francis, in order that Your love might also set our hearts afire.’ The Spouse of Christ had already begun to experience the long series of social defections among the nations, with their denials, treasons, derision, slaps, spittings in the very praetorium, all of which conclude in the legalized separation of society from its Author. The era of the Passion is advanced; the exaltation of the Holy Cross, which for centuries was triumphant in the eyes of the nations, acquires in the sight of heaven, as the Angels look down upon it, the aspect of an ever closer resemblance with the Spouse to the sufferings of her crucified Beloved.

Saint Francis, loved today by all who know of him — and few there are who do not — was like precious marble placed before an expert sculptor. The Holy Spirit chose the flesh of the seraph of Assisi to express His divine thought, thus manifesting to the world the very specific direction He intends to give to souls thereafter. This stigmatization offers a first example, a complete image, of the new labor the divine Spirit is meditating — total union, on the very Cross of Christ itself, of the mystical Body with the divine Head. Francis is the one honored by this primacy of choice; but after him the sacred sign will be received by others, who also personify the Church. From this time on, the Stigmata of the Lord Jesus will be at all times visible, here and there on this earth.

—Excerpted from L’Année liturgique, by Dom Prosper Guéranger (Mame et Fils: Tours, 1919), “The Time after Pentecost V”, Vol. 14, translation O.D.M.

Things to Do:


St. Hildegarde
Called the "Sibyl of the Rhine," Hildegard of Bingen became the most famous mystic and prophet of her time. Her writings and music are still found in all major bookstores, and no woman saint is more popular in her native Germany. When she was eight, she was placed in a convent, where she later became abbess. She was a biblical exegete, visionary, preacher, composer, and herbalist, who corresponded with the major royalty and church leaders of her day, including four popes. Her greatest vision came when she was forty-two, which is recorded in her famous Scrivias, or Know the Ways of the Lord, a treatise whose magnificence rivals William Blake's visionary work. Hildegard's spiritual writings found approval during her lifetime, and her lectures on the spiritual life drew crowds from all over Europe. She wrote prolifically, on topics as varied as history and drama, polictics and and liturgical poetry. Her monastery joyfully sang the praises she wrote. During the last year of her life, when she was eighty-one, she entered into a conflict with ecclesiastical authorities because she allowed a young man who had been excommunicated to be buried in her abbey cemetery, and her convent was placed under interdict. It is probably that, for this reason, Hildegard was never formally canonized, although she is found in all major saints' books and her cult was approved locally because of so many miracles reported at her tomb.

— Excerpted from Women Saints, Madonna Sophia Compton

Things to Do:


32 posted on 09/17/2012 3:46:57 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Doctors of the Catholic Church




Saint Robert Bellarmine was the first Jesuit priest to develop the theory of the indirect power of the Pope in temporary affairs. He all but eliminated the Divine-Rights-of-Kings untenable principle that had been in existence many years before we worked at the Vatican.

He described and explained the head of hell-Satan and his cohorts. The titles of Gentle Doctor of The Controversies, one of his more notable writings, and the title "Prince of Apologists" are two of the most known names that identify him.

Robert is the Doctor of Church, State and Country Relations. The pope made him a Cardinal and insisted on having him by his side as his personal theologian. The more he stepped down, the more God raised this humble priest up with greater responsibilities at the Vatican.

This brilliant Jesuit lived in an age of great deflection within the church amidst religious controversy. His writings, intelligence, and character served the church at a time that was most needed.


St Robert Bellarmine, 1542-1621. Doctor of Church State Relations, Feast Sept 17th.

Diplomats, ambassadors, heads of state, government officials and top church decision-makers and ministers can learn much from Robert. He had major responsibilities and used it properly for the development and growth of the church, states and countries. The more authority one exercises, the more divine guidance one needs to serve others in a Christian manner. Plead with St Bellarmine to gain wisdom and discernment leading others and supporting your country. You will definitely receive strength and insight to handle sensitive issues that could affect your church, state and country.


