Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

'Deep Impact' Spacecraft to Travel to Comet
FoxNews ^ | 11-26-04 | Fox News

Posted on 11/26/2004 12:01:30 AM PST by ChristianDefender

BOULDER, Colo. — Where the movie "Deep Impact" depicted a comet hurtling to Earth, a real-world namesake is set to go the opposite direction to eventually slam into a comet.

Deep Impact — as the spacecraft is called — will travel six months to reach a comet, named Comet Temple 1. It will then release an 825-pound impactor to search out and collide with the 5-mile long, 2-mile wide comet.

The minds at Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (search) have been working on the spacecraft since 1996.

(Excerpt) Read more at foxnews.com ...


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: comet; space; starwars

1 posted on 11/26/2004 12:01:30 AM PST by ChristianDefender
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: ChristianDefender

They should have named the satellite Tea Leoni, it would have been a sure bomb.


2 posted on 11/26/2004 12:10:56 AM PST by Petronski (Siam's gonna be the witness to the ultimate test of cerebral fitness.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Petronski

I would suggest "To Osama With Love"....


3 posted on 11/26/2004 12:13:04 AM PST by ChristianDefender (Never give the enemy a foothold in your life)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ChristianDefender
I would suggest "To Osama With Love"....

Suitable for a probe sent to Uranus.

Well, I dind't mean YOUR . . . nevermind.

4 posted on 11/26/2004 12:14:15 AM PST by Petronski (Siam's gonna be the witness to the ultimate test of cerebral fitness.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Petronski

825 pounds? Why is it so heavy? Is this an attempt to blow the thing up or something?


5 posted on 11/26/2004 12:25:25 AM PST by Steve Van Doorn
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: ChristianDefender

Is there enough room for Michael Moore on that thing?


6 posted on 11/26/2004 12:25:59 AM PST by Citizen James (Notorious G.O.P.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Citizen James

...5-mile long, 2-mile wide comet.

i guess so..


7 posted on 11/26/2004 12:30:27 AM PST by ChristianDefender (Never give the enemy a foothold in your life)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

...5-mile long, 2-mile wide comet. i guess so..
thought so, but I wasn't sure...
8 posted on 11/26/2004 12:36:25 AM PST by Citizen James (Notorious G.O.P.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

Comment #9 Removed by Moderator

To: sowat_imamuslim

Forty years from now I can predict that there will be people starving, have no funds, and dying. And it didn't cost billions either.


10 posted on 11/26/2004 12:50:45 AM PST by endthematrix ("Hey, it didn't hit a bone, Colonel. Do you think I can go back?" - U.S. Marine)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: sowat_imamuslim

So what you're a muslim?

So what?

So why mention it, troll?


11 posted on 11/26/2004 12:54:32 AM PST by Petronski (Siam's gonna be the witness to the ultimate test of cerebral fitness.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: ChristianDefender
Where the movie "Deep Impact" depicted a comet hurtling to Earth, a real-world namesake is set to go the opposite direction to eventually slam into a comet.

Good! Take the fight to them! If we hit them out there, they won't be able to hit us here!

-PJ

12 posted on 11/26/2004 1:36:06 AM PST by Political Junkie Too (It's still not safe to vote Democrat.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ChristianDefender

Outer space? Comets? I thought "Deep Impact" was the message voters made towards Democrats on Nov. 2nd.


13 posted on 11/26/2004 2:49:04 AM PST by Imaverygooddriver (I`m a very good driver and I approve this message.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Petronski
So what you're a muslim? So what? So why mention it, troll?

Ignore 'em Petronski. They dont' know the secret FR code anyway.

(The secret code phrase for today is "Mohammed was a pedophile", pass it on, ok?)

[Heh! Heh!]
14 posted on 11/26/2004 3:42:26 AM PST by Mad Mammoth
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: timer

Ping


15 posted on 11/29/2004 4:28:06 PM PST by Lexinom (Please say a prayer for Josiah - a 12-year-old boy with brain cancer)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ChristianDefender

So, they are finally going to launch this dog. The hammer theory of scientific research.


