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From barbers to baristas, sailors' unique jobs below deck help run George H.W. Bush carrier
WAVY-TV ^ | November 15, 2018 | Michael Marrero

Posted on 12/06/2018 10:26:34 AM PST by 2ndDivisionVet

ATLANTIC OCEAN (WAVY) -- Shy Riggins is no stranger to military life.

"My father actually was in the Navy. He always told me stories about his traveling."

So when the now Third Class Petty Officer joined the Navy himself, Veterans Day took on a new meaning.

"It feels great that people acknowledge we do this for them."

He chose to be a become a barber, a role he enjoys.

He says the best part of his job is meeting different people, something that comes easy given the location of his barbershop aboard the George H.W. Bush, a Nimitz class aircraft carrier.

When you think of these cities at sea, images of jets and busy flight decks come to mind, but with a floating like this there are jobs to fill.

"Everybody has their own unique job. and the reason we have all those jobs is because without them we could not complete the mission," said Electronics Technician Second Class Tamara Capodanno.

"My job is highly important on an aircraft carrier. Without the planes, it is just a ship."

There's a mailroom, food to be cooked and electronics to fix.

There's even a Starbucks, which is also run by sailors.

And while these jobs may not be as glamorous as what happens above, sailors know that working together is what makes the Navy a cut above the rest.

"Different ranks do different things but they all work together to make this ship run appropriately," Riggins said.


TOPICS: Government; Military/Veterans; Travel
KEYWORDS: bush
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1 posted on 12/06/2018 10:26:34 AM PST by 2ndDivisionVet
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

A Starbucks? From what I read about the navy, this sounds about right.


2 posted on 12/06/2018 10:30:44 AM PST by doorgunner69
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
My grandfather was 1st Lieutenant on the Bunker Hill. A lot less creature comforts on a carrier back then, but still the challenges of keeping a floating small town running.
3 posted on 12/06/2018 10:32:53 AM PST by dirtboy
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

A Nimitz class carrier has a compliment of over 6,000 sailors including the personnel for the air wing.


4 posted on 12/06/2018 10:38:56 AM PST by C19fan
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
I'm an old Army guy (enlisted,with encouragement from my draft board,in 1969) who loves to watch the many youtube videos showing operations on a carrier's flight deck.But not many that I've found show what goes on below decks.
5 posted on 12/06/2018 10:41:09 AM PST by Gay State Conservative (I've Never Owned Slaves...You've Never Picked Cotton.End Of "Discussion".)
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To: dirtboy

try the creature comforts of a 2250 class tin can. Bunker Hill was floating palace by comparison.


6 posted on 12/06/2018 10:47:57 AM PST by Bull Snipe
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

I learned to cut hair on the ship (USS Tripoli LPH-10)because the Squid barbers purposely screwed up Marine hair cuts.


7 posted on 12/06/2018 10:48:30 AM PST by sean327 (God created all men equal, then some become Marines!)
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To: C19fan

Yep - I was on the Independence for ~ 2 years working in the Deck department. We always relaxed a little after the air wing flew off when we were coming in port. More room, less noise, able to get things prioritized for the ship easier.

Then after the air maintenance team left when we got in port it felt like a bit of a ghost town.

Going from ~6000 to ~2000 makes a huge difference.


8 posted on 12/06/2018 10:48:48 AM PST by reed13k
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
SNL short film from 1979: "Port of Call, Bayonne, NJ"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jhioeOeOHsA

The Navy. It's not just a job, it's $96.78 a week."

9 posted on 12/06/2018 11:09:10 AM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Yo-Yo

When I went Army.


10 posted on 12/06/2018 11:12:27 AM PST by 2ndDivisionVet (You cannot invade the mainland US. There'd be a rifle behind every blade of grass.)
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To: doorgunner69

BM1 - Barista Mate First Class
VS1 - Virtue Signalman First Class

what other new ratings does the Navy have?


11 posted on 12/06/2018 11:13:43 AM PST by RitchieAprile
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To: 2ndDivisionVet

My dad’s friend who was on a destroyer in WW2: “I used to envy those guys on the carriers during rough seas but not when the Kamikazes showed up.”


12 posted on 12/06/2018 11:17:33 AM PST by AppyPappy (How many fingers am I holding up, Winston?)
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
And why I went Air Force.

To all of my Army friends, I say "Hooah."
To all of my Navy friends, I say "Anchors Aweigh."
To all of my Marine friends, I say "Semper Fi."
And to all of my fellow Airmen, I say "Fore!"

13 posted on 12/06/2018 11:26:05 AM PST by Yo-Yo (Is the /sarc tag really necessary?)
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To: Gay State Conservative

“But not many that I’ve found show what goes on below decks.”

Speaking of which...

“The other is a Type III-B device, and is defined as a Collection, Holding, and Transfer (CHT) system designed to collect both sewage and gray water while in port in order to offload sewage and gray water to suitable shore receiving facilities; to hold sewage while transiting with 0-3 nautical miles; and to discharge both sewage and gray water overboard while operating beyond three nautical miles of shore. This system holds sewage during transits of U.S. territorial waters, usually three nautical miles from shore, while gray water is diverted overboard. Operating in this mode, US Navy ships are designed to have a minimum twelve hour sewage holding capability. When the ship is pier-side, both sewage and gray water are collected in the CHT tanks and pumped to the shore discharge connections. “

https://www.quora.com/On-a-US-Aircraft-carrier-where-does-the-poop-go


14 posted on 12/06/2018 11:26:28 AM PST by treetopsandroofs
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To: Bull Snipe

I liked my tin can just fine. She was a Texan launched in ‘43 and missed that one but did some Korea and was up close and personal in the next decade while we were exploding some nukes in the Pacific. The heat always worked when it was cold and the AC always worked in the radio shack. Evaps went down only once but the salt water showers helped not even one bit when it was 115 outside.


15 posted on 12/06/2018 11:32:10 AM PST by VietVet876
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To: VietVet876

Why the heck do we have a ship named after Bush.

Nothing should be named after a person until the person has been dead 50 years.

Nothing.

Every building and bridge and ship and edifice named after someone alive or not dead for 50 years needs to be renamed.


16 posted on 12/06/2018 11:38:49 AM PST by Chickensoup (Never count on anyone, ever.)
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To: Chickensoup

Agreed.


17 posted on 12/06/2018 11:43:38 AM PST by sparklite2 (See more at Sparklite Times)
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To: Yo-Yo

“And to all of my fellow Airmen, I say ‘Fore!’”

I grew up a few miles from Langley AFB in Virginia. I think the golf course on base was 27 holes then. We always enjoyed the opportunity to play different courses in the area, and an invitation to play at Langley was very welcomed.


18 posted on 12/06/2018 11:56:58 AM PST by riverdawg
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To: VietVet876

I sailed on DD 862. She was built in 1943. No AC in Bravo 3.


19 posted on 12/06/2018 12:48:30 PM PST by Bull Snipe
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To: 2ndDivisionVet
OK, Listen up "ground pounders":

Most sailors have two "jobs." One is their vocation, like barbering, the other is some kind of "fighting the ship." By that I mean manning (sorry snowflakes) a gun, torpedo or missile, standing by to do fire fighting, standing watches, the list is long. And often dangerous.

20 posted on 12/06/2018 1:53:29 PM PST by Ace's Dad
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