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Keyword: virus

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  • Nipah Virus, Dangerous and Little Known, Spreads in India

    06/05/2018 4:19:13 PM PDT · by Politically Correct · 13 replies
    New York Times ^ | 4 June 2018 | Emily Baumgaertner
    A rare, brain-damaging virus that experts consider a possible epidemic threat has broken out in the state of Kerala, India, for the first time, infecting at least 18 people and killing 17 of them, according to the World Health Organization. The Nipah virus naturally resides in fruit bats across South and Southeast Asia, and can spread to humans through contact with the animals’ bodily fluids. There is no vaccine and no cure.
  • At least 13 dead after rare nipah virus breaks out raising fear of global epidemic

    05/28/2018 10:09:03 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 40 replies
    The disease, which kills up to 75% of those infected, starts with flu-like symptoms and causes a brain-swelling condition known as encephalitis. The virus has not yet spread beyond two areas in south India, according to officials, but they have issued a series of warnings to people living in the stricken towns where more than 200 people are being treated in hospitals. Over 25 people are under strict observation and another three are in a critical condition. … There is no vaccine for nipah, which is listed alongside ebola and zika as one of eight priority diseases by the World...
  • New chemical compound 'stops common cold in its tracks'

    05/15/2018 11:57:17 AM PDT · by TBP · 37 replies
    The Guardian ^ | May 14, 2018 | Nicola Davis
    It’s a conundrum that has stumped scientists for centuries, but now researchers say they have taken a tantalising step forward in the quest to tackle the common cold. The scourge of workplace, home and school playground, the common cold is predominantly caused by the rhinovirus. But attempts to thwart the pathogen by vaccination or antiviral drugs face a number of difficulties – not least because the virus comes in many forms and can mutate rapidly leading to drug resistance. But now scientists say they have discovered a way to nobble the virus that could one day help those with conditions...
  • New outbreak of Ebola kills 17 in northwest DR Congo

    05/09/2018 4:32:09 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 12 replies
    yahoo.com ^ | 5/8/18 | AFB
    Seventeen people in northwest Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) have died from Ebola, the health ministry said on Tuesday, describing the fresh outbreak as a "public health emergency with international impact." "Twenty-one cases of fever with haemorrhagic indications and 17 deaths" have been recorded in Equateur province, it said, citing a notification to the ministry as of May 3. It is the DRC's ninth known outbreak of Ebola since 1976, when the deady viral disease was first identified in then-Zaire by a Belgian-led team.
  • Exotic Tick Species Arrives In Garden State [NJ]

    04/24/2018 8:36:54 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    CBS ^ | 04/24/2018 | Staff
    HUNTERDON COUNTY, N.J. (CBSNewYork) – A tiny parasite could become a big problem this year in New Jersey. It’s an exotic tick that’s never been seen before in the United States. It was first spotted on a sheep in Hunterdon County, and efforts to wipe it out have failed. New Jersey has always been home to different species of ticks – five to be exact. But a new variety of the bloodsucking bug is now in the mix. It’s the East Asian tick, sometimes called a longhorned or bush tick. Originally found in Asia, thousands of them are now in...
  • How North Korea’s Hackers Became Dangerously Good

    04/19/2018 6:19:25 PM PDT · by KingofZion · 11 replies
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | April 19, 2018 | Timothy W. Martin
    North Korea’s cyber army, long considered a midlevel security threat, is quietly morphing into one of the world’s most sophisticated and dangerous hacking machines. Over the past 18 months, the nation’s fingerprints have appeared in an increasing number of cyberattacks, the skill level of its hackers has rapidly improved and their targets have become more worrisome, a Wall Street Journal examination of the program reveals. As recently as March, suspected North Korean hackers appear to have infiltrated Turkish banks and invaded computer systems in the run-up to the Winter Olympics, cybersecurity researchers say. *** North Korea is cultivating elite hackers...
  • Epstein-Barr virus <i>(mononucleosis)</i> linked to seven serious diseases