16 posted on 11/29/2004 4:32:21 PM PST by RightWhale (Destroy the dark; restore the light)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: ChristianDefender; KevinDavis
What a smashing article! :^)

Excerpt from The Dallas Morning News:

NASA spacecraft expected to collide with comet on July 4

11:01 PM CST on Saturday, December 18, 2004

By ALEXANDRA WITZE / The Dallas Morning News

In mid-January, NASA plans to launch its Deep Impact spacecraft from Florida. If all goes as planned, on the Fourth of July it will run head-on into a comet 83 million miles from Earth – on purpose.

"We expect to provide some great fireworks," said Richard Grammier, project manager at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

The celestial crackup could dig a crater big enough to swallow Texas Stadium. Scientists say it will provide their first-ever glimpse inside the heart of a comet, those icy visitors from the edge of the solar system.

Because comets spend most of their time in the deep freeze of outer space, only occasionally swinging past the sun in a fiery blaze, their interiors act as time capsules – preserving chemical records of the solar system's early days.

"These are literally the leftover building blocks of our solar system," said Thomas Morgan, Deep Impact program scientist at NASA headquarters in Washington, D.C.

By blasting a hole into Comet Tempel 1, scientists hope to scrutinize the exposed interior of a typical comet.

The $330 million mission actually packs two spacecraft in one: the washing-machine-sized, copper-plated "impactor" and the larger mothership that will watch the collision from a distance. Both carry cameras to capture the most close-up photos of a comet ever taken.

Deep Impact got its name long before the movie of the same name, and scientists don't expect any Hollywood overtones. Smashing into the spacecraft will alter the comet's orbit imperceptibly, but Tempel 1 will never hit Earth as the rogue comet threatened in the movie, said the mission's principal investigator, Michael A'Hearn of the University of Maryland.

Deep Impact's journey is scheduled to begin just after noon on Jan. 12, when it should soar into space from Cape Canaveral aboard a Delta rocket. If weather or other problems arise, mission controllers have until Jan. 28 to get it off the ground. (After that, Tempel 1 will move out of range, and NASA would have to pick another comet for the mission.)

Tempel 1 is the target precisely because it is so ordinary, said Dr. A'Hearn.

Its heart, or nucleus, is a chunk of ice and rock several miles across. When it comes closer to the sun every six years, the sun's warmth begins to vaporize the ice, causing the comet to spray a dramatic tail of gas and dust. The tails make comets some of the most dramatic celestial sights.

Tempel 1 is neither as well known as Halley's comet nor as bright as Comet Hale-Bopp in 1997. But it's in the right place at the right time for Deep Impact to run into it, Dr. A'Hearn said at a NASA news briefing.

After traveling nearly 270 million miles through space, Deep Impact's mothership will release the smaller craft, letting it drift just ahead of the comet. Tempel 1 will then barrel into the impactor at 23,000 miles per hour, marking the first time a spacecraft has ever touched the surface of a comet.

The crash could send a cone of pulverized rock and ice spraying outward, then falling back to the comet's surface. Or it could create long cracks throughout the nucleus. Or it might just compress the surface material, forming a small dent.

But Dr. A'Hearn is hoping for a full-fledged crater that could engulf a football field.

Meanwhile, the mothership will fly alongside, taking pictures with the most powerful telescope ever launched into deep space. It will radio data back to Earth, where scientists will be waiting to see what happened.

The comet might brighten momentarily at the time of impact, a change that could be visible even to amateur astronomers. Telescopes around the world, including some at McDonald Observatory in West Texas, will also be watching the collision and its aftermath.

Click HERE for the rest of the article.

E-mail awitze@dallasnews.com


17 posted on 12/19/2004 10:36:18 AM PST by MeekOneGOP (There is only one GOOD 'RAT: one that has been voted OUT of POWER !! Straight ticket GOP! )
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: yall
Go here to get an ID and Password to read the rest of this article: BugMeNot

Here is the URL to enter for this source: http://www.dallasnews.com/

If the first ID and password don't work for you, click on the button marked "This Login Didn't Work" for another one.


18 posted on 12/19/2004 10:37:11 AM PST by MeekOneGOP (There is only one GOOD 'RAT: one that has been voted OUT of POWER !! Straight ticket GOP! )
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson