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Study: Dinosaurs Died Within Hours After Asteroid Hit
University of Colorado News Center ^ | May 24, 2004

Posted on 07/08/2004 12:29:19 AM PDT by LibWhacker

click here to read article


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To: LibWhacker

Well, it was 1 hour, forty minutes and thirty-three seconds.



Seriously,

"only those organisms already sheltered in burrows or in water were left alive"

What about Mosasaurs and Ichthyosaurs?


61 posted on 07/08/2004 8:58:55 AM PDT by ZULU
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To: LibWhacker; Victoria Delsoul; PatrickHenry; Quila; Rudder; donh; VadeRetro; RadioAstronomer; ...






FYI


62 posted on 07/08/2004 9:06:20 AM PDT by Sabertooth
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To: LibWhacker; hchutch
According to new research led by a University of Colorado at Boulder geophysicist, a giant asteroid that hit the coast of Mexico 65 million years ago probably incinerated all the large dinosaurs that were alive at the time in only a few hours, and only those organisms already sheltered in burrows or in water were left alive.

And, of course, Bush and Halliburton did it.

63 posted on 07/08/2004 9:07:45 AM PDT by Poohbah ("Mister Gorbachev, TEAR DOWN THIS WALL!" -- President Ronald Reagan, Berlin, 1987)
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To: LibWhacker
"......only those organisms already sheltered in burrows or in water were left alive........."

This explains why the Creationists are still with us.

64 posted on 07/08/2004 9:11:33 AM PDT by DoctorMichael (The Fourth Estate is a Fifth Column!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!)
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To: ZULU
"What about Mosasaurs and Ichthyosaurs?"

I'm not a scientist. but I did just finish a museum exhibit on paleontology a few months ago. I would assume that such large animals would have been faced with a new environment in which they had to adapt or die. They either went extinct, or adapted to meet the post extinction event, and evolved into other species.

65 posted on 07/08/2004 9:21:56 AM PDT by SoCal Pubbie
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To: Aracelis
That was pretty close to the way I read "rapid and efficient carbon sequestration" at first glance.

I had horses on my mind from another thread and thought I'd entered the Twilight Zone for a minute.

After three in the morning you "could" show a little mercy. ;)

66 posted on 07/08/2004 9:48:02 AM PDT by Free Trapper (Because we ate the green mammals first!)
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To: Michael121
"respected archeologist, he looks like a hippie wears a hat all the time, (name escapes me)"

You are probably referring to Prof Robert Bakker. He is a vertebrate paleontologist. (Archeologists study historic and pre-historic people and culture.) Bakker is one of the leading researchers who has not jumped on the killer comet/asteroid bandwagon.

67 posted on 07/08/2004 10:04:43 AM PDT by capitan_refugio
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To: Lazamataz
Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam,
Spam, Spam, Spam, Spam,
Spamity-spam, Spamity-spam.

(I love Monte Python)

68 posted on 07/08/2004 10:11:33 AM PDT by capitan_refugio
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To: ZULU

You make a good point. All sorts of species and genera died out with the Cretaceous-Tertiary extinction. Most people only focus on the larger animals, while ignoring the plant kingdom. But there was another natural kingdom to consider - the microfauna. I spent quite a bit of time in my career working with micropaloentological data. These data often provide a better, more complete record of climatological change than do terrestrial fossils. I do not believe the micropaleo records supports a "sudden" extinction.


69 posted on 07/08/2004 10:18:36 AM PDT by capitan_refugio
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To: LibWhacker

If this is true, then why did the crocodiles, aligators, birds, and other assorted animals traced to that time period survive?


70 posted on 07/08/2004 10:23:02 AM PDT by Desdemona ("He throws like a girl." - my mom's observation of John Kerry)
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To: Aracelis
The article mentions the nearly worldwide layer of clay that's laced with ET iridium and soot.

Isn't the soot the carbon we're looking for?

Also,wouldn't extra heavy,extended rainfall cause much of the carbon to be swept into the oceans and possibly be suspended for quite some time?

71 posted on 07/08/2004 10:24:29 AM PDT by Free Trapper (Because we ate the green mammals first!)
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To: Sabertooth
Thanks for the ping!
(I almost forgot my manners.) :^)
72 posted on 07/08/2004 10:25:16 AM PDT by capitan_refugio
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To: SoCal Pubbie
Both are air breathers: saurian equivalents to whales. Thy would have had to surface sometime...
73 posted on 07/08/2004 10:26:57 AM PDT by Little Ray (John Ffing sKerry: Just a gigolo!)
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To: lelio
Where on earth did he get this figure from? The Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs were in the 12-20 KILO ton range, meaning this explosion is 5 MILLION times stronger (provided that a megaton = 1000 kilotons).

an asteroid with a 6 mile diameter would be about 110 cubic MILES of rock and iron hitting the earth at speeds of up to 50,000 miles an hour. Thats a hell of a lot of KE. Comet Shumaker Levy smacked Jupiter hard enough to leave earth sized holes in the cloud cover that lasted weeks. This has happened and will happen again.
74 posted on 07/08/2004 10:30:18 AM PDT by Kozak (Anti Shahada: " There is no God named Allah, and Muhammed is his False Prophet")
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To: Sabertooth; NormsRevenge; blam; FairOpinion

Thanks for the ping!

Very interesting.


75 posted on 07/08/2004 10:54:47 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (.New Linux SUSE Pro 9.1 user here.)
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To: Drammach

Thanks for the link.

That is a neat animation of the crater forming.


76 posted on 07/08/2004 10:57:05 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (.New Linux SUSE Pro 9.1 user here.)
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To: capitan_refugio

What is your take on this then? A series of cumulative disasters?


77 posted on 07/08/2004 10:58:25 AM PDT by ZULU
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To: Little Ray

Well, there you go.


78 posted on 07/08/2004 11:09:23 AM PDT by SoCal Pubbie
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To: LibWhacker

I can no more imagine this than I could putting out a charcoal grill with a single ice cube; the deposits of which the author speaks could just as easily been deposited as silt over the course of flux and some several months of time.


79 posted on 07/08/2004 11:10:59 AM PDT by Old Professer (Interests in common are commonly abused.)
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To: LibWhacker

That's not good enough, it's like saying you are clever because you're still alive, pure tautology.


80 posted on 07/08/2004 11:12:28 AM PDT by Old Professer (Interests in common are commonly abused.)
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