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Anti-government protest in Albania (It seems to be spreading round the world)
Herald Sun ^ | Jan 29, 2011 | Staff

Posted on 01/29/2011 10:19:14 AM PST by Islander7

TENS of thousands of demonstrators have started a silent protest in the Albanian capital Tirana, a week to the day after clashes during an opposition rally killed three.

The demonstrators, headed by the leadership of the opposition Socialists and the families of the victims, started a march on the government buildings. People continued to pour into the downtown area near the government, bringing traffic in central Tirana to a standstill. Many protesters carried flowers.


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: albania; protests; revolt

1 posted on 01/29/2011 10:19:16 AM PST by Islander7
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To: Islander7

Maybe a lot of people want more than their “leaders” (or a world government) have deemed for them as their lot in life. I wouldn’t want to trade places with anyone living in Tunisia, Egypt, or Albania.


2 posted on 01/29/2011 10:24:59 AM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: Islander7

People around the world are realizing that they are the ones that will determine their future, not their governments. Kinda sounds like what our forefathers wanted for the US doesn’t it?


3 posted on 01/29/2011 10:26:46 AM PST by RC2
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To: RC2

The elephant in the middle of the room is now swinging on a trapeze.....As most in America are thinking....>>When does it start here<<<


4 posted on 01/29/2011 10:31:38 AM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: RC2
I also think we forget the rise of the Tea Party movement during the course of 2009 that totally drove the Democrats nuts--remember those "town hall" meetings during the summer that turned into one PR fiasco after another for the Democrats?
5 posted on 01/29/2011 10:35:13 AM PST by RayChuang88 (FairTax: America's economic cure)
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To: dragnet2

The jury is still out on who is at the root of the ME chaos, but my money is on Iran. I doubt those folks in Egypt are having their ‘Bunker Hill’ event. I don’t see this mess ending well for anyone.

Please pray that I’m wrong.


6 posted on 01/29/2011 10:40:31 AM PST by Islander7 (There is no septic system so vile, so filthy, the left won't drink from to further their agenda)
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To: Islander7

Can I be honest?

I am getting to the point, where I don’t give a sh*t about the ME....


7 posted on 01/29/2011 10:42:38 AM PST by dragnet2 (Diversion and evasion are tools of deceit)
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To: Quix; houeto; null and void; aragorn
Halfpasthuman.com webbot 100% "GlobalRev" hit from years ago.


Today is a good day to die.
I didn't say for whom.

8 posted on 01/29/2011 10:44:02 AM PST by The Comedian (It's 3am all over the planet.)
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To: dragnet2

LOL! You are about 5 fives years behind me. I’d like to see a fence built around the place and let them eat their damned oil. Of course, we’d have to drill for own oil here. Can’t have that, now can we?


9 posted on 01/29/2011 10:48:09 AM PST by Islander7 (There is no septic system so vile, so filthy, the left won't drink from to further their agenda)
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To: dragnet2

I think Americans have to be pushed pretty far to get to the point that we take to the streets as they do in the Middle East. I also believe this goes to our education in this country. We know there are better ways to get what we want, without destroying our whole country. It may take longer but we will win.


10 posted on 01/29/2011 10:49:46 AM PST by RC2
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To: Islander7

Socialists. I think the Communists are the root of these riots. Obama may have a hand in it someplace.


11 posted on 01/29/2011 11:08:31 AM PST by screaminsunshine (Surfers Rule)
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To: dragnet2

Unfortunately Albania is much closer to home than that; however, I also stopped giving a sh!t about the ME a long time ago...


12 posted on 01/29/2011 11:25:30 AM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: kearnyirish2

As bad as the political climate is. I wouldn’t want to live anywhere else in the world but, right here.


13 posted on 01/29/2011 11:32:56 AM PST by MsLady (If you died tonight, where would you go? Salvation, don't leave earth without it!)
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To: RC2

I agree that Americans have to be pushed further, but the despair in this country is becoming palpable. I can’t believe how many people I know are resigned to probably never working again in their fields, and they’re being joined by lots of government employees with jobs skills for little else (police, fire, untenured teachers, Motor Vehicles types). At this point if they can find a job at all it is for food & rent; home ownership is lo longer an option without viable jobs. The cut-off of unemployment benefits was the final warning: the jobs we used to work (or jobs with comparable salaries) are not returning anytime soon, so head down to your local Wal-Mart and fill out an application. While many of the gov’t. layoffs are the youngest workers, the worst situation is the older workers (often with mortgages, children, etc.) who feel they may never work again. People can prattle on about how it is their fault, and free-market economy, blah blah blah, but in the end those terms mean nothing to someone involuntarily retired at 50. Telling them it is their own fault (which may or may not be true, depending on the individual scenarios) isn’t solving anything for them.

