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EU: Daylight robbery in Cyprus will come to haunt EMU
The Telegraph ^ | 3/18/2013 | Ambrose Evans-Pritchard

Posted on 03/19/2013 12:36:02 AM PDT by bruinbirdman

One's first reflex is to gasp at the stupidity of the EU policy elites, but truth is that most EU officials handling the Cyprus crisis know perfectly well that their masters have just set the slow fuse on a powder keg – and they can only pray that it is slow.

The decision to expropriate Cypriot savers – even the poorest – was imposed by Germany, Holland, Finland, Austria, and Slovakia, whose only care at this stage is to assuage bail-out fatigue at home and avoid their own political crises.

This latest debacle has caught me on the hop, literally, since I am in Tokyo learning about Abenomics, so let me just make a few quick points before going off for a pint of sake.

The EU creditor states have at a single stroke violated the principle that insured EU bank deposits of up $100,000 will be guaranteed come what may, and in doing so they have more or less thrown Portugal under a bus.

They appear poised to seize large sums from Russian banks – €1.3bn from state-owned VTB alone, and therefore from the Kremlin – prompting the condign riposte from Vladimir Putin that the action is "unfair, unprofessional and dangerous."

They have demonstrated that the rhetoric of EMU solidarity is just hot air, that they will not force their own taxpayers to share a single cent of clean-up costs for the great joint venture of monetary union – in which northern banks, insurers, pension funds, and indeed governments, were complicit.

Their refusal to pay is entirely understandable in one sense – and if I were a German taxpayer, I would not care to swallow these losses either – but then the leaders of these creditor countries can hardly expect the world to believe that they

(Excerpt) Read more at blogs.telegraph.co.uk ...


TOPICS: Breaking News; Business/Economy; Crime/Corruption; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 03/19/2013 12:36:02 AM PDT by bruinbirdman
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To: bruinbirdman

Spending more of an ever an dwindling pile of ever shrinking value currency does not sound like it has a great future does it?

but the leftists are blind to reality


2 posted on 03/19/2013 12:45:07 AM PDT by GeronL (http://asspos.blogspot.com)
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To: GeronL

No what’s wrong are people like you pushing simultaneously for deep cuts AND massive tax increases.

You get flat growth and with an economy dead in the water, you get massive social unrest.

Europe’s present course is not sustainable - economically, socially or politically. There’s no upside to it for European politicians who’ve sold Europeans a bill of goods.

The EU crisis will continue to worsen.


3 posted on 03/19/2013 12:50:28 AM PDT by goldstategop (In Memory Of A Dearly Beloved Friend Who Lives In My Heart Forever)
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To: bruinbirdman

Socialism is an ugly thing.


4 posted on 03/19/2013 2:11:40 AM PDT by exnavy (Fish or cut bait ...Got ammo, Godspeed!)
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To: bruinbirdman

Hoot man!

5 posted on 03/19/2013 2:14:22 AM PDT by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
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To: bruinbirdman

Free Trade Communist Globalism does not work. Those who still think it works after this EU robbery of Cyprus will the loudest ones calling to be bailed out


6 posted on 03/19/2013 2:15:11 AM PDT by SeminoleCounty (GOP = Greenlighting Obama's Programs)
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To: goldstategop

When you borrow money, you are borrowing from an assumed productive future. For example, if you borrow $24,000 for a car, to be paid back in 6 years, you are predicting that you will make enough money back over the next 6 years to pay it back. If you do, great. However, if you don’t, you will lose the car, everything you have paid into the car, and you will have nothing. This is the nature of debt.

However, when you borrow money from your future, you are making a deliberate decision to reduce your future prosperity for a more prosperous present. This is not necessarily a bad thing, because by borrowing money now, you may be creating a more prosperous future, because having that car now allows you to take advantage of opportunities that you might not have if you didn’t have a vehicle to drive. However, it is not wise to borrow from your future to pay for things that do not contribute to your future prosperity, like vacations, video games, or fancy clothing, because if you do not have the money to pay these things back, then you must resort to outright theft by declaring bankruptcy and rob the people who loaned you money.

This is basically what Europe has done to itself. It didn’t just borrow money to create a productive future for itself. It also borrowed money on non-productive things like healthcare, pensions, and welfare based on the gamble that it had a future prosperity and could afford it all. Unfortunately, it’s prosperity has been less than it hoped and the debt it borrowed has grown.

The only ways out is to either cut its non-productive spending: education, healthcare, welfare, and pensions, until,the books are glanced or resort to outright theft to those that bought Europe’s bonds based on the promise that Europe would eventually buy those bonds back.