Patriotism is a virtue. It is not only a virtue that displays love for country but also supports the authority and interest of country. Many have died defending our independence, liberty and freedom. We can defend and honor our country and its citizens by upholding everything that makes us free. However, in God's work of salvation, which means freedom from sin, a Christian patriot is one who stands up for any cause which promotes justice, equality and human dignity. That is what St Robert Bellarmine advocated and defended. Saints tell us that there are other battles going on in life. We are Christian protectors and defenders fighting for spiritual values as well as in the armed forces defending our country against oppressors and war. Hopefully, as humankind grows in spiritual perspectives, our struggles are going to be more socially, educationally and mentally rather then physically with forces and arms for war. However, we must be prepared to go to war and fight to defend freedom and destroyers of humanity and offenders of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Vitally important in this manner is the ghastly topic of abortion and the vivid pictures and disfigurement of infants in women's wombs through abortions, clearly witnessed. ABORTION KILLS MORE THAN 46,000,000 BABIES EVERY YEAR WORLDWIDE? That is a sheer horror to the Christian psyche. No educated person can impugn that all human life, no matter the stage, is a gift of God, unequivocally and indisputably, and any laws to the contrary can and must be subject to change.


33 posted on 09/17/2012 3:56:46 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Luke 7:1-10

Saint Robert Bellarmine, Bishop and Doctor of the Church

“He deserves to have you do this for him.” (Luke 7:4)

The centurion’s messengers extolled his generosity. Though not a Jew, this soldier paid for the build­ing of their synagogue. Surely he deserved this favor. Surely Jesus would heal his servant.

As soon as the centurion realized how his request had been conveyed, he hastened to make an important correction. He was fully aware that Jesus didn’t owe him anything. His only claim was his great need, not his worthiness. He didn’t want to inconvenience the Master, who must have had more important things to do. Rather, he simply cast himself on Jesus’ mercy. He knew that this rabbi had the power to heal from a dis­tance simply by speaking a word of command.

Jesus was happy to heal this man’s servant, and he held the man up to others as a remarkable example of faith. However, maybe he was a lit­tle disappointed as well. It was not Jesus’ habit to use intermediaries to help people. Maybe Jesus wanted to enter under the man’s roof. Sure, he could have accomplished everything the centurion asked for with just a quick word, but he wanted so much more! Maybe he wanted to look into his eyes and help bring him closer to the one true God. Maybe he wanted to ask what the centurion under­stood about Judaism, what attracted him and made him so eager to sup­port it. Maybe he wanted to talk about how he had come to fulfill the deepest longings of the man’s heart, not just to heal his servant.

With our newly revised and trans­lated missal, we have the privilege of echoing the centurion’s words every time we approach the Eucharistic table. But we shouldn’t stop there. We know that we are not worthy of so great a redemption, but at the same time we also know that Jesus loves to “enter under our roof” and bring us to a deep experience of fel­lowship with him.

So open the door of your heart to the Lord today. Don’t think you have to limit yourself to asking Jesus to do something good for you. Instead, linger in his presence, and ask him to reveal his heart to you more fully. Let him speak words that heal your heart and soul!

“Lord, I am amazed that you want to unite yourself with me. Since we are under the same roof, I want to dwell in your love today.”

1 Corinthians 11:17-26, 33; Psalm 40:7-10, 17


34 posted on 09/17/2012 4:05:33 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for September 17, 2012:

“He is near who upholds my right…let us appear together.” (Isaiah 50:7-8) When was the last time you came to the defense of your beloved? It’s nice to know you have each other’s back.


