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To: AppyPappy

"As long as you are obeying the rules created hundreds of years ago by bored Rabbis,"


While we're on the subject of these rules, what's the reason behind them? This isn't an 'attack', but rather a chance (for me) to be educated. Because, honestly, these rules sound extremely archaic.


6 posted on 05/17/2005 12:43:20 PM PDT by Blzbba (Let them hate us as long as they fear us - Caligula)
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To: Blzbba

I am also wondering the same. I also want to know why not everyone has to obey these rules since in the old testament gentiles don't work on the sabbath either.


8 posted on 05/17/2005 12:45:57 PM PDT by cyborg (Serving fresh, hot Anti-opus since 18 April 2005)
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To: Blzbba

The Jews believed God was appeased by obedience to rules. Once God established a set of rules, the Rabbis needed to "clarify" them for every day living. This is the result.

Religion by committee.


9 posted on 05/17/2005 12:46:03 PM PDT by AppyPappy (If You're Not A Part Of The Solution, There's Good Money To Be Made In Prolonging The Problem.)
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To: Blzbba

Because startinga fire was considered 'work' in the Torah, and was forbidden on the Sabbath.


10 posted on 05/17/2005 12:47:42 PM PDT by JAWs
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To: 1st-P-In-The-Pod; A Jovial Cad; A_Conservative_in_Cambridge; adam_az; af_vet_rr; agrace; ahayes; ...
FRmail me to be added or removed from this Judaic/pro-Israel ping list.

WARNING: This is a high volume ping list

15 posted on 05/17/2005 12:51:14 PM PDT by Alouette (Muslims bite the hand that feeds them, and kiss the boot that kicks them.)
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To: Blzbba
"While we're on the subject of these rules, what's the reason behind them? "

Until an Orthodox Jewish Freeper chimes in, I'll take a shot at it. I've lived in Orthodox neighborhoods and studied Orthodoxy a bit in college.

Before we go around pointing out how wasteful or amusing all this is, it's probably useful to know that Orthodox Judaism has been around for a while and has been an extremely successful lifestyle for its followers.

The Sabbath laws ensure that people really take the commandment seriously. All work is prohibited (work to save a life or preserve life being excepted). Since cooking is work, the Orthodox have a number of ways of complying with the commandment while still being able to enjoy a hot meal.

They also employ timers for their lights and other work-sparing devices. This is the reason that Orthodox communities are always within walking distance of the synagogue - driving a car is work. Interestingly, Orthodox smokers (and there are some) give up smoking during the Sabbath without much difficulty. It's just something they expect to do.

None of this applies to Christians, of course.
20 posted on 05/17/2005 1:00:17 PM PDT by Gingersnap
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To: Blzbba; All

There's a web site I go to when I have questions regarding Judaism. It's called http://www.jewfaq.org

Specifically, here's what they have to say about observing Kosher (or Kashrut) laws:

Why Do We Observe the Laws of Kashrut?
Many modern Jews think that the laws of kashrut are simply primitive health regulations that have become obsolete with modern methods of food preparation. There is no question that some of the dietary laws have some beneficial health effects. For example, the laws regarding kosher slaughter are so sanitary that kosher butchers and slaughterhouses have been exempted from many USDA regulations.

However, health is not the only reason for Jewish dietary laws. Many of the laws of kashrut have no known connection with health. To the best of our modern scientific knowledge, there is no reason why camel or rabbit meat (both treyf) is any less healthy than cow or goat meat. In addition, some of the health benefits to be derived from kashrut were not made obsolete by the refrigerator. For example, there is some evidence that eating meat and dairy together interferes with digestion, and no modern food preparation technique reproduces the health benefit of the kosher law of eating them separately.

In recent years, several secular sources that have seriously looked into this matter have acknowledged that health does not explain these prohibitions. Some have suggested that the prohibitions are instead derived from environmental considerations. For example, a camel (which is not kosher) is more useful as a beast of burden than as a source of food. In the Middle Eastern climate, the pig consumes a quantity of food that is disproportional to its value as a food source. But again, these are not reasons that come from Jewish tradition.

The short answer to why Jews observe these laws is: because the Torah says so. The Torah does not specify any reason for these laws, and for a Torah-observant, traditional Jew, there is no need for any other reason. Some have suggested that the laws of kashrut fall into the category of "chukkim," laws for which there is no reason. We show our obedience to G-d by following these laws even though we do not know the reason. Others, however, have tried to ascertain G-d's reason for imposing these laws.

In his book "To Be a Jew" (an excellent resource on traditional Judaism), Rabbi Hayim Halevy Donin suggests that the dietary laws are designed as a call to holiness. The ability to distinguish between right and wrong, good and evil, pure and defiled, the sacred and the profane, is very important in Judaism. Imposing rules on what you can and cannot eat ingrains that kind of self control, requiring us to learn to control even our most basic, primal instincts.

Donin also points out that the laws of kashrut elevate the simple act of eating into a religious ritual. The Jewish dinner table is often compared to the Temple altar in rabbinic literature. A Jew who observes the laws of kashrut cannot eat a meal without being reminded of the fact that he is a Jew.


125 posted on 05/17/2005 2:00:48 PM PDT by MplsSteve
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To: Blzbba; Yehuda; Alouette; SJackson
"While we're on the subject of these rules, what's the reason behind them? This isn't an 'attack', but rather a chance (for me) to be educated. Because, honestly, these rules sound extremely archaic."

I am certainly not very knowledgeable in such things, yet, so someone else might be able to better answer your question. I've only begun study of these things and have changed one or two plans during study. ...proposed to practice writing Torah versus while studying, for example, and decided against that plan after finding out that it would be wrong or might cause problems to do so. Learning to write hebrew block and informal script for other (secular, discussion and the like) notes, letters and documents is fun, though.

But some laws have been extended as extra precautions to keep Orthodox Jews yet further from violating the Law (613 of 'em, for those who live long enough to fulfill the last one)--for example, the meat and diary law. Others have been given extra intrepretation for the purpose of contemporary living.

Anyone who is more knowledgeable, feel free to correct and/or add to the above explanation.
132 posted on 05/17/2005 2:03:27 PM PDT by familyop ("Let us try" sounds better, don't you think? "Essayons" is so...Latin.)
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