7 posted on 03/19/2013 2:27:02 AM PDT by Jonty30 (What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults)
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To: Jonty30
What Islam and secularism have in common is that they are both death cults

And united to cut off Adam Smith's invisible hand.

8 posted on 03/19/2013 2:40:01 AM PDT by spokeshave (The only people better off today than 4 years ago are the Prisoners at Guantanamo.)
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To: bruinbirdman
even the poorest

Just how far class warfare has gone. It's not immoral if you steal from a rich person.

9 posted on 03/19/2013 3:13:22 AM PDT by 1010RD (First, Do No Harm)
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To: bruinbirdman

It’s amusing watching Putin and Medvedev get into a tizzy about this, considering that Cyprus is one of the most popular destinations for the Russian Mafia and oligarchs to deposit their dirty money. I read that over half of the assets in Cyprus are Russian...

Wouldn’t be surprised if Putin himself was in danger of losing his money.


10 posted on 03/19/2013 3:31:15 AM PDT by Corporate Democrat
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To: goldstategop
It's not just Europe, this is coming to the USA soon too.

They may decide to 'manage' your 401k's.
They may just use the standard remedy and inflate - which is already happening. That way, they can steal even the money hidden in mattresses - technically, the money is untouched, but the value is drained from it.


11 posted on 03/19/2013 4:00:13 AM PDT by Bon mots (Abu Ghraib: 47 Times on the front page of the NY Times | Benghazi: 2 Times)
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To: bruinbirdman
if I were a German taxpayer, I would not care to swallow these losses either

Hmmmm - Europe went through two disastrous, world changing wars that killed nearly 75 million people in 25 years, allowed Communism to take over Russia and nearly the world, destroyed the British empire and untold billions of dollars of wealth, (or whatever currency you wish to denote it in), ruined countless lives, nearly resulted in a world wide race based dictatorship, yada, yada, yada.

And they really want to poke the Germans through the bars one more time? Really?

12 posted on 03/19/2013 4:33:57 AM PDT by Hardastarboard (Buck Off, Bronco Bama)
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To: Hardastarboard
Seems to me the Cypriots voted for the government they deserve.
13 posted on 03/19/2013 5:56:04 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks (NRA Life Member)
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To: bruinbirdman

Just wait and see what happens when the banks re-open for business...bye, bye Miss American Pie, drove my chevy to the levy and the levy was dry...


14 posted on 03/19/2013 6:35:58 AM PDT by veritas2002
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To: bruinbirdman
When dealing with leftist you must start with a bedrock understanding of them. I am NOT talking about all the hot air that they and their supporters generate.

leftists are all theorists. From the writers in 19th century Europe to the political leadership world wide, including the White House. As theorists they have no interest or background in the real world. If the theory looks good and polls well it will succeed. And when it doesn't, the normal out come, reasons for the failure start with unidentified right-wing reactionaries and go down hill from there.

15 posted on 03/19/2013 6:50:26 AM PDT by Nip (BOHEICA and TANSTAAFL - both seem very appropriate today.)
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To: bruinbirdman
They have demonstrated that the rhetoric of EMU solidarity is just hot air, that they will not force their own taxpayers to share a single cent of clean-up costs for the great joint venture of monetary union –

It's already cost them more than "a single cent." This kind of rhetoric renders the argument essentially, hot air.

There was no way to create monetary union without political union in the first place. Allow for state sovereignty and one of said "sovereigns" will eventually seek to plunder the others with reckless fiscal policy. That was completely understood by every one of the current union member states. That is why the Maastricht Treaty specified specific fiscal targets. It's failure is that it lacked specific enforcement means. So, loser members blew off the fiscal targets almost before the ink was dry.

Friedman pointed out that such a system leads directly to higher unemployment, because there is no mechanism for devaluation of the currency because of loose fiscal policy. Gad do I miss his clarity in the public debate.

16 posted on 03/19/2013 6:54:05 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: Corporate Democrat
It’s amusing watching Putin and Medvedev get into a tizzy about this, considering that Cyprus is one of the most popular destinations for the Russian Mafia and oligarchs to deposit their dirty money. I read that over half of the assets in Cyprus are Russian...

You are missing the big picture....Look on a map....where is Cyprus?....Currently, Russia has one Navy base in the Mediterranean, and it is located in Syria, not exactly the most stable of places these days.

17 posted on 03/19/2013 6:56:14 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: Bon mots
That is one really interesting graph.

Thank you.

18 posted on 03/19/2013 6:57:09 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: bruinbirdman

Thing that gets me here is no one is talking about risk/interest rates. Banks pay low rates due to security, and low risks. Risk almost did not exist. Now throw 9.9% risk (and how often?)... what do interest rates have to be to cover that. The banks can not afford it.

Switzerland here comes the money. Until Switzerland creates a fear of risk.


