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To: GadareneDemoniac
One of the first thing I was taught by my Thermodynamics was that centralized power plant scale Solar power was impractical due to the huge amount of land needed to collect the Solar energy and the obvious fact that the solar energy is only available when the sun is shinning and the sky is clear which is often not the case. If you need electricity when the sun don't shine you are out of luck

Experience with trying to shut down power plants and convert to solar energy and wind power in Europe has been a real disaster.

The huge fluctuations and surges in power levels from the multitude of tiny distributed solar and wind farms has proven to be very destructive to the power grid when there is too much available and they still need the conventional nuclear plants as a bock up for when the sun does not shine or the wind is not blowing.

Unfavorable conditions for wind and solar power production seem to more frequent than favorable conditions.

There have been major mismatched conditions between power generation and the demand for power. So at times the system is stressed with very high demand and low availability which causes brown outs and power shut downs like we saw in California when Grey Davis (Dem) was in office. At other times demand for power is low and power production is very high which overloads the system

Wind and solar power production in Europe also as proven to be unreliable and more expensive than anticipated due to frequent breakdowns in the very complex wind turbines and and the solar cell systems

6 posted on 10/12/2011 6:53:03 AM PDT by rdcbn
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To: rdcbn

That makes a lot of sense.


7 posted on 10/12/2011 6:36:55 PM PDT by GadareneDemoniac
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