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FBI raids Strongsville-based international adoption agency as part of criminal probe
Cleveland ^

Posted on 02/17/2017 8:38:02 AM PST by MNDude

STRONGSVILLE, Ohio -- The Cleveland FBI raided an international adoption agency based in Strongsville Tuesday as part of an ongoing criminal investigation, a spokeswoman confirmed.

The visit by federal agents to European Adoption Consultants came less than two months after the U.S. State Department barred the company from conducting international adoption services for three years.

The State Department's investigation found the company and its providers overseas committed several violations, including soliciting bribes and lying to officials to affect adoption eligibility, according to a report posted on its website. In some instances, the agencies' decisions or actions led to children being harmed, the report says.

FBI spokeswoman Vicki Anderson only confirmed Tuesday that agents visited the company's Alameda Drive headquarters, as well as a house. She said the investigation is ongoing and court filings are sealed.

The State Department says European Adoption Consultants operates adoption programs in Bulgaria, China, Colombia, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Haiti, Honduras, India, Panama, Poland, Tanzania, Uganda and Ukraine.

(Excerpt) Read more at cleveland.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: news

1 posted on 02/17/2017 8:38:02 AM PST by MNDude
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To: MNDude

Pizza?....................


2 posted on 02/17/2017 8:42:56 AM PST by Red Badger (If "Majority Rule" was so important in South Africa, why isn't it that way here?.......)
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To: MNDude
I might be the only person who feels the way I do. This isn't a slam to those parents who've provided wonderful homes from children from all corners of the world, many times having serious disabilities the adoptive parents didn't anticipate.

So here goes.....I'm uncomfortable with these adoptions from all over the world, when there are children in the US who need homes. It seems hypocritical to be opposed to abortion in the US, then go elsewhere for a child. And yes, I understand the problems that can be involved with the stability of the adoption of a US child.

3 posted on 02/17/2017 8:43:56 AM PST by grania
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To: grania

Most people I know who adopt are very prolife.


4 posted on 02/17/2017 8:47:07 AM PST by MNDude (God is not a Republican, but Satan is certainly a Democrat)
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To: MNDude

I wonder if Chief Justice Roberts is nervous?

5.56mm


5 posted on 02/17/2017 8:48:36 AM PST by M Kehoe
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To: Red Badger

It makes you wonder.


6 posted on 02/17/2017 8:54:45 AM PST by rdl6989
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To: Red Badger

Pedosta?


7 posted on 02/17/2017 8:58:34 AM PST by Proyecto Anonimo
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To: grania

>So here goes.....I’m uncomfortable with these adoptions from all over the world, when there are children in the US who need homes. It seems hypocritical to be opposed to abortion in the US, then go elsewhere for a child. And yes, I understand the problems that can be involved with the stability of the adoption of a US child.

Most of the kids who need homes in the US are abused or have disabilities. Very few people want to take on a burden like that.

Realistically adoption only works very well when you’re adopting a family member. When you get farther away from direct blood there are more and more problems.


8 posted on 02/17/2017 8:59:17 AM PST by RedWulf (TRUMP TRUMP TRUMP!)
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To: Red Badger

Could be. Those kids come from countries with little paperwork and/or turmoil.


9 posted on 02/17/2017 9:06:09 AM PST by Vince Ferrer
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To: grania

“I’m uncomfortable with these adoptions from all over the world, when there are children in the US who need homes.

2 words- legal entanglements


10 posted on 02/17/2017 9:07:17 AM PST by aMorePerfectUnion
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To: aMorePerfectUnion
two works....legal entanglements

That's what I meant by the instability of US adoptions. I'm expressing my feelings here. I'm glad those foreign children have homes. At the same time I'm super-uncomfortable that we embrace life but don't say anything about those children who need nurturing homes after birth.

Perhaps the answer is to go back to well-run orphanages. I'm not condemning those parents who had their individual reals for adopting children from overseas. One case I know is age of parents can be disqualifying.....what a shame.

11 posted on 02/17/2017 9:15:39 AM PST by grania
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To: aMorePerfectUnion

Two more words - activist judges.