35 posted on 09/17/2012 4:11:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Regnum Christi

Lord, Say the Word…
| SPIRITUAL LIFE | SPIRITUALITY
Monday of the Twenty-fourth Week in Ordinary Time


Father David Daly, LC

Luke 7:1-10

When Jesus had finished all his words to the people, he entered Capernaum. A centurion there had a slave who was ill and about to die, and he was valuable to him. When he heard about Jesus, he sent elders of the Jews to him, asking him to come and save the life of his slave. They approached Jesus and strongly urged him to come, saying, "He deserves to have you do this for him, for he loves our nation and he built the synagogue for us." And Jesus went with them, but when he was only a short distance from the house, the centurion sent friends to tell him, "Lord, do not trouble yourself, for I am not worthy to have you enter under my roof. Therefore, I did not consider myself worthy to come to you; but say the word and let my servant be healed. For I too am a person subject to authority, with soldiers subject to me. And I say to one, ´Go,´ and he goes; and to another, ´Come here,´ and he comes; and to my slave, ´Do this,´ and he does it." When Jesus heard this he was amazed at him and, turning, said to the crowd following him, "I tell you, not even in Israel have I found such faith." When the messengers returned to the house, they found the slave in good health.

Introductory Prayer: Lord Jesus, I believe that you came into this world to redeem sinners. I hope in you and in your power to transform my soul, by your grace, from sinfulness to holiness. Lord, I love you and offer you the longings of my heart to put you truly first in my life. I want to love you with all my mind, heart, soul and strength.

Petition: Lord Jesus, grant me the gift of a deeper faith.

1. The Centurion: Frequently the people to whom God has given the most recognize him the least. For that reason, he extends the gift of faith to other men and women, especially the simple and humble of heart. The centurion exemplifies this dynamic of God´s grace in our lives. We should strive to be like him: simple, humble, and confident in the powerful action of Jesus in our daily lives.

2. Lord, I Am Not Worthy to Receive You: These words manifest the centurion’s humility. They should also manifest our humility and faith in Christ’s presence in the Eucharist, since they are the words we pray at every Mass just before receiving our Lord in Holy Communion. When we receive the Blessed Sacrament, we truly receive Christ — body, blood, soul and divinity. Our faith is the key to opening up our hearts to Christ’s healing grace.

3. Not Even in Israel Have I Found Such Faith: Don’t we want Jesus to say these words to us? Isn’t it much better than hearing those other words of Christ: “When the Son of Man returns will there be any faith on earth?” (see Luke 18:8). Christ calls us to be a fresh well of faith, hope and love so that even if he does not find it anywhere else, he can always be consoled by our undying faith.

Conversation with Christ: Lord Jesus, I want to repeat these words of the centurion. I do believe in you and in your Real Presence in the Eucharist. In my times of doubt or weakness of faith, I will call out to you, “Only say the word and I shall be healed.”

Resolution: I resolve to pray these words with all my heart today at Mass, in a visit to the Eucharist or in a spiritual communion.


36 posted on 09/17/2012 4:22:49 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

Faith in Christ

Monday, September 17, 2012 by Food for Thought

FirstReading:1 Cor 11:17-26, 33
Psalm: Ps 40:7-8a, 8b-9, 10, 17
Gospel: Lk 7:1-10

The faith of the centurion was great because he recognized the authority of Jesus Christ as the Son of God.

Sometimes we doubt that God has the power to solve and cure us. We think that, yes sure, Christ can help, but we better put matters into our hands, just in case Jesus does not have the time or complete
solutions to our problems. We doubt the authority of Jesus given by God to him. Sometimes we even think that the battle between good and evil is equally balanced. This is not true because the power of Satan cannot be equal or greater than the power of Christ. The power of Jesus Christ has complete authority over Satan. Satan has no power to tempt you more than what is allowed by the Lord. This is clear in the case of Job.

Therefore let us believe that Jesus has supreme authority over all the powers of this world, including the devil himself. Let us not doubt this. All creatures bow before the Lord to do his bidding and will.
Christ can do the impossible for us. Let us never give up hope nor doubt his great power and authority to help us!


