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How Hollywood De-Christianized Johnny Cash
National Review Online ^ | February 25 2013 | Lee Habeeb

Posted on 02/26/2013 5:46:45 AM PST by Bratch

It’s an early scene in the 2005 Johnny Cash biopic, Walk the Line. The young Cash, played by Joaquin Phoenix, is auditioning for the man who might make him the next Elvis Presley. That man was Sam Phillips, the Sun Records impresario from Memphis.

The fictional Cash walks into the room and begins playing a Gospel song. The fictional Phillips is not impressed, and tells the fictional Cash that no one listens to Gospel anymore, and that he should play something more meaningful. More relevant.

Cash did. The rest was history.

Well, not quite. It turns out that Cash, who was born on February 26, 1932, didn’t stop playing Gospel music at all. Nearly a quarter of the songs he wrote were in some way about his faith or the Bible, and many others were influenced by his Christian worldview.

But there wasn’t a single Gospel song on the Walk the Line soundtrack. Somehow, the screenwriters left out that important dimension of his musical catalogue. And there wasn’t a single mention of the greatest love of Cash’s life: Jesus Christ. That’s a love story the screenwriters of Walk the Line just couldn’t wrap their minds around.

Yes, he loved June, the love of his earthly life. But she too loved Jesus Christ, and no doubt Cash’s love for her had much to do with her love for Him. That fact too was omitted from the movie.

Cash recorded the entire King James Version of the New Testament, performed at countless Billy Graham revivals, made a movie about the life of Jesus, and studied the Bible as much as most divinity-school Ph.Ds. Somehow, none of that made it to the screen during the movie’s 136-minute running time.

The screenwriters left all of that out, and for reasons that are inexplicable.

Leaving out Cash’s Christian faith from his life story is like leaving out half-naked 19-year-old girls from Hugh Hefner’s. It’s like telling the story of Jackie Robinson without ever mentioning race or segregation.

The tension between the flesh and spirit, between things of this earth and things of heaven, animated all of Cash’s music. It’s what drew audiences to him generation after generation. Sin and redemption, good and evil, selfishness and love, and the struggles of living by a standard set not by man but by God — all were driving forces in Cash’s work and life.

While the rock-’n’-roll crowd was busy extolling the virtues of sexual freedom and rebellion, Cash was exploring eternal themes. Even his secular songs mined unusual territory for popular music. Here are the opening lyrics to his first No. 1 Billboard hit:

I keep a close watch on this heart of mine.
I keep my eyes wide open all the time.
I keep the ends out for the tie that binds.
Because you’re mine, I walk the line.

Not exactly “Shake, Rattle, and Roll.”

Cash wasn’t walking just any line. He was trying his best to walk a Christian line.

He sometimes succeeded and sometimes failed. Cash spoke openly about his bouts with drug addiction. He talked about his selfishness, and how he lost contact with God during those periods, and the toll those episodes took on his loved ones. On himself. “You don’t think about anyone else,” he said late in his life. “You think about yourself and where your next stash is coming from or your next drink. I wasted a lot of time and energy. I mean, we’re not talking days, but years.”

Believers and non-believers alike know about such struggles. That’s what attracted so many people to Cash’s music: his humility and his empathy. He had no tolerance for the false piety of many Christians, and he respected people of all faiths. And those of no faith, such as his friend Kris Kristofferson: The two simply agreed to not talk about religion.

Many great stories about Cash’s faith didn’t make it to the screen, but not because they were hard to find. Fans can find them in the remarkable biography by Steven Turner, The Man Called Cash.

One story that should have made it into the movie took place during a low point in Cash’s life, in the 1990s, 30 miles west of Chattanooga in the Nickajack Cave, an underground warren that’s home to over 100,000 bats. According to Turner, Cash spent time there earlier in his life, hunting for treasures such as Indian arrowheads and items left behind by Confederate soldiers. But on this occasion, Cash had different plans.

This is what Cash told the writer Nick Tosches in 1995:

I just felt like I was at the end of the line. I was down there by myself and I got to feelin’ that I took so many pills that I’d done it, that I was gonna blow up or something. I hadn’t eaten in days, I hadn’t slept in days, and my mind wasn’t workin’ too good anyway. I couldn’t stand myself anymore. I wanted to get away from me. And if that meant dyin’, then okay.

He was going there to commit suicide. And that’s when things got really interesting. Cash continued:

I took a flashlight with me, and I said, I’m goin’ to walk and crawl and climb into this cave until the light goes out, and then I’m gonna lie down. So I crawled in there with that flashlight until it burned out and I lay down to die. I was a mile in that cave. At least a mile. But I felt this great comfortin’ presence sayin’, “No, you’re not dyin’. I got things for you to do.” So I got up, found my way out. Cliffs, ledges, drop-offs. I don’t know how I got out, ’cept God got me out.

That would have been quite a scene in Walk the Line. But it never made it to the screen.