The last thing I wanted was for some activist judge to later decide that some grandmother/aunt/uncle/third cousin twice removed should have visitation rights to my child.


12 posted on 02/17/2017 9:16:59 AM PST by pinkandgreenmom
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To: grania
So here goes.....I'm uncomfortable with these adoptions from all over the world, when there are children in the US who need homes.

Most of the available children in the US who need homes, appear to be non-white kids from "inner city" parents, a number of whom may have "issues" related to mom's drug/alcohol use while pregnant.

13 posted on 02/17/2017 9:18:50 AM PST by PapaBear3625 (Big government is attractive to those who think that THEY will be in control of it.)
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To: PapaBear3625

“issues” related to mom’s drug/alcohol use while pregnant.”

Looks like foreign adoptions don’t protect you from any of that and then some.

http://clevelandmagazine.com/in-the-cle/the-read/articles/families-in-crisis-when-foreign-adoption-goes-wrong


14 posted on 02/17/2017 9:30:05 AM PST by MagnoliaB (You can't always get what you want but if you try sometime you might find, you get what you need.)
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To: grania

I don’t know the facts, but I have got the impression that it is older, significantly handicapped, minority children who are most available in the US. With some parents not feeling equipped or able to take on the older, troubled, and/or handicapped challenges and official policy often limiting the ability to adopt interracially.

In that environment, I can understand the impulse to look abroad. But I also am uncomfortable with what readily becomes a market for finding “adoptable” children worldwide.

Have you by chance seen the film “Lion”? It is a heartwarming true story of an international adoption.


15 posted on 02/17/2017 9:34:16 AM PST by 9YearLurker
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To: RedWulf

Most of the kids who need homes in the US are abused or have disabilities. Very few people want to take on a burden like that.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

Unless your a pedo, a trafficker, or want to pedo out your pizza or hotdogs....


16 posted on 02/17/2017 9:39:32 AM PST by Freemeorkillme
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To: grania

It is almost impossible to adopt a baby in the USA. Two of my nieces are adopting black children after having them as foster children.

The one of them adopted a child from Somalia 6 years ago because they weren’t having any luck adopting in the USA. She had 3 boys and wanted a girl and tried again and had another boy, the foster child is a boy so the girl she adopted from Somalia will still be the only girl.


17 posted on 02/17/2017 9:53:08 AM PST by tiki
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To: grania
It seems hypocritical to be opposed to abortion in the US, then go elsewhere for a child.

I have two daughters, both adopted from China. They are now older, so my information is more than 20 years old, and the situation does change. With that said: when we started the process, we inquired about domestic adoptions. We were told to expect a five to seven year waiting period for a healthy infant, with no guarantees at the end of the process. We were also told that if we were over 35, we would be deemed too old.

Those were rules of thumb, not iron laws. People arranging private adoptions had considerable latitude, and a lot of money was changing hands in pre-natal "support" to pregnant girls who planned to give up their kids. There is a fine line between providing support and buying a child, but I will leave it to those who went that route to get into the details.

We inquired about interracial adoptions and were told very bluntly that various activist groups made that very problematic in the U.S. The National Association of Black Social Workers, in particular, was on a crusade to ensure that black kids not be adopted by white couples. It was, of course, not put so bluntly; the stated rationale was that black kids should be raised "culturally black." The snarky retorts almost write themselves.

Then there was the option of adopting an older child, or a special needs child. Had we been experienced parents with several older children, and had we been living somewhere other than in a big city, we might have considered it. For a first child who would be raised in the city (not the far suburbs, but an inner city location), that was a bridge too far.

So we started looking abroad. There were a lot of adoptions at that time from Russia and Eastern Europe, and a lot of problems related to parental drug and alcohol use and disastrous orphanage situations. Other parts of the world had their plusses and minuses. China liked older parents, and the kids coming out of China had usually received decent care; China has people to thrown at problems, and children in orphanages get enough attention.

Last but not least, foreign adoptions are final. You do not have to worry about the birth mother getting out of jail and/or off drugs for a couple of months, and deciding she wants to get reinvolved with her child. Bottom line, in the U.S. most children who might be good candidates for adoption are aborted. If they survive that, the system favors foster care and the hope of future family reunification over certainty for adoptive parents. People don't go abroad for fun. They do it because they hit roadblocks here.

18 posted on 02/17/2017 9:58:09 AM PST by sphinx
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To: sphinx
Thank you for that heartfelt answer. In spite of my unease, what's true is that if I were in a situation of wanting to adopt a child, I'd probably be choosing a foreign adoption.

I wish there were a way to solve the paradox. That's why I wonder if orphanages of earlier times, if well run, would solve a lot of problems.

19 posted on 02/17/2017 10:05:47 AM PST by grania
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To: grania
I think that watching a young toddler, being ripped from the only home and parents that he had ever known; because some guy had knocked up some girl, she didn't tell him she was pregnant; or, that she had given the child up for adoption -- and, he decides he wants the child back and the court agrees.

This type of event was happening for a while back in the 80's or 90's, I think. I can't help but believe that it was a spur to foreign adoptions, where the birth family is completely out of the picture.

20 posted on 02/17/2017 10:46:56 AM PST by LibertarianLiz
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To: MNDude

Haiti


21 posted on 02/17/2017 10:48:42 AM PST by Lady Heron
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To: pinkandgreenmom
some grandmother/aunt/uncle/third cousin twice removed should have visitation rights to my child.

Or, had rights to your child, period. I already posted about that occurrence happening a while ago. People regretting that they gave the child up for adoption; and, they get the child back, years after that child had been living with a family --- the only family they had known. I believe one of those birth families, married each other in order to look better to the judge, so they could get that child back. They ended up divorced just a couple of years later; and, that child went from a stable family, to a situation where the parents end up separated and divorced soon after they get the child back.

I think the judges who were giving these children back to their birth parents --- years after they had been living in a home with married parents, and sometimes siblings, were a real spur for foreign adoptions.

22 posted on 02/17/2017 10:52:02 AM PST by LibertarianLiz
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To: grania
So here goes.....I'm uncomfortable with these adoptions from all over the world, when there are children in the US who need homes. It seems hypocritical to be opposed to abortion in the US, then go elsewhere for a child. And yes, I understand the problems that can be involved with the stability of the adoption of a US child.

The biggest reasons people go overseas include (1) smaller, faster, and cheaper bureaucracy; and (2) in the U.S. almost all adoptions are "open" adoptions, meaning that the birth parent still gets to be involved in or in contact with the child in some way. Dealing with adoption agencies in some parts of the country is a nightmare, especially if you have guns in the house. We were told flat out that unless we got rid of our guns, we would have a very difficult time getting approval for adoption. Waiting lists for healthy babies are incredibly long, compared to other countries where the problems are primarily not associated with baby health but rather with finding homes for the extraordinary number of healthy children they have.

And, while Mrs. FATC did succeed in getting preggers shortly before we were going to pull the trigger on going the international adoption route, I was really concerned about the involvement of some American birth mother (and possibly father, but rare) in my family. I'm selfish. I was thinking, if I couldn't replicate my genes, at least I could replicate my upbringing. That's harder if it's an open adoption.

23 posted on 02/17/2017 11:02:08 AM PST by FateAmenableToChange
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To: MNDude

Adoption or part of the child trafficking global supply chain?

https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=PL_fCfRD4ODqfqxgO1xQGqnGjMOVZTMX6k&v=pEvlty5bG9E

Not all trafficking of children is for sex. Spare parts?More trafficking connections:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkQrCYWHugY


24 posted on 02/17/2017 11:33:36 AM PST by SetFree (American)
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To: FateAmenableToChange
Thank you for sharing that heartfelt response, from your personal experience. As I said to someone else, in spite of my unease, if I were adopting a child I get it that an overseas adoption might be the only viable choice.

That's why I'm wondering as I type if perhaps what's needed is well run orphanages. If we ask a mom to choose life for her pre-separation child, there should be provisions that the child is well cared for.

25 posted on 02/17/2017 11:37:09 AM PST by grania
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