37 posted on 09/17/2012 4:28:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 

<< Monday, September 17, 2012 >> St. Robert Bellarmine
 
1 Corinthians 11:17-26, 33
View Readings
Psalm 40:7-10, 17 Luke 7:1-10
 

AMEN!

 
"Just give the order and my servant will be cured." —Luke 7:7
 

When you receive Holy Communion, the priest or distributor says: "Body of Christ," and you respond: "Amen." Your "Amen" means:

  • You believe you are receiving "the body, blood, soul, and divinity of Jesus" (Catechism, 1374).
  • You ask Jesus to give you an order, a word, for you to obey (Lk 7:7).
  • You believe in the Lord's healing (see Lk 7:7).
  • You commit yourself to unity with the members of Christ's body (cf 1 Cor 11:18ff).
  • You commit yourself to the new covenant in Jesus' blood (1 Cor 11:25).
  • You "proclaim the death of the Lord until He comes!" (1 Cor 11:26)

Your "Amen" before receiving Communion is a total commitment of your life to the Father, through the Son, and in the Spirit.

Therefore, we should receive Jesus in Holy Communion daily or as often as possible. We should prepare for Communion by regular, frequent Confession and by fasting in some conscious way before each Mass. Communion will either be one of the greatest events of our lives and a whole way of life, or Communion will be very harmful to us (1 Cor 11:17). Make all your Communions holy.

 
Prayer: Father, may this book lead its readers to daily and holy Communions.
Promise: "This is My body, which is for you. Do this in remembrance of Me." —1 Cor 11:24
Praise: Although St. Robert was a small, physically unimpressive man who had to preach from the pulpit while standing on a stool, he preached with such power and authority that many converted to Catholicism.

38 posted on 09/17/2012 4:33:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
 
Indeed, let us pray to remove paying for the abortion of others from ANY healthcare coverage!

39 posted on 09/17/2012 4:36:38 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Luke
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Luke 7
1 AND when he had finished all his words in the hearing of the people, he entered into Capharnaum. Cum autem implesset omnia verba sua in aures plebis, intravit Capharnaum. επει δε επληρωσεν παντα τα ρηματα αυτου εις τας ακοας του λαου εισηλθεν εις καπερναουμ
2 And the servant of a certain centurion, who was dear to him, being sick, was ready to die. Centurionis autem cujusdam servus male habens, erat moriturus : qui illi erat pretiosus. εκατονταρχου δε τινος δουλος κακως εχων εμελλεν τελευταν ος ην αυτω εντιμος
3 And when he had heard of Jesus, he sent unto him the ancients of the Jews, desiring him to come and heal his servant. Et cum audisset de Jesu, misit ad eum seniores Judæorum, rogans eum ut veniret et salvaret servum ejus. ακουσας δε περι του ιησου απεστειλεν προς αυτον πρεσβυτερους των ιουδαιων ερωτων αυτον οπως ελθων διασωση τον δουλον αυτου
4 And when they came to Jesus, they besought him earnestly, saying to him: He is worthy that thou shouldest do this for him. At illi cum venissent ad Jesum, rogabant eum sollicite, dicentes ei : Quia dignus est ut hoc illi præstes : οι δε παραγενομενοι προς τον ιησουν παρεκαλουν αυτον σπουδαιως λεγοντες οτι αξιος εστιν ω παρεξει τουτο
5 For he loveth our nation; and he hath built us a synagogue. diligit enim gentem nostram, et synagogam ipse ædificavit nobis. αγαπα γαρ το εθνος ημων και την συναγωγην αυτος ωκοδομησεν ημιν
6 And Jesus went with them. And when he was now not far from the house, the centurion sent his friends to him, saying: Lord, trouble not thyself; for I am not worthy that thou shouldest enter under my roof. Jesus autem ibat cum illis. Et cum jam non longe esset a domo, misit ad eum centurio amicos, dicens : Domine, noli vexari : non enim sum dignus ut sub tectum meum intres : ο δε ιησους επορευετο συν αυτοις ηδη δε αυτου ου μακραν απεχοντος απο της οικιας επεμψεν προς αυτον ο εκατονταρχος φιλους λεγων αυτω κυριε μη σκυλλου ου γαρ ειμι ικανος ινα υπο την στεγην μου εισελθης
7 For which cause neither did I think myself worthy to come to thee; but say the word, and my servant shall be healed. propter quod et meipsum non sum dignum arbitratus ut venirem ad te : sed dic verbo, et sanabitur puer meus. διο ουδε εμαυτον ηξιωσα προς σε ελθειν αλλ ειπε λογω και ιαθησεται ο παις μου
8 For I also am a man subject to authority, having under me soldiers: and I say to one, Go, and he goeth; and to another, Come, and he cometh; and to my servant, Do this, and he doth it. Nam et ego homo sum sub potestate constitutus, habens sub me milites : et dico huic, Vade, et vadit : et alii, Veni, et venit : et servo meo, Fac hoc, et facit. και γαρ εγω ανθρωπος ειμι υπο εξουσιαν τασσομενος εχων υπ εμαυτον στρατιωτας και λεγω τουτω πορευθητι και πορευεται και αλλω ερχου και ερχεται και τω δουλω μου ποιησον τουτο και ποιει
9 Which Jesus hearing, marvelled: and turning about to the multitude that followed him, he said: Amen I say to you, I have not found so great faith, not even in Israel. Quo audito Jesus miratus est : et conversus sequentibus se turbis, dixit : Amen dico vobis, nec in Israël tantam fidem inveni. ακουσας δε ταυτα ο ιησους εθαυμασεν αυτον και στραφεις τω ακολουθουντι αυτω οχλω ειπεν λεγω υμιν ουτε εν τω ισραηλ τοσαυτην πιστιν ευρον
10 And they who were sent, being returned to the house, found the servant whole who had been sick. Et reversi, qui missi fuerant, domum, invenerunt servum, qui languerat, sanum. και υποστρεψαντες οι πεμφθεντες εις τον οικον ευρον τον ασθενουντα δουλον υγιαινοντα

40 posted on 09/17/2012 6:12:31 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex
1. Now when he had ended all his sayings in the audience of the people, he entered into Capernaum.
2. And a certain centurion's servant, who was dear to him, was sick, and ready to die.
3. And when he heard of Jesus, he sent to him the elders of the Jews, beseeching him that he would come and heal his servant.
4. And when they came to Jesus, they besought him instantly, saying, That he was worthy for whom he should do this:
5. For he loves our nation, and he has built us a synagogue.
6. Then Jesus went with them. And when he was now not far from the house, the centurion sent friends to him, saying to him, Lord, trouble not yourself: for I am not worthy that you should come under my roof:
7. Wherefore neither thought I myself worthy to come to you: but say in a word, and my servant shall be healed.
8. For I also am a man set under authority, having under me soldiers, and I say to one, Go, and he goes; and to another, Come, and he comes; and to my servant, Do this, and he does it.
9. When Jesus heard these things, he marveled at him, and turned him about, and said to the people that followed him, I say to you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel.
10. And they that were sent, returning to the house, found the servant whole that had been sick.

TITUS BOST. When He had strengthened His disciples by more perfect teaching, He goes to Capernaum to work miracles there; as it is said, When he had ended all his sayings, he entered into Capernaum.

AUG. Here we must understand that He did not enter before He had ended these sayings, but it is not mentioned what space of time intervened between the termination of His discourse, and His entering into Capernaum. For in that interval the leper was cleansed whom Matthew introduced in his proper place.

AMBROSE; But having finished His teaching, He rightly instructs them to follow the example of His precepts. For straightway the servant of a Gentile centurion is presented to the Lord to be healed. Now the Evangelist, when he said that the servant was about to die, did not err, because he would have died had he not been healed by Christ.

EUSEB. Although that centurion was strong in battle, and the prefect of the Roman soldiers, yet because his particular attendant lay sick at his house, considering what wonderful things the Savior had done in healing the sick, and judging that these miracles were performed by no human power, he sends to Him, as to God, not looking to the visible instrument by which He had intercourse with men; as it follows, And when he heard of Jesus, he sent to him, &c.

AUG. How then will that: be true which Matthew relates, A certain centurion came to him, seeing that he himself did not come? unless upon careful consideration we suppose that Matthew made use of a general mode of expression. For if the actual arrival is frequently said to be through the means of others, much more may the coming be by others. Not then without reason, (the centurion having gained access to our Lord through others,) did Matthew, wishing to spear; briefly, say that this man himself came to Christ, rather than those by whom he sent his message, for the more he believed the nearer he came.

CHRYS. How again does Matthew tell us that the centurion said, I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof, while Luke says here, that he beseeches Him that He would come. Now it seems to me that Luke sets before us the flatteries of the Jews. For we may believe that when the centurion wished to depart, the Jews drew him back, enticing him, saying, We will go and bring him. Hence also their prayers are full of flattery, for it follows, But when they came to Jesus, they besought him instantly, saying that he was worthy. Although it became them to have said, He himself was willing to come and supplicate You, but we detained him, seeing the affliction, and the body which was lying in the house, and so to have drawn out the greatness of his faith; but they would not for envy reveal the faith of the man, lest He should seem some great one to whom the prayers were addressed.

But wherein Matthew represents the centurion to be not an Israelite, while Luke says, he has built us a synagogue, there is no contradiction, for he might not have been a Jew, and yet built a synagogue.

THEOPHYL; But herein they show, that as by a church, so also by a synagogue, they were wont to mean not only the assembly of the faithful, but also the place where they assembled.

EUSEB. And the elders of the Jews indeed demand favors for a small sum spent in the service of the synagogue, but the Lord not for this, but a higher reason, manifested Himself, wishing in truth to beget a belief in all men by His own power, as it follows, Then Jesus went with them.

AMBROSE; Which certainly He did not do, because He was unable to heal when absent, but that He might set them an example of imitating His humility. He would not go to the son of the nobleman, lest He should seem thereby to have respected his riches; He went immediately here, that He might not seem to have despised the low estate of a centurion's servant. But the centurion laying aside his military pride puts on humility, being both willing to believe and eager to honor; as it follows, And when he was not far off, he sent to him, saying, Trouble not yourself: for I am not worthy your, &c. For by the power not of man, but of God, he supposed that health was given to man. The Jews indeed alleged his worthiness; but he confessed himself unworthy not only of the benefit, but even of receiving the Lord under his roof; For I am not worthy that you should enter under my roof.

CHRYS. For as soon as he was freed from the annoyance of the Jews, he then sends, saying, Think not that it was from negligence I came not to You, but I counted myself unworthy to receive You in my house.

AMBROSE; But Luke well says, that friends were sent by the centurion to meet our Lord, lest by his own coming he might seem both to embarrass our Lord, and to have called for a requital of good offices. Hence it follows, Wherefore neither thought I myself worthy to come to you, but say in a word and my servant shall be healed.

CHRYS. Here observe that the centurion held a right opinion concerning the Lord; he said not, pray, but, command; and in doubt lest He should from humility refuse him, he adds, For I also am a man set under authority, &c.

THEOPHYL; He says that he though a man subject to the power of the tribune or governor, yet has command over his inferiors, that it might be implied that much more is He who is God, able not only by the presence of His body, but by the services of His angels, to fulfill whatever He wishes. For the weakness of the flesh or the hostile powers were to be subdued both by the word of the Lord and the ministry of the angels. And to my servant, Do this, &c.