In August 1969, hundreds of thousands of young Americans gathered at Woodstock to watch Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Janis Joplin, Sly and the Family Stone, The Band, Jimi Hendrix, and others perform. It was a wet and wild affair as the counterculture asserted itself into the mainstream. Just two weeks later, Johnny Cash closed out his music-variety show on ABC with a Gospel song. It was a remarkable version of “Were You There (When They Crucified My Lord)?” Always, to the end, Cash was a countercultural figure. Always a rebel.

Perhaps his most famous recordings were the ones he made in prisons, especially his two shows at Folsom Prison. Cash seemed at home there. He didn’t see himself as better than those men. He was just one of the guys, and understood the prisoners in ways they realized, without his ever saying anything. It didn’t hurt that he’d written some of his best songs from the point of view of condemned and convicted men. The inmates loved him for that. America loved him for that.

“He doesn’t sing for the damned,” Bono once commented about Cash, “he sings with the damned.” That was the true mark of Cash’s Christian walk: the empathy he had for the men and women often overlooked in our society. Prisoners; the hardworking field workers in rural America; the down-and-out and downtrodden; those of us struggling with personal demons, the kind that rob from us the best parts of ourselves.

When Cash got serious about his faith, and left the women and alcohol behind, some of his old friends were not very happy with him. “They’d rather I be in prison than church,” Cash admitted. Waylon Jennings was especially tough on Cash, according to Turner, accusing him of “selling out to religion.”

“He’d be attacked by agnostics and atheists if he appeared too pious,” explained Turner, “and he would be denounced by the religious community if he appeared too worldly.”

Talk about a tough line Cash had to walk. But he tried to walk it.

Cash was once asked how he was able to reach so many people with his message without ever hiding his faith. He had a simple, superb answer. “I am not a Christian artist,” he explained. “I am an artist who is Christian.”

Cash was revered by artists of every genre, from hip-hop to rock. Springsteen and Bono, Snoop Dogg and Trent Reznor all admired the openly Evangelical southern man. And all because Cash transcended stereotypes, and transcended musical categories.

He even transcended time, something few pop stars manage. His 2002 acoustic take on the Nine Inch Nails song about heroin addiction — “Hurt” — was about as courageous a recording as any ever made by a popular artist. Cash, who was 70, found an entire new generation of fans with that stark MTV video.

Thus was the universal appeal of the man called Cash. And that is the universal appeal of a man called Christ.

Steven Turner’s biography of Cash ends so beautifully that it is worth closing with his words:

The realm that Johnny Cash lived in was clouded by pain and colored by grace. He had the ability to transform the rough and commonplace into objects fit for heaven, just as he had been transformed. Rick Rubin remembers him taking Ewan McColl’s song “The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face” and turning it from a love song into a devotional song. “He loved that,” said Rubin. “It came really natural to him. It seemed like his devotion for life came from his devotion for God.”



TOPICS: Music/Entertainment; Religion; TV/Movies
KEYWORDS: hollywood; johnnycash; music; religion

1 posted on 02/26/2013 5:46:54 AM PST by Bratch
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To: Bratch
The fictional Phillips is not impressed, and tells the fictional Cash that no one listens to Gospel anymore
Not true. IIRC, Phillips told Cash that the (Gospel) song he was singing had been covered by so many artists, no one would listen to one more version of it.
2 posted on 02/26/2013 6:00:05 AM PST by oh8eleven (RVN '67-'68)
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To: Bratch

If you ever get a chance to see $Million Dollar Quartet just go.

Freakin great for an off Broadway type performance

It’s about a night when 4 of the greatest entertainers of the day got together One Night and had one hell of a session performing their contemporary songs and gospels.

Elvis, Carl Perkins, Johnny Cash and Jerry Lee Lewis are portrayed by very talented and abke bodied performers.

It is a must see.


3 posted on 02/26/2013 6:15:53 AM PST by Vendome (Don't take life so seriously, you won't live through it anyway)
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To: Bratch

That movie is good. After reading this, maybe there could have been more tribute to his conversion. But it would need to be real and raw just like the rest of the movie. There was a hint of his conversion in that his behavior changed and he finally went to church with June. The movie focused on June being his reason for change and her tough love may have forced him to deal with his sin. I love the movie and I love Johnny Cash. He was a complicated man.


4 posted on 02/26/2013 6:17:51 AM PST by outinyellowdogcountry
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To: Bratch

Great article... thanks for posting.


5 posted on 02/26/2013 6:18:42 AM PST by SomeCallMeTim ( The best minds are not in government. If any were, business would hire them)
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To: Bratch

The article mentions “Hurt”; I’m surprised it doesn’t mention “The Man Comes Around”, from the same CD, which Cash said was the hardest song he ever wrote.


6 posted on 02/26/2013 6:29:05 AM PST by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: outinyellowdogcountry

The country church in the movie is in my neighbor hood in Covington Tn. Lots of my neighbors were extras.


7 posted on 02/26/2013 6:36:36 AM PST by Coldwater Creek (He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High will rest in the shadows of the Almighty Psalm 91:)
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To: DuncanWaring
"I’m surprised it doesn’t mention “The Man Comes Around”, from the same CD, which Cash said was the hardest song he ever wrote."

That is my favorite Cash song. It's absolutely haunting and clearly written by a man staring death in the face. Virtually every lyric is straight out of the bible and focuses on the book of Revelation. As soon as I heard it for the first time I immediately downloaded it and probably listened to it hundreds of times over the next week. I just couldn't get it out of my head.

8 posted on 02/26/2013 6:47:09 AM PST by circlecity
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To: Bratch

It is important to note that Gospel singers should never be confused with church singers. Many Gospel singers had reputations for drinking and carousing, fighting and otherwise cutting up rough. For many it was the equivalent of music school before becoming mainstream artists, and was the backbone of jazz, rhythm and blues, pop, soul, funk, hip hop and electronic music.

Just as importantly, there were many Gospel singers who were of good character.


9 posted on 02/26/2013 7:01:25 AM PST by yefragetuwrabrumuy (Best WoT news at rantburg.com)
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To: Bratch

Want some good Johnny Cash???

God’s gonna cut you down
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJlN9jdQFSc

Hurt
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o22eIJDtKho

Personal Jesus
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQcNiD0Z3MU


10 posted on 02/26/2013 7:09:42 AM PST by Syntyr (Happiness is two at low eight!)
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To: Bratch

Thanks for posting this article. Was lucky to see Johnny and June live in my younger days. Gospel songs were always a part of their shows.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8o471PUpS-I
Johnny Cash - Farther Along


11 posted on 02/26/2013 7:17:38 AM PST by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
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To: DuncanWaring

I think Kris Kristoferson wrote “Sunday Morning Coming Down”. Johnny sang this song and it shows both sides of man. One of my favorites.


12 posted on 02/26/2013 7:18:59 AM PST by taterjay
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To: Bratch

Very good post.


13 posted on 02/26/2013 7:30:01 AM PST by bmwcyle (People who do not study history are destine to believe really ignorant statements.)
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To: taterjay

I’ve heard Kristoferson was a National Guard helicopter pilot, and landed his helicopter on Cash’s lawn to drop-off a copy of the lyrics.


14 posted on 02/26/2013 7:37:01 AM PST by DuncanWaring (The Lord uses the good ones; the bad ones use the Lord.)
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To: Bratch
The screenwriters left all of that out, and for reasons that are inexplicable.

Inexplicabloe? Puh-leeeeeze.

15 posted on 02/26/2013 7:37:35 AM PST by who knows what evil? (G-d saved more animals than people on the ark...www.siameserescue.org.)
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To: DuncanWaring

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9IfHDi-2EA
Johnny Cash - The Man Comes Around


16 posted on 02/26/2013 7:49:56 AM PST by Liberty Valance (Keep a simple manner for a happy life :o)
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To: Bratch

We have a couple of CDs of his gospel music. It definitely doesn’t seem like an act. One of the interesting things to me when listening to Cash, is that he almost never seems to hit notes straight on. He creeps up on them. It wasn’t that he was a sloppy singer, but a casual listen might make you think so.


17 posted on 02/26/2013 8:16:00 AM PST by zeugma (Those of us who work for a living are outnumbered by those who vote for a living.)
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To: Bratch; All

“That old wheel”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x_zDs9-ufbw
_____________________________________________________

“Children, Go Where I Send Thee”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aQMT8OD9nzU
_______________________________________________________

“Belshazzar”

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5NN62uD1ZAc


18 posted on 02/26/2013 9:40:12 AM PST by 444Flyer (Obama killed the Twinkie, but not the Terrorists in Benghazi. What's wrong with this picture?)
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To: DuncanWaring

Wiki—” He became a helicopter pilot after receiving flight training at Fort Rucker, Alabama. He also completed Ranger School. During the early 1960s, he was stationed in West Germany as a member of the 8th Infantry Division.[8] It was during this time that he resumed his music career and formed a band. In 1965, when his tour of duty ended, Kristofferson was given an assignment to teach English Literature at West Point.[9] Instead, he decided to leave the Army and pursue songwriting. His family disowned him because of this decision and they never reconciled with him. They saw it as a rejection of everything they stood for, in spite of the fact that Kristofferson has said he is proud of his time in the military, and received the AVA (American Veterans Awards) “Veteran of the Year Award” in 2003.”


19 posted on 02/26/2013 11:25:40 AM PST by ansel12 (Romney is a longtime supporter of homosexualizing the Boy Scouts (and the military).)
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To: taterjay

“Sunday Morning Coming Down”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4KqM0xZQVpE


20 posted on 02/26/2013 11:34:48 AM PST by ansel12 (Romney is a longtime supporter of homosexualizing the Boy Scouts (and the military).)
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Ping for later.


21 posted on 02/27/2013 7:10:54 AM PST by Responsibility2nd (NO LIBS. This Means Liberals and (L)libertarians! Same Thing. NO LIBS!!)
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