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To: Lessismore

And who made it even possible for Russia to fight the Germans? Gee, could it have been the good ol' US of A?

http://www.geocities.com/mark_willey/lend.html

Also don't forget that the Russians were aligned with the Germans early in the war and also with Japan.


20 posted on 05/07/2005 5:07:41 PM PDT by Kirkwood
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To: Kirkwood

Here's a little bit about what they were up to between the "revolution" and WWII:


At the very dawn of the Soviet state, the Russian Communist leaders were too well aware of the fact that this country could not permanently exist unless it received some foreign support. The only socialist island washed by hostile waters of capitalist countries had little chance to survive. And the 1917 Socialist revolution in Russia was carried out with expectations of outside support.

Those revolutionaries who gained power in Russia believed they were at the threshold of a revolutionary movement sweeping all countries worldwide, they were possessed with the idea of "the world revolution." They flattered themselves with the thought that they were pioneers in the universal breakthrough into happiness. There could be hardly another reason to explain the rush and lightness of rulers to throw the country into the pit of a bloody Civil War in Russia in the ensuing years after the Great War.

"During the Civil War, the Bolshevik party believed that the revolution in Russia was just a beginning of transformation of the entire world, and that socialist revolutions would happen in many developed capitalist countries."1

As the economy of the newly emerged Soviet Russia needed close collaboration with its neighbors, hopes of economic advancement were also linked with the goal of world revolution. For example, Zinoviev, one of the chief leaders and a coworker with Lenin, set the date for it: as early as 1927. No wonder the Communist leadership was surprised and upset with reluctance of foreign proletariat to use the experience of Russia and carry on the struggle for the Communist cause.

Expressing his confidence in the forthcoming revolution in Europe, Lenin made remarks that "all our hopes of the ultimate socialist victory are founded on this confidence and on this scientific foresight."2 He also wrote, "There cannot be a shadow of doubt about the ultimate outcome in the world struggle. In this aspect the ultimate victory of socialism is wholly and certainly secured."3


21 posted on 05/07/2005 5:17:21 PM PDT by Vn_survivor_67-68
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