Imagine the “Okies” in the Grapes of Wrath arriving in California and it looked just like Oklahoma...


14 posted on 01/29/2011 11:34:47 AM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: MsLady

I agree, but the problem here isn’t a political climate: it is an economic one. People started sensing something was wrong when Western Europeans stopped emigrating here more then 10 years ago; at this point I truly see less Latinos around in an area that was inundated five years ago. If Americans can’t survive here (in NJ), than the illegal aliens that they employed can’t either as they leave.


15 posted on 01/29/2011 11:37:49 AM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: kearnyirish2

I believe we cannot separate the political from the economic prolems. The Latinos have come to Texas, Arkansas and Oklahoma. Mena, Ark (remember the teens who went to sleep on the railroad tracks) which was a haven for Clinton’s drug imports, now belongs to illegals and their drug trade.
Obama’s anti-capitalism agenda and hatred for America policies are destroying us.


16 posted on 01/29/2011 12:02:59 PM PST by charlie72
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To: The Comedian
Halfpasthuman.com webbot 100% "GlobalRev" hit from years ago.

Interesting. Thanks.

17 posted on 01/29/2011 12:08:19 PM PST by houeto (Government derives its just powers from the consent of the governed.)
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To: kearnyirish2
... the jobs we used to work (or jobs with comparable salaries) are not returning anytime soon.... People can prattle on about how it is their fault, and free-market economy, blah blah blah, but in the end those terms mean nothing to someone involuntarily retired at 50.

Nobody makes running boards for cars anymore either.

There's no "pattling on" about the free markets and no one is blaming anyone or their age. It's up to you to remain current and relevant in your skills-sets.

Plenty of salaried people become stale and ossified in their jobs, and the corporate umbrella can only provide cover for so long before that catches up to them. Employees need to remain trainable for new things and current in what they do to remain competitive in today's employment market.

And it has always been so....

Whenever you land a new job, you start from day 1 planning for where or what your next job is going to be. That has a way of keeping your skills sets fresh and relevant.

Don't resent the fact that there are such things as free markets, else we'd all be paying for more things that only the government thinks we need. You'd best hope the free market stays free or with the ascendancy of a new breed of free-marketers (e.g., tea party) the world becomes more free and America's industrial productivity is once again allowed to become unshackled.

In the meantime, set your sights higher than Wal-mart. If you are 50 years old and the experience you gained in your career has real value, figure out a way to market it to someone who will buy that experience directly from you instead of the company you used to work for.

It's a liberating thing when you do. FReegards!


18 posted on 01/29/2011 1:58:08 PM PST by Agamemnon (Darwinism is the glue that holds liberalism together)
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To: dragnet2

“The elephant in the middle of the room is now swinging on a trapeze.....As most in America are thinking....>>When does it start here<<<”

I don’t know if most are but I sure am thinking that


19 posted on 01/29/2011 2:49:04 PM PST by FromLori (FromLori">)
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To: charlie72

Immigration ploicy is identical between both parties: catch-and-release. Bush’s Medicare prescription benefit was a nice socialist touch, too. Politically, they’re 2 heads of the same hydra; Obama simply acted too soon. If he’d waited until we’d sunk further their would have been a lot more unemployed socialists supporting whatever he did to put a chicken in every pot & a Volkswagon in every driveway.


20 posted on 01/29/2011 2:49:21 PM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: Agamemnon

For what it’s worth, I’m not 40 yet and employed at a job where I’ve been promoted 3 times over 10+ years; I can step outside of myself to see what is happening to other people, though. My situation is fine, though there are people everywhere less blessed/driven/whatever.


21 posted on 01/29/2011 3:09:59 PM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: kearnyirish2
My situation is fine, though there are people everywhere less blessed/driven/whatever.

