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How Long Did It Take to Deposit the Geologic Strata? (Hint: Maybe it wasn't millions of years)
Institute for Creation Research ^ | John Morris, Ph.D.

Posted on 10/03/2005 6:22:45 AM PDT by DaveLoneRanger

Abstract: Since both young and (most) old earth advocates agree that the strata themselves represent short periods of time, an estimate of the length of the non-depositional and erosional periods will give us the approximate time required for the whole.

The alleged great age of earth's geologic strata has been characterized by evolutionists as representing millions of years of accumulation of sediments under water. Modern observers are generally willing to recognize evidence of rapid deposition of the strata by catastrophic processes, but insist that great ages passed between depositional episodes. During these long ages, erosion may have occurred, but they say the whole package required great ages.

Creationists, on the other hand, consider that the bulk of earth's sedimentary rock accumulated rapidly beneath the waters of the great Flood of Noah's day. One layer followed another in swift succession, sometimes interrupted by brief periods of quiescence, uplift, and erosion. Some time may have passed between depositional events, but these periods were not long, and the bulk of the sedimentary rock record may represent hardly more than one year.

Since both young and (most) old earth advocates agree that the strata themselves represent short periods of time, an estimate of the length of the non-depositional and erosional periods will give us the approximate time required for the whole. This draws our attention to the upper surface of each layer. Is there evidence that it lay exposed for great ages, or was it quickly covered by the next layer?

Looking like sand on a seashore, many layers exhibit "ripple marks." Yet ripple marks in loose sand last only until the next tide. Even in hard rock they erode within a few years. Their nearly ubiquitous presence on sandstone surfaces argues for quick burial perhaps by the next wave, protecting them until they hardened.

A similar line of reasoning notes that animal burrows and plant roots, etc., can be found on every modern soil surface, on land or in water. Why are they rare to non-existent in the geologic record? Sometimes a fossil tree or animal body will intersect more than one layer. Called "polystrate" fossils, they demand a short time between layers.

An erosional surface in the rocks is called an unconformity, and some amount of time is necessitated between two unconformable layers. But unconformities are not worldwide. When traced laterally they often grade into conformity, implying continual (rapid) deposition, of the sequence. On a larger scale, entire geologic periods, like the Cambrian or Ordovician are present, implying a short duration. Sometimes they grade conformable into the next period.

Somewhere in the world the middle Cambrian grades conformably into the upper Cambrian, which somewhere grades into lower Ordovician then middle Ordovician and so on. From the Cambrian upwards the geologic strata are a record of continuous, catastrophic, rapid deposition under flood waters. This is what we would expect based on the Biblical account of the great Flood.


TOPICS: Conspiracy; Politics; Reference; Religion; Science; Society; Weather
KEYWORDS: bewarefrevolutionist; creation; creationist; geology; icr; johnmorris

1 posted on 10/03/2005 6:22:47 AM PDT by DaveLoneRanger
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To: gobucks; mikeus_maximus; MeanWestTexan; JudyB1938; isaiah55version11_0; bondserv; plain talk; ...
(((Creationist Ping)))



You have been pinged because of your interest regarding matters of Creation vs. Evolution - from the Creationist perspective. Freep-mail me if you want on/off this list.

Colossians 1:16 "For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by him and for him."
2 posted on 10/03/2005 6:24:51 AM PDT by DaveLoneRanger (As long as liberalism and I exist, neither one of us is safe.)
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To: DaveLoneRanger; JimWforBush; The SISU kid; lump in the melting pot; Wilhelm Tell; sauropod; ...

Civil Engineer Ping List: Of possible interest to the civils on the geotech side.


3 posted on 10/03/2005 6:39:41 AM PDT by Fierce Allegiance (Huh?)
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To: DaveLoneRanger

" . . . a similar line of reasoning notes that animal burrows and plant roots, etc., can be found on every modern soil surface, on land or in water. Why are they rare to non-existent in the geologic record?"

1. The immense pressure crushes such things, especially anything resembling a void. They may or may not be there --- we have no idea (you'd just have a crack, at best).

2. While certainly not commonly found, who says they are rare? The chances of coming into contact with one with a core sample (and recogonizing it for what it is) is slim and none. A bit would just give you dust --- lucky if you get micro fossils.

3. Drilling activities generally occur in former sea/reef beds because that is where the oil/gas. No trees or gophers at the bottom of the sea.

This is just the before coffee answers. I could go on.

Investigate "sand frac jobs" to learn more about the immense pressures involved ---

---- I will not be responding, as it is like pounding a drill bit against a closed rotary table having these discussions.


4 posted on 10/03/2005 7:00:32 AM PDT by MeanWestTexan (A good friend helps you move. A great friend helps you move a body.)
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To: MeanWestTexan; DaveLoneRanger; Aetius; Alamo-Girl; AndrewC; Asphalt; betty boop; bondserv; bvw; ...
"1. The immense pressure crushes such things, especially anything resembling a void. They may or may not be there --- we have no idea (you'd just have a crack, at best)."

This is a red herring for sure. I have numerous well defined plant fossils in my own collection that are not crushed in any way. The pressure came long after the beds had cooled, and the calcium carbonate had crystallized. This can be as little as a few days. The sheer amount of plant fossils in museums alone destroyes this argument.

"2. While certainly not commonly found, who says they are rare? The chances of coming into contact with one with a core sample (and recogonizing it for what it is) is slim and none. A bit would just give you dust --- lucky if you get micro fossils."

More meaningless diversion. Core samples are such a small poetion of the visible evidence that they aren't worth even considering. The real picture is seen on large earth moving jobs. You will not find many evolution believers on an earth job; the big picture is almost like bringing Genesis back to life at your own feet.

5 posted on 10/03/2005 4:21:51 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Atheist and Fool are synonyms; Evolution is where fools hide from the sunrise)
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To: DaveLoneRanger
Check out this moon of Saturn--Hyperion

http://www.spaceflightnow.com/cassini/051002hyperion.html

6 posted on 10/03/2005 4:25:15 PM PDT by RightWhale (Repeal the law of the excluded middle)
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To: editor-surveyor

A plant fossil is not a void.

I shall now go back to successfully drilling for oil based on the science you reject.


7 posted on 10/03/2005 4:43:11 PM PDT by MeanWestTexan (A good friend helps you move. A great friend helps you move a body.)
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To: MeanWestTexan

It was you that imagined up the void. I don't reject any science, just fairy tales and academic dogma that are used to fend off science.


8 posted on 10/03/2005 6:25:14 PM PDT by editor-surveyor (Atheist and Fool are synonyms; Evolution is where fools hide from the sunrise)
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To: editor-surveyor

Thanks for the ping!


9 posted on 10/03/2005 8:52:52 PM PDT by Alamo-Girl
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To: editor-surveyor

"It was you that imagined up the void."

Paragraph 6ish "animal burrows"

I shall now stop pounding the bit against the rotary table as I stated I would, as there are none so blind as those who refuse to see.

By the way, by relying on "fairly tale" geology, I discovered an entirely new gas formation in Reeves County, Texas, which was just proven to be commercially productive. Good stories that geology!


10 posted on 10/04/2005 8:20:04 AM PDT by MeanWestTexan (A good friend helps you move. A great friend helps you move a body.)
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To: MeanWestTexan

I have never called geology a fairy tale. My point is that geology works better when the young earth is recognized. Your gas find is a good example; the finding of gas in accessable pockets is another proof of the young earth; in an old earth, the gas would have vented eons ago.


11 posted on 10/04/2005 8:49:46 AM PDT by editor-surveyor (Atheist and Fool are synonyms; Evolution is where fools hide from the sunrise)
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To: editor-surveyor

Actually, the gas is trapped under a 100 meter thick cone-shaped coral reef, 2 miles down. Quite impervious.

Neat fossils, though. Of sea creatures.

In that ocean-front property known as New Mexico.


12 posted on 10/04/2005 9:32:09 AM PDT by MeanWestTexan (A good friend helps you move. A great friend helps you move a body.)
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