    04/17/2018 5:09:38 AM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 14 replies
    medicalexpress.com ^ | 4/16/18 | Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center
    A far-reaching study conducted by scientists at Cincinnati Children's reports that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)—best known for causing mononucleosis—also increases the risks for some people of developing seven other major diseases. Those diseases are: systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), multiple sclerosis (MS), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), celiac disease, and type 1 diabetes. Combined, these seven diseases affect nearly 8 million people in the U.S. Overall, the study sheds new light on how environmental factors, such as viral or bacterial infections, poor diet, pollution or other hazardous exposures, can interact with the human genetic blueprint...
  • Every post office in France paralyzed by computer bug

    04/09/2018 8:57:01 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    TheLocal.fr ^ | 9 April 2018 15:37 CEST+02:00
    Every post office in France has been hit by a computer bug that has shut down most of their services, preventing customers from receiving or posting mail and depositing or withdrawing money at counters. The bug hit the country’s 8,500 post offices on Monday morning, and by mid-afternoon was still not fixed. The firm’s tech teams were working to repair the fault, which La Poste says appears to be a technical failure and not the result of hacking. […] This was the first time that the entire network has ground to a halt, according to LCI news channel. […] Some...
  • Denmark to build 70km border fence to keep out swine virus

    03/22/2018 5:47:51 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 19 replies
    TheLocal.dk ^ | 22 March 2018 11:52 CET+01:00
    Denmark’s conservative parties have backed a motion to erect a 70-kilometer-long fence along the country’s border with Germany in a measure to protect pork exports. The government and parliamentary ally the Danish People’s Party agreed on Thursday on a number of proposals aimed at preventing the African swine fever virus from spreading amongst the country’s large pig population. Those measures include a fence to run along a large stretch of the border with Germany. “I do not want to take any risk. We have an export industry worth 11 billion kroner (€1.5 billion) annually, which could be put at risk,”...
  • A (apparently) new malware is making the rounds, called Log 1

    03/05/2018 6:11:11 PM PST · by Chances Are · 28 replies
    The source is one Brooklyn Williams | 03/05/2018 | Chances Are
    This email starts innocently enough. Don't open it!
  • Is Southern-Fried Squirrel the Answer to KFC's Extraordinary Chicken Shortage?

    03/03/2018 9:37:24 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 55 replies
    The Guardian ^ | Morwenna Ferrier
    Some people in Britain hate grey squirrels enough to devour them. With the UK’s biggest purveyor of fried chicken in crisis, perhaps we should be cooking up our furry feral friendsne cold Sunday morning last month, I visited Pow Hill, a glorious moorland thick with pine trees that overlooks the Derwent reservoir, north-west of Durham. In a clearing, three amateur wildlife photographers, in full camouflage gear, sat on plastic bags and watched a red squirrel race across the bracken. As I watched the little fella leap from log to tree, the sunlight dancing across its tail, naturally my thoughts turned...
  • OUTBREAK ALERT: Yellow Fever Death Toll Triples In Brazil

    01/26/2018 7:17:47 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies
    SHTF Plan ^ | 1-26-2018
    The yellow fever outbreak in Brazil has taken a backseat to the flu outbreak spreading globally. But, the death toll from yellow fever has now tripled and travelers are being warned. The World Health Organization (WHO) said on Monday there are 35 confirmed cases of the disease, including a case confirmed in the Netherlands for a traveler who had recently visited Sao Paulo state. Sao Paulo even closed its zoo and botanical gardens Tuesday as the yellow fever outbreak that has led to 70 deaths is picking up steam. The big Inhotim art park, which attracts visitors from all over...
  • Think Flu Season Is Bad? It Might Get Even Worse

    01/16/2018 8:03:46 PM PST · by blam · 32 replies
    Globall News ^ | 1-16-2017
    “This is the first year we have had the entire continental U.S. be the same color on the graph.” Now new strains may be coming. The influenza virus that’s sickened millions of Americans is already the most widespread outbreak since public health authorities began keeping track more than a dozen years ago. Now, with the threat of more strains emerging, it might get even worse. “Flu is everywhere in the U.S. right now,” said Dan Jernigan, director of the influenza division at the national Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases. “This is the first year we have had the entire...
  • ‘Eye-bleeding fever’ outbreak CONFIRMED: Fears of PANDEMIC as disease hits SECOND country [Africa]