Well, it seems you did say "the jobs we used to work ... " so regardless of the fact you've been employed for >10 years and gotten three promotions, you write like it doesn't sound as though you have much to look forward to.

I went into business for myself in my late 30's (BTW, my career is in pharmaceutical development, not AMWAY) and I'm celebrating 15 years in business this year.

I've held all the titles and had the the promotions, but I'd rather have the return business. I'd never look back.

If you're in your late 30's yourself and expecting to be on the street by 50, you might want to start making a plan to start addressing that eventuality now.

FReegards!


22 posted on 01/29/2011 3:48:38 PM PST by Agamemnon (Darwinism is the glue that holds liberalism together)
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To: Agamemnon

I work in my field; at this point it is one of many that are being outsourced. The reference to “jobs we used to work” was a generality; in addition to all of the manufacturing jobs, there were related fields (such as cost accounting and other support for the manufacturing) that are also almost gone. As predicted, our standard of living is falling while Asia’s rises (to meet somewhere in the middle); we certainly haven’t stopped falling yet. Most people don’t know if they’ll have their jobs six months down the road (with good reason); whatever the official stats are, high unemployment isn’t going away any time soon.

At this point I need the insurance benefits for my family; in the meantime I move with technological changes and gladly absorb any work into my department that other people/departments try to push off on us. When we had layoffs a few years back, my department was unscathed while the dead wood that had delegated most of their tasks away were let go.

Best of luck with the business; it is a lot of responsibility!


23 posted on 01/30/2011 4:58:41 PM PST by kearnyirish2
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To: kearnyirish2
I take it that you are probably 15-20 younger than I am, and likely don't remember the Carter years as a salaried worker might have memories from that time (1977-1981).

It looked pretty bleak and dismal back then too. Chrysler on strike, US taxpayers baled them out with loan guarantees, the auto industry making cars no one wanted and all looked like they have been designed by the politburo. First Chicago bank fails -- largest in US history to that point. 20% interest rates to squeeze out the inflation. Gas lines and cost of gas that nearly tripled in 4 years (imagine the impact $7 gas would do to us now).

I graduated college with 2 undergrad science degrees into an economy stuck a 10.8% unemployment. Double-dip recession 1980 and 1982. Jobs? What jobs? I worked temp jobs and played piano gigs to make it work back then.

But Reagan -- who lost the (R) nomination in 1976, and was being done in by the RINOs of that time actually beat the odds in 1980 and won convincingly. We flipped the Senate after 40 years of solid Dems. He was a visionary like none other I'd had the privilege of seeing in my life to that point and he disemboweled the Soviets without firing a shot while giving us the longest peace-time expansion on record.

Yes, America was down -- in Carter's words -- in "malaise" -- and Reagan changed the debate against great odds and subterfuge, co-opted his competition (GHWBush -- made him his VP "keep your friends close, your enemies closer"). Rockefeller's "monetarist" boys lost, and Reagan's "supply side" boys were proved right.

I am quite confident that what follows Obama will be a resurgence that makes the Reagan years look like timid by comparison. Now that the dreams of socialism have failed as miserably as they have, people are now paying attention in ways they haven't before and with means to spread the word in ways we didn't have 30 - 35 years ago.

But we beat the odds then, we will beat the odds again. The Chinese will over play their hand and the bubble that is China will deflate even as a resurgent US rises again with a new domestic industrial and energy policy that will be unleashed in the next string of (R) "Tea Party" driven victories in 2012.

The enviroweenies overplayed their hand with global warming (I've got 4' of snow in CT already where I live -- how about you?). The credibility of the EPA is toast. The MSM is unravel ling (bye bye MSNBC just for starters) and no one believes them or the NY Times anymore -- no one cares what the evening news says, we're all over a FoxNews. The Fed is Dead -- QE2 QE3 QE4 -- they are all getting investigated.

Ask yourself what happens when the truth about Obama surfaces -- when he can't get his name on all 50 state ballots because he can't produce a long form BC. And that's just the beginning. (R) victories were for the record books at the state level and we took the House in 2010. By that order we are further along bringing this thing around at this point now than we were before Reagan won. I am truly optimistic. You've even got your Gov. Christie. You should be more optimistic than me!