CHRYS. We must here remark, that this word, Fac, signifies a command given to a servant. So God when He wished to create man, said not to the Only-begotten, "Make man," but, Let us make man, that by the form of unity in the words he might make manifest the equality of the agents. Because then the centurion considered in Christ the greatness of His dominion, therefore said He, say in a word. For I also say to my servant.

But Christ blames him not, but confirmed his wishes, as it follows, When Jesus heard these things, he marveled.

THEOPHYL; But who had wrought this very faith in him, save He who marveled? But supposing another had done it, why should He marvel who fore knew it? Because then the Lord marvels, it signifies that we must marvel. For all such feelings when they are spoken of God, are the tokens not of a wonder-struck mind, but of a teaching master.

CHRYS. But that you might see plainly that the Lord said this for the instruction of others, the Evangelist wisely explains it, adding, Verily I say to you, I have not found so great faith, no, not in Israel.

AMBROSE; And indeed if you read it thus, "In none in Israel have I found so great faith," the meaning is simple and easy. But if according to the Greek, "Not even in Israel have I found so great faith," faith of this kind is preferred even to that of the more elect, and those that see God.

THEOPHYL; But he speaks not of Patriarchs and Prophets in times far back, but of the men of the present age to whom the faith of the centurion is preferred, because they were instructed in the precepts of the Law and the Prophets, but he with no one to teach him of his own accord believed.

AMBROSE; The faith of the master is proved, and the health of the servant established, as it follows, And they that were sent returning to the house, found the servant whole that had been sick. It is possible then that the good deed of a master may advantage his servants, not only through the merit of faith, but the practice of discipline.

THEOPHYL; Matthew explains these things more fully, saying, that when our Lord said to the centurion, Go your way, and as you have believed, so be it done to you, the servant was healed in the self-same hour. But it is the manner of the blessed Luke, to abridge or even purposely to pass by whatever he sees plainly set forth by the other Evangelists, but what he knows to be omitted by them, or briefly touched upon, to more carefully explain.

AMBROSE; Mystically, by the centurion's servant is signified that the Gentile people who were enthralled by the chain of heavenly bondage, and diseased with deadly passions, are to be healed by the mercy of the Lord.

THEOPHYL; But the centurion, whose faith is preferred to Israel, represents the elect from the Gentiles, who as it were attended by their hundred soldiers, are exalted by their perfection of spiritual virtues. For the number hundred, which is transferred from the left to the right , is frequently put to signify the celestial life. These then must pray to the Lord for those who ho are still oppressed with fear, in the spirit of bondage. But we of the Gentiles who believe can not ourselves come to the Lord, whom we are unable to see in the flesh, but ought to approach by faith; we must send the elders of the Jews, that is, we must by our suppliant entreaties gain as patrons the greatest men of the Church, who have gone before us to the Lord, who bearing us witness that we have a care to build up the Church, may intercede for our sins. It is well said that Jesus was not far from the house, for his salvation is nigh to them that fear him, and he who rightly uses the law of nature, in that he does the things which he knows to be good, approaches nigh to Him who is good.

AMBROSE, But the centurion wished not to trouble Jesus, for Whom the Jewish people crucified, the Gentiles desire to keep inviolate from injury, and (as touching a mystery) he saw that Christ was not yet able to pierce the hearts of the Gentiles.

THEOPHYL; The soldiers and servants who obey the centurion, are the natural virtues which many who come to the Lord will bring with them in great numbers.

THEOPHYL; Or in another way. The centurion must be understood as one who stood foremost among many in wickedness, as long as he possesses many things in this life, i.e. is occupied with many affairs or concerns. But he has a servant, the irrational part of the soul, that is, the irascible and concupiscent part. And he speaks to Jesus, the Jews acting as mediators, that is, the thoughts and words of confession, and immediately he received his servant whole.

Catena Aurea Luke 7
41 posted on 09/17/2012 6:13:15 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex


Jesus Healing the Centurion's Servant

Paolo Veronese (1528 – 1588)

42 posted on 09/17/2012 6:13:42 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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