19 posted on 03/19/2013 7:18:42 AM PDT by Quick Shot
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To: Carry_Okie

You might like this.

http://thirdparadigm.org/doc/45060880-When-Money-Dies.pdf


20 posted on 03/19/2013 7:29:43 AM PDT by Bon mots (Abu Ghraib: 47 Times on the front page of the NY Times | Benghazi: 2 Times)
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To: Quick Shot

Cypriot banks were paying out 7% on deposits.

That screams risk.


21 posted on 03/19/2013 8:40:26 AM PDT by reformedliberal
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To: Bon mots

Thanks again. I’ve been writing on the topic of the Levitical economic system (as designed, not as implemented). This should help with lending perspective.


22 posted on 03/19/2013 8:49:29 AM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: reformedliberal
Agree, but 9.9% is negative, where do they go from here, back under the mattress
23 posted on 03/19/2013 8:54:11 AM PDT by Quick Shot
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To: bruinbirdman
Great post. One of the comments had to do with why we use banks instead of hiding our money at home and the answer is to protect from the danger of being robbed and also (used to be) to earn interest.

The interest motive has been pretty small for quite some time and now EU members can be robbed through the banks, a little at a time. Why wouldn't anyone/everyone in the EU take their money out ASAP.

They have been given an entirely untrustworthy promise that other countries won't be involved. The check is in the mail, I promise I'll still respect you in the morning. That may slow it down, but the runs will start and move fast with the next country that is “taxed” in this manner.

IMO this will spread way past the EU—the only question is how fast.

I can't help but wonder if the geniuses in charge are really this dumb or if somebody thinks a world wide depression is in his interest.

24 posted on 03/19/2013 9:05:35 AM PDT by Sal (Pres and DOS watched our people get raped + murdered in REAL TIME-did nothing and don't care!)
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To: Bon mots

The Latest:

New Zealand planning to rob small depositors

http://tickerforum.org/cgi-ticker/akcs-www?post=218911


25 posted on 03/19/2013 9:25:54 AM PDT by Revel
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To: Bon mots

This is why it is wise to have some savings in the form of silver and gold as both are relatively immune to inflation unlike paper currency.


26 posted on 03/19/2013 11:21:42 AM PDT by MeganC (The left have so twisted public perceptions that the truth now appears pornographic.- SpaceBar)
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To: bruinbirdman

So the people in Europe are mad that the the Socialists they elected are Socializing?

Sounds like what is going on in the US....


27 posted on 03/19/2013 1:16:26 PM PDT by Tzimisce (The American Revolution began when the British attempted to disarm the Colonists.)
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To: bruinbirdman
Why in the world would they steal the Russians money? that's asking for trouble.

I believe that if Putin does nothing (publicly) then it's a green light for others to start doing it too.

28 posted on 03/19/2013 2:45:52 PM PDT by IllumiNaughtyByNature ($1.84 - The price of a gallon of gas on Jan. 20th, 2009.)
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To: IllumiNaughtyByNature
I believe that if Putin does nothing (publicly) then it's a green light for others to start doing it too.

Robbing Russian Mafia is a task not for the faint of the heart. But that's minor details; the proposal failed to pass anyway. I think Putin now has a good possibility to position Russian banks as a safe haven - safe from EU's turbulence, at least. Russian economy is stable, thanks to high oil and gas prices. Additionally, the same well known team is in power - and they are not likely to do something exceptionally stupid with other people's money. At least because they don't need to. Perhaps Mafia figures won't be so interested to keep their ill-gotten gains in the country; however plenty of foreign (EU) clients might not care that Putin can look into their accounts.

Probably China and other major non-EU players are also interested to get into this game. They are a bit farther geographically, though - however little it matters today, in the age of instant secure communications.

29 posted on 03/19/2013 8:35:15 PM PDT by Greysard
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To: Carry_Okie
OK, so I finished it. A thoroughly researched but not well presented work. Hence, it resulted in a search for trees in the forest. Not enough was made of the connections between industrialists gaming the system and the Reichbank. The explanation as ignorance, ideology, or stupidity, just doesn't wash. Such a mechanic can only go so long before the people running it understand what is happening. After that responsibility becomes culpable.

It did teach me to be more aware of the warning signs that the system is about to go unstable. Yet what to do when the dollar loses its reserve currency status isn't any clearer than it is now. Somehow, in an era in which nearly every transaction is traceable, I don't think a flight to gold will work.

30 posted on 03/27/2013 10:37:51 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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To: Bon mots

The above post was to be for you. Thanks again, CO


31 posted on 03/27/2013 10:38:52 PM PDT by Carry_Okie (An economy is not a zero-sum game, but politics usually is.)
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