But where one's career is going -- when tax and energy policy changes radically and industry returns to these shores it won't look like the industry that left? The value of the industry that was off-shored just reached the real $-value level that it was always worth stripped of costly regulations and punitive tax structures.

America has a creative sense that the monopoly capitalist economies don't have. John Naisbitt's "Megatrends" and Alvin Toffler's "Third Wave" made many predictions which were bang on back in the late '70's and early '80's, and there will be new editions of Naisbitt and Toffler for this era. There already are in fact.

Consider Toffler's "40 for the Next 40" in the Manufacturing sphere looking towards the year 2050. You and I have a manufacturing component to what we do. Toffler predicts "PRODUCTION WILL INCREASINGLY BE REPLACED WITH ON-DEMAND, CUSTOM MANUFACTURING OF COMPLEX PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

 Small, agile companies will continue to bring personal attention to customers, allowing them to compete effectively with large manufacturers.

 Compact fabricators and raw material supplies will replace stockpiling repair parts for maintenance."

That describes where I am now. I am that complex service. Age-ism doesn't factor in when the pharma and biotech start ups I often advise are looking for the personal seasoned experience I bring clients, not just the cheap fresh out of school guy that's gotten him in trouble already (think of the Harvard MBA "wizards of smart" that got us into the 2008 financial debacle. Even the DeloitteTouche and the PriceWaterhouse outfits have had to restructure and re-invent themselves.)

Sure, we all need insurance and I have an HSA I fund for that purpose. I'm incorporated, and started in business with 4 kids in the house to feed -- none over the age of 12, and with my wife working also. And that was 15 years ago. Today, my wife is my business partner.

Being in your own business, selling what your competencies are with a personal touch is the value added that business and a new American industry will be looking for in the next in the next 40 years.

The guys working at Wal-Mart will still be retired seniors trying to stay busy doing something and those who didn't do anything to reposition and diversify what their skills sets are in order to be prepared to roll with the coming changes.

It just doesn't have to be that way for everybody - or for yourself if you start planning now.

FReegards!


24 posted on 01/30/2011 8:23:57 PM PST by Agamemnon (Darwinism is the glue that holds liberalism together)
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To: Agamemnon
But we beat the odds then, we will beat the odds again....2012.

I,too...Am confident & thanks, for your post.


25 posted on 01/30/2011 8:33:00 PM PST by skinkinthegrass (You do not have to smear (Imam) Obama w/ lies....the truth does a fine job. 8^)
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To: Agamemnon

I see what you’re saying; I don’t know if the comparison to Carter is fitting here in terms of job losses, though. These started before Obama, and neither party can stop it. China isn’t the only problem there; India and the Philippines, as well as a host of other Asian nations, are fundamentally changing how US companies operate (and who they hire). There is no comparison to the number of foreign cars (or goods in general) sold here in the late 1970s and today. Our real unemployment is more like 20% than 10%, and many of the “new” jobs don’t pay what is needed for young people to start off.

I am an absolute coward in terms of leaving my current job to start a business; that is difficult enough to do in good times, and temporarily out of the question due to reduced consumption by prospective clients/customers. The next year or so should give us a clearer idea of where we’re headed; unfortunately, I think more people will see socialism as a short-term answer without considering the long-term consequences.

As far as Gov. Christie goes, his election victory itself was an indication of how bad things have gotten here. He has to stop the flow of jobs and taxpayers from NJ to other STATES, not countries. The tax burdens in NJ were tolerated when well-paying jobs were available; now the people can’t pay them because their wages have stagnated (if they’re even still working) while the taxes continue to rise. The recent mass layoffs of municipal employees in NJ (the ones who were best equipped to pay $10K+ in property taxes), accompanied by our horrible snow removal (or lack of it) are just a taste of what it is going to be like living a more affordable, fiscally responsible Northeast, and it isn’t going to be pretty. Not only do individuals dislike it, but it makes it more difficult to do business here as well. On a somewhat un-related note, even when we had recent mild winters, there was a trend of business to move to areas where heating costs were lower or non-existent; this doesn’t work in our favor either.

I just don’t think we have any historical experience to which we compare our current situation. Even in the worst years of the Depression, our markets weren’t flooded by foreign goods the way they are now; we are also approaching the unemployment levels seen back then (25%)


26 posted on 01/31/2011 2:40:01 PM PST by kearnyirish2
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