    01/16/2018 1:42:30 PM PST · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    www.dailystar.co.uk ^ | 01/15/2018 | By Henry Holloway
    HEALTH bosses have confirmed they are facing an outbreak of the “eye-bleeding fever” after four people died of the suspected disease in weeks. Uganda’s health ministry has today finally admitted it is facing the risk of a large-scale explosion of the viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF). VHF causes victims to suffer a burning fever before beginning to bleed from orifices including their eyes, anuses and mouths. It comes after a girl, nine, was reportedly killed by the infection Uganda, and three people died in neighbouring South Sudan of similar symptoms. Uganda health minster Sarah Opendi confirmed emergency response teams are now...
  • HIV breakthrough as cancer drug could hold secret to curing the virus

    12/01/2017 6:12:44 AM PST · by Red Badger · 27 replies
    www.mirror.co.uk ^ | 00:05, 1 DEC 2017 Updated10:52, 1 DEC 2017 | ByAmy-Clare Martin
    Doctors using a treatment called nivolumab on a lung cancer patient with Aids noticed a “drastic and persistent” decrease in infected white blood cells A new cancer drug could “cure” HIV, a revolutionary study suggests. Doctors using a treatment called nivolumab on a lung cancer patient with Aids noticed a “drastic and persistent” decrease in infected white blood cells. The findings have raised hopes that drugs could one day eradicate the HIV virus, which attacks the immune system and cur­­rently has no cure. At present, those infected must take anti-HIV drugs for the rest of their lives to stop the...
  • Is the Golden Age of Antibiotics Over?

    11/25/2017 10:56:25 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    Gulf News ^ | 11/26 | Suchitra Bajpai Chaudhary, Senior Reporter
    Yes, say some international experts citing the rise of the super bug. But experts in UAE disagree and argue for better prescription protocols and patient responsibilityThe case of the six-year-old girl who developed antibiotic resistance is not an isolated one in the world of antibiotics. As these super drugs are routinely prescribed, controversies on their abuse and overuse are beginning to throw a big question-mark on whether antibiotics have outgrown their effectiveness. The question doing the rounds in many medical corridors is: Is the golden age of antibiotics over? “No, this is not true,” said Dr Sandeep Pargi, consultant pulmonologist...
  • So...is Kaspersky software safe to use?

    11/15/2017 6:43:19 PM PST · by EinNYC · 32 replies
    A query from a friend about Kaspersky | 11/15/17 | Me, Myself, & I
    I came home tonight to find an answering machine message from a friend considering installing Kaspersky Internet Security on her computer. But, she had heard of the recent Israeli hack into Kaspersky and the rumors that Kaspersky is collecting info for the Russian government. I have read several authors' discussions about whether Kaspersky is safe to use. I have used it for about a decade or so, and find it to be excellent. I'd be interested to know what FReepers think, particularly those of you with a computer security background!
  • Mumps Makes a Comeback, Even Among the Vaccinated

    11/06/2017 7:44:52 AM PST · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 70 replies
    NYTimes ^ | 11/6/17 | PERRI KLASS, M.D.
    The number of mumps virus infected in 2010 was in the hundreds. Last year there were 6,000 cases reported. (See news source due to copyright restrictions)
  • Common Tech Myths Debunked

    11/04/2017 11:42:08 AM PDT · by fireman15 · 25 replies
    JFG Inc. Technology for Business ^ | 11/02/2017 | JFG Team
    Myth: Apple computers can’t get viruses Truth: Apple computers are susceptible to malware just like Windows PCs. Apple once bragged they were not as susceptible until a Trojan infected thousands of computers in 2012. To learn more about how to protect against malware see Cyber Security: The Onion Approach Myth: It’s harmful to plug your phone in before the battery is drained. Truth: Much like the myth of leaving your phone plugged in to charge for extended periods of time, this is also false. In fact, it could even be beneficial to plug your phone into the charger prior to...
  • The Zika Virus Grew Deadlier With a Small Mutation, Study Suggests

    09/29/2017 12:08:52 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 4 replies
    "The Zika Virus Grew Deadlier With a Small Mutation, Study Suggests The mutation, called S139N, first arose in an Asian strain of the Zika virus in 2013, just before a small outbreak in French Polynesia — the first linked to an increase in babies born with microcephaly. The researchers noted that strains of the virus without the S139N mutation caused some mice to develop mild microcephaly, meaning that the mutation, which occurs on a protein involved in making the virus’s protective coating, is likely only a piece of the puzzle. “That was a surprise to